Tag Archives: ramsay

Merril Munro Lost in Ramsay Swamp 1944

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Merril Munro Lost in Ramsay Swamp 1944

Merril Munro, 9 year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Munro, Jr., 11th line of Ramsay Township, was the object of an intensive search from Monday evening until he was found on Tuesday. Mr. Munro purchased Mrs. W. H. Robertson’s farm on the 11th line at the first of this year. At the back of the farm is a large swamp which runs down to the Mississippi river. The boy had gone to bring the cows home and thought he heard a cowbell in the swamp.

It is thought that he merely heard an echo as the cows had come home themselves. He became completely lost and when he came to the river bank he made a comfortable bed of leaves (so he said) and slept until morning. In the meantime a search party had been organized and shots were fired to try to attract his attention.

The searchers gave up at midnight but continued their search at daylight. Mr. Thos. Command who was patrolling the river in a boat about 10 a.m. Tuesday discovered the lad and rowed across to Percy Drynan’s on Highway 29. From there he was brought to his home. It is noteworthy that the boy was not afraid nor did he complain of being cold. It is understood some of the searchers kept on looking for the lad for some time after he had been found until word reached them to that effect.

1944

LOST in Cedar Hill

So Which Island did the River Drivers of Clayton get Marooned On?

The Babes Lost in the Woods

The Story of Caroline La Rose– Charleston Lake

The Case of the Missing Toe

Francis Shaw Pakenham Postmaster Gone Missing —Elizabeth Shaw — Residential School Teacher

Effie McCallum —– Missing Milliner

The Case of the Missing $900

Explosives Go Missing! Stories From Old Photos

The Missing Heir

This is the old Hugh Munro log house, located on lot 1, concession 11 of Darling Township, which was apparently built in the early 1840’s or early 1850’s.

This property is presently owned by Wilbert Munro.

John Neilson – Neilson Family – Chocolate Genealogy

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John Neilson – Neilson Family – Chocolate Genealogy

Name:John Neilson[John F. Neilson]
Gender:Male
Age:78
Birth Date:abt 1850
Birth Place:Ramsay, Ontario
Death Date:4 Nov 1928
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Cause of Death:Stroke Cerebral Hemorrhage With Fanlysie

928, Friday November 9, The Almonte Gazette front page
John Neilson Passes After A Brief Illness
Was One of the Outstanding Citizens of Almonte for Many Years
Was Born on the Pioneer Homestead of the Neilsons in Ramsay.
He was 78 Years of Age. His Wife Died 22 Years Ago.


Almonte has lost a valued and honoured citizen, in the death of Mr John Neilson, who passed away on Sunday evening. His death was a great shock to the town and district, for he had been ill only a few days. Mr Neilson was one of the outstanding citizens of the town, and was held in the highest esteem by a very large circle of friends, both in town and throughout the surrounding district. He was the son of the late Mr and Mrs James Neilson and was in his 79th year. Born in March 1850, in the old pioneer homestead on the 12th line Ramsay, where his grandfather, John Neilson, who came out from Scotland, settled there in the year 1820. Mr Neilson later moved to the 11th line Ramsay, where he successfully followed the occupation of farming for many years until he retired in 1916 and moved to Almonte, where he had since resided.


Active Church Worker
In religion the late Mr Neilson was a staunch Presbyterian. he took an active part in church work, and was a member of the Board of Session for many years. At the time of church union he held the opposite view and adhered to the Continuing body of that denomination and was a member of the Session of that church, up to the time of his death. He was predeceased by his wife, Janet McIlquam, who died twenty-two years ago, in May 1906. He is survived by four sisters, Agnes, Mrs Wilkie, of Toronto, widow of the late Rev John Wilkie, formerly of Indore, India; Marion, Mrs David Forgie, of Cleveland, Ohio; and the Misses Sarah and Jessie, both of whom resided with him at the family home here. Two brothers Matthew and William, and two sisters, Margaret and Mary, died some years ago.


