Tag Archives: railroad

The Pakenham Landslide April 1987

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The Pakenham Landslide April 1987

April 15 1987 Almonte Gazette

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

The C. P. R. Co. have struck a lot of hard luck of late, and there seems to be no let-up to it. What with accidents by snow-slides, run-offs, collisions, &c., and the severe snow-storms of the past winter, they have been experiencing quite a serious time of it. The latest we have to report is one entailing serious financial loss by destruction of rolling stock and impeded traffic, but providentially no loss of life.

We refer to the which took place on the C. P. R. track opposite the residence of Mr. Thomas McCann, a mile this side of Pakenham, early on Tuesday morning last. This spot has been regarded with suspicion for years past by residents of the neighbourhood. The express for Winnipeg that morning was somewhat late, and when passing over the scene of the slide the passengers got a good shaking up, showing that the earth had at that time been wearing away from the track a little. An examination of the wheels of the express was made at Pakenham, and everything was found right. A freight train composed of empty box-cars followed the express three-quarters-of-an-hour afterwards, the engine running backward at the head. Just as the engine cleared the fatal spot the the right side of the track, stopping the train suddenly.

The tender was pretty badly smashed, as was also the cab of the engine, the engineer and fireman having a narrow escape with their lives. The fireman received a slight injury on the forehead. The train stood for but a short time when the earth (probably owing to the action of the frost and the water) began to slide away from beneath the track,, and all at once one of the centre cars broke from the others and slid with the earth to the river—a distance of between and 75 yards. Two cars and the van were still left en the track at the rear end of the train, and the men lost no time in making themselves scarce there from.

It was well they did, too, for after some time another large section commenced to slip, and all three cars were precipitated to the great chasm below. The third car from the engine turned a half-somersault, and remains, minus wheels, &c., bottom side up halfway down the steep divide ; while the second remains suspended over the brow of the hill in an exceedingly dangerous position. The whole presented —one that pen cannot properly describe. Nearly 100 yards of the track and earth were carried away. The Mississippi at that point will be narrowed by about twenty yards as a result of the accident.

The ice was heaved up along the shore as if there had been a tremendous ice-shove, while for acres both up and down the river it was broken into large cakes. The railway fence and a telegraph pole which were alongside the track remained for some time in about the same position on the shore of the river as they had occupied up above, which will serve to show what a large portion of the earth must have become detached from its original position. The momentum obtained by the moving earth may be judged from the fact that large clods were on the river and remain thirty or forty yards from the opposite shore.

Date
1882c
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds –Acquisition Source
Donated to the Archives by Arthur McLean in 2003. The maps were in the basement of his law firm’s building on John Street. Mr. McLean’s father Alan McLean took over the law firm from Arthur Burwash who was the lawyer for McLachlin Bros.—Scope and Content —-Shows proposed railway between CPR main line and McLachlin Yards. Shows McLachlin, Mackie & Hartney property along Madawaska River and names McGonigal, Elgin, and Madawaska Streets.

Fortunately the box cars were all empty, being on the way to McLaughlin Bros. yards at Arnprior to be filled with lumber ; otherwise the loss to the Company would be very much heavier. Every car was smashed more or Iras, while the engine was badly damaged, it will be a big job to haul up the cars that are now lying around promiscuously on the hank and in the river. is laid by most people who have visited the scene to the action of the water and the frost. The water probably insinuated itself into minute cracks, which were widened and deepened by freezing during the winter. The fissures thus created, under the influence of the late warm weather, may have produced the landslip. Or the bed or strata supporting the superincumbent mass may have absorbed water enough to render it slippery, causing the slid, in chat way n getting a gang of men to work to clear away the wreck and build anew the portion of the track that was taken away.

