Tag Archives: recipes

The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario Cookbook

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The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario Cookbook

Click here-– for cookbook

Addie’s Apples II

About a year ago, I shared a couple of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless’ apple recipes with you. Click on this link if you’d like to re-read that post.

This year, I want to share with you (read: brag about) my recent triumph in the pie-making department. One of the members of the Women Inspiring Women WI is a prize-winning pastry maker. Elaine Tully will hold a couple of workshops later this fall for our WI, but first she wanted to have a technical rehearsal at the church kitchen. There I made my first ever peach pie. OH. EM. GEE. as they say. It was wonderful good!

Yesterday, I made an apple pie using Addie’s Apples. Literally. These apples were picked from the trees at the Homestead.

My hubby tried an apple fresh and found them rather tart. When I told him that I had made a pie he asked, “Did you put in lots of sugar?” Of course, I did, we’re talking brown sugar here!

The secret to success? Cold ingredients and limit handling: keys to fantastic pie crust. I used the pie crust recipe on the Crisco box and Edna Staebler’s Double Crust Apple Pie filling, copied here:

  • 3 cups of peeled, cored, and sliced apples (I used 4 cups. Next time I will use more – the crust to fruit ratio can use some tweaking)

Toss the apples in with the following:

  • 2/3 to 1 cup sugar, depending on tartness of apples
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg (I omitted this – too lazy to grate the nutmeg)
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Place in pie shell and dot with

  • 2 or 3 tablespoons of butter
  • 2 tablespoons of milk or cream

Cover with the top crust, flute edges, and slash the top to create vents for steam to escape.

Bake at 375 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes until the crusts are a pale golden colour.

***

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

I still have this cookbook but some do not and have asked where they can get one.. It is all online now and you can Click here- to get those fabulous recipes and you can also see their blog also..

D & L Slade Co.– Way of Housekeeping Larry Clark — A Tide Mill

Was the Butter Tart Really Invented in Barrie, Ontario? Jaan Kolk Files

Favourite Recipes from Drummond Central School

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Easy Christmas Cake- Lanark County Recipes

Holiday Popcorn– Lanark County Recipes

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipe

Gluten Free–

Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? Pastry Chef Ben White

“Sex in the Pan” Memories – A RIP Fashion Violation Photo Essay

Katherine Hepburn Did Eat Brownies

I Want Them to Bite into a Cookie and Think of Me and Smile

D & L Slade Co.– Way of Housekeeping Larry Clark — A Tide Mill

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D & L Slade Co.– Way of Housekeeping Larry Clark — A Tide Mill

Larry Clark

In 1775 the mill provided a footnote to the American Revolution. One of the earliest naval engagements of the war took place near the mill, and its gates prevented the British from sailing up Mill Creek and coming within firing range of Chelsea.
Henry Slade had bought into the mill in 1827, and the innovation introduced in his time was the grinding of tobacco into snuff to supplement corn. As Henry’s children David, Levi and Charles took an interest in the business, they – especially David – wanted to let their new ideas and ambition increase the business.
For one year, Henry turned the mill over to the hard-working David, who increased the mill’s profits to $500 until the older generation stepped back in. But soon David took charge again, creating the D & L Slade Co. with brother Levi. It would for more than 100 years turn out spices for New England home and professional kitchens

 

