Tag Archives: Rose Mary Sarsfield

Silas Shane Shoemaker Lanark, Clayton, Almonte

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Silas Shane Shoemaker Lanark, Clayton, Almonte

Silas Shane

Long Suffering Ended.

Death came as a happy release to the suffering of our village shoemaker, Mr. Silas Shane, early last Thursday morning. Deceased had been afflicted with stomach trouble for a couple of years and for the past three months had been confined to bed during which his suffering at time were almost unbearable. The end, however, was peaceful, for he had became so weak and frail that the last few days he simply slept away. The late Mr. Shane born at Clayton being a son of the late John Shane. He was in his 53rd year.

His wife who predeceased him five hears ago was formerly Miss Cecelia Nicholson. While at work in a sawmill near Chapleau several years ago, Mr. Shane was caught in the machinery and had one of his legs severed, since which time he had worked at the shoemaking business in Almonte, Ottawa and for the past year in Carp, and was considered a first class tradesman. He is survived by three children, Freddie, Belle and Eva, who were unfailing in their attendance upon their father and did all in their power to comfort and allay his sufferings.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 May 1917, Mon  •  Page 4

The latter had also nursed her mother in her long and trying illness which ended in 1917. He is also survived by two brother and seven sisters as follows; Otto at Clayton; John of Warren, Ont.; Mrs. Thomas Munro, Clayton; Mrs. William McCoy, Smiths Falls; Mrs. Charles Brown, Washago, Ont.; Mrs. Dickson, Haileybury; Mrs. George Garreau, Shoal Lake; Mrs. Fred Little, Montreal; Mrs. Charles Fisher, Janesville, Wis. The funeral service was held at the house at 1 o’clock Friday, service being conducted by the Rev. R. B. Waterman.

The remains were afterwards taken to the eighth line of Ramsay cemetery , near Almonte, and laid to rest beside those of his late wife and two children, Rev. Waterman also conducting the service at the grave. His brother, Mr. Otto Shane, and brother-in-law, Thomas Munro and the latter’s son, all of Clayton, attended the funeral. (Carp Review) July 1918

See rosemarys book- Whisper’s from the Past

Name:Silas Henry Shane
Age:24
Birth Year:abt 1868
Birth Place:Clayton Village
Marriage Date:28 Sep 1892
Marriage Place:Canada, Lanark, Ontario
Father:John Shane
Mother:Ellen Shane
Spouse:Cecilia Ellen Nicholson
Name:Silas Shane
Gender:Male
Marital status:Married
Race or Tribe:Irish
Nationality:Canadian
Age:44
Birth Date:Jun 1866
Birth Place:Ontario
Census Year:1911
Relation to Head of House:Head
Dwelling No.:75
Province:Ontario
District:Lanark North
District Number:89
Sub-District:21 – Ward 1
Sub-District Number:21
Place of Habitation:Hope
Religion:Methodist
Occupation:Labourer
Employer:No
Employee:No
Works at:Saw Mill
Weeks Employed:22
Hours/Week:60
Earnings:198
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
Language:E
Family Number:75
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeSilas Shane44Cecelia Shane39Eva Shane18Elizabeth Shane8Earniest Shane5Fredrick Shane

1911 Census

Photo and Text from Rose Mary Sarsfield book-****Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email Rose Mary Sarsfield at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

His Father Shane was in the 1857 directory of Clayton and was Clayton’s first shoemaker. John and his wife Ellen lived in a log house on the lot that is now 2886 Tatlock Road ( not the present log house), His shoe shop was east of his home according to the 1863 Walling Map of Clayton. John Shane died in 1905. Read the rest in Rosemary’s book

he Methodist cemetery and site of the first Methodist Church is often considered to be part of Bolger’s Corner.

In 1841, John Bowes bought 4 acres of NE1/2 Lot 21 Conc 1 which was next to the Methodist cemetery.  He also operated the Post Office for a short time.  There was a slot in the door as a place to leave letters for mailing. Patrick Murray, a shoemaker, once lived there and shoe lasts were found when the house was torn down many years later.  In 1850, John Bowes sold his property and moved away.

Bennie’s land (William, John and James), which later situated a crossroads point became the village of Bennies’s Corners less than two miles from Blakeney. In the 1850s, with a population of about fifty, there was a post office and general store, a few residences, a school and tradesmen such as blacksmiths and shoemakers.  William and John Baird owned a grist mill, Greville Toshack owned a carding mill and Stephen Young a barley mill, all of which were located on the Indian River.

Robert Drury’s Harness Shop and House: The leather produced at a tannery usually lead to the establishment nearby of enterprises that used leather. Leckie’s Corners boasted both a shoemaker and harness maker,.

From Mississippi Mills

Also read-Remembering a Shoemaker in Lanark Village–Thomas Wilson

What Does Regal Spell Backwards? Allan’s Shoe Store

Did The Bootleggers in Lanark County Wear Cow Shoes?

James Watson– Bigamy and Shoes

Lanark County Shoe Socials? A Past Fetish or Party Game?

Bristol Stomp Shoes by Charles Jay

These Boots Were Made for Walkin’ 1905

Manolo-in” and “Jimmy Choo-in” about Uncomfortable Shoes

Mrs. James Prentice Hatmaker Milliner of Lanark

J. Paul’s Store in Clayton –Putting Together a Story — Joseph Paul and Margaret Rath Paul

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J. Paul’s Store in Clayton –Putting Together a Story — Joseph Paul and Margaret Rath Paul
1903– Almonte gazette

All photos from Rose Mary Sarsfield book-****Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email Rose Mary Sarsfield at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

I saw this ad in the 1903 Almonte Gazette and it intrigued me– so this is what I found.

According to Rose Mary Sarsfield’s book about Clayton called Whispers From the Past– Mrs. Dickenson sold her store in Clayton to Joseph Paul in the 1896. Joseph Paul and his wife Maggie ( margaret Rath) ran the store situated at the Darling Road and the Main Street. Paul put on an iron roof on the store in 1903.

In 1903 the first telephone office was situated in Mr. Paul’s store: where all messages, whether public or private will be attended to promptly. Johnnie Erskine’s father bought the store from Mr. Paul in 1905.

