Tag Archives: ray paquette

The McNaughton Farm– Memories Ray Paquette

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The McNaughton Farm– Memories Ray Paquette

 

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Photo Janice Tennant Campbell– McNaughton Farm in Beckwith-

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Photo- Janice Tennant Campbell​ Campbell–7th Line of Beckwith near Tennyson. McNaughton family

 

Ray Paquette –One summer I was spending the evening at the Old Cheese Factory in Tennyson that the late Len Coleman had turned into a place for teenagers from the cottages and others to hang out and dance to a juke box. Len called me over (he knew me through my mother) and introduced me to Murray McNaughton who was looking for some help during thrashing that was about to begin. We came to an agreement and I went home with him to spend the night.

The next morning I began by stooking sheaves in the field that can be seen at the left of the house. It was a fascinating experience for me particularly when Mr. McNaughton showed me the remains of my mother’s family homestead which was cross the 7th Line road. The McNaughton farm was probably close to being the last farm that harvested their grain crops using a reaper and a thrashing machine. I have often looked back on those few days with fondness because of the traditional methods that were used which have long since been replaced by self-propelled combines..

 

Dale Costello Spent many a summer evening dancing the night away at the cheese factory. Favourite dancing partner was Ann Fentiman.

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Janice Tenant Campbell Photo-

Hi Linda
Here is one of the photos I told you about.
Duncan McNaughton on the back. His son, Lawrence (my maternal grandfather) standing beside the wheel.
Lawrence’s 2 oldest children my Aunt Edith and Uncle Lloyd sitting.
This would have been taken about 1928 or so.
Jan Tennant Campbell

 

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Janice Tennant Campbell That is my Uncle LLoyd McNaughton! I think it was taken at Tennyson store and the lady was the owner. I have this clipping somewhere. I’ll see if I can find it.

The caption says : Owner Elaine Taylor chats with local resident Lloyd McNaughton outside her store, formerly a cheese factory.

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Glory Days of Carleton Place–This and That–Ray Paquette

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Glory Days of Carleton Place–This and That–Ray Paquette

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Not playing a full deck these days so this morning I spent time making sure I had documented all comments on The Tales of Carleton Place so history can be preserved-keep commenting and sending me memories at sav_77@yahoo.com. Thanks again everyone!!

Memories of Ray Paquette

 

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Thomas E. Nichols was the grandson of Abner Nichols and son of W.A. Nichols whose lumber business took up most of the south east Moore Street and Lake Avenue as well as a good portion of the Carleton Place Mews that borders Landsdowne Avenue.

There was also a lumber yard and saw dust disposal site at the location of the current Farmer’s Market. The business went into bankruptcy in the late 1950’s and the assets were scooped up by Ronnie Waugh who reopened the business as W&S Building Supplies. My Uncle Tom and Aunt Wilma lived at the north east corner of Queen and Lake Avenue East in the large frame house that has a large addition on the eastern side, created by the current owners

 

 

 

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Ottawa Journal Ad

Roy Gilmour was the original owner of the hardware store. I was not aware that Ches Argue was in partnership with him before Mr. Argue assumed sole ownership. Mr. Gilmour moved to Ottawa and worked at the Sears Store in the appliance department in the Carlingwood Shopping Centre. Some of your readers may remember Penny and Peter Gilmour, the older children in the Gilmour family. They lived at the south-west corner of Park and Lake Avenue East, kitty corner from the hospital in the interesting brick house

 

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Ottawa Journal ad–Where was Ullet’s?

Keith Giffin I maybe wrong but Reg Ullett garage was on the town line left hand side , between Thomas and Moffat , garage there today is a truck repair shop.
Ray PaquetteKeith is right. Ullett’s Motors was where he remembers. The Ulletts lived on Herriott Street right behind the garage. Mr. Ullett died under tragic circumstances one Saturday afternoon at the garage. If I have my facts correct he committed suicide.
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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 06 Jan 1919, Mon, Page 8
Ray Paquette I noticed that the deceased had a son Thomas. I wonder if that was Tom New of Rochester Street who later, in my childhood, delivered the mail on R.R. #1?