HISTORY

Re: D&L Slade Company Boston, Massachusetts

By genealogy.com user September 30, 2000 at 07:43:06

Henry Slade (born 1791) purchased an old mill in Revere that was powered by tidewater.This mill has burned down TWICE, so the poor building that is falling to ruin currently is more modern than Henry’s mill.He used the mill to grind snuff, since he sold tobacco products.He turned over the use of part of the mill to two of his sons, Charles (born 1816) and David (born 1819), and they began to grind spice for wholesale grocers as Slade Spice Company.Charles eventually left the company and was replaced by his brother Levi (born in 1822)and D & L Slade was formed.When Levi died in 1884, the company incorporated, with David, Wilbur L. Slade (son of Levi), Herber L. Slade (son of Levi), and Henry Dillingham (son-in-law of David and husband of Anna Jeanette, David’s daughter, of course).They began to buy spice and sell it, and since they were sticklers for quality, they did very well and the company grew rapidly.They refused to put fillers in their spice, and they soon became the largest seller of unadulterated spice (something that was hard to find in those days).Besides the mill in Revere, they had a factory in Chelsea, and offices in Boston.When Bell Seasoning’s went on the market, they purchased that company, which had also been family-owned, but they retained the name of Bell’s on all its packages.Somehow the same nicety was not extended to the Slade’s brand when it was finally acquired by a large food corporation, and the Slade’s Spice name no longer exists.

THE SLADE MILL

The mill was one of several tide mills dotting the New England coast – an innovation that some say originated in the area. Tide mills worked by using a set of flood gates. When the tide surged in, the flood gates swung open to allow the ocean water to fill the marsh and mill pond. When the tide turned and began to exit the marsh, the gates closed, trapping the water. From this impounded water the mill drew off a steady stream to turn its machinery – similar to the way a mill on a river used the flow to drive its works.

Tide mill - Wikipedia

In 1918 Slade would make the investment that keeps its legacy alive today. It bought out the Bell’s Seasoning Company. In 1867, William Bell had begun selling his blend of poultry seasoning through his market in Boston. Bell had started as a grocer in Lowell, Mass. before moving south to Boston where he could buy spices directly off the ships arriving in port.

Over the next 40 years Bell continually expanded the popularity of his Bell’s Seasoning – a blend of rosemary, ginger, oregano, sage and marjoram – until his sudden death at age 76. Sensing opportunity, Slade purchased the brand, but wisely did nothing to change the name or formula. Instead, he  incorporated Bell’s into his own lineup, which had expanded to baking powders, cumin, pepper and a wide range of spices. The company promoted them in its own cookbook.

The Slade name finally disappeared from the grocery shelves in the 1970s when the Slade family sold the company. Only the Bell’s brand name remains today – touted by a wide range of cooks as still the best poultry seasoning for a Thanksgiving turkey.

The Slade Mill, though, still lives on. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, its owners converted it to apartments in 2004.

Hat tip to: The Spice Mill on the Marsh by Thomas P. Smith

The Boston Globe
Boston, Massachusetts
07 Nov 1919, Fri  •  Page 16

Comments from Larry Clark

Drove from North Bay to Ottawa with a wedding cake for my sister in law. My wife baked the cake (3 layers) and had it iced professionally here. The baker was a little dubious when told of our mission but completed the cake. Everything went well until the time to cut the cake. They ended up using a hammer on the knife to break the cake open. The cake (and icing, when you managed to soften it) was delicious. Larry Clark

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Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

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Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

1. Easter Bunny Cake recipe (1950)

1953 Easter egg cake recipe

A feather in your Easter bonnet — this luscious Easter bunny cake… Best cake you’ve baked in a month of Easter Sundays… and you… yes, you… can take all the glory!

Ingredients

1/2 cup Dexo (shortening)
2-1/4 cups sifted cake flour
3 teaspoons double-action baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1% cups sugar
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 eggs, unbeaten

Directions

Measure shortening into bowl. Sift dry ingredients onto shortening. Add vanilla to milk. Add 2/3 of the milk.

Blend and beat 1 minute (count at least 150 strokes per minute). Add remaining 1/3 milk. Add eggs. Beat 2 minutes. Bake in two greased and floured deep 8-inch layer pans in moderate oven, 375° F for 25 to 30 minutes.

When cool, frost with butter frosting. Color coconut green, using vegetable coloring. Place on top of cake.

Arrange Easter candy bunny on coconut. Decorate with colored jelly beans.