All photos from Rose Mary Sarsfield book-****Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email Rose Mary Sarsfield at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

All photos from Rose Mary Sarsfield book-****Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email Rose Mary Sarsfield at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

1921 census

Name:Joseph Paul
Gender:Male
Racial or Tribal Origin:Canadian
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Married
Age:59
Birth Year:abt 1862
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:2
Residence Street or Township:Country
Residence City, Town or Village:Town of Almonte
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Head
Spouse’s Name:Margaret Paul
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Church Of England
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Months at School:X0-13
Occupation:Salesman
Employment Type:2 Wage Earner
Nature of Work:Fathers Farm B
Income:700
Out of Work?:No
Duration of Unemployment:0
Duration of Unemployment (Illness):0
Municipality:Almonte
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Almonte (Town)
Sub-District Number:45
Home Owned or Rented:Owned
Monthly Rental:BB
Class of House:Single House
Materials of Construction:Wood
Number of Rooms:6
Enumerator:J. Paul
District Description:Ward 3, Polling Division No. 2 – Comprising the remainder or balance of the said Third Ward
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:3
Family Number:2
Household MembersAgeRelationshipJoseph Paul59HeadMargaret Paul65Wife


Photo added by Ian MacaulayAdd Photos Request Photo

Joseph E. Paul

BIRTH1859
DEATH1935 (aged 75–76)
BURIALSaint Pauls Anglican Church CemeteryAlmonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada

Joseph E. Paul Called By Death 1935

Former Almonte Resident Passes Away in Carleton Place.

After a somewhat brief illness Mr. Joseph E. Paul, on of our esteemed citizens, passed away at his home on William Street, in the early hours of Sunday morning, of a heart affection. Mr. Paul was in his 76th year. He was born in Admaston, Renfrew County, in December, 1859, a son of the late Robert L. Paul and his wife Sarah Houston. After receiving his early schooling he took a commercial course in a Brockville College and later went into business in Clayton village, which he conducted successfully for some years. After disposing of this business he moved to Almonte, where he resided for many years and about three years ago came to Carleton Place. Mr. Paul was twice married, his first wife, Margaret Rath predeceased him, leaving three sons – Robert, Clare, and Everett. Clare enlisted in the Great War and became one of Canada’s heroes who gave their lives for the cause of democracy. Robert died four years ago, and Everett, whose home is in Montreal, was at his bather bedside when the final summons came. Three years ago, Mr. Paul married Isabella Wilson Butler, who predeceased him by some 13 months. One brother and three sisters survive – W. B. Paul, of Stittsville, Mrs. Geo. Robertson and Mrs. Alex Rath of Clayton, and Mrs. Wm. Robertson of Haileybury. Mr. Paul was a member of the Anglican Church and a member of the Masonic Order belonging to Mississippi Lodge, Almonte. He was fond of music, had been a former member of the Almonte Band and was latterly a member of the Band her, and the members of both these organizations attended at the funeral and paid the last tribute of respect to their late comrade. The funeral took place Tuesday afternoon to St. James Church, where the service was conducted by Rev. Mr. Bruce, assisted by Rev. J. J. Lowe of Almonte. Before leaving the home the Masons conducted a brief service. At St. Paul’s cemetery, Almonte, the Masonic service was concluded by Bros. D. B. Taylor, Dr. W. M. Johnson and Ernest Adams. The pallbearers were Bros. D. B. Talor, John Lindsay, Ed. Nicholson, Edgar Lee, Thos. Barclay and Chas. Baird. Many floral tributes were received. Amongst them, Wreaths from: Mississippi Lodge No. 147, A. F. and A. M., Almonte, Carleton Place Horticultural Society and the Carleton Place Band. Among those present from out of town were Mrs. R. Paul, Mrs. J. J. Dunlop and Mrs. J. A. Charbonneau, of Ottawa, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wilson, Mr. Harry Wilson and Mrs. Dr. Samis of Lanark.

Joseph Paul’s second wife

Mrs. Joseph Paul

Another of our native born citizens passed to her reward on Wednesday last in the person of Mrs. Joseph Paul, William street. Mrs. Paul the youngest daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wilson, her maiden name Isabella Bell Wilson. She was twice married, her first husband William Butler of Drummond, who died some ten years ago. Two years ago last April she married Mr Joseph Paul, of Almonte, and since their marriage they have made their home in Carleton Place. Mrs. Paul had been ailing for some time, but her death was not thought so near and the final message came as quite a shock to her family. A life long member of the Anglican Church and a zealous worker in St. James congregation, Mrs. Paul was widely known and highly respected. She Is survived by her husband, one brother, Mr. Robert Wilson of Lanark., and two sisters Mrs. John McArton of Ramsay and Mrs. Margaret Bourk of Carleton Place, who have the sympathy of many friends in their bereavement. The funeral took place on Friday afternoon to St. James Church and cemetery and was largely attended. The service was conducted by the rector, Rev. C. L. G. Bruce. The pallbearers were Messrs; Robt. Wilson, J. A. McArton, W. B. Paul, 0. M. Warren, D. R. McNeely and H. Bowland. Many beautiful floral tributes were received. Among those from a distance who were present were Mr. Wm. Moore and the Miss Moore of Brockville; Mr. and Mrs. R. Wilson and Mrs. Dr. Charbonneau of Lanark; Miss M. Wilson and Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dunlop of Ottawa; Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Paul and Mrs. F. Bradley of Stittsville, and many from Almonte, Clayton, Ramsay and other places. Carleton Place Herald. 

Related reading

Clayton in the 1890s

Spending the Holidays in Clayton 1955

Documenting Isabel Hogan’s Candy Store

Clayton Ontario History
November 9, 2019  · 

Arthur Clare Paul was the son of Joseph Paul and Margaret Rath who owned the store for a time in Clayton. Clare was born August 13, 1893. He enlisted in Toronto on October 13, 1915. He was a Gunner with the 9th Brigade Canadian Field Artillery. He died at Passchendaele, West Flanders, Belgium.He was buried in the Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium.

What Happened to Lottie Blair of Clayton and Grace Cram of Glen Isle?

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What Happened to Lottie Blair of Clayton and Grace Cram of Glen Isle?

Miss Lottie Blair of Clayton, who has been staying- with her aunt, Miss Fleming, and attending’ the high school, had to go to Ottawa and undergo an operation for an affection of the ear following an attack of la grippe. She is now at her home in Clayton and w ill soon he able to resume her studies at the school here –April 24 1907– Almonte Gazette

Rose Mary’s book -Whispers from the Past**

Thanks to Rose Mary’s book -Whispers from the Past**– I found out that Lottie Blair was the daughter of Wesley Levi Blair and was a teacher from 1913-1914 at the Clayton School. Her father Wesley Levi Blair was a a successful contractor building many a fine house in the Ottawa Valley and the son of Edward Blair. Edward was born in Shelburne Vermont, and arrived on a stolen family horse making a special entrance in the town of Clayton. He then went back to Vermont and married Emma Connor and returned to Clayton.