Linda Seccaspina Did he go off to war Ray?

Ray Paquette Frankly, I don’t recall any talk of his being a veteran. I was less than ten years old during my time living on Rochester Street and WW1 would not be a subject that came up in my conversation!
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Ray Paquette David spent many hours patrolling the Main Street with a pipe in his mouth and box under his arm picking up debris/litter thrown away carelessly by less civically minded citizens. I seem to recall that the Town held a small ceremony for him in recognition of his tireless effort in reducing the clutter on our streets.  David was the best pin boy ever. He was able to pick up pins on two lanes while the rest of us were limited to one.
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What a momentous Saturday morning in 1954 when Bob Flint arrived at our house with the 17″ RCA Victor TV and the necessary supplies to install an antenna on the roof! If memory serves me, Bruce Sadler was assisting Mr. Flint during the antenna installation.
The area to the left was Bruce McDonald’s Optometrist practice which, when Mr. McDonald took in an associate preparing to retire, became Ian Edmison’s first location. As an aside, I meet for coffee with Brian McDonald, Bruce’s son, here in Burlington, where we talk about our boyhood experiences living on Herriott Street.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Arthur Street The Burgess House and Dangerous Places- Ray Paquette

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Then and Now–SRC– Ray’s Recollections

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Then and Now–SRC– Ray’s Recollections

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Comment From–Arthur Street The Burgess House and Dangerous Places- Ray Paquette

 

This house always fascinated me. When I was a lad the Burgess home was owned by a Mr. Feltham (sic) who ran a rag business out of a former hotel on the west side of Moore Street in the area beside Interval house that was torn down in the 1950’s and replaced with a Cities Service gas station.–Ray Paquette

 

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Snedden Hotel on Moore Street (Franktown Road)– the building across the street used to house a rag business. Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Looking at the two buildings from another direction–Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

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SRC Music Store in Carleton Place, Ontario–124 Moore St where the large building once stood and once was a Cities Service gas station.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

historicalnotes

Dr Howard was also located in the back of that empty property near Wool Growers.

 

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Dr. Howard, who claimed to have been descended from one of the original 13 Barons of England, was a big man, soft spoken, and used to relate to me about his turkey hunting trips in the U.S.A.  He had a law suit with the Montreal Daily Star and lost.  The Star published a pamphlet about him and distributed it to the householders of Carleton Place.

Did You Know Who was Cooking in Back of Lancaster’s Grocery Store? Dr. Howard I Presume! – Part 3

Part 1- Dr. G. S. Howard of Carleton Place — Just Call Me Master!

The Shenanigans of Dr. Howard of Carleton Place – Part 2

 

 

relatedreading

Another Demolished Building of Carleton Place –Gone Baby Gone!

Arthur Street The Burgess House and Dangerous Places- Ray Paquette

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

Signed Sealed and Delivered with Tom New — Ray Paquette

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

Arthur Street The Burgess House and Dangerous Places- Ray Paquette

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Arthur Street The Burgess House and Dangerous Places- Ray Paquette
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Ray Paquette
This house always fascinated me. When I was a lad the house was owned by a Mr. Feltham (sic) who ran a rag business out of a former hotel on the west side of Moore Street in the area beside Interval house that was torn down in the 1950’s and replaced with a Cities Service gas station.
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Photo- The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Ray Paquette
There was lots of commercial activity on Arthur Street during my boyhood years. Right at the corner of Arthur and Moore Street, the Nichol’s Lumberyard maintained a satellite office and there was a cast iron watering basin for horses with a roundabout. Further up Arthur, alongside the CPR tracks was a small stock yard where every Saturday morning local farmers brought livestock to be auctioned off by H.B. Montgomery which were then loaded into cattle cars on the siding abutting the stock yard.
The Nichols lumberyard also had coal warehouses lining Arthur Street while alongside the tracks the railway maintained a freight shed. I have a vague remembrance of Russ Mill’s Feed and Seed and as his son is in the Carleton Place area he might be able to shed some more personal reminisces of his father’s operation.
Another activity that I remember was the refrigerated cars laden with fruit and vegetables that were placed in the siding north of the Wool Growers to be unloaded by the Rubino’s and taken to there warehouse at the corner of Mill and Beckwith Streets. All this activity captured the attention of me and my contemporaries and we spent many hours roaming through this area, often ignoring our parents caution of how dangerous this area could be for us!
raypThank you Ray for all you send to us and keeping history alive. We can’t do this without any of you so send those stories in!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

