Tag Archives: rosamond mill

Letters from Bennett Rosamond — 1894- Adin Daigle Collection

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Letters from Bennett Rosamond — 1894- Adin Daigle Collection

Adin Daigle

2h  · 

A pretty sweet grab today a hand written note from Bennett Rosamond House of Commons 1894. The Rosamonds were one of the first industrial developers in Carleton place starting a woolen business in 1830. By 1846 they built a woolen mill on the Mississippi (credited with being the first known textile mill to be ran by water power in eastern Ontario). Then moving on to Almonte in 1857, they build another woolen Mill that still stands there today.

In 1862 Bennett Rosamond and his brother William leased the Victoria Woolen Mills from their father under the partnership of B & W Rosamond and embarked upon a programme of rapid expansion. In 1866, they brought into the firm, now renamed B & W Rosamond & Co-MVTM

Unexpected Almonte
January 20, 2020  · 




Adultery & desertion…
One of Almonte’s Textile Industry mill owners, Bennett Rosamond, eldest son of James Rosamond, founder, wasn’t as lucky in love & life as you might imagine…

From the Dictionary of Canadian Biography:
“His early marriage caused him great unhappiness and led to separation within a decade. The son whom he had groomed to take over his business, John M., predeceased him, as did his other children. These events may help explain the harsh, practical image of Bennett Rosamond.”

The clipping below is from an 1887 edition of the Canada Gazette (Google Books). Thanks Brent Eades for the tips for this post #Struggles #WeAllHaveEm #Almonte #HeritageMatters 
from my collection

So Who Was Mary Rosemond/Rosamond?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jul 1899, Mon  •  Page 1

Adultery & desertion…
One of Almonte’s Textile Industry mill owners, Bennett Rosamond, eldest son of James Rosamond, founder, wasn’t as lucky in love & life as you might imagine…

From the Dictionary of Canadian Biography:
“His early marriage caused him great unhappiness and led to separation within a decade. The son whom he had groomed to take over his business, John M., predeceased him, as did his other children. These events may help explain the harsh, practical image of Bennett Rosamond.”

Rosamond History– The “Damn” Dam Case 1870

Pinehurst 1898 — The Rosamond Home — 8 Years After it was Built

So Who Was Mary Rosemond/Rosamond?

The Rosamond Memorial Training School

John Morrow Writes About MP Ian Murray — Gailbraith — and Rosamond

Five Men That Tied up the Rosamond Mill 1907

Rosamond History– The “Damn” Dam Case 1870

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Rosamond History– The “Damn” Dam Case 1870

No 1 Mill– the dam that would have been taken out would be at the top of the falls.

Jan 1871 Almonte Gazette

The Dam Case — Some time during last summer four of the employees of B. & W. Rosamond & Co. were charged before a Justice of the Peace with the crime of tearing away and destroying 60 feet of the dam at the long wooden bridge leading to No. 1 mill. The case was tried a t the Perth assizes in October, and a true bill against the four men was found by the Grand Jury. 

The judge, however, had no time to try the case and it was left over to the Quarter sessions — the result of the trial being that the four men were found guilty and sentenced to three months imprisonment in the common Jail.

It is rather hard for the men to be thus incarcerated, for the facts are that the men were ordered by their employers to go out and destroy the dam, and that they (the employers) would stand between them and all harm, ensuring the men at the same time that they had the highest legal authority for doing so. 

Under the circumstances we think it is a pity that the majesty of the law could not have been vindicated quite as well by a much shorter period of imprisonment. Since the trial we have heard but one universal opinion expressed In the affair, and that is, a strong feeling of sympathy for the four employees.

In 1862 Bennett Rosamond and his brother William leased the Victoria Woolen Mills from their father under the partnership of B & W Rosamond and embarked upon a programme of rapid expansion. In 1866, they brought into the firm, now renamed B & W Rosamond & Co-MVTM

Bridge on Pinehurst

photo almonte.com

Built by Bennett Rosamond, president and managing director of the Rosamond Woollen Company, one of the largest woollen mills in Canada at the time. In 1884, he started to clear his land on the “Point” in a quiet and secluded area known as Brookdale Park, and by March 1890, had announced contracts for construction of Pinehurst, “the handsomest house” at the “prettiest location in town.” This was followed by a lodge (1892), a grapery (1894), and two outbuildings (1895). Later, an iron bridge was built on the road leading to Pinehurst from No. 1 Mill and a stone wall was built along the driveway.

photo almonte.com

The Seven-Barrelled ‘pepper box’ Revolver — Rosamond Fight — July 1875

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The Seven-Barrelled ‘pepper box’ Revolver — Rosamond Fight — July 1875
Photo from Almonte.com

Seldom is it that the law-abiding citizens of Almonte allow their angry passions to rise, or to tear each others’ eyes out. But last week a most ludicrous conflict occurred in which the principal actors were the proprietors of two woolen mills and their respective employees.