Mr. H. B. Spencer, Assistant Superintendent, was early on the scene, with a large staff, to look after the interests of the Company. The passengers and baggage on the express from Winnipeg were transferred about nine o’clock, a special train being sent for the purpose, so that comparatively little delay was experienced by the travellers. It will take two or three days to get the m shape again. Since the above was written some ten to fifteen feet of earth where the new track was laid has disappeared

A very large staff of men has been put on and the work is being pushed ahead as rapidly as the circumstances will permit. Word from the scene of the accident this (Thursday) forenoon is to the effect that about thirty feet of the earth that was being prepared for the road-bed went away during last night. Some spectators are said to have narrowly escaped being carried down with it. The C. P. R. Company have purchased the field adjoining the Stack from Mr. McCann, and will make a circuit through it, commencing some distance back in order to ensure perfect safety. This will entail a lot of heavy work, and it will be almost impossible to have the track ready for trains to cross for a week or two, at least. Mr. C. W. Spencer is now on the scene superintending the work

April 22, 1887 Almonte Gazette

The Pakenham Landslide has been visited by thousands of people during the past ten days. Mr. Spencer estimates the loss to the Company by means of it at about $15,000. The route through Mr. McCann’ s field was ready for the first train last Saturday afternoon. The rails were laid on the ground, making it a pretty rough piece of road, with quite a hill to climb at the end nextto Pakenham. It required two engines and a pretty full head of steam to accomplish the trip. Freight had been accumulating very rapidly, and on Sunday train after train was rushed through in order to catch up. The cars that went down with the slide will be fished up and repaired.

April 29 1987–Almonte Gazette

Another Slide.

On Friday night last about twenty feet more of the earth at the scene of the accident near Pakenham slid away, taking with it the portion that had been partially prepared for the rails. This proves that it was a wise move to make the circuit through the fields. The officials of the road have not yet decided whether they will make the route now in use permanent or build trestle-work and use the old route. In either case it will be quite a big job.

Where was the Pakenham Station?

Pakenham, ON-Photo by Andrew Jeanes, 21 April 2014
West off highway15 in Pakenham on to White Fish Lake Road, ½ km west to Five Arches Drive at end of street on left hand side. Former CP Pakenham Station, moved a short distance away from the former right-of-way and in use as a residence.  CLICK

Related reading

The Pakenham Bridge is Falling Down 1873

What Happened to Lena May Connery of Pakenham? Connery Melanson Genealogy

The Bi Way Tour Margie Argue- Pakenham #1 and #2

The Bi Way Tour Margie Argue- Pakenham #3 and #4–Maps

Ingram Scott Pakenham

Prominent Merchant of Pakenham Expired After Opening Up For The Day

Clippings of Scott’s General Store

R Scott & Son Pakenham Gents Furnishing Dept.

Pakenham 1953

Photos of Early Pakenham

Needham Notations Pakenham Genealogy

The Pakenham Brush Fire of July 1939

The Pakenham Fire of June 1939 –Names Names Names

Mayne Store–Memories of the Pakenham Fire 1940

  1. The Pakenham Fire of 1940
  2. July 8, 1940 Fire at the Mayne Store Pakenham
  3. Dickson Hall Fire Pakenham-H. H. Dickson
  4. Fire at Pakenham Woollen Factory with Town Directory

Carleton Place Railroad Notations

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Carleton Place Railroad Notations
Canadian Pacific Railway Co., Wreck. Part of a wreck scene in the vicinity of the shops in Carleton Place. Negative envelope shows 1900-1910
ID #: MAT-04600
Subject: Canadian Pacific Railway Co.,Wreck,Déraillement
Collection Name: Aubrey Mattingly Transportation Collection

From the Ottawa Citizen August 20, 1948

Gananoque Man Injured
CARLETON PLACE Walter Cross, 58, Gananoque steam roller operator, suffered a possible skull fracture and other injuries yesterday when a Pembroke-Ottawa passenger train struck his machine. The roller was cut in two and some minutes later Cross was found, semi-conscious, on the front of the locomotive. Carleton Place is 40 miles northwest of Brockville.

Winnipeg by way of Carleton over railroad. By Sid Anabelle

They left Toronto March 1, 1885, and arrived at Carleton Junction on March 3, In one of the worst blizzards Ontario has ever known. The first section was snow-bound immediately on its arrival,” said Mr. Annable. Tom Bagley, yardmaster, got lost in the snow trying to find sidings to store the sufficient heat to warm the wooden coaches, a consequence of which was that the volunteers suffered greatly from the intense cold.