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Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?


 

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I have posted these on the LCGS Facebook pages and do not want to lose them…

Ray Paquette’s Carleton Place Moment..-In the right corner of the advertisement for Howard McNeely’s Barber Shop, it mentions E. McNeely, Assistant. I wonder if that is Earl McNeely who later or perhaps prior to worked barbering with Howard Little and lived on Munro Street west of Rochester? As well, how many people remember Ned Root’s Shoe Repair beside the driveway for Stanzel’s Taxi?

 

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Ray Paquette on Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

What about the doughnut machine that could be viewed through the front window. It methodically churned out simple, unadorned fresh doughnuts that would melt in your mouth. My personal favourite though were the jam filled pastries. Woodcock’s was the last stop on my paper route and I rarely left the store empty handed!!!

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Linda Gallipeau-Johnston– Ned Root – oh yes – not only did we go there for shoe repair but he was just a door away on our street – Bob and Bill Root, the sons – Bob became a Minister and I have one of Bill’s DVD’s(singer).


Dale Costello-– Howard gave me many a haircut, and Ned Root performed magic on my shoes. Who remembers Mae Mulvey, Charlie Jay, Ruby McPherson at the Roxy, Kelly at the Chinese Laundry,Giffins restaurant next to the Roxy, E D Robertsons, Okilmans, Argue Hardware, and many more.



Linda Gallipeau-Johnston- Dale, I remember it all – free silverware on weekend nights at the Roxy – getting candy from Santa with the school – sitting waiting for your turn to go up onto the stage at the Roxy. I also I have a memory of a double deck bus(red) tour when I was about 4 – 1950 or 51? – it loaded at the corner of the town hall but we missed it. No one I know remembers this – Dale?? – anyone??

Allan Wing –George Eades at Eades Hardware, does anyone remember how to remember how to spell GEOGRAPHY . . . George Eades Old Goat Ran A Pig Home Yesterday


Dale Costello Remember going into Allens Shoe sore. If you spent more than $10 for a pair, you were getting expensive footware. And Abe Levine place, sold him lots of old newspapers, with rocks in the bottom to raise the weight. Bad Bad.

 

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April 26 2017– Memories of Ray Paquette
“The Mississippi Hotel was part of my paper route as well. What I remember on entering the lobby of the hotel was the number of stuffed birds and animals that adorned the walls. Frankly, as a 12 year old, I found it a bit “spooky”!”

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Blaine Cornell— I also remember the birds being in glass display cabinets. These may be the same displays that ended up in the waterworks building in riverside park. Where are they now?
Linda Gallipeau-Johnston- I so remember how dark it was at the front entrance – probably not so bad for those days – had to have been 50 or 51 – just a little kid but that memory sticks with me.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

rayp

Related reading

The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

Signed Sealed and Delivered with Tom New — Ray Paquette

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

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The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

rayp

Comments about–Weldon Armour- One of Carleton Place’s Cool Kids

Weldon was indeed a renown character in Carleton Place, even before his unfortunate accident. Every evening Weldon was brought down town in his wheelchair by George Baker, a neighbour of his and would eventually make his way to the Olympia Restaurant where he would spend the remainder of the evening.