The bone of contention between them was the proprietorship of a small piece of mill property upon which one of the parties, apparently trespassing, attempted to erect tenter bars for stretching cloth. This was perceived by his neighbour who ordered him to stop. The first party refused, and the neighbour’s foreman promptly threw the tenter bars and his opponent into the nearby river. One thing led to another until a battle took place pitting workers of the mills against each other. Weapons (handspikes and crowbars) were obtained, but fortunately no blood was spilled.

Combatants struggled in and around the water with slight interruption for three hours. Peace was finally restored when one employee produced a seven-barrelled ‘pepper box’ revolver and threatened all combatants with it unless the brawl ceased. Only after the fighting did stop was it revealed that the small revolver had not been loaded.

  • No 1 Rosamond Mill. CLICK HERE
  • Coleman Island, Lot 18
  • As James Rosamond was building the second Victoria Woolen Mill in Almonte, he realized that with the coming of the railway, the mills would be too small. He began acquiring property on Coleman’s Island near the falls which was occupied by a tannery and residences. Between 1857 and 1867 he acquired six parcels of land. The Coleman Island Mill was built in 1866 – 1867. The first building was a six story stone building, six wide by twelve windows long, centred by a tower.
  • In 1872 a three story dye house was added on the north end of the building and a 45 foot by 130 foot warehouse and a 40 foot by 45 foot counting house was added on the south. In 1887 a four story north addition was built connecting the dye house. Also, a four story addition was built connecting the main building to the counting house.
  • The counting house was demolished in 1880 and the south wing extended to Ramsay St.
  • The New Counting House
  • A new Counting House for the No. 1 Rosamond Woolen Mill was added to the west end of the warehouse in 1880. This complex is now the home of the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum.

The pepper-box revolver or simply pepperbox (also “pepper-pot“, from its resemblance to the household pepper grinder) is a multiple-barrel repeating firearm that has three or more barrels grouped around a central axis. It mostly appears in the form of a multi-shot handheld firearm. Pepperboxes exist in all ammunition systems: matchlockwheellockflintlockpercussionpinfirerimfire and centerfire.

The pepperbox should not be confused with a volley gun (like the seven-barrel long gun made by Nock), a firearm that fires multiple projectiles simultaneously by use of multiple barrels.[1] The difference is that a volleygun fires all the barrels simultaneously while the pepperbox is a repeater. The pepperbox should also not be confused with or as a development of the Gatling gun, which fires rapidly by the use of rotating multiple barrels.

So Who Was Mary Rosemond/Rosamond?

The Leaky Chancery Dam –The Forgie’s of Almonte Part 2

The Rosamond Memorial Training School

John Morrow Writes About MP Ian Murray — Gailbraith — and Rosamond

Five Men That Tied up the Rosamond Mill 1907

The Mules of the Number 1 Mill?

The Drought of 1871 and the Mills on the Mississippi River

When the Circus Shut the Town Down

Falling Through the Cracks at Work

Was Working in One of Our Local Mills Like Working in a Coal Mine?

Babies in the Textile Mills

Rosamonds – The One Carleton Place Let Get Away

The Rosamond Woolen Company’s Constipation Blues

Tears of a Home -The Archibald Rosamond House

The Exact Reason Rosamond Left Carleton Place

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

Tears of a Home -The Archibald Rosamond House

So Who Was Mary Rosemond/Rosamond?

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So Who Was Mary Rosemond/Rosamond?

I just got the postcard I bought today in the mail. “Greetings from Pinehurst at Almonte, Ontario, Canada RPPC – Real Photo Post Card A Canadian Private Post Card Postmarked at Almonte on December 19, 1905 Mailed to Miss Mary Rosamond of Des Moines, Iowa”

In the Christmas greeting Bennett Rosamond called Mary “coz” and it was addressed to the State Library in Des Moines. I looked into some of the genealogy , but I could not find her, so I went to the newspaper archives. It was tough but I dug her up. Born in Washington, Ohio, Miss Rosemond came to Iowa as a child with her parents, Capt. and Mrs. William E. Rosemond.  Notice, that her family were cousins with the Almonte Rosamonds but the American family spelt it Rosemond.

