Tag Archives: respect

Respecting Each Other in Canada – Skyler Seccaspina

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Respecting Each Other in Canada – Skyler Seccaspina

Photo Taryn Card

My son wrote this from his heart – whether you agree with it or not is up to you – well written Sky we are all suffering in one way or another – We should all be working together as one.

Written by Skyler Seccaspina

I stood along the 417 in Ottawa with my family and waved my Canadian flag for four & a half hours today. I hadn’t seen that much highway action since Ryan Hawkins and I played ‘follow the Good Housekeeping’ on highway 29 back in grade 6 (his grandmother, Isabelle, put an end to that pretty quickly🤣).

It is incredible to think of how divided we’ve become as a country, a country that was once a benchmark for unity. Yes, I agree, it starts at the top. It’s hard to think of a leader in the history of this country who has divided so many Canadians. Blame it on whoever you want, though. At the end of the day we all control ourselves. We control our thoughts and how we express them.

I’m always reminded of the days when my Nonna would tell me to SHHHHH!! Or, even my dad’s advice that he would instill in me as a kid: “Keep your mouth shut!”They were right. If I didn’t have something nice to say, I shouldn’t say it at all.

It’s hard to hold back though, and for everyone that is true, especially in the situation we find ourselves in. We’ve all had our fair share of COVID discussions with one another. We’ve been heated. We’ve been keyboard warriors. Even if we disagree though, for the most part, we listen. It’s been frustrating, lonely, and hopeless. We’re struggling, especially our kids. In what was supposed to be “2 weeks to flatten the curve” almost two years ago, we seem to have arrived at a crossroads.

Everyone has an opinion on how and when we should move on from this pandemic. Some folks are already done with it, while some are still isolating themselves from the rest of the world. Opinions are so far entrenched in some that they are determined to stay in their narrative, regardless of the facts.

We have politicians, national/independent news outlets and social media all telling us different things.We aren’t all going to agree on the right time to move on, but we should respect each other. We should respect everyone’s choices, regardless of how they makes us feel. After all, we are all going to get out of this at once, together.

Don’t Make Me Use my Senior Citizen Voice! By Linda Knight Seccaspina

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Don’t Make Me Use my Senior Citizen Voice! By Linda Knight Seccaspina

Don’t Make Me Use my Senior Citizen Voice! By Linda Knight Seccaspina

A few weeks ago I received a note from a top Canadian Bank advising me that once I turned 70 on July 24, that my ‘insurance’ on  one of my investments, or was it a loan, would be cut off.  My son explained it to me like this:”cash surrender value on the policy”. I still don’t get it.

Frankly, I never expected with my inherited health lineage to live this long, but here I am.  But why did the bank pick the age of 70? People typically lose almost one-half inch in height every 10 years after the age of 40. Height loss is even more rapid after age 70. There is no doubt I am shorter, but was that one of the reasons? Three inches shorter at the bank counter and not making honest eye level with the teller anymore?

We know being a senior is not all unicorns and rainbows, but was I really going to drop dead the day after 70 and therefore be uninsurable?  Maybe when I walked into the bank one day they saw my foot that has been swollen since the birth of son number one 36 years ago and realized I wear a normal shoe on one foot and a shoe box on the other. Maybe the crepey skin on my arms caught their attention. That word “crepey” is still a new one to me.

The day I turned 60 was an important milestone for me with the same bank and they sent me several letters of warm congratulations. In the lovely letters they thanked me for being a devoted client for many years. In recognition of turning 60 they were going to give me a monthly rebate of $4.00 on my monthly fees. That’s right! Instead of charging me $13.95 a month I would be paying $9.95 instead.

I sat there and wondered what I would be able to do with the extra $4.00 savings each month. Would $4.00 buy me a package of Depends down the road? As I continued to read the letter they also told me that my banking needs might change over time, yet they never mentioned the word “70”.  The popular bank also reminded me that it was an important time in my life now and they wanted to help me reach my goals.

Goals?

What goals?

Triathlons?

Freshman College?

If I can get up in the morning and walk and talk at the same time I am on a roll for the day. So thank you dear bank for being so concerned. But now ten years later it seems to be another story. Honestly, if you think about it I am really 18 years old with 52 years experience— or 21 in celsius.  Honestly, I feel like maybe I should put up a for sale sign that says : “For Sale- 70 year-old, needs parts, but only one owner”.

When I became a town councillor I got involved with senior advocacy groups as I have always felt seniors feel less important, and they shouldn’t. Even as a teenager when I volunteered at the Nesbitt Senior Residence in Cowansville I knew the seniors felt they were being ignored and that our society values young folks more. Did you know ageism is one of the most tolerated forms of discrimination in Canada?

I was telling my friend Toby that seniors are now treated like trying to insure any home built before 1920 and he agreed. He said, “seniors make some people nervous and twitchy” and he is right. As Dr. Seuss wrote: “You’re Only Old Once” and life does not end when wage earning capacity ends. My mind is still functioning and so is my fashion wardrobe. I am still young at heart, but slightly older in some places. I am never going to change and one day I want to be that little old lady that puts vodka in the IV bags at the retirement home.  

Yes, we sometimes stumble, we suffer and we transcend, but we are positive, still have our sense of humour, and need some respect. If things do get better with age— then my fellow seniors, we are all approaching magnificence– and please don’t forget our discounts!

Related reading

Since When did the Word “Senior” Become a Dirty Word?

Being Old is No Place for Sissies! Part 2

Being Old is No Place for Sissies

Did You Know About the Golden Girls Act? BILL 69– More Homes, More Choice: Ontario’s Housing Supply Action Plan

All I am Asking for is a Little Respect!

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lousie

I got this photo from the Delmer Dunlop collection at Archives Lanark on Saturday. I knew I had to compose a story for it as this picture from 1893 needed to be documented. This is Lanark Village! BTW I am pretty sure that is the Cohen General Store on the left we are seeking information about. Here is the story about something we are lacking in our society.

                                     All I am Asking for is a Little Respect!

Lucy trudged across the Main Street of Lanark Village and was angry that her playground friends continually disrespected her. Maybe she had set herself up to the unfortunate point of being made fun of that day. Who needs emotional target practice? The toddler also didn’t want to remind them again that they were getting what they deserved when she cursed them.

Attempting to become head of the playground she roared defiantly,”You’re going to respect me,” Lucy said. She hit the outdoor slide with her fist and continued, “I demand respect because I am grown”. “I am sick of it and I am not playing with you anymore”.

Maybe it did sound a little harsh when she complained to her Mother that day. However her sensible Mother quickly interjected and said the only way things were going to change is if everyone organized their thoughts together. That was, and always has been the only way to create real and meaningful change.

Lucy stamped her feet in defiance and said that her friends were getting what they deserved. Her Mother immediately made it clear that one does not ‘demand respect’, respect is earned. You also don’t obtain it by banging your fists publicly in a childish manner. Again, if you have to demand it, you must not have earned it.

There should be no need for a power struggle in the playground when it is clear what everyone’s role is, said Lucy’s Mother. Compromise, play together and move on! She also reminded Lucy to ask herself what she had brought to the table and what steps to negotiate with her various friends had she taken as a leader.  Her mother patted Lucy on the head and gently said, ” Every single person in this world should always remember that successful leaders are servants, not dictators”.

 

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