One time (before he joined the RCMP), Weldon was hired by Alan Barker to work on the ambulance. At the scene of an auto accident, Alan gave Weldon a shovel to pick up a human brain, off the road…Weldon quit that day.

I can recall returning to Carleton Place on leave from the Navy after an extended absence and going to the Olympia before my parent’s home because I was sure that Weldon would be there and I could get caught up on what was going on in town and where all the “old gang” were. Having the franchise for the license bureau enabled him to keep current on everything that was happening in town!–Ray Paquette

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Photo from-Dishing up the Memories of The Devlins

Comments about —Dishing up the Memories of The Devlins and Sitting on a Bench Outside Devlin’s Store Looking for Stories

Devlin store-The owners prior to the Devlins were the Shackeltons. They were an English couple that had emigrated to Canada in the 1950’s with their two boys, Leon and Frank. I believe that Leon has passed away and Frank my be in the Toronto area. After they sold the store, I believe Mr. and Mrs. Shackleton returned to England.

Since being introduced to your blog I have taken great pleasure in reliving my earlier years in Carleton Place when the population seemed to be eternally stuck at 4800. Those years must have gone a long way in shaping the person I have become and for this I will be eternally grateful–Ray Paquette

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal13 Oct 1898, ThuPage 4

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal22 Apr 1897, ThuPage 8

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal27 Apr 1897, TuePage 5

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal29 Aug 1898, MonPage 7

Related reading:

Signed Sealed and Delivered with Tom New — Ray Paquette

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

So Who Did Live at 107 John Street? Here is Your Answer….

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So Who Did Live at 107 John Street? Here is Your Answer….

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The Beginning…

“I was reading this morning about the Smyth’s 50th. I live at 107 John Street and believe it is the original Smyth house which was built in the early 1900’s. I purchased the house from Bill Blanche whom I believe was the son of George Blanche as I am led to believe the house was kept in the family until my purchase. I cannot confirm any of this as I do not have the research skills to verify.” Bill Russell Carleton Place–  read more here–107 John Street– The Smyths? Calling Out My Lifeline Please…

 

So if you want some clues or answers you contact the guys that know: our local community historians Blaine Cornell and Ray Paquette. You know the ‘cool guys’ from Carleton Place in the photo below.

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This cool group took over the steps of the Bank of Nova Scotia in 1959!
Pictured are Blaine Cornell, Gary McLellan, Weldon Armour seated, Dave Gordon, Dale Costello, Bob Bigras, Gerald Griffith, Ray Paquette and Gordon Bassett.- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum


Blaine Cornell
I remember the Blance’s living there in the 50’s but have no memory of the Smyth family living at that address. Just for info: Bill went onto the Brampton area where he  became a school teacher.  He also played banjo in a well known blue grass group called *General Store (nominated for Juno awards). He is retired and now lives in the Allison Ont. area.

Ray Paquette
The house was owned by the Blance family in my youth. Bill and I, as well as Blaine Cornell, were in the army cadet band at the high school in the late 1950’s. During the period I was absent from Carleton Place I understand that Bill graduated from CPHS and moved on to Toronto while his family remained in the house.
The Blance Family lived in the downstairs apartment entered by the door on the left and for the life of me, I can’t remember who lived upstairs. Perhaps Blaine has more current information than me or Wayne Drummond, whose family lived on the corner of John and Frank Street at that time.
As for Tom Smyth, I seem to remember him living on Lake Avenue East in one of the three very similar homes on the south side of the street beginning at 264. Now, take what I have to say with the proverbial “grain of salt” because I was 13 at the time of his 50th wedding anniversary!
Author’s Note– Someone said the Moorheads/Muirheads? lived upstairs? 
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Okay, so who originally lived in that house? Bill Russell seems to think a former mayor lived in it, but it wasn’t Mayor Thomas Smyth from the 50s– so who is it? Maybe instead of Smyth I need to research the Blances. Bingo– I hit the motherlode.
The original owner of the home was Mr. and Mrs. David Smythe. (add an “e” to that Smyth)  David Smythe was  a merchant and harness maker and had his business on Bridge Street.   Smythe was also the Mayor of Carleton Place in 1911 and again in 1917. David died in 1937 and his wife Jennie also died in the home at 107 John Street a little over 20 years later in 1953. (see obit below)
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So what was the relationship between the Blances and the Smythes? Mrs. George Blance, Jean, was born a Smythe, and it seems likely that is why the family lived there as her mother was alone for many years after her husband died. That’s just what people did on those days.