Of course no family story is complete without some sort of scandal. One of Edward’s daughter’s who would be Lottie’s aunt had the nerve to fall in love with a Catholic, Alexander McDonald. Knowing that her father Edward, who was a pillar of the local Methodist church would never allow a catholic to darken his door, the two eloped. Needless to say his daughter’s name was stricken from the family bible, never to be spoken about again, and they lived in Wisconsin and later in British Columbia. If you would like to read more of this story you will have to buy Rose Mary Sarsfield’s book.

****Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email Rose Mary Sarsfield at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

1911 Census Lottie Blair

Name:Lottie Blair
Gender:Female
Marital status:Single
Race or Tribe:English
Nationality:Canadian
Age:19
Birth Date:Dec 1891
Birth Place:Ontario
Census Year:1911
Relation to Head of House:Daughter
Province:Ontario
District:Lanark North
District Number:89
Sub-District:10
Sub-District Number:10
Religion:Methodist
Occupation:Teacher
Works at:Public School
Weeks Employed:40
Hours/Week:35
Earnings:350
Can Read:yes
Can Write:yes
Language:E.
Family Number:125
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeLevi Wesley Blair45Jennie Blair49Lottie Blair19Jean F Blair15Alfred E Blair13Levi L Blair7Annie Fleming54Stanley Woodman20

Daniel Cram Homestead on Glen Isle (provided by Daniel W Cram b 1963)

Grace Cram

Whilst playing in the woods Saturday with some other children,- Gracie the daughter of Mr. Daniel Cram, Glen Isle, fell from a tree in which she was swinging, the branch breaking, and sustained such a shock that she was unconscious for an hour or so. No serious results are expected–April 24 1907– Almonte Gazette

1901 Census

Name:Grace Cram
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:Scotch
Nationality:Canada
Marital status:Single
Age:6
Birth Date:18 Jun 1894
Birth Place:Ontario
Relation to Head of House:Daughter
Religion:Baptist
Can Speak English:Yes
Province:Ontario
District:Lanark (South/Sud)
District Number:81
Sub-District:Beckwith
Sub-District Number:2
Family Number:122
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeDaniel Cram48Euphemia Cram35Laura E. Cram15Jessie M Cram13George M Cram11Robert G Cram8Grace Cram6John W Cram5William H Cram1Florence I Cram1

Grace H Guhl

BIRTHunknown
DEATH4 Sep 1976
BURIALLake View CemeteryCleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
PLOT
Name:Grace H Cram
Marriage Date:4 Sep 1927
Form Type:Marriage
Age:31
Gender:Female
Birth Year:abt 1896
Birth Place:Canada
Father:Daniel
Mother:Euphemia Houston
Spouse:Benjamin Guhl
Spouse Age:29
Spouse Birth Year:abt 1898
Spouse Father:Mathew
Spouse Mother:Catherine Haller

Grace’s husband Benjamin Guhl was a World War 1 veteran and also worked for the railroad all his life. He died in 1970, 6 years before Grace and they are buried in the same cemetery.

Benjamin Guhl

BIRTHunknown
DEATH12 Sep 1970
BURIALLake View CemeteryCleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
PLOTSection 46 Lot 185-0
MEMORIAL ID78121766
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Jul 1968, Mon  •  Page 24

Perth Courier, October 1, 1869

Allan-Cram—Married, at Brockville on the 14th (?) Sept. by Rev. Mr. Mulhern, Mr. Thomas Allan, Jr., of Perth to Miss Maggie Cram, 2nd daughter of Daniel Cram, Esq., of Glen Isle.

Daniel Cram (provided by Daniel W Cram b 1983)

July 21, 1968     Dan B. Cram Dies – 65th Year

The funeral of Daniel Boyd Cram took place July 23, from the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, McArthur Avenue to the Baptist Church where Rev. John MacPhail assisted by Rev. Ron Crawford of Ottawa conducted the service. Interment was made in the United Cemeteries. Mr. Cram died in an Ottawa hospital, July 21 after an illness of many years. He was in his 65th year and had resided at Glen Isle. He was born October 22, 1903, a son of the late Daniel Cram and his wife, Euphemia Houston of Glen Isle. He attended the Carleton Place Baptist Church. He was predeceased by his four brothers. Murray, Glen, Jack, and William; also by two sisters, Miss Laura Cram and Jessie, Mrs. M. Wilkinson. Survivors include two sisters, Grace, Mrs. Ben Guhl of Cleveland and Florence,  Mrs. Harwood McCreary of Glen Isle. The pallbearers were Robert Anderson, Robert Hawkins, Bert Lowry, Dr. E. G. Cameron, Dan McCreary and Glen Robertso

Daniel Cram

beckwith township
Daniel Cram and his second wife Elizabeth Harness and don George Dunnett

CRAMS

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

More “Clippings” on the Local Crams

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

After I Read an Obit About Mrs. William Cram I also Found Out

So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

Donald Cram — Nobel Prize for Chemistry

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Searching for Joey Cram of Carleton Place

I Now have Part of Joey Cram

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Genealogy Chatter- Willard and Margaret E Simpson Cram

Norman Cram and Ed Sibbitt –The Rest of the Story — Lots of Genealogy

Bits from Bolgers Corners

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Bits from Bolgers Corners

Where Clayton Side Road meets Tatlock Rd is often referred to a Bolger’s Corners. On the southeast corner, the farm Bolger family in the area, William and Elizabeth Bolger and hence became known as Bolger’s Corners.

There was a little settlement in that area with the stores of John Bowes and John McWhinnie as well as the Reformed Presbyterian Church that was right at the corner, across the road from the Bolger farm.

The Methodist cemetery and site of the first Methodist Church is often considered to be part of Bolger’s Corner. Read-The Clayton Methodist Cemetery

In 1841, John Bowes bought 4 acres of NE1/2 Lot 21 Conc 1 which was next to the Methodist cemetery.  He also operated the Post Office for a short time.  There was a slot in the door as a place to leave letters for mailing. Patrick Murray, a shoemaker, once lived there and shoe lasts were found when the house was torn down many years later.  In 1850, John Bowes sold his property and moved away.

In 1842, John McWhinnie bought a piece of land, part of Lot 21, Conc2, across the road from John Bowes.  He also operated a store amongst his many activities but in 1846 he declared bankruptcy, selling his place in 1850 and moving away. The Reformed Presbyterian Church Clayton.

Also read-What is the Biggest Change in Your Lifetime? Ramsay 1979

From Whispers From The Past – History and Tales of Clayton by Rosemary Sarsfield

Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email me at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

School

S.S. No. 4 Ramsay – Clayton School

Originally, there were three early schools in this area – one on second line at Clayton Lake and Beaton’s Resort, another on James Smith’s Property, Lot 21 Concession 2 at Bolger’s Corner and McMunn’s Schoolhouse was built on the corner of Lot 23, Concession 4. Bathrooms consisted of one side of a bush for the girls and the other side was for boys. Using money from the Township tavern licenses, a new school was built in 1866 by the Indian River. It was used until it became too crowded and another school was built in 1872 which had a cloakroom and two bathrooms at the back. Students put on concerts with a 10 cent admission fee in order to buy a bell and later an organ and piano.  They would try to sit near the wood stove in the wintertime,  as it was the building was not insulated. The school operated until 1969. Fred Forsythe was the last teacher when the students went to Comba and then to Naismith School in Almonte.  The former schoolhouse is now a private residence.
​photo courtesy of Hans Raffelt

This picture will stir memories for any one who was a student at Clayton School in 1958. Students in the front row have been identified as (left to right) Allan Bellamy, Brian Bolger, Bob Drynan, Stuart McIntosh and Carl Drynan. The second row students were Debbie Rintoul, Shirley LeClaire, Elaine Rath, Dorothy Drynan and Adelle Stewart. In the third row were Mary Stewart, Linda Fligg, Roger Rintoul, Bill Rintoul, Linda Drynan and Mary Rath. The back row students were Evelyn McIntosh, Morley Wark, Walter Wark, Mrs. Emily Moulton, Donnie Ladouceur, Charlie Rath and Phyllis Barr. The Photo, dated Sept. 22, 1958, was submitted by Clayton area resident Valma Bolger, student Brian Bolger’s mother.

 Photo by Tom Edwards​--This looks like dads handwriting. Would that be Ray and Fred on the wheel? Clayton–Bolger’s Corner.. Originally, there were three early schools in this area – one on second line at Clayton Lake and Beaton’s Resort, another on James Smith’s Property, Lot 21 Concession 2 at Bolger’s Corner and McMunn’s Schoolhouse was built on the corner of Lot 23, Concession 4.

Perth Courier, September 7, 1894–Tatlock:  The picnic in connection with St. Peter’s Church on Thursday of last week was a great success.  Nearly one hundred dollars was taken in.  The tables were laden with good things to eat, fit for a king.  Our ladies of Darling know how to bake and provide a sumptuous feast.  The music was furnished by the choir of the Clayton Presbyterian Church and was first class in every respect.  Mr. McIntyre with his bagpipes enlivened the day’s proceedings.  The following gentlemen gave addresses:  Rev. Mr. Smith, the pastor; Rev. Mr. McIlraith of Balderson; Robert McNair of Carleton Place; and Dr. Preston, M.P.P.  The doctor spoke quite happily and was greatly pleased to meet his Darling constituents.  Miss Katy Bolger of Clayton gave two very pretty, nice recitations and our pastor gave one entitled “The Courting of the Widow”.  The day was fine and everything passed off harmoniously.

Clayton Ontario History Photo
Howard Bolger at a beaver dam in the Clayton area. All the trees that are down in this area were cut by the beavers.-Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email me at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

More on The Floating Bridge– Memories of Lyall McKay

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More on The Floating Bridge– Memories of Lyall McKay

Taylor Lake is a small lake connected to Clayton Lake. To get there, go west from Union Hall (junction of County Roads 9&16) three kms to Lanark Conc. 12. Turn north to the end of this road (about 11/2 km) to the end of the road at the lake. Launch your canoe at the small boat launch and circumnavigate the lake. Watch out for stumps in the bays. This lake was raised considerably two decades ago, with the reconstruction of the dam at Clayton. On the first point to your left as you launch, you can see a path of downed, dead trees, which were felled by a tornado a few years ago. Directly in a line across the lake from the boat launch is a road leaving the shore. Connecting these two points was a famous floating bridge. It was wiped out by hurricane Connie in 1964 and many of the logs can be seen on the bottom on the lake.

Some books tell us this bridge was first built to get people from Halls Mills and Galbraith to Ferguson Falls. This is quite true, as it did separate Taylor’s Lake from Clayton Lake at the narrows, and is one mile west of Ramsay Township.  It was used by many farmers as a short cut for hauling cord wood and grain to Almonte. Bill McIntosh of RR 6 Perth remembers crossing the bridge in a car when the water would squirt up through the flooring. Advanced transportation caused the demise of the bridge, which was also a popular fishing spot. The bridge before it was destroyed was almost 300 yards long. Historical Notes

Photos by Lyall’s grandmother Bernice E. Willis McKay

Memories from Lyall McKay

The photos of the floating bridge are from Bernice McKay. She used to have a beauty parlour at Union Hall. My grandfather ran the garage (McKay Motors) in the original cheese factory for many years.

Union Hall Cheese Factory- Lyall McKay family photos

She wrote a book before she passed away used to live in the retirement home in Clayton. Believe there should be a copy of her book still in the library there. There are local stories if Union Hall in her book. Her husband was Elvin McKay. His father is in Rose Mary Sarfield’s Book- “Whispers From the Past” (email at rose@sarsfield.ca or call at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store) he used to drive the sawdust/slab wagon for the sawmill.

There used to be another floating bridge over Indian River above the command bridge on Galbraith rd. I remember my grandfather saying it was in use till the seventies until a oil delivery truck fell through. Many years ago one could see a fire tower in the distance at the head of Taylor lake. Many call the channel between Clayton Lake and Taylor Lake Watchhorn Lake. I am assuming if comes from previous land owner before the lake was flooded by the Clayton dam. ( Read more about the Watchhorn’s in : Rose Mary Sarfield’s Book- “Whispers From the Past” (email at rose@sarsfield.ca or call at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store.)