Under the tutelage of the late Johnson Brigham and associated with many others in library work, Miss Mary Morton Rosemond engaged in building up for the state a library of economics and political science, for the use of state officials and legislators who really want to know, for the sincere students of public affairs. She served on the staff of the Iowa state library from 1809 to 1937. She passed away in 1941.

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Ames Daily Tribune
Ames, Iowa
10 Feb 1933, Fri  •  Page 7
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Mary Morton Rosemond Iowa State Census, 1905 birth: about 1873 Ohio residence: 1905 Polk, Iowa, United States

father: W E Rosemond

mother:Caroline C Baumgardner

Bennett Rosamond

The Rosamond Memorial Training School

John Morrow Writes About MP Ian Murray — Gailbraith — and Rosamond

Five Men That Tied up the Rosamond Mill 1907

Was Working in One of Our Local Mills Like Working in a Coal Mine?

Babies in the Textile Mills

Rosamonds – The One Carleton Place Let Get Away

The Rosamond Woolen Company’s Constipation Blues

Tears of a Home -The Archibald Rosamond House

The Exact Reason Rosamond Left Carleton Place

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

Tears of a Home -The Archibald Rosamond House

The Leaky Chancery Dam –The Forgie’s of Almonte Part 2

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The Leaky Chancery Dam –The Forgie’s of Almonte Part 2

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Oct 1907, Mon  •  Page 10

 

Today the Victoria Woolen Mills stands in business section of Almonte at the corner of Bridge and Mill streets. It is an unusual five-sided, five-storey high stone structure. A provincial historical plaque commemorating “The Rosamonds of Almonte” stands outside the building.

Take a walk behind the mill, following the path beside the building and next to the parking spaces. Immediately one notices the spectacular view of waterfalls, rapids and the limestone rock over which the river tumbles. Look closely and you’ll see the Chancery Dam, Almonte’s oldest structure, dating from the 1820s. This wooden dam was completely submerged in spring but in summer it held water back to the benefit of mill owners upstream, resulting in endless lawsuits with those operators below.

 

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In 1869 Rosamond employees were criminally prosecuted for destroying 60
ft of the Almonte Chancery dam in a case that became known as Rosamond vs. Forgie. James Forgie died at age 83 in 1916  and owned 73 Little Bridge St.  in Almonte. (Mississippi Mills)

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Mary Peden 1920s Carleton Place- Photo property Linda Seccaspina– Rosamond House in the background on Bell Street.

 

Rosamond returned to Carleton Place for two years, operating there for a short while,
and then came back to Almonte in 1836, purchased the present Rosamond property on the North end of the Island, and proceeded to demolish the “Chancery Dam.” This of course would turn the water to the North Channel, and impair all powers adjoining Mill Street. This intolerable situation brought on the famous lawsuit known as “Forgie V Rosamond.”

 

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Forgie owned the old Penman property (now the site of the new Post office) and of course he was out of business if the Mill Street power owners could not maintain the “Chancery Dam.” This suit was a “class action” by all the Mill Street powers. Rosamond
lost this suit and another later on over the same dam.

 

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Photo from Lanark County Tourism–Almonte Walking Tour

 

Further down from the “Commercial House” was a vacant lot. This may have been intended for an extension of Charles Street, which now exists only on the Easterly side of George Gomme’s property. Crossing this vacant space, to the present location of “Harry’s Motors,” was a small building occupied by Robert Drury, a saddler and harness maker. He was one of the several who had “lately removed from Lackey’s Corners” there and “now expects to meet his old friends and make new ones” in Almonte.

From there down there were but two buildings – the Shipman property and James Wylie’s store (above mentioned). Around the corner at the turn to the bay (Gemmill’s Bay) was the first residence of James Rosamond in Almonte. This James Rosamond was born in Carleton Place – his father Bennett Rosamond came to Carleton Place from Ireland. And Bennett Rosamond, known to many present old-timers, was the grandson of the first Bennett Rosamond, the first Rosamond in Almonte, started in the woollen business here close to the site of the Shipman gristmill – across the street from the Public Utilities Commission property. The property was owned by his father Bennett Rosamond (the first) and was sold by him in 1834 to John Baird, with the stipulation that Baird was to have all the benefits of the “Chancery Dam” to run his woollen mill. After selling, Rosamond returned to Carleton Place for two years, operating there for a short while, and then came back to Almonte in 1836, purchased the present Rosamond property on the North end of the Island, and proceeded to demolish the “Chancery Dam.”  (Documented by Fran Cooper)

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Oct 1907, Thu  •  Page 7

 

The “Chancery Dam” is really a historic edifice in the history of Almonte, although it is under water most of the time. You may still see it to the North of the bridge below the Dairy property. Waterpower was a matter of life and death to the early industries. There was no electricity in those days.  (documented by Fran Cooper)

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jan 1907, Wed  •  Page 3

 

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Graham Forgie and 65 Mill Street

Past Parables of the Penman Woollen Mill

Reports of Cases Adjudged in the Court of Chancery of Ontario …, Volume 26

The Exact Reason Rosamond Left Carleton Place

Rosamonds – The One Carleton Place Let Get Away

 

Entire Dam Above Smiths Falls Swept Away

Swimming at the Dam, St. James Park and Other Things

The Power of the Mississippi River Dam in Carleton Place

This Old Dam

What’s New at the Mississippi Textile Museum?

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What’s New at the Mississippi Textile Museum?

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Michael Rikley-Lancaster  sent this to me last night. Here is your 2018 MVTM board!

Hesch Hanley President/ Director

Hesch has 35 years of federal government experience working at central agencies and large operational departments, providing executive advice and direction in the areas of resource reallocation and governance, project management, risk management, strategic and operational planning, policy development, task force management, and program management and review.

During his career, the wind down and the transformation of Museums Canada from one corporate entity into new corporate entities: the National Gallery of Canada, Museum of History, and other notable federal cultural institutions, occurred. Hesch was also part of the Public Service 2000 initiative that oversaw the transformation of the federal government, including Program Review I and II. Hesch has lectured at Queen’s University and the University of Ottawa.

Lizz Thrasher, Vice President/ Director

With a background that ranges from kitchen management to auto restoration, Lizz has an unusual mix of technical and artistic skills.  She formally trained in conservation and arts administration at Sir Sandford Fleming College, Peterborough.

Since starting her career as a conservator and museum professional, Lizz has worked in a variety of heritage institutions, including the Canada Museum of Science and Technology and The Klondike National Historic Site. She has worked on objects as diverse as a beaded silk wedding dress and the carding machines upstairs at the MVTM.  She is currently the Facilities Manager at the Diefenbunker, where she is responsible for the building and building infrastructure as well as the care of the museum collection.

Meredith Filshie, Secretary/ Director

Meredith has been passionate about textiles, fibres, beads and beautiful things all her life. She has an undergraduate degree specializing in Textiles, Clothing and Design from the University of Guelph and an MBA from the University of Western Ontario. For 24 years, she worked in economic development policy groups with the federal government and had increasing levels of management responsibility. Currently she is the owner of Canada Beading Supply in Ottawa and is a member of several fibre arts organizations in the Ottawa area. Her experience in management, policy development, strategic and operational planning, budgeting and personnel combined with her involvement in the fibre arts community will help the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum remain a vital and exciting institution in Eastern Ontario.

Alan Jones, Treasurer/ Director

Alan was the Chief Valuator for Revenue Canada, and retired in 2000. He and Glenda moved to their new home in West Carleton in 1994. They have 20 acres of ANSI land -Area of Natural and Scientific Interest. Alan is an MBA, and a Fellow of the Chartered Business Valuators, the Chartered Professional Accountants, and the Certified General Accountants. He has been involved with the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum (MVTM) since 1995,and served as treasurer 1997-2003 and president 2008-2012. He has served on a number of local initiatives, such as the Stewardship Committee, the Heritage Committee, the Mills Community Support Corporation and the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority. Alan and Glenda won the Mississippi Volunteerism Award in 2013.

John Beesley, Director

John has now lived in Almonte for 3½ years. He has recently been looking at ways that he can contribute to the community in a meaningful way, while also leveraging some of the skills that he has developed in his full time work. John has come to appreciate the importance of arts organizations to the community, and given that the MVTM is one of the pre-eminent arts organizations in Almonte, he believes he can help the organization build on its past successes and prepare for the future.