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Here is a pill box found in house prescribed to George and a ticket for a baking school held at the church that was supported by Mrs. Smythe! –Photo Bill Russell

 

Jean Smythe *married George Ronald Blance on the 4th of June 1940 in the Presbyterian Manse in Carleton Place. Seeing it was 5 years after her father died, I assume they moved right into the brick red house on John Street.

So Bill, yes your home was probably built in the early 1900’s as Mr. and Mrs David Smythe, the original owners, got *married in 1898. The bricks from your home I assume came from the brickyards down at the end of Lake Avenue East.  Not only a former Carleton Place mayor built and lived in your home– but a Juno nominee musician lived there too. Now that’s star power!!

Thanks to Ray and Blaine for sending  me down the river of mystery with some sort of paddle.

 

If anyone has any stories about this or anything else please send them to me.

sav_77@yahoo.com

 

historicalnotes
SmytheDavid

David Smythe – 1871/1935

Mayor of Carleton Place – 1911-1917 – Merchant Harness maker.

David Smythe was born in 1870. He was Mayor of Carleton Place in 1911 and again in 1917. He was also a Merchant and Harness Maker and had his business on Bridge Street. David Smythe, of Ferguson and Smythe, harness makers, was elected for the first of seven yearly terms as mayor of Carleton Place. He died in 1934.  

*Marriage of David Smythe and Jennie Willis in Carleton Place
8392-98 David SMYTHE, 29, harness maker, Arnprior, Carleton Place, s/o John SMYTHE & Susan MORAN, married Jennie Helena WILLIS, 22, Carleton Place, same, d/o John Henry WILLIS & Sarah Ann WRIGHT, witn: George MORRISON & Margaret E. BURROWS, both of Carleton Place, 26 Jan 1898 at Carleton Place

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal05 Jan 1935, SatPage 12

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal29 Jun 1940, SatPage 10–Jean Smythe Blance’s wedding

 

Jean Smythe Blance’s Brother Desmond Smythe

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal05 Oct 1955, WedPage 24– Jean Smythe Blance’s brother Desmond death notice

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal04 Apr 1932, MonPage 8–Desmond married one of the Dunlop girls from Carleton Place

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This glass baseball was found inside a wall of the addition on the house and the ginger ale sign was found in the eaves of the addition.  Photos–Bill Russell
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Band Members
Bill Blance
Brian Riseborough
Helen Lewis
John Perkins
Norm Tellier
GENERAL STORE is a multi-award winning bluegrass band from Southern Ontario with a reputation for smooth 3 and 4 part vocal harmonies. The band excels at traditional as well as contemporary bluegrass music, including original material. Their repertoire is also rich with gospel music.
General Store was chosen ‘Bluegrass Gospel Band of the Year’ 5 years in a row at the Central Canadian Bluegrass Awards, and now has been retired from this category. Additional awards have included ‘Most Promising Band’ in 2004, and two ‘Mandolin Player of the Year’ awards for instrumentalist Norm Tellier. And in 2007/08, the Arts Council of Brampton, Ontario (a city of 500,000) presented General Store with the prestigious Bloom Award for ‘Top Concert Performance by a Small Ensemble’.
In 2011, General Store released their 3rd CD ‘Phantom Train’, to add to their 2 previous releases ‘Open for Business’ and ‘More in Store’. All 3 CDs have received award nominations, and airplay all around the world.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 Related Reading: