Tag Archives: rivers

The Lakes of Lanark County

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The Lakes of Lanark County

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I always question where is where and people have to help me out. Thanks to the school books from Doris Blackburn we have this great map of  reference where we know which lake or body of water is where in Lanark County.

 

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 - Daring rescue brings reward ALMONTE (Special)...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 10 May 1978, Wed,
  3. [First] REVISION,
  4. Page 3 - Mississippi canoe event set for May 22 CARLETON...

    Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 10 May 1978, Wed,
    3. [First] REVISION,
    4. Page 3

     - a poa- for PRIEST CHASED LIKE A THIEF Exporteoe...

  5. Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 14 Feb 1906, Wed - a teen-aged WINTER OR SUMMER, they pull some...

      Clipped from

      1. The Ottawa Journal,
      2. 21 Feb 1959, Sat,
      3. Page 14 - , . FROM PERTH, we have received a brief...

        Clipped from

        1. The Ottawa Journal,
        2. 07 Feb 1959, Sat,
        3. Page 11

        Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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        Tales from Lake Park– A Disabled Motor and Manslaughter

      4. Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

      5. Family Photos– Mississippi Lake– Darlene Page

Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

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Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

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Photos by Bill and Carole Flint= The Sky Pilots

A disappearing stream or subterranean (under Tim Horton’s Franktown Road) is the term used to describe a stream or a river, which flows into a sinkhole or a crack. There is a geological reason for this vanishing act: the bedrock under Tim Horton’s on Franktown Road is made of early Carboniferous (around 325-360 million years old) limestone. Limestone is prone to dissolving when it comes into contact with slightly acidic rain water, creating of fissures, sinkholes, and underground channels and caves (Pike Hole) that surface water can escape into.

In the past the stream flowed down Rochester Street where memories of opening up basement windows to let the flood streams go through are still talked about. Then it flows under my house (Springside Hall on Lake Ave E.) where in the Spring before we bought it and installed sump pumps after the first Spring the basement waters would be about 4-5 feet deep.

From there it flows into the old stream at the bottom of Lisgar Street where that stream was once a lot bigger. Big enough to warrant a small bridge on Lake Ave East where there was a small bridge near Beckwith Street. The staff at Nichols/Waugh used to clean their work tools in the stream on a daily basis on the corner of Lake Ave East.

But, where does it come back to the surface again? It is commonly stated that it reappears a few miles downstream and flows out at the arena. I asked our popular photographer John Rayner to shoot some photos, if he was near the arena, so we can see where it finally flows out into the Mississippi River.

So thanks to John here it is.

All Photos courtesy of John Rayner ac-pic-sm

These are just some of his fabulous photos–see the rest his Lanark Couty photos here on his blog The AC is Always On..

                      Go to about where there is a path between the ball fields.
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That scene above was to my back as I looked at the drain pipe.pipe (metal) below.
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There is another drain pipe (plastic) to the left as you look toward the river from the path, but it didn’t look as though it had discharged anything for awhile.
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I was able to go down the embankment to look back at the drain pipe (the metal one).
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A young nimble-footed person might have been able to get to where your stream enters the Mississippi, but I am neither young nor nimble, so I took a few photos back up on the trail, all to the right (toward the arena) of the drain pipe above. You can see where they meet up below, with your stream being on the foreground.
​All Photos courtesy of John Rayner
So that’s all I’ve got for you. You might see better later in the fall when all of the leaves have fallen.
I didn’t know about this, so it was fun to explore and find it.
Thanks John!!
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 I grew up on Lake Ave. E. in the last war time house. We played in treasure valley a lot. Spring time we would build a raft in the pond in the valley and skate on it in the winter. Summers we played house at the ledges of rock going into the valley. One time some boys had bows and arrows. The end of the arrow had a nail on it. As we were running home guess who got an arrow in her little behind. That’s right me!
historicalnotes
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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-This map dates to 1868 with updates in red done in 1873. Rochester Street didn’t exist in 1868 “This has become the division line by length of occupation”. The name Rochester is penciled in red in the 1873 update along with “this part of Street laid out by third parties”.

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum The stream crossing under 12 Con. (now Lake Avenue East) had A BRIDGE! (at the corner of Beckwith Street). This stream still runs, mostly underground, but is visible in backyards along Argyle Street, and then again along Sussex Avenue.

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Is that part of Tannery Creek? This is the barn where Canadian Tire was..

Peter Iveson- There was Tannery Creek– it emerged on the east side of Beckwith Street and ran between the MacDougal House and where Canadian Tire was, then run under the CPR tracks and eventually went through the old dump and into The Mississippi River.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

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Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–
Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

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Channeling John Gillies

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John Gillies was born in 1811 on Scotland. In 1822 he came to Canada with his father, brother, and sister settling on a bush farm in Lanark.  His mother and remaining family came a year later.  It was a hard existence for them, with the lay of the land making them struggle for existence. However,the frugality of a Scotsman, and the perseverance, overcame all obstacles. In 1836 Gillies struck out for himself and created a bush farm. In 1838 Gillies engaged in a lumbering operation and also wool carding and cloth dressing machines.

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In 1872 he disposed of his mill property and moved to Carleton Place. He still owned the lumbering enterprise with Peter McLaren. Gillies ended up retiring—sold his share to McLaren and established a foundry for the manufacture of mill machinery and steam engines. He erected this building in 1875 for that purpose. The building was originally 4 stories and they also used the blacksmith shop next door.  He was also a senior member of Gillies Son & Co Manufacturers of woolen fabrics.  At 77, he was like our local Mr. Tom Cavanagah and still running the show. Gillies made a specialty manufacture of Shipman and Acme automatic steam engines using coal for fuel. They had exclusive control of the patents on these engines in the Dominion of Canada.

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The company was known for their neatness, simplicity and cleanliness. They were also beloved for their many company “pleasure parties” so they would not have the annoyance a of labour disruption. They had many catalogues and circulars — none of which have been seen by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum. It was also added that their firms engines and boilers were exempt from government inspection.

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In 1908  the town of Carleton Place loaned Messrs Bates and Innes ten thousand dollars extending over a ten year period of time and exemption from taxation except for school purposes to start the manufacture of knitted felt goods in what was known as gillies mills. After it closed it served purpose to many companies and no word if the town got their money back. Working hours for the winter season at the woollen mill of Gillies & Son & Company were from 7 a.m. to 6.15 p.m. with closing time one hour earlier on Saturdays.

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Here are the maps of the bridges and how they made a man made channel for the Mississippi River to flow next to their building. Later on in years it was filled in with limestone.

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As you can see they made a man made channel for the river to follow right up against the building and by Bill Bagg’s which was the Blacksmith’s shops. There were originally three bridges. This map shows only the Gillies Mill channel.

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Some photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

 - coa-alderably HEAVY LOSS IN A VALLEY TOWN Ten...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Mar 1906, Tue,  Page 1

 

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place