The Funeral
The funeral took place on Tuesday from the family residence to the Presbyterian Church, and thence to the Auld Kirk Cemetery. Impressive services were conducted by the Rev W.H. McCracken, assisted by Rev George Thom. Mr McCracken made reference to the high character and staunch personality of the deceased elder, and there was a large congregation of mourners, many coming from long distances to pay a final tribute of respect and friendship. There were many floral offerings and messages of sympathy. The pallbearers were: Messrs Stanley Neilson, Montreal; James Neilson, Toronto; John Neilson, Welland; Robert Neilson, Ottawa; George McCallum, Carleton Place, all nephews of deceased, and Mr W. D. Aikenhead, of Pakenham.
Contributor: Gary J Byron (49329383)

Neilsen farm- Appleton side Road-Photo from the North Lanark Regional Museum

ReadWhen Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

This is Ramsay –History of 1993

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This is Ramsay –History of 1993

John Ibbitson Citizen staff writer

No one would want to spend a glorious spring Saturday cooped in a church hall debating planning issues. So the 70-odd people who gathered at Almonte United Church to tussle with the question of Ramsay township’s future may all have been a little mad. But then, the people of Ramsay Township care about the place. And Ramsay Township must soon choose its fate: to preserve itself, or let itself be transformed into a suburb.

It is an old township. People started coming here in the 1820s; people still live in houses built more than a century ago. Part of the land valley farmland: fairly flat, criss-crossed with concession roads, dotted with farmhouses and barns. The rest to the west is Shield: the roads meander over hills and around rocks and through the maple bushes that are the only crop. It is a place of split rail fences, dirt roads, stone houses; of tiny villages created around the grist and saw mills that once exploited the rivers but now have vanished or are in ruins; of families that go back seven generations and remember all of it.

It is also a place of ranch-style bungalows that look as though they were plucked from Barrhaven and tossed, haphazard, onto the protesting landscape. It is the place of Greystone Estates, Mississippi Golf Estates, Hillcrest, Carlgate, Ramsay Meadows suburban subdivisions of monstrous homes on big lots. There’s no place in Ramsay township that’s more than an hour’s drive from downtown Ottawa, and that fact has started to sink in.

“If you have a house going up here, a house going up there, that’s one thing,” protests Clarence Gemmill, who has run the Gemmill’s General Store in Clayton with his wife Betty for nearly 19 years. “But you get these subdivisions, they’re different. People are just there to sleep between trips to the city.” Ramsay Township, like so many within driving distance of Ottawa, is in danger of losing its identity as a rural Valley place, and turning into something of which only ; a Nepean politician would be proud.

The township needs to update its official plan. Two years ago, a planner hired by the township proposed a new plan at a public meeting. There was so much anger and criticism that the township council promptly scrapped the plan and started again. “It was presented as ‘Here’s what we’re going to do to you,’ ” remembers Cliff Bennett, one of the organizers of the Saturday meeting. ” ‘Over our dead bodies.”

People were angry, not so much with what the planner had planned, but that no one had asked them what they wanted. So now there are committees, and subcommittees of committees, and there are forums and discussion papers and polls and presentations. ; “You’ll have as much public participation as any municipality in the area,” promises Ben James, a township councillor. This time the people are going to be heard. Some people at the planning seminar talked about ending strip development single houses on lots along the concession roads. Some talked about clustering houses together, off the road and out of sight to protect the natural look of the place.

Some talked about imposing rules on what houses should look like. Julian Smith, a heritage architect who lives in Appleton and works in Ottawa, pleaded for a re-thinking of the planning philosophy. Forget about zoning, he argued: Forget about densities and land uses. Simply apply this rule: “Any development should be shown to improve what’s around it.” But little of what the group proposed sat well with Brian Keller. Keller is a truck driver who lives in Clayton. He came to the workshop because “I wanted to see that it was more of a full consensus of the whole population.” Everyone was going on about housing clusters and setbacks and protecting this environment and that environment.

“They’re all typical city ideas, that people are saying can work rurally,” said Keller, dismissively. The last thing he thinks Ramsay needs is more restrictions on the rights of property owners. His wife’s father has been trying to sever his farmland for years, so the children will have a place to live. But the township won’t let him. “He told me, I can’t give my land to my own family. I’ve got to wait for a politician to tell me.’ ” Councillor James understands Keller’s concerns. “Over the past hundred years, individual landowners have had autonomy in what they do with their land. And you don’t want to curtail that too much. You have to let people do what they think is best, within certain limits.” But if some people want to see controls on development, and others want to protect the rights of property owners, can there be any real hope for consensus? “Not likely,” James acknowledges. “Not in total.”