Vintage Easter bunny cake recipe from 1950

Bake Swan’s Down Yellow Cake Mix in two 8-inch layers, following directions on package. Make Easy Chocolate Frosting, using the recipe on the back of the blue and yellow package of Baker’s Unsweetened Chocolate.

1. Cut each cake layer in two, about 1/4-inch off-center. This will make two large and two smaller pieces.

2. Place these four pieces together with frosting between them, the smaller pieces on the outside. Stand them upright, cut sides down, on a cake plate.

3. Trim the outside pieces at the top outer edges to help round off sides of cake for egg shape.

4. Then trim off lower ends of outside pieces, slicing diagonally, to give cake an oval shape at base.

Cover the whole mound with remaining frosting, filling in to make an egg shape. Decorate with white and tinted frosting and jelly beans. Make a nest of green-tinted Baker’s Coconut around egg. To serve, cut across the egg, making four-layer slices of cake.

When I go to a family reunion, or maybe church homecoming, THIS is the type of Coconut Cake I want to see on the dessert table.  One look, and you can tell it was made by a dear, older Mother or Grandmother, that’s been baking for years.  Sure, she wants it to look good, but she’s more concerned about how it tastes.

There might have been a day, years ago, when she could make her cake look like something in a bakery window.  Now, the years have taken a toll on her body.  Her hands shake a bit these days, as she adjusts layers and spreads the icing.  Her legs just don’t have the strength to stand at her table, and work and fuss with it like she once did. She has to take frequent breaks lately, just to rest awhile, so she can work on it a little bit more.

As a young child, she learned how to make this cake standing beside her own mother.  She’s never used a recipe, but now, her mind continues to wonder if she’s somehow forgotten a key ingredient.

All through the years, she’s heard people talk about how great her cakes are.  She just smiles, often looking downward as if embarrassed, but her heart is made happy as she tenderly says, “Thank You.”

Out the corner of their eye, everybody seems to watch when they realize her cake is being brought in. Some even strain their neck a bit, to see exactly where it gets placed among the others on the long table. You know hers will be the first empty cake plate on that table, and you have already schemed up a plan to get a slice.  Heaven forbid if someone should take the last piece before you get yours.

My mother made a great Coconut Cake, one that was similar to this one. Her icing was more of a clear type and you could clearly see the layers beneath that frosting and the layer of coconut spread on top. In the earlier years, she always used a fresh coconut, grating it by hand. She would always hand me the small leftover pieces that she didn’t grate, and that was like pure candy in my book.

Cake Ingredients: Sungold Coconut Cake

  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 1 cup Butter, at room temperature
  • 4 Eggs, separated
  • 1 cup Evaporated Milk
  • 3 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 3 teaspoons Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • Pinch of Salt

Coconut Cream Icing

  • 3 cups Coconut
  • 3 cups Confectioners’ Sugar
  • 8 Tablespoons Heavy Cream, approximately.
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350ºF.

  1. Place flour, baking powder, and pinch of salt, in a sifter.
  2. Sift three times. Set aside.
  3. Place butter in a large mixing bowl.
  4. Add Sugar.
  5. Beat butter and sugar to a smooth cream consistency.
  6. Separate the egg yolks from the whites, set whites aside.
  7. Beat the egg yolks well.
  8. Add egg yolks to the butter and sugar mixture and beat until very light.
  9. Add the sifted flour, alternating with the milk, to the first mixture, mix to combine.
  10. Beat the egg whites to a stiff froth.
  11. Add the vanilla extract to the batter mixture.
  12. Gently fold in the egg whites to the batter.
  13. Butter and flour two 9 inch cake layer pans.
  14. Divide the batter between the two pans.
  15. Bake at 350ºF for 20-25 minutes, or until done.
  16. Insert a wooden toothpick or skewer in the center of the baked layer. If it pulls out clean, cake is done.
  17. Remove from oven, place on a wire rack, let cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan.
  18. Let layers cool completely.
  19. Prepare layers as desired before frosting.

To Make The Icing and Assemble The Cake

  1. Place sugar in a medium size mixing bowl.
  2. Add the cream, a little at a time, beating steadily.
  3. Add Vanilla.
  4. When icing is of the right consistency, spread over the top of the layer.
  5. Sprinkle a good layer of coconut on top of layer.
  6. Repeat with the next layer.
  7. Ice the final layer and sides of the cake.
  8. Cover the entire cake with remaining coconut.
  9. Serve and Enjoy!

ow to make an Easter Bunny cake:

This is a cake that my mom used to make for us on Easter Saturday from a pattern she found in a magazine back in the early 70’s. It’s simple and clever: one round cake serves as the bunny face and two simple slices in a second cake create the ears and a bow tie. You then frost, cover the imperfections with coconut (that’s what I do), and decorate with goodies.

Bunny cake diagram

This is the diagram from the old magazine clipping.

Bunny cake diagram


Mom used to frost the cake with boiled icing which looks lovely and bunny-like. I haven’t yet learned to make boiled frosting so use a simple white frosting instead. You’ll need a good 4 cups of icing to ice the cake.

Make your bunny cake with this molasses devil’s food cake

Easy creamy icing

1/4 cup soft butter

3 Tbsp milk

1 tsp vanilla

3-4 cups of icing sugar

Cream the butter with the milk and vanilla. Add the icing sugar one cup at a time until you get a spreadable consistency.

**You’ll need to double the recipe to fully frost a layer cake.

Related reading

‘Pet De Soeurs’ or Nun’s Pastries

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Easy Christmas Cake- Lanark County Recipes

Holiday Popcorn– Lanark County Recipes

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipe

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Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? Pastry Chef Ben White

“Sex in the Pan” Memories – A RIP Fashion Violation Photo Essay

Katherine Hepburn Did Eat Brownies

‘Pet De Soeurs’ or Nun’s Pastries

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‘Pet De Soeurs’ or Nun’s Pastries

 

“pet-de-soeurs” the leftover crust butter and brown sugar sweets which would never make it to the table before I gobbled them up. recipe from

3 cups flour

 1 cup lard

 1/2 teaspoon salt

 1 large egg, beaten

 5 tablespoons cold water

 1 teaspoon vinegar

 Butter, enough to spread over dough

 1 1/2 cups brown sugar

 2 teaspoons cinnamon

Step 1

Cut together flour, lard and salt until it resembles small peas.

Step 2

Combine the egg, water and vinegar and gradually add to flour mixture.

Step 3

Stir just until moistened and a soft dough forms.

Step 4

Wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Step 5

Roll out dough into 2 squares.

Step 6

Spread butter all over dough.

Step 7

Sprinkle brown sugar and cinnamon over butter and spread out evenly.

Step 8

Roll dough into logs and cut into 1/2 inch thick pinwheels.

Step 9

Place on parchment paper lined baking sheets.

Step 10

Bake in a preheated 350 degree Fahrenheit oven for 20 minutes.

Step 11

Cool completely and enjoy.

Favourite Recipes from Drummond Central School

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Easy Christmas Cake- Lanark County Recipes

Holiday Popcorn– Lanark County Recipes

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipe

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Recipes, Clippings and Ephemera — Old Burnside

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Recipes, Clippings and Ephemera — Old Burnside

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1994, Wed  •  Page 48
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 May 1914, Fri  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Oct 1931, Sat  •  Page 16
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Apr 1934, Tue  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Apr 1923, Sat  •  Page 6

Did you Know Old Burnside has a Ghostly Horse?

The Menzies House

Who was the Almonte Ghost of 1886?

photos-almonte.com
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1994, Wed  •  Page 48

‘Poverty and Oysters Always Seem to Go Together’– and Beans

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‘Poverty and Oysters Always Seem to Go Together’– and Beans

1880's HALF A DOZEN OYSTERS HERE WE ARE SIR VICTORIAN MERIT CARD*AUBRY LITHO

 

As ‘Dickens’ Sam Weller remarks in the Pickwick papers:
‘Poverty and oysters always seem to go together’.