From an academic perspective, John has an Executive MBA from the Smith School of Business, Queen’s University.  The program is generalist in nature and provides a background in business management, human resources, operations management and finance.  Additionally, he has worked for CIBC in a number of roles with increasing scope and complexity throughout the years. His work experience has given him exposure to personal & small business banking, project management, leadership of branch and district teams and regional operations accountability.

Edith Cody-Rice, Director

Edith is a senior lawyer, now retired, with years of experience in public, legal, and voluntary sectors. She is deeply committed to public service and is a strong negotiator and team player with superior collaborative and communication skills. Edith is fluent in both official languages and has long experience in governance and management of projects, policy development and the crafting of legislation and reports. She loves the arts and museums, and thinks that the textile museum is one of the most valuable assets in the town of Mississippi Mills. Edith has been deeply involved in the voluntary sector most of her adult life.

Josée Dambois, Director

Josée has had a lifelong curiosity and interest in fibre arts, learning sewing from her mother at age ten to being a self-taught quilter and knitter. Currently, she is pursuing coaching in classical drawing and painting as well as apprenticing with a master weaver. She is a member of the National Gallery of Canada, the Ottawa Valley Weavers’ and Spinners’ Guild, the Out of the Box Fibre Artists group and, of course, the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum (MVTM). Fluent in both English and French, her work experience includes three national museums (the Canadian Museum of Nature, the National Gallery of Canada and the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation) amongst other national organizations.  Josée brings over 20 years of experience in non-profit sector, ten of those years in corporate governance. She holds a Diplôme d’Etudes Collégiale (DEC)  in Business Administration with specialization in Finance, a Fine Arts Certificate from Algonquin College and a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in psychology, from Waterloo University.

Jill McCubbin, Municipality of Mississippi Mills Council Representative/ Director

Jill is a Mississippi Mills Councillor, Almonte Ward. She also works at the Mississippi Mills Public Library, at Mill Street Books and provides marketing and communications services to a couple of private organizations. Jill’s background includes small business (mainly bookstores) website design and development, publishing, writing and editing. She was a founder and early editor of theHumm and of Independently Reviewed (a national newsletter). Jill is also an artist and has exhibited paintings in Ottawa, Peterborough, Almonte and at the MVTM in 2013.

Kathy Priddle, Director

Kathy has lived and worked in Almonte for more than 23 years. She has raised her 3 children here and been a tireless volunteer over the years. Her roles have ranged from President of the Almonte Toy Lending Library to President of the MVTM. Kathy also volunteers at The Hub and Cornerstone Community Church and served on the Mississippi Mills Library Board. She still finds time to work part-time in downtown Almonte and also teach drama. Early in her career, Kathy taught Grade 4 and was also a nature interpreter for the MNR. Her educational background is in Environmental Studies (B.E.S., University of Waterloo) and Education (B.Ed., Nipissing University).

Fraser Scantlebury, Director

Fraser is currently the Executive Director of the United Way Lanark County, having joined the organization in the spring of 2011 as Fund Development Officer. He brings to that position an extensive business career as a consultant, combined with a long-standing volunteer commitment to the non-profit community. Fraser has had extensive dealings with a number of senior level management teams across various industries, government, and non-profit organizations, and his management roles have included international experience, as well as serving on the boards of a number of non-profit organizations and a publicly traded company. Primarily areas of expertise include leadership learning; fund-raising and marketing; governance; e-learning program development; and project management.

Michael Rikley-Lancaster

 

How Much is that Doggie In the Museum?

Emotional Patchwork at The Mississippi Valley Textile Museum

The Rosamonds Would Love You to Come and Shop Vintage!

Guess What I Found?–A Purchase from the Yard Goods Store

Does Fabric Make You Happy? Read This!!

Should we Really Keep Time in a Bottle or a Box?

The Rosamond Woolen Company’s Constipation Blues

Was Working in One of Our Local Mills Like Working in a Coal Mine?

Babies in the Textile Mills

Emotional Patchwork at The Mississippi Valley Textile Museum

Carleton Place Rules the World — Almonte Waves a White Flag!

The Mules of the Number 1 Mill?

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The Mules of the Number 1 Mill?

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Photo from Almonte.com

Almonte Gazette 1871

Sir—

You will obliged by inserting the following in the Almonte Gazette. Having seen a letter by Mr. “O” of the Carleton Place Herald— first to the employers of the No. 1 Mill  and secondly in the interest of the workpeople. I think it should not pass unnoticed.

 

Mr. “O” says that girls have been placed to work as mules in one of the mills, and undoubtedly-he means instead of the boys, to save expense. This is positively an untruth, but suppose it had been true, where is the wrong; every man is justifiable in running any business as cheap as he can, as long as his proceedings are just and honest.

Again Mr. “O” says in the Herald— the girls have been worked nearly 14 hours per day. This only occurred once, and then by the girls’ request, and if this had not been the case, we think it quite out of place at this time when shortness of water has caused such delay, to mention the working of one quarter of a day overtime as a means used by the employers to find a living out of the poor.

Again Mr. “O”  refers to the fine of one dollar, deducted from the boys’ wages for absenting themselves from work without permission, and says that in some cases it amounted to nearly three day’s pay-(including the half day’s time lost).

This of course is another way whereby the rich live at the expense of the poor. Does Mr. ‘‘O” suppose that if a lad neglects his work for one half day, that three days’ pay makes up the loss, if the machine he runs stops one-half day, is not invariably the next process injured, and the third and fourth and so on; through the whole mill the delay is felt and the goods late in market and perhaps thrown on the sellers hands.

Where is the common reason of the thing, or the foolish parent who would encourage his children to pursue such a course?  Nothing but ‘‘ill will,” I think, could have induced M r. “O ” to. write such a letter. First, he tried the editor of the Almonte Gazette, but with an invisible success, and then came out in his true colours, manifesting a fair share of the avaricious spirit he speaks so much about, and resembling, in a slight degree, the principles of the Societe Internationale, as mentioned in the Almonte Gazette and injurious to the working classes of Almonte, generally.

How can the employees attempt to ask any favours of their employers, when such treatment is practised upon them, as to be publicly exposed and to have statements made in reference to them-which- is wholly untrue in a public newspaper, it is unnecessary. to ask to which side does the avaricious spirit belong, but does it not rather suggest to us how liable we are to err, and how many of us are there who have not committed actions and found the silent rebuke of conscience a sufficient punishment, and what we have done in haste we, have grieved over at our leisure.

Much more might be said, but we would be sorry to lie too personal or severe in our remarks: rather let us examine ourselves and see first if there is not a beam in our own eye to be removed, before we attempt to”take the note from our brother’s eye”, and if not let us so walk that the light reflected from our good deeds which shall show others the way wherein they should go.

“The D”

Author’s Note- So why was there such a furor? Why was Mr. O’s letter printed in the Carleton Place Herald and not the Almonte Gazette?  Did Carleton Place still had bitter grapes about Rosamond leaving Carleton Place in 1866 for Almonte? Towards the close of their lease with  Mr. Boulton in Carleton Place Rosamond wanted to buy or rent the water power. The owner Mr. McLaren of Beckwith would do neither and the town council of Carleton Place was on the side of McLaren. Rosamond left Carleton Place in a huff for Almonte and it appears the media battle began. This letter was  obviously written by someone with great education and an instigator to be sure.

 

 

 

historicalnotes

The Mississippi Valley Textile Museum (MVTM) is located in the annex of the former Rosamond Woolen Company in Almonte, Ontario. History click here

August 11 1871– Almonte Gazette- The employees of No. 1 mill had a gala day, on Saturday, their employers giving them a free trip to Ottawa. Two years ago they were treated with a trip to Brockville ; and last year they were taken up ‘the Ottawa as far as Portage-du-Fort. The excursion party consisted of about 350 persons, and was composed principally of the operatives of the firm, their relatives and a few invited guests.

Upon arriving in Ottawa they walked from the railway station to the Parliament buildings, and here, through the kindness of the Hon. Alex. Morris, they were shown every attention, and were taken through the chamber of the House of Commons, the Speaker’s Room, Library, Senate Chamber, and other places of interest about the buildings. Many of the excursionists visited the Chaudiere, the mills, factories, and other sights worth seeing in the capital, and altogether a most pleasant day was spent in ‘‘ doing” Ottawa. All present enjoyed themselves with the trip; and nothing occurred to mar the general pleasure.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Related reading:

Was Working in One of Our Local Mills Like Working in a Coal Mine?

Babies in the Textile Mills

The Drought of 1871 and the Mills on the Mississippi River

What Do You Know About the Burnt Lands?

When the Circus Shut the Town Down

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When the Circus Shut the Town Down

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Photo from The Circus Blog

with files from –August 18 1872 Almonte Gazette

The Rosamond Woollen Mill shut down on Wednesday in order to give the employees an opportunity of attending the circus. The great event of the week was the appearance of Howe’s Circus.  A large crowd of people was attracted to Almonte and the attendance in the afternoon was very large and in fact it was estimated just a little of over 3000 people came to attend the event.  The attendance was so large in the afternoon every tier of seats in the large pavillion was over crowded.  At night the attendance was also good but not as large as the afternoon when the Rosamond Mill was closed. To mar the event an individual hailing from Carleton Place, having taken one glass too much, became *obstreperous, and was collared by Constable Patterson and taken to the lockup

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The man named O’Donnell, who was drunk and disorderly, was endeavouring to create a disturbance at the Almonte House, when one of our newly-fledged constables “went for him ” in lively style, and eventually bore him off to the lockup in triumph. In consequence,  the prisoner had to pay, $8 and he was liberated the next morning and told to return to Carleton Place immediately.

 

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Digital Resources and Publications

 

historicalnotes

*Word of the day: obstreperous
noisy and difficult to control.

synonyms: unruly, unmanageable, disorderly, undisciplined, uncontrollable, rowdy, disruptive, truculent, difficult, refractory, rebellious, mutinous, riotous, out of control, wild, turbulent, uproarious, boisterous

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Eastern Kentucky University – Special Collections and Archives

Howe’s Circus

Previous to 1825 a circus top had not been used by the few small shows hardly worthy of the name of a circus. That year “Uncle” Nathan Howes of Putnam County, New York, became possessed of an ancient elephant called “Old Bet” and organizing a small show he started forth with a topped tent and about a dozen men and horses, making an incursion through New England as far East as the Indian Village of Bangor, Maine. Seth B. Howes, a boy of eleven, afterwards a famous manager, accompanied the expedition. “Uncle” Nate’s success turned the heads of many “Put County” investors and all the boys of the region caught the circus fever. In the writer’s early days, you could make no mistake by going into any store or office at Brewsters Station and talking circus. Every mother’s son of them had “followed a red wagon” in their day in some capacity or “been ahead of the show.” The youth of “Put County” “took a course of circus” just the same as they “go through college,” these days.

Danbury, like Bridgeport later on, became a circus town, the former on account of its being the home of the Turners and George F. Bailey, and the latter by its’ development by P. T. Barnum. Danbury was also famous for horse thieves, it summered and wintered the horse theves and wintered the circus. There was no connection between the horse thieves and the circus, but the fellows who appropriated other people’s horses never meddled with the circus stock as Mr Bailey once humorously remarked, “they extended the usual courtesies to the profession,” explaining seriously, “the crooks were afraid of being caught before they could cross the York State line and that the showmen would take the law into their own hands and take the halter off the horse and put it on the thief .”

When the small circuses dragged around the country on wheels, there was little offered in amusements summer or winter, outside the, larger cities, and these were few in number and, small in population. The stage was under a ban almost everywhere, and but few of the people traveled or passed beyond the borders of their own town. A stage coach trip, like seeing the elephant on a visit to the circus, was the event of a life.

Nathan Howes, who put a cloth roof over the circus, was a wire walker in his younger days, traveling from town to town exhibiting his skill in hotel dining rooms at a shilling a head. He was in himself “the whole show” and when he appeared before twenty paying people assembled with the landlords family and the help admitted free he was “doing a good business.”

It was some years before Aron Turner and “Uncle” Nate Howes” called off the mounted advance agent and replaced him with the bill wagon and the advertisers buggy. Paste took the place of tacks to fasten the bills. The wooden curb ring that was hauled about the country in sections and the man on horse back ahead of the show, lingered long after the abandonment of the sidewall topless circus.  He exhibited under a sixty-foot round top which would not make a dressing-room for a circus of today. This innovation had seats four tier high and a twenty-foot dressing room; also a four-horse band-wagon. Undoubtedly competitors gave the enterprising manager a wide berth and avoided his chosen territory. —Circus in the Days of Old

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Related reading

Before Rooney’s Pool House There Was..

The Boy that Ran Away to the Circus and Other Stories

When the Circus came to Carleton Place

The Continuing Curse of William Street in Carleton Place

What Happened the Day the Circus Left Carleton Place

Just Beat It! Carnival Riot in Carleton Place at Riverside Park

The Horses of Carleton Place– Wonder if they ever had a Merlin?

My Greatest Summer Show on Earth!

Falling Through the Cracks at Work

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Example of a trap door – not a trap door at the Rosamond Mill

Dec 1, 1886–Almonte Gazette

One day last week Mr. William. Smith,  who was a superintendent of the Rosamond Woollen Mill, had a very narrow escape from what might have proved to be a very serious, if not a fatal accident.

While walking through one of the lower rooms of the mill he stepped into an open trap door but his arms caught on the floor and prevented him front going entirely through. He was quickly extricated from his perilous position. Had he gone through, his escape from instant death could only have been averted by a miracle, as he would have dropped on some machinery underneath and perished.

 

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Photo–Virtual Reference LibraryBook cover of Frost and Woods Works, Smiths Falls, Ont

 

 

Nov 16 1888– Almonte Gazette

Mr. Hugh McGillivray, while working on Frost & Wood’s new storehouse at Smith’s Falls, fell between two joists the floor and broke two ribs. A board on which he was standing gave way caused the accident.

 

Author’s Note-

Many old mills did not have stairs- just trap doors and ladders. Sometimes there was the odd hidden mattress under a trap door for those hoping to take a snooze working long hours.

In doing research for trap doors a Miss Jones from Leeds UK is doing trap door art. I kid you not.

OLD WOOL MILL COLLECTION – TRAP DOOR OPEN

 

The Rosamond Woolen Company’s Constipation Blues

The Bomb Girls of Smiths Falls

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

 

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

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Woollen Mill Party

In view of the claim that a people and its times often are best reflected in its songs, a Christmas Eve supper party given by the Rosamonds to their employees of 1863 may be worth recalling.  Its chairman was Thomas Watchorn, formerly of Carleton Place and later of Lanark and Merrickville.

A song by a member of the party was given between each toast after the supper, ending with the glee club’s Christmas carols at midnight.  The offerings of Mr. Hepworth, the principal performer, included: The Cottage by the Sea, Dearest Mary, Little Tailor, The Factory Bell, A Merry Ploughboy, A Kish of Black Turf, Young Ramble Away, Stunnin’ Pair o’Legs, and The Sailor’s Grave.

Mr. Lowe offered Hard Times Come Again No More ; Mr. Douglas gave I’ll Marry Both Girls Bye and Bye, and J. Dornegan The Wedding of Ballyporeen.  The Irish wit *George Bond contributed I’ll Never Get Drunk Again.   Did you know that George Bond, born in Carleton Place in 1837, was still singing in a celebration of his hundredth birthday by relatives and friends at his home in the Clyde Hotel in Lanark in 1937, when he “concluded the happy event by singing, in a fine clear tenor voice, When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door.”)

For the Christmas party of the men of the Almonte woollen mill, in the time of local recruiting and Canadian defense preparations which accompanied the progress of the United States Civil War, a fitting conclusion with the national anthem was guest Dr. William Mostyn’s The Banner of Old England.

 

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historicalnotes

Within Almonte Rosamond behaved in the traditional manner of local patriarchs. He was active in municipal affairs, as a township councillor and reeve and in the 1880s as mayor of Almonte; in addition, he was chairman of the Board of Education. He donated to the town a hospital, named after himself, supported St Paul’s Church (Anglican), and was involved in a plan to conserve the upper waters of the Mississippi. Toward his factory workers he could be benign, treating them to Christmas parties, sponsoring a choir, and providing them with a “spacious croquet lawn.” In return, he expected and generally received their support for his ventures into politics.  Dictionary of Canadian Biography

*George Bond-

George Bond and Catherine Perritt were married at Carleton Place, April 15th., 1858 by
the late Rev. Mr. Holdcroft.   The groomsman was Mr. J. Griffith and the bridesmaid Miss
Mary McCallum, sister of Mrs. H. Wilson of this village.   The bridesmaid of that long ago
happy event is still living; she is now Mr. Wm Moore of Brockville.   The happy couple
went to reside in Perth, where they remained three years, proceeding to Almonte, Mr. Bond
taking a position with the Rosmond Woolen Co. which he filled for fifteen years.   All of
the family were born in Almonte, except the youngest (George), who first saw the light of day
in Pakenham, to which place they moved from Almonte, Mr. Bond to take charge of a woolen
mill for Hilliard, Dickson and Lorimer.   In July, 1870, the family came to Lanark, which
has been their home ever since, with the exception of a few years spent in Connecticut, U.S.A.
The family are: Mrs. James N. Dobbie and Mrs. R. R. Drysdale, Lanark; Wm.H. at Aitken,
Minn,; George in Spokane, Wash.; Joseph, deceased
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