The Duncan family has been farming on the Ninth Concession since 1821. But no more. There isn’t any money in it, and the latest batch of kids are pursuing different careers. The Duncan home, built in 1870, is being turned into a bed-and-breakfast. But Don Duncan doesn’t feel like offering any heart-in-the-throat eulogy to a dying way of life. “The Ramsay township of the past doesn’t have any future. The question is, what kind of future will there be?” The township council hopes to have its new official plan by 1994, maybe 1995. There will be more meetings and more presentations and more groping toward consensus. Three new subdivisions were recently approved.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada12 Apr 1993, Mon  •  Page 17

Ramsay W.I. Tweedsmuir History Book 1—SOME EARLY RAMSAY HISTORY

Stories of Ramsay Township– Leckies Corner’s – James Templeton Daughter’s 1931

Conversations with Brian McArton– Henry Wilson of Carleton Place and the McArtons of Ramsay

A Trip Along the Ramsay Sixth Line –W.J. Burns

Snippets of The Duncan Farm ( Dondi Farms)

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Snippets of The Duncan Farm ( Dondi Farms)

Archibald McNab was the 13th chieftain of the McNab clan from the Loch Tay region in Scotland. In order to escape heavy debts, he fled to Upper Canada where he negotiated for land along the Ottawa River so that he might bring his clansmen from Scotland as settlers. Read more here…click and here Click

Related reading

Wind Storm in Ashton- Heath Ridge Farms 1976

Death of Local Farms in 2025?

Alan and Betty Thompson Meadowside Farms

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

The McNaughton Farm– Memories Ray Paquette

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Information about the Duncan Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Snippets of the Thompson Farm — Ramsay

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Snippets of the Thompson Farm — Ramsay

Related reading

Who was Patricia Thompson From Clayton?

Looking for Stories and Photos- Thompson Family

Black Rock Clayton

Information about the Thompson Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton

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Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton
Photo- SEE below– Women’s Institute
SYME, Nelson Aberdeen Peacefully after a lengthy illness at the Carleton Place Hospital on Monday, November 20, 2006, at the age of 80. Loving husband of Emma (nee Howie) for 56 years. Dearly loved father of Glen (Ellen), Karen (Lonny Lytle) and Audrey Syme. Proud grandfather of Travis, Trudy and Jordan. Predeceased by his brothers Orville and Milburn and his sister Lois. Friends may call at the ALAN R. BARKER FUNERAL HOME, 19 McArthur Avenue, Carleton Place, Ontario on Wednesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service Thursday in the chapel at 2:00 p.m. Interment to follow at Auld Kirk Cemetery, Almonte. For those who wish, a donation to the Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital would be appreciated by the family.

Back row standing:  Nelson Syme, Karen (Syme) Lytle, Murray Lowry, Keith Lowry
Front row:  Inez McCoy’s nephew, Beth (Lowry) Nanne, Allan Drummond
Nelson and Emma resided at this farm located at 406 River Road beside Appleton Village.  Son Glen, now operates. read-The Story of the Appleton Sleigh Ride–Audrey Syme

406 River Road beside Appleton Village
Original and Subsequent Owners: An 1829 Crown Patent, for all 200 acres, was granted to the Canada Company. In 1842, they sold the same to James Wilson for $550.00. 14 February 1851, James Wilson sold 65 acres of the West half of lot 3 to William Wilson for $1.00. Four months later, William & Flora Wilson sold to Albert Teskey for $64.00. 26 Jan 1883, Teskey sold to Duncan Miller for $95.00. It has been owned by various owners since that time. From Hot off the Press–Sarah More

ON another subject you can also read: Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark

Information about the Wilson Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Norman Paul Talks About the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

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Norman Paul Talks About the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

There was no more to the articlein the book

S.S. No. 5 Ramsay – Galbraith School

Daniel Galbraith purchased land on the West half of Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay township in 1855. He sold half an acre to the trustees in 1870 for $1.00. The first teacher was Nell Forest. Ratepayers became enraged when the Ramsay Township School Boarded voted to close the school, so in 1958, S.S. No. 5 became a separate school section. Ratepayers donated two cords of wood per family. A new piano was purchased and a music teacher was hired. In 1969, the rural pupils were bussed to Almonte or Carleton Place. The school was moved across the road to become Bert Hazelwood’s cabin in his bush. It was later used as sleeping quarters for retreats. Read- Recollections of Bert Hazelwood 1973

Jennifer E Ferris There are two Galbraith’s on the old maps. One very near Hazelwoods farm(now Arlee Sheets), and the other North of Middleville /Clayton area.