 

What is with the Victorian obsession with oysters?—slimy rubber creatures that have no place in my menu. When I was a child, my father used to be in charge of the Cowansville Trinity Church’s annual Oyster Dinner. You would think they were serving filet minion the way his eyes lit up when the day approached.

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 Photo January 1900 CP Herald
Found by Josh Greer- and property of Lisa Occomore and Brad Occomore of Valley Granite & Tile

Basically oysters with a  good pot of baked beans was the food of the poor, and the poorer you were the more oysters you would put in your pie and the beans in your pot. Oysters were plenty, the smaller ones sold as fast food while the bigger ones were put in
stews and pies to make up for the deficiency of meat. It was a cheap source of protein.

 

Image may contain: food and indoor

Photo from The Grand Hotel–2017


Oysters were also a typical food to be found in public houses and the local pubs where they were most commonly served with a pint of stout. Stout beers were popular because of their strong flavour, higher alcohol content, longer shelf life and because they were cheaper than other beers. The claims of Stout being a nutritious drink made the
pairing with oysters and a side of beans the perfect cheap meal for the working class on their way home with their wages.

 

Photo would not come up will find later

 Photo January 1900 CP Herald
Found by Josh Greer- and property of Lisa Occomore and Brad Occomore of Valley Granite & Tile.. Mrs Love was located at the Good Food Co. and she began the famous Italian Candys. Margaret Love -From Sweet to Sour

 

 

 

 

Clipped from The Weekly Hawk Eye,  08 Feb 1883, Thu,  Page 4

 

 

December 17 1890

 

December 19 189

 

Image result for recipes png

Scalloped Oysters

  • 1 quart shucked oysters in their liquor
  • 2 cups coarsely crushed saltine crackers
  • 1 cup dry bread crumbs
  • 3/4 cup melted butter
  • 1 cup cream
  • Nutmeg
  • Salt and pepper
  • Celery salt, optional

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Pick oysters free of any shells.

In a deep buttered casserole, mix together crackers, bread crumbs, and melted butter. Place a thin layer of crumb mixture in the bottom of the casserole. Cover it with half of the oysters. Season cream with nutmeg, salt, pepper and celery salt (if using). Pour half of this mixture over the oysters. On the next layer, use the oysters, 3/4 of the remaining crumb mixture and cover that with seasoned cream. Top with the remaining crumbs. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until lightly browned.

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

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Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

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Favourite Recipes from Drummond Central School

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Favourite Recipes from Drummond Central School

 

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Drawing by Paula Lentz Grade 6–circa 80s

This was an old early 80’s book I rescued at the St. John’s Rummage Sale in Perth. Missing a back cover and in bad shape but still has lots of love to share.

 

Chocolate Marshmallow Clusters– Fruit and Nut Clusters–Drew Gray Kindergarten Class–circa 80s

  •  1 can Eagle Brand
  • 1 (12 oz.) pkg.
  • 1 tbsp peanut butter
  • 3 c. miniature marshmallows
  • 1/2 c candied cherries
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • Combine Eagle Brand milk and chocolate chips and peanut butter in large saucepan.
  • Allow chips to melt over very low heat, stirring constantly until chips are melted and mixed completely. Let cool until lukewarm, gradually fold in marshmallows, raisins and candied cherries until covered with chocolate.
  • Spoon onto waxed paper ( lightly spread some butter on the wax paper, so no sticking) in small clusters.
  • Let stand at room temperature, then chill in refrigerator to set.

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Illustration by John Wright Grade 5 –Circa 80s

 

 

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Easy Oatmeal Bread– Mrs. Elizabeth Mittler- Kindergarten Teacher

  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 2 Tbsp dry yeast
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 2/3 cup Molasses
  • 6 cups flour

Instructions:

  1. In a large bowl combine butter, salt and rolled oats.
  2. Pour the 2 cups of boiling water over the rolled oats mixture. Cool to lukewarm.
  3. In a small bowl combine the 1 cup warm water and sugar. Stir in yeast then add to the cooled oat mixture.
  4. Mix in molasses.
  5. Gradually add flour. (You may need to turn the dough out onto the counter to incorporate the final cup or two of flour.)
  6. Divide dough in half, shape into loaves and place in two greased loaf pans.
  7. Cover with a clean dishtowel and let rise until doubled in bulk (about 1.5 hours, but really depends on how warm your kitchen is).
  8. Bake at 350 F for 45 minutes to an hour, until loaves sound hollow when tapped.
  9. Remove from pans to cool.

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Jun 1977, Wed,  Page 61

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

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Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

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Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

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“Sex in the Pan” Memories – A RIP Fashion Violation Photo Essay

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Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

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Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–By June MacMillan–From the Kitchens of Lanark County 2003

boston-baked-beans-horiz-a-2000.jpg

  • 1 pound (2 to 2 1/4 cups) dry white beans such as Navy beans or Great Northern beans
  • 1/3 cup molasses (not black strap)
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp dry mustard
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 5 cups hot water
  • 1/2 pound salt pork (can sub bacon), cut into 1/2-inch to 1-inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion, (1 1/2 cups) chopped

 

1 Soak beans in water: Place beans in a large pot and cover with 2 inches of water. Soak overnight and drain. Alternatively, bring a pot with the beans covered with 2 inches of water to a boil, remove from heat and let soak for a hour, then drain.

2 Mix molasses, brown sugar, mustard,  with water: Mix the molasses, brown sugar, mustard,  with 3 cups of hot water.

3 Add ingredients to slow-cooker

4 Slow cook until beans are tender: Cover and cook in a slow-cooker on the low setting for 8 hours (or in a 250°F oven), until the beans are tender. Check the water level a few hours in, and if the beans need more water, add some. Add additional salt to taste if needed.

Note that fresher beans will cook faster than older beans. Your beans may be ready in less than 8 hours, or they may take longer. Best the next day.

 

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Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipes

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

 

 

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

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Maple Fudge– Barb Dowdall– From the Kitchens of Lanark County

 

2 cups maple syrup

3/4 cup cream

2 tbsp butter

In  a saucepan bring all to a boil until it reaches soft ball stage. Cool to lukewarm and then beat until creamy. Turned into a greased pan and chill.

Soft ball stage

 

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipes

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

 

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Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

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Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf by Aileen Conboy- Lanark County

Ingredients

For the cake:
1 cup fresh cranberries

½ diced candied mix peel
2 cups flour
1/4 cup butter, at room temp
3/4 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 Tbsp lemon zest
2 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt

1 tsp cinnamon
3/4 cup milk


For the glaze:
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup sugar
Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350.
Grease a 9 x 5 inch loaf pan
Toss the cranberries and peel with ¼ c flour and set aside.
Cream the butter and sugar until fluffy, 2-3 minutes.
Add the eggs and lemon zest and beat until thoroughly combined.
Stir together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Add half of the mixture and mix on low speed just until combined.
Add half of the milk and mix on low speed just until combined.
Add the remaining flour, mixing just until combined, and then the remaining milk.
Add cranberries and mix a few seconds longer.
Pour the batter into the pan and bake 45-60 minutes, until a skewer comes out with moist crumbs attached.
Cool the cake for 15 minutes and then remove it from the pan.
To make the lemon glaze, combine the sugar and lemon juice in a small saucepan.
Bring the mixture to a boil for 30 seconds.
Remove the pan from the heat.
Gently pierce the top of the loaf cake many times with a toothpick.
Use a pastry brush to apply the warm glaze evenly over the top of the loaf.
Slice into ~10 slices to serve.
Store leftovers tightly wrapped, will keep ~3 days.

Visit the Carleton Place Farmers Market Facebook page for more recipes.. click here..

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