There is a story of a family being buried at the corner of I think the 10th line on Galbraith Rd. The corner is fenced off about 8 ft square where they are supposed to be were placed there after they died of a plague and the house was further up at the end of the road.

Have been told that many years ago the settlers used to walk the oxen across the lake by using the islands in Taylor Lake before the dam. ( see So Which Island did the River Drivers of Clayton get Marooned On?) My understanding is that Watchhorn area was wet but not deep. Even now in summer there is only about 8 ft of water in the channel between the lakes. The damn was built first and then they came upriver to cut all the trees on the flooded lands. That’s why there are many big stumps sand logs in channel area. In the centre of the channel is a clear stretch. My belief is that it was the original path of water between the lakes. Taylor and Watchhorn are both spring fed lakes. In first freeze up one can see where the water flow meanders from various sides the length of the channel.

My grandfather told me it was three layers deep with a arch in the centre at one time. But later have heard they used to have to drag boat’s across the bridge to get between the lakes. Was a story of a team of horses jumping off the bridge when spooked by fish laying on the bridge from a fisherman

I have heard that on the north east side of the floating bridge there was a gravel pit that they used to load/pull by horses. I have been told the Watchhorn house was on the Stewart side of the lake and the owner used to wade across the channel to work the fields on the west side. No one on my family can recall a building in the west side when the bought it other than a old barn.

Grandfather used to talk about skating parties at Thompson’s. They use to skate the length of the lake. They used the strap on blades to boots somewhere in the lake is one he lost in a ice ridge. Years ago my uncle used to have a two level swimming diving raft in the north end of the channel before it got busy like now.

May 27, 1943 Almonte Gazette

The following interesting story about the famous “floating bridge” across Clayton Lake, has been written for The Gazette by Mr. William W. Watchom, one of the old Clayton boys and for many years one of Almonte’s best known citizens: The floating bridge on the 12th line of Lanark, is closed to traffic and has slipped off the foundation or timbers which supported it in places. 

It was built about 70 years ago by Timothy Sullivan of Ferguson Falls, who was successful in tendering for the contract; Lanark Township Council financed the building. In those days there was a number of families living in the Galbraith and Halls Mills districts that belonged to the R. C. parish church at Ferguson Falls and it saved them driving around by Clayton.They were able to cut across and come onto the old mail route at James’ School. 

It was a substantial structure with heavy cedar timbers underneath. The top structure was of cedar covering spotted to be solid on the sleepers. The railing was two logs high, bolted down to the outside sleepers which kept the covering in place. The top of the railing was braced to the covering which was longer where a brace was required. There was one place about the centre of the bridge, built wider so two rigs could meet. 

The structure is over five acres long and took a lot of timber and men to build it. After it was completed there was a dispute about paying for it as another who tendered claimed it was not built according to specifications. The late Mr. John Thompson who had a lot to do with having this bridge built, asked Mr. James Turner who now resides at Grand Forks, N. D., and at that time was following up the carpenter trade, to inspect the bridge. He found it was built according to the specifications. 

It is to be hoped that it will be repaired as it is one of the old landmarks and would be very much missed by a lot of people. In the spring and summer it is quite a fishing resort and it is a good place for wing shooting during duck hunting season.

November 23, 1945Almonte Gazette

A heavy gravel truck that crossed the Floating bridge recently caused some damage that had to be repaired
this week.

Rose Mary Sarfield’s book about the history of Clayton- “Whispers From the Past” (email at rose@sarsfield.ca or call at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton General Store)

The Baye’s Of Lanark Township.

Excerpts from the Almonte Gazette Newspaper;

Dear Sir:

With regards to an article in the book (Ramsay Reflections) recently published dating from 1836-1979 page 41, I beg a small space in your paper.

It concerns the late Joe Baye, his wife and family, Mrs. Baye who died October 5th, 1927, and Mr. Baye who died October 31, 1928. As the Baye’s nearest neighbour, for the first 20 years of my life, I was asked about three years ago for information as to the Baye’s way of life and home etc.

When I contacted Ramsay Residents I was very surprised to see that the Baye history refers to them as residents of Ramsay Township.

I made it clear at that time, that this was a mistake, and to my knowledge it was changed then.

I have absolutely no fault to finish with the ladies who have written the book I except they used the material as they received it.

However the truth is Joe Baye his wife and family never lived in Ramsay Township.

He may have camped along the river between Almonte and Appleton while trapping etc., but it never was a permanent place of abode.

His property comprised about one acre of land, more or less in the eleventh concession of Lanark Township.

He also had access to about half an acre in the twelfth concession, owned by a neighbour, on which he grew potatoes, corn and other vegetables.

It was known as the (Sand Hill) and he was never molested. This land was ploughed and worked by neighbours, and he was always ready to do a kind act in return.

His house, shop and other buildings were In the eleventh concession, and were always in A-1 condition.

Also the famous (Floating Bridge) which did form part of the twelfth concession just near his home is in Lanark Township.

Other books tell this bridge was first built to get people from Halls Mills and Galbraith to Ferguson Falls. This is quite true as it did separate Taylor’s Lake from Clayton Lake at the narrows, and is one mile west of Ramsay Township.

The bridge before it was destroyed was 300 yards long.

As I said before, I have no fault to find with the ladies, who no doubt have spent many hours preparing the book. I would say a job well done.

No doubt this article was printed as received, and was taken as a true story to a lot of people.

However like all my neighbours, who remember what fine people the Baye’s were that this part of the community, and especially the town of Almonte, join with me in remembering them as residents of Lanark Township.

Sincerely, Eldon Ireton, RR 2, Almonte.

ps. The following is in no way connected with the foregoing article.

I see pictures of the Floating Bridge in several places bearing a date of 1890.

While it is a good picture of the bridge, the date is absolutely wrong.

First it shows the telephone line. We didn’t have telephones in these parts in 1890. I think 1910 is closer to the correct date.

Also as to the railing on the bridge. My neighbours and myself, helped build the railing shown, and it could be the last one before the bridge was closed in 1944. It could be in the (thirties) with wages at 25 cents or 30 cents an hour/

Thank You. Eldon Ireton.

Picture of the Floating Bridge

The floating bridge at the narrows between Clayton and Taylor Lakes was actually constructed on the water adapting to the lake’s water levels. It was used by many farmers as a short cut for hauling cord wood and grain to Almonte. Bill McIntosh of RR 6 Perth remembers crossing the bridge in a car when the water would squirt up through the flooring. Advanced transportation caused the demise of the bridge, which was also a popular fishing spot. Joe Baye’s home appears in the far right. This week’s peek is courtesy of Bill Labron who also submitted a letter to the editor (see below) about Joe Baye.

Visiting with Joe Baye near Bridge

Although this story has been told before, I thought it might be suitable to go with the floating bridge on Clayton Lake.

Some time after I migrated to Paris, Ont. with the Penman Company, Mr. Long, Penman’s general superintendent, as me if I knew the Indian fellow Joe Baye who lived near the floating bridge.

I replied that I didn’t know him personally, but I knew of him.

“Well Bill.” said Mr. Long, “I can tell you a story involving Joe Baye.”

“As you probably know I make periodic inspections of all the Penman Mills. One time in Almonte, manager Herb Lundy asked me if I would like to go fishing.”

“I liked to fish so the next day about 1 pm Herb hired a horse and buggy from the local livery and some time later we arrived at the floating bridge.”

“Joe was going to be our fishing guide in his boat. After we returned from two or three hours of fishing Joe fried some fillets from the fish we caught and we sure enjoyed them.”

“Just about the time we were ready to return to Almonte, a terrible storm came up. As the wind and rain didn’t let up, Joe invited us to spend the night there.”

I wasn’t very keen on that, but Herb thought we should. Later we went up some steps, steep as a stepladder, to a room in the attic where there were two beds.”

“Although the bed was clean and comfortable I could not sleep with the lightning and rain pounding on the roof.”

“Just about daylight I heard someone come up the ladder. Then I could see this Joe Baye fellow’s head and shoulders and a large knife in his hand.”

“Gosh Bill, I was scared. I didn’t know whether to call Herb or what. However, this Joe Baye went over to a rafter and cut down a bundle which was tied there. He went back down the steps apparently carrying some smoked meat.”

“Afterwards I could smell ham and eggs frying and Bill, I don’t know when I enjoyed a breakfast like we had that morning.”

“Bill, I always wanted to go back there again for some fishing, but I never did make it.”

Joe Baye was a well-known Indian who trapped, worked for farmers during their busy season and acted as a fishing and hunting guide.

William Labron, Paris, Ontario.

To the Editor,

Congratulations on the new look of the Gazette which I have read with interest since James Muir was the publisher.

Recent correspondence re: Joe Baye evoked pleasant memories of him and of Mrs. Baye — his horse and buggy, his dog, his friendly home, his shop and his unique style of skill under construction. Rev. J. T. Blanchard a relative of Mrs. Baye told me that at the time of their marriage she was a very beautiful girl and he a very handsome man. In age they were still beautiful people to me.

Yours truly, Robert Martin, Penetang, Ontario

Biography

Thomas Tennant was born in 180 in Ireland and immigrated with his family to Upper Canada in 1820. They settled in Ramsay Township, Lanark County, where his application for land (Conc. 7, Lot 2) was turned down because he was too young (age 17). Eventually he did acquire land. The 1851 census records no longer exist for Ramsay Township, but Thomas, his wife Mary Ann, and his children lived in Lanark Township for more than twenty years. He died in Lanark in and was buried in the Tennant Cemetery.

The Carp River Floating Bridge

More Memories of the Floating Bridge

More Notes on the Floating Bridge in Clayton

The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

Clayton floating bridge

Searching for the Floating Bridge?

The Floating Bridges of Lanark County

The Mystery Ruins and the Floating Sidewalk Near the McNeely Bridge

Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

Why the Appleton Bridge Collapsed…

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

Almonte Gazette Fake News- Rosemary Sarsfield Sets it Straight

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Almonte  Gazette Fake News- Rosemary Sarsfield Sets it Straight

Last week I posted this from the Almonte Gazette

Story of How Clayton Village Got Its Name Is Copied Out Of Gazette Files Of 25 Years Ago

Need a Christmas gift? It’s back!!! Rose Mary Sarsfield

After a very successful book launch my book “Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” sold out the first printing of 200 copies during the first week. Today I picked up the second printing, so we are back in business! If you want to purchase a book please email me at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

Place names in Lanark County usually are derived from original settlers in the localities or from points in the Old Country where the pioneers lived before embarking for the wilds of Canada.

Another example of this was I brought to light, recently, by Mr. Abraham Evans of Clayton. He noticed in an article written for The Gazette by Mr. W. H. Black of Toronto, that a question was raised as to how Clayton and Rosetta got their names. He claims that Clayton was called after Colonel Clayton, an original settler in that district, and that Rosetta got its name from a Miss Rosetta McFarlane or Rosetta Craig, who were among the first to live in that part of the County. The Bellamys went to Clayton after the Colonel had been there for some time. It was they who built the grist and saw mills. Up to the time of their coming, pioneer residents like Mr. Evans’ grandfathers, had carried their grist to Perth on their backs, to have it milled. Bellamys offered to build the mills provided the farmers around what is now known as Clayton Lake, agreed to let them dam the stream emptying out it thus raising the level of the water by 12 feet. Anxious for the facilities offered the people came to terms with the Bellamys and as a result of this agreement the lake was first known by the name of Harmony. It appeared that way on old maps but as time passed and the reasons for this rather fancy appellation faded into the distance, the body of water above the Village became known variously as Watchorns Lake, Evans’ Lake, Thompson’s Lake and Clayton Lake. Finally the last label stuck, and today, Clayton Lake is famous for its pike fishing. Mr. Evans, maternal grandfather, Donald Munro, came out from Scotland and settled in the Clayton district 140 years ago. His paternal grandfather, Richards Evans, was a native of Wales, and carved out a home for himself on the shores of the lake about the same time as the Munros.

Need a Christmas gift? It’s back!!! Rose Mary Sarsfield


After a very successful book launch my book “Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” sold out the first printing of 200 copies during the first week. Today I picked up the second printing, so we are back in business! If you want to purchase a book please email me at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

Rose Mary Sarsfield OMG Linda This is so much crap!!! See below– ( I love Rosemary LOLOLOL)

The Name of the Village
From the very early days the settlement seems to have been known as “Bellamy’s Mills”. It was also called “Bellamyville”,1 or “Bellamy’s” by those outside the community. The river was named the Indian River on the map made by the surveyors in 1821.


The difficulty with the name Bellamy’s Mills was there was another community with the same name in Augusta Township, Leeds County. The village now known as North Augusta was settled by Edward Bellamy’s brothers. Imagine the confusion of trying to deliver letters to the correct persons with only the address of Bellamy’s Mills.


In October 1855 advertisements for businesses in Bellamy’s Mills began to appear as “Clifton”.2 This carried on until late 1858 when the name “Clayton” started to appear. But often the names were used interchangeably for a few years. The name Bellamy’s Mills was what people were used to using. It seems that it may have been the Post Office department that changed the names. While the name of “Almonte” was made official by a bylaw passed by the Bathurst District Council, nothing similar can be found for Clayton. The name “Clifton” was probably removed for the same reason as “Bellamy’s Mills” because there was another town called “Clifton” in the western part of the province.


Where did the name Clayton come from? There has been a story that has been repeated in the Almonte Gazette over the years, which now must be corrected. My mother, Mrs. Kate Richards, told the story of an old gentleman coming to visit my father, Harry Richards in 1938. The conversation got around to the subject of how Clayton got its name. My Mother, being young and brash, said, “Oh there was probably some old Colonel Clayton around that they named it after.” The next week, to her horror, the story appeared in the Almonte Gazette that this gentleman had reported that Clayton was named after a Colonel Clayton, a settler in the area.

My Mother, not wanting to cause embarrassment to the old man, said nothing. And so, the myth continued. It was even repeated at the opening of the Clayton dam in 1970. I have done a lot of research to see if there was any possibility of this having even a shred of truth, and there is none. There never was any Colonel Clayton anywhere in Lanark County. The truth is we don’t know where the name Clayton came from. It was most likely chosen by someone in charge of Post Offices at the time.

The Tiny Hamlet of Bellamy’s Mills 1851

Welcome to Clayton, Ontario

No More Credit at Bellamy’s Mills and Other Notes

Falling For Lanark’s Heritage — Thanks for the Memories

The Floating Bridges of Lanark County

Judy from The Cheddar Stop is Selling a Little Bit of Heaven from Clayton

Skunk Street — Shane’s Field– Clayton – George Belton 1939

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Skunk Street — Shane’s Field– Clayton – George Belton 1939
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1939, Sat  •  Page 2

“The old sawmill burned down the year I was born” George Belton

The sawmill was seasonal work. It generally ran from the middle of March through to September.  The logs were dumped on the ice on the river over the winter and when the ice cleared in spring, the sawing began.

The sawmill was rebuilt after the great fire at Clayton in 1875 when the mill and all the lumber piled next to it burnt.  1959 was the final recorded year of operation of the saw mill. Below is a picture of the sawmill in 1955.

From Whispers From the Past by Rose Mary Sarsfield- History and Tales of Clayton, Ontario– It is available from me rose@sarsfield.ca or at the Clayton Store

George R. Belton, Teacher, Journalist and Business man of 756 Westminster Ave., aged 79, died Friday at Grace Hospital.
George was one of a family of twelve children, two of whom are still living, Walter L. Belton of Portage la Prairie and Miss Minnie Belton of MacGregor.
Also surviving are his wife, two sons, George Manly Belton and Norris D. Belton, two daughters, Alice Belton of Los Angeles and Mrs Cyril J. Smith and nine grandchildren.

Name:George Russell Belton
Birth Date:3 Feb 1875
Birth Place:Clayton, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Death Date:27 Aug 1954
Death Place:Winnipeg, Greater Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Cemetery:Brookside Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Winnipeg, Greater Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Has Bio?:Y
Father:Charles Belton
Mother:Mary Ann Belton
Spouse:Edythe Minerva Belton
Children:Alice Margaret Belton

Skunk Street

Skunk street is now Gemmill Street. It was known as Skunk Street when I went to school even though there was no street there…now it is where some of the fanciest houses in the village are. Rose Mary Sarsfield

John Shane

From Whispers From the Past by Rose Mary Sarsfield- History and Tales of Clayton, Ontario– It is available from me rose@sarsfield.ca or at the Clayton Store

Louis Irwin of Clayton

Who was Patricia Thompson From Clayton?

Black Rock Clayton

So Which Island did the River Drivers of Clayton get Marooned On?

The Old Community Hall in Clayton

The Clayton Methodist Cemetery

Come all my dear companions and listen to my song–Songs of Clayton

Rocking and Rolling on the Spring Clayton Road

Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

A Trip to the Mad Hatter’s Wonderland — Well Clayton

The Social Comings and Goings of 1901 Clayton

More Notes on the Floating Bridge in Clayton

Party Ideas from Clayton 1906

Clayton News July 1897

Any Photos of Jane Dick Bowes?

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Any Photos of Jane Dick Bowes?

Could you ask if anyone has a photo of Jane Dick (1806-1886) who married John Bowes. In 1852 they left Clayton and went to Lambton County. She came from the family with 11 children who lost both their mother and father before they reached Lanark County and the older children raised the younger ones. She was one of the founders of the Temperance Movement in Lanark County. —Rose Mary Sarsfield

Jane Bowes (Dick)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom
Death:
Immediate Family: Daughter of James Dick and Jane Dick
Wife of John Bowes
Sister of Janet Bowes

 

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Taverns on Main Street, Lanark Village, Ontario, Canada, during the temperance movement.

Source: Lanark Legacy, by Howard Morton Brown, ISBN 0-9690289-2-X, page 207.

As the temperance movement grew in popularity, it became more difficult to buy alcoholic beverages 

in the rural areas and privately owned whisky stills became more popular – for example the one at Manotick Station.

(“The Pokey Moonshine Settlement”).

 

 

The nature of the traditional rural amusements was slowly but profoundly altered by the temperance movement. The first temperance society in the Canadas was formed at Montreal in 1828. Within four years about one hundred Societies had been organized in Upper Canada . John Gemmill in Lanark Township wrote in 1832:

We have also a Temperence Society which was formed about twelve months ago which is doing a great dale of good. There is above four hundred members although it has met with a grate dale of opposition yet it is increasing and many that was seen in a fit of intoxication are now become steady members of society. We all form a part of it. I should like that you would inform us how they are getting on in Scotland

Temperance Movement

 

Effects of excessive consumption of alcohol became a nineteenth century social problem.  Commonly caused or aggravated by other social conditions, it appears to have been a conspicuous contributor to crime and to other broader social losses.  Local temperance societies were formed as early as about 125 years ago to combat its evils.  At the outset of settlement at Carleton Place the Ballygiblin Riots of 1824 – joined in the name of law and order by participants of the areas from Perth to Almonte, with gunfire casualties including loss of a life – had been sparked by a drunken military Donnybrook on Mill Street in Morphy’s Falls.

A period of restriction of sale of alcoholic beverages, imposed in Lanark County in the 1870’s under the Dunkin Temperance Act, was ended for this county in 1879.  Its suspension was reported by editor James C. Poole (Herald, June 18, 1879):

“Hotels – The hotels throughout the county are again in full swing, though to be candid they “swung” just as freely while the Dunkin Act was in force.  Our genial landlords can now remove the syrup labels off their brandy bottles.”

Lanark and Renfrew hotel keepers two years later were found getting together to raise the prices of meals and liquor.  As reported in Carleton Place, “The hotel keepers of this section held a largely attended meeting at Arnprior, and unanimously agreed on raising the price of liquor to ten cents a glass, and meals to thirty-five cents.”  Similar liquor prices seem to have prevailed for many years, as suggested by a 1905 report from Brockville, relating that “Brockville hotel men have combined to raise the price of liquor dispensed over the bar.  Five cent drinks will hereafter be ten cents.”

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading (1).jpg

Did you Know that Temperance Drinks Are all the Rage Now?

Taverns the Press and the other End of the Valley

There is a Golden Rule of Selling Alcohol in Carleton Place?

No Drinking in Delta! Did You Know this About Delta?

Nothing But the Cooler Left in Carleton Place

82 Bottles of Booze on the Wall – 82 Bottles of Booze

The Big Beer Store Heist in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to the Masonic Lodge Building

Was the McNeely Bridge Funded on “Drinkin’ Fines”?

We Don’t Live in Lanark County — We Live in Hallmark County

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We Don’t Live in Lanark County — We  Live in Hallmark County

Some days I look at Steve and say that I wished we lived in one of those Hallmark movies, or even in the town of *Middleton where Cassie The Good Witch lives. I guess I didn’t realize it until Saturday that I really do live in the midst of Hallmark emotions and sights. If the Hallmark channel folks had come here Saturday, we could have created a whole movie for them. There would be no script needed trust me.

*Wendy Kennedy Middleville was originally named Middleton. Look no further! 😉

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Carleton Place had their Pumpkinfest— To be honest, I have a hard time walking on uneven ground now since my fall so I sent Steve to investigate, and I did see it up closeup and was so happy. Kate Murray, Jessica Hansen & Amanda Blakeley Charania! So well done.. so well done.

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Off to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum for their Vintage Sale today and picked up an old Captain Kangaroo and some other great things. Stay tuned– something coming up on October 27th that you should be aware of. And I got to see their Chamber of Commerce nomination sign today too. Congratulations!!

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We were on our way to Clayton so we stopped for lunch at the North Market Cafe on Mill Street in Almonte. One amazing place and we had the fried green tomatoes and the pekoras and of course their  Nanaimo bars, which the flavour of the week was Pink Peppercorn.

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Fried Green Tomatoes with corn relish and spicy crema

Look at the people we met there. People that do good for our community. Can you name them?

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Then another smile came…

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Then it was off to Rose Mary Sarsfield’s book event today. Rose Mary who also does  the Clayton History Page has been working a long time on this history book and this book can be bought now at the Clayton General Store or email Rose Mary at rose@sarsfield.ca or call 613-621-9300

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Then we had to say adieu to the sunshine, the fall colours and the wonderful people.

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I said to Steve on the way home:

” You know I miss Berkeley a lot, but today I realized this is where I belong”.

As Faith Hill once said: “I don’t want to sound like a Hallmark card, but to be able to wake up each day with food and shelter, that alone is good. Forget aging and the fact that my butt is becoming a little more familiar with my knees than my tailbone. If you are six feet above ground it’s a good day. So, give me more!”

You gave me so much more on Saturday Lanark County– more than I could handle so I had to share. Thank you.

 

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relatedreading

The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

“The Mounties Will Arrest You if You Step on a Trillium”

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

Party Ideas from Clayton 1906

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Party Ideas from Clayton 1906

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February 6 1902 Clayton, Ontario– Photo- Courtesy Tom Edwards

Author’s Note- I wanted to call this the neck tie party but I couldn’t- If you Google neck tie party– you will see that is what they used to call a lynching party. Since none of that went on in Clayton and I have many US readers I thought it best be not to upset anyone.

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February 6 1902 Clayton, Ontario– Photo- Courtesy Tom Edwards

 

 

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Photo from Tom Edwards–I’m not sure but I think this is the Clayton Store when my great uncle Johnny Erskine and Aunt Essie owned it. Clayton Historian Rose Mary Sarsfield has verified it

Rose Mary Sarsfield—- who is working on a book about Clayton and runs Clayton Ontario History on Facebook “I know about this! This is wonderful! I did an interview with Morris Turner from Union Hall back in the early 80s and he rhymed this off to me! I was just listening to the interview a couple of weeks ago.”

 

 

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Again we are looking for help with identification on this group of ladies outside Guthrie United Church in Clayton. They are Mrs. Cochrane, Mrs. Penman, Mrs. Wm. Dunlop, Mrs. John McIntosh, ?, ?, Mrs. Bob Paul, Mrs. Charlie McNeil, Mrs. Rintoul. Thanks to Allan Bellamy and Stuart McIntosh for the photo.– Photo–Clayton Ontario History

 

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Eleanor this looks like dads handwriting. Would that be Ray and Fred on the wheel?

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The last week of each month my mother used to hold the neighbourhood Canasta party at the bottom of Albert Street in Cowansville, Quebec. Her friends would come en masse to our home carrying their sweet pot-luck treats in their Tupperware dressed to the nines. One Tuesday when I came home from school I stopped dead in my tracks when I spotted my mother and her canasta club having a Joan Crawford makeover day.

Sitting like glamour queens, I am sure each one of them thought they all looked like MGM starlets. There they were munching on these pineapple squares with bright red lips, short bangs and evil eyebrows. It was the scariest thing you ever saw, and I swear I didn’t sleep for days after that gut wrenching experience. Because of this childhood memory these squares will be part of who I am until I die. Read more here..

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Taffy Party Comes to Blows and Infection on the Ramsay Line – What was in the Punch?

Party Conversations from: The Good, the Bad and the Famous

 

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Doorunnamed (1)