Lila Leach-James S S#5 was built on a piece of property given by the Leach family …The Leach property surrounded the school. I believe my Dad owned 200 acres at one time from the 6th Line to the 5th Line, plus bush in the Wolf Grove on the Old Perth Road. He took polio in 1952 at which time he sold Sutherland’s to Fred Toop where Ruth Boyce now lives…. I believe it was called Galbraith as they owned farm prior to the Leach in 1800’s…. When the school was closed in the 1960’s, Alex Hazelwood purchased land and school and moved school to their convention grounds! Mount Blow Farm was between the 7th and 6th Line of Ramsay! Galbraith Road is on the Clayton side of Taylor/Clayton Lake and use to join up with Floating Bridge! The two have no connection!

Sarah Duff McPherson and John Paul — Mount Blow Farm

Ken Manson– 1986 Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds –Side 1B — Bill Croft and Farm Machinery

The Wondrous Life of Norman Paul

The Amazing Mr. Paul

The Mysterious 5th Line ?????

Recollections of Bert Hazelwood 1973

Case no. 9 – Marie Fouyol, Parisian wife of Thomas Mansell– Revolutionary France– (Mrs. James Greig of Carleton Place)– Thanks to Susan Courage

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Case no. 9 – Marie Fouyol, Parisian wife of Thomas Mansell– Revolutionary France– (Mrs. James Greig of Carleton Place)– Thanks to Susan Courage

https://french-genealogy.typepad.com/genealogie/FGB Free Clinic – Case no. 9 – Marie Fouyol, Parisian wife of Thomas Mansell– thanks to reader Susan Courage 

Posted: 15 Jul 2021 04:48 AM PDT

Marie Fouyol

Not so long ago (but longer ago than we should like to admit, we are ashamed to say) we were contacted by Madame J. with a submission for the FGB Free Clinic. She had been able to find little on the origins of her French ancestor, Marie Fouyol, and asked if the FGB could be of help. The following is her summary of her research:

MARIE FOUYOL (c. 1783 – 1872)

Also spelled Fouyolle, Fouillol, Fouillot, Fouyot

Born in France (possibly Paris) c. 1783

1st Marriage: French Officer (widowed – no known name, place or date)

2nd Marriage: Thomas Mansell (also spelled Mencel, Mansall, Mansill)

– no known place or date of marriage

See below re Thomas Mansell.

Died: 2 October 1872 in Westmeath, Renfrew, Ontario, Canada

Marie had four children with Thomas Mansell

Three were born in Paris (all baptised at St Jacques du Haut Pas) and one was born in Canada (Thomas Alfred in 1821). Links to the childrens’ Paris baptismal records are here:

• Baptismal entry at St Jacques du Haut Pas, Paris, Françoise Joséphine ‘MANCELL’, 13 Nov 1814, 26, https://en.geneanet.org/archives/registres/view/26945/21

• Baptismal entry St Jacques du Haut Pas, Paris, Pierre Georges Alphonse ‘MANSALL’ 9 February 1816, no. 32, p.139, https://en.geneanet.org/archives/registres/view/26945/139

• Baptismal entry St Jacques du Haut Pas, Paris, Jeanne Richard ‘MAUSANN’ (1813-19, p.335/378, https://en.geneanet.org/archives/registres/view/26945/335.

THOMAS MANSELL (Mansill, Mancell, Mansall, Manssall, Mausann, Mencell)

Born: 19 July 1777, Rillington, Ryedale, N. Yorkshire

Parents: George Mansell (1744-1816), a weaver

Frances (Dinsdale) Mansell (1748-1829).

Occupation: Weaver (tisserand, mécanicien)

France – went to France for work sometime before 1801

Detained: 1801-1814 (Dépot de Fontainebleau and Paris)

Left France c. 1819

Emigrated to Canada c.1820

Died: 13 Nov 1852, Ramsay, Ontario, Canada

Madame J. and her sister both had done a great deal of previous research, as evidenced above. Additionally:

They had found that the child born in 1818, Jeanne Richard Mansall, died at the age of six weeks and was buried in Père Lachaise cemetery. (https://tinyurl.com/vkz8f49j)

They had found the family in Canadian census returns of 1861 (and possibly other years; we are waiting on that).

Based on the precise dates above, they would appear to have found the Canadian death registrations for Thomas Mansell and Marie Fouyol Mansell. (We are waiting for those to be sent to us.)

They contacted us previously and we were able to send them the page showing Mansell’s name on a list of prisoners of war, or détenus, held by the French at Fontainebleau in 1803.

They had found an obituary for the surviving daughter of Thomas and Marie, Françoise Joséphine, who married James Grieg in Canada in 1832:

Friday April 3, 1903, The Almonte Gazette p.4: The Late Mrs Jas Greig –

“The Gazette last week mentioned the death of Mrs Jas Greig of Carleton Place, (read-Greig Family — Carleton Place and Ramsay Lanark County) which occurred on the 24th of March, and this week is enabled to give some interesting particulars regarding her life. She was born in Paris, France, in 1811. Her father, Mr Thos Mansell, was an English weaver, who went to France about 1801. Soon thereafter war arose between England and France, and, with hundreds of other Englishmen, he was made a prisoner at Paris and could not escape. He married the widow of a French officer killed in war, and in 1811 their daughter, the late Mrs Grieg, was born. In 1819 Mr Mansell returned to England and Yorkshire, and here their only son, Mr. A.T. Mansell, of Westmeath, now 82 years of age, was born. In 1820 the family came to Canada on the strength of reports sent back from relatives. For four years they lived near Brockville and then settled in Ramsay near Almonte. The father died fifty years ago. The mother some years later. The former was 90 years of age, the latter 75. [reverse seems correct because the 1861 Census for Westmeath ON, lists her mother [Marrey Mensell] as born in France; 78 years of age, which would mean she was born approx. 1783]. Mr and Mrs Grieg were married in 1832. He was a native of Clarkmannshire, Scotland. They came to Carleton Place in 1863. For six years Mr Greig operated the grist mill. Then he retired altogether from business life and for many years the two enjoyed unbroken pleasures. The children living are Peter, James, Andrew, Mrs Jas Cram, Alfred, Mrs John Donaldson, Robert and Christena. The dead are John, Mrs Templeton and Thomas. All the children were present at dinner on the day of the funeral, Robert and James coming from far western States and Mrs Cram from Pilot Mound. The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon, interment being made in the family plot in the 8th line Ramsay cemetery, quite a number going from Almonte to join the cortege, some at Carleton Place and others as it neared the cemetery. Five sons and her son-in-law, Mr Donaldson, were the pall-bearers.”

Josephine Frances Mansell Greig

BIRTH8 Nov 1811Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
DEATH24 Mar 1903 (aged 91)Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALAuld Kirk CemeteryMississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID52221309 · View Source

Her father

  •  Thomas Alfred Mansell
  • was born in Britain

    Birth

    1777 • Rillington, Yorkshire,England

    and her Mother-Mary Jane Routledge

    Marriage

    abt 1810 • Paris, France

    When Thomas married Marie, she was the widow of a French army officer killed in the war.

    Mary Jane Routledge

    (1782–1872)

    • Birth1782 • Paris, Île-de-France, France1 Source1782(AGE)
    • Birth of Daughter Frances Josephine Mansell(1811–1903)18 Nov 1811 • Paris, Île-de-France, France181129
    • Birth of Son Alfred Thomas Mansell(1821–1907)abt 1821 • Elizabethtown (Athens), Leeds, Ontario, Canada182139
    • Death of Husband Thomas Alfred Mansell(1777–1852)13 Nov 1852 • Lanark, Ontario, Canada185270
    • Death2 Oct 1872 • Westmeath, Renfrew, Ontario, CanadaAge 90; Widow; of old age


    For a number of reasons, this is not an easy case.

    The many spelling variants of both names make searches of any indexed records exceedingly tedious and fraught with missed possibilities.

    Thomas Mansell was not French, so there will not be  much French documentation about him to link back to Marie Fouyol.

    Most of the parish and civil registrations of Paris prior to 1860 were lost in conflagrations; those that were reconstructed from other records were done so by families that remained in France and needed the documentation for one reason or another.

    The Mansell-Fouyol family emigrated to Canada and so were unlikely to have bothered to re-establish their French documentation. However, if Marie Fouyol had relatives who remained in France, they may have done so.

    The above reasons can help to explain why Madame J and her sister, in spite of their stellar research on various genealogy websites extensively, were not able to find:

    A record of the Mansell-Fouyol marriage, whether religious or civil.

    A record of Marie Fouyol’s first marriage.

    A record of Marie Fouyol’s birth or baptism.

    In the next post, analysis of what we have.

    ©2021 Anne Morddel

    French Genealogy

    Greig Family — Carleton Place and Ramsay Lanark County

    Working in the Grist Mill

    The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

    The Wilkie Lowry house was owned by my great grandfather, John Fairbairrn Greig, in the 1860sMy great r\andfather, Thomas Campbell Arthur (not MCArthur), married J F Greig’s daughter

    Frances Josephine Greig. My grandmother,Jessie Miller Arthur,(Hamilton) was born and grew up in the house as did her eight brothers and sisters. TC. Arthur also ran the Appleton store as dd his uncle Thomas Arthur. Granny was a friend if Mrs Hollie Lowry. I believe they were both members of the ROCKY RIDGE WI. When the Arthurs left the farm they carved there initials on an upstairs window. 2021 marks 200 years since the first of my family arrived in Ramsay. )Robert and Thomas Mansell. Enjoy all your articles,Linda. Thanks so much
    Judith Salley

    Laurysen Kitchens Fire 1987

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    Laurysen Kitchens Fire 1987
    Clipping from Sarah More and an unidentifed donor
    $5M factory fire may leave 65 out of work —-A fire Saturday destroyed a West Carleton kitchen factory, causing an estimated $5 million in damage and leaving a cloud of uncertainty oyer the future of its 65 employees. The blaze at Laurysen Kitchens on Carp Road, north of Hwy. 417, started at 10 a.m. Within minutes, the flames engulfed the 4,050-square-metre building where kitchen cabinets, cupboards and shelves were custom-built and stored. “Seventeen years of hard work, all lost in 20 minutes,” said business owner John Laurysen.

    A native of Holland who emigrated to Canada in 1960, Laurysen said he was to meet his employees today to discuss plans for the family business he has operated since 1970. He said he did not know if any workers would lose their jobs. Firefighters from West Carleton, Almonte, Beckwith and Goulbourn townships worked throughout the night Saturday to prevent the smouldering debris from igniting and spreading to the Laurysens’ nearby home and warehouse. The warehouse contained such flammable’ materials as varnish and paint thinner. The company’s showroom, located in the owner’s house, was not damaged. The cause of the fire is not known. Ontario fire investigator Marcel Lalonde continued his investigation today, said Terry Kelly, chief of the West Carleton fire department.

    Lalonde interviewed witnesses this morning and he and Kelly were to begin examining the debris in detail this afternoon. Kelly said there is no indication how long it will take to determine a cause. Laurysen said he lost about $5 million worth of equipment and supplies in the fire, which left nothing but heaps of twisted, charred debris in its wake. Chemical products were not stored at the plant and smoking was prohibited inside the building, said Laurysen. One employee was inside the building when the fire started and escaped without injuries. About 15 shift workers were outside on their break when the blaze broke. Laurysen said he hopes to rebuild.

    He said a nearby lumber company has al- Wayne Hlebert, Citizen Firefighters worked throughout the night Saturday at Laurysen Kitchens ready offered an empty warehouse as a temporary place to house the factory. If all goes well, he said, he would like to. start re-establishing the business in the donated building within a week, then rebuild the the factory during the next month. “But most of the equipment came from Europe,” he added. “Replacing that will be the hardest part.” “We’ve looked after our customers for the past 17 years. Now I hope our customers will look after us and wait until we rebuild.” , Bruno Joppen, a cabinet-maker who has been working at factory for the past 10 years, said the employees will have a better idea of what their future holds after today’s meeting. “I’m not really worried, but I am concerned,” he said. “You can go on unemployment insurance and look for something else, but I’d rather go back to Laurysen’s because he is good to his employees.” Joppen, 58, said it won’t be easy whatever happens, but he hopes the owner will decide to rebuild. “It’s our livelihood and I hope he is going to get back on his feet,” he said. “The problem is the ongoing contracts: he is going to lose them.”

    The Ottawa Citizen

    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada10 Aug 1987, Mon  •  Page 6

    CLIPPED FROM
    The Ottawa Citizen
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    15 Aug 1987, Sat  •  Page 87
    CLIPPED FROM
    The Ottawa Citizen
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    29 Aug 1994, Mon  •  Page 17