The snow was six feet deep on the level over the village and all trains were held up at this point for five days. Every foot of siding was utilized for the coaches. The only Pullman car in the service was that which served as headquarters for Major Fred Middleton of the Queen’s Own Rifles, Colonel Otter and their officers. This was placed on a siding opposite the old C.P.R. station, two hundred yards from the railroad gates. The shanty which sheltered Bob Taggart, the gate-man, still stands in the same old spot.

Yardmaster Bagley and his crew, composed of Andy Armour, Bill Carr, Tom Carter and Jack Annable had maneuvered the snow plows around to clean the sidings, they put the coaches on the north bound sidings from the station to the railroad bridge which crosses the Mississippi below the rapids.

There were only two streets for crossing purposes in the lower part of the village commonly called Chisleville —McLaughlin’s crossing on Lake avenue and Annable’s. Our crossing was not used much as the traffic was light. Later they placed fifty coaches on these sidings. Regulars were stationed along the sides of the train to prevent volunteers leaving without passes. These privileges were few and hard to obtain.

The writer’s home was only a hundred feet away, and as the men were calling for someone to run their errands I decided to make myself useful. The snow was set and soft and I was the proud possessor of a toboggan and a team of dogs, the only ones in the village. As the boys were calling for postcards, my first investment was one hundred penny postcards. Before I had finished one coach I had sold my stock at for five cents each.

 I then bought writing paper, envelopes and stamps and sold them for ten cents a set. By this time I had realized fifty dollars on my original investment of one dollar. After the second day I loaded my toboggan with eatables pies, doughnuts, oranges and apples and drove them up and down between the snow-bound trains. As the food in the baggage cars was getting low I found ready buyers for my cargo.

I worked from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. and by the time the trains were ready to move on I had cleared over three hundred dollars. The last day of his sojourn in Carleton Place Colonel Otter sent for me and asked me to go to the Bank of Ottawa for him. He gave me a large envelope covered with sealing wax, which I was to deliver to the manager, John A. Bangs, and return immediately with an answer. Mr. Bangs told me afterwards that the envelope contained two thousand dollars.

When I returned Col. Otter invited me to Join the Queen’s Own Rifles. Owing to the fact, however, that my mother was sick in bed at the time, my father refused to give his consent. Later I went to Col. W, W. Wylie and Capt. Joe McKay of the 43rd Regiment of volunteers of our village and told them I wanted to get out to the West. If I had to run away to do it. McKay refused to heed my plea; he sent for my oldest brother to take me home.

Mr. Annable then tells of preparations made by a companion whom he chooses to call Peck and himself to “make a break for it” in the spring. 

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

The trial of W. H. S. Simpson the Railway Mail Clerk

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

55 years ago–One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte

The Kick and Push Town of Folger

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

The Men That Road the Rails

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

The Almonte Railway – Memories

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The Almonte Railway – Memories
This shot, above, is one of the earliest photos I could find of the railway in Almonte. Amazingly, this scene would not change much over the next hundred plus years, as much of the town’s 19th century buildings were preserved, This image, from Library and Archives Canada, is undated, but would likely date back to the early 1900s or the turn of the century. The only information listed on the photograph states that the train is passing a flour mill on the Mississippi River.–http://beachburg.blogspot.com/2017/02/almonte-town-proud-of-its-rail-heritage.html

The railway and the first textile mills (1851-1865)
The brief period between 1851 and 1865 saw the arrival of the railway in
Almonte, establishment of the first textile mills and the subdivision of large
landholdings into residential areas on both sides of the river. It gave rise
to many features that make up the cultural landscape of Almonte today,
including parts of the street grid, the railway bridge and right-of-way, the
Victoria Woollen Mill, the first land registry office, several churches and many private homes.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Apr 1896, Fri  •  Page 7


The 1850s were a heady time in Ontario, as investors rushed to establish
railroad companies and build railway lines, spurred on by generous grants
from a colonial government that was keen to see the area settled and
serviced. The first railroad in Ontario went into operation in Aurora in 1853, but dozens of others were built before the end of the decade and railway construction continued apace well into the 20th century. Construction of the Brockville and Ottawa Railway (BOR) began in 1853, with the intention of linking the two centres. By 1859 the BOR had reached Almonte, with stops in Smiths Falls, Perth and Carleton Place. At Brockville it connected to the Grand Trunk Railway line, providing links to American markets.

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The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
07 Jun 1906, Thu  •  Page 1

In 1864, the BOR was extended from Almonte northwest to Sand Point located at Arnprior on the Ottawa River, and in 1870 it connected to Ottawa via the Canada Central Railway from Carleton Place. In 1881, the BOR merged with the Canadian Pacific Railway, becoming part of that larger network of railways. The railway continued to play a large part in the daily life of Almonte until 1978, when passenger service ended and the Almonte CPR station 10 was demolished. The town library currently stands on the site of the former train station. The final blow was dealt in 2012, when freight service through the town ended and the rails were removed. Remnants of the railroad remain in the town, however, including the former railroad right-of-way which slices through the downtown, the re-alignment of the street grid along that right-of way, and the prominent railway bridges with its stone piers crossing the river.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Apr 1914, Wed  •  Page 6


Much of the local development during the 1850s was likely in anticipation
of the railway and the economic prosperity it was expected to bring to the the town. Hotels were built along Mill Street to serve the anticipated traffic from the new mills and railway. John Murphy’s hotel at the current site of 34, 36 and 38 Mill Street, later the North American Hotel, was destroyed by fire. With files from Mississippi Mills

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Jun 1898, Sat  •  Page 7

Fred Gauthier Survivor — 6 Months 1 Day –1942 Almonte Train Wreck – Vern Barr

Names Names and More Names of Almonte Train Accident plus McDowall Family 1917

  1. Miraculous Escapes– Almonte Train Wreck
  2. Cpl. James H. Clifford and Miss Marion  McMillan-Survivors of the Almonte Train Wreck
  3. Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage
  4. Survivor still affected by 1942 Almonte train wreck55 years ago–
  5. One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte
  6. Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks

There Once was a Man Named C. F Towlsey —- Towlsey and Begley Genealogy

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There Once was a Man Named C. F Towlsey —- Towlsey and Begley Genealogy

 - Around The Town -V -V with . ; ; . - i k Walter... - .,. i Like meet railwaymen he's been an...Ottawa Journal 1951

 

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Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum– What was that building in the distance? Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

 

Donna Mcfarlane– Linda I sent a copy of the newspaper article re Mr Towsley to a grandson of his… Frank replied that he has the gold pass referred to in the article.

 

historicalnotes

Local Railway Items from Ottawa Papers – 1931-Colin Churcher

Pigeon crashed through locomotive headlight
Injured bird found by engineer on C.P.R. train.

It’s quite an experience for any pigeon to be aboard a train, but when a pigeon is a passenger in the casing of the headlight of a locomotive travelling at seventy
miles an hour, its an adventure. And that is exactly what happened Sunday night when a tiny pigeon broke the glass in the headlight of an Ottawa-bound C.P.R. engine in charge of C.F. Towsley, 5 Elm street.

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August 13 1931

Mr. Towsley was proceeding from Vaudreuil to Vankleek Hill with his train when he noticed his headlamp flickering. He did not know the glass was broken, but decided to investigate on arrival at Vankleek Hill. He did so, and found the bird, still alive.
Mr. Towsley brought the bird into the cabin, and when he pulled into the Union Station, he placed it on the platform, but the bird could not fly, as it had been injured. The only mark of identification is a celluloid ring on its left leg. Mr. Towsley is anxious to locate the owner of the bird.

 

 - Thomas A Begley Dies Suddenly Af Campbellfon,...

Mrs. Towsley died the year after in 1947

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Oct 1946, Tue,  Page 21

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

The Railroad Thanks You For Giving Up Your Life for “Safety’s Sake”

I’ve Been Working on the Railroad

“The Junction Town” “Killer Junction” –Names of the Past

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“The Junction Town” “Killer Junction” –Names of the Past

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Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Viewing platform on OVRT bridge

Photo Tara Gesner- Metroland

William Willoughby  built the railroad bridge that spans the Mississippi. In August of 1964, three young girls were caught on the Mississippi River narrow railway bridge. Watching in horror, a CPR Ottawa-bound Canadian passenger train was coming towards them quickly. Two sisters were forced to jump from the 25 foot high train-only bridge and they landed in the shallow waters of the rock-bottomed Mississippi River. Read the rest here.

‘Carleton Junction’ is the proposed name of the Carleton Place section of the Ottawa Valley Recreational Trail, which will serve both motorized and non-motorized users.‘   Carleton Junction’ will function as space for rest and play

I so appreciate this name as I cannot tell you how many times Carleton Place was called “The Junction Town” in all the newspaper archives I read. I am absolutely thrilled!

 

comments


Ted Hurdis I like it and could not be happier that we are being proactive in developing this land.

Norma Ford I remember it being called the “Hub of the Ottawa Valley” when I went to school (long time ago). I do like the name “Carleton Junction” though. What other names do you recall?

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston I remember “the junction town” – we always called it the “junction” at the intersection for Ottawa Smith Falls Perth and CP.

 

Reputation of the Town

Those Editors and Professional men that persist in going to the Junction twice daily should get a good fitting suit at Sumner’s Old Stand and keep up the reputation of the town, in the tailoring line at least, especially as Bob will sell them a suit so cheap.  Also dress shirts at a great bargain.  Come in, gentlemen, and try ‘em on.

Robert McDiarmid & Co., April 28, 1880.

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Photo-Jaan Kolk, my favourite historian commented “Seems appropriate. The 1879 Bleden Atlas had the railway station marked “Juction Stn.” CLICK here to enlarge 

 

Railway Shops

1882- A new railway station was built at the junction of the two lines here.  Exemption from municipal taxation was granted for the C.P.R. workshops being moved to Carleton Place from Brockville and Prescott.  Major James C. Poole (1826-1882), Herald editor, predicted the town was “about to enter upon an era of advancement and unparalleled prosperity.”

Junction Town

1886 – The railway junction and divisional town of Carleton Place was a stopping point for the first through train of the C.P.R. to reach the west coast from Montreal.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Jul 1940, Fri,  Page 17

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Oct 1904, Sat,  Page 15

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Nov 1898, Tue,  Page 2


Ted Hurdis Yes ” there is an accident at the junction ” This was all too common until we got lights at the junction. 

Doug B. McCarten My Mom always called it “Killer Junction” because of all the fatalities from vehicle collisions!

She wasn’t the only one Doug– Found many many references to that name in the archives.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  15 Dec 1961, Fri,  Page 3

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 Dec 1961, Thu,  Page 51

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

 

Pardon me Boys — Is That the Carleton Place Choo Choo?

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

The Railroad Thanks You For Giving Up Your Life for “Safety’s Sake”

 

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The First Train to Perth–and I Don’t Know if I’m Ever Coming Home! Seriously!

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The First Train to Perth–and I Don’t Know if I’m Ever Coming Home! Seriously!

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On January 21, 1869 smoke billowed out of the wide funnel of the wood-burning locomotive engine of the B & O train (Brockville and Ottawa Railway Company) as the temperature roared 40 degrees below zero and a blizzard blew across Brockville. The two little wooden cars were crowded with excited passengers along with a reporter for this maiden journey to the end of the line– which was Perth.

A week previous a train inspector had ‘thumbed up’ the journey and pronounced it safe and ready for business. But, it had snowed the day before, which inspectors had not anticipated, nor the passengers. The trip was reported as uneventful to Smiths Falls-but from Smiths Falls the journey was described as a ‘heap of trouble’. Snow and ice had caked on the rails of the puffing wood burner and the trains could just not gain any traction. The ‘cowcatcher’ caught all the snow in the centre tracks and turned it over on the rails now rendering progress impossible.

Some decided to go home after sitting there for awhile trusting the Perth Stage to get them home. However, the bolder folks decided to stay put on the ‘iron horse’ that had scorned the old planks roads over the swamps. The second engine had not hauled their passengers every far when it balked.  The engine was now dry and the passengers were instructed to scour the frozen ditches and creeks for water. This chore had to be done again a few miles down the road and then stalled once again barely two miles from Perth.

 

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The last train on the car came to a dead stop as the coupling of the car had given way leaving a car full of passengers all alone until the engine returned from Perth with a rope to hitch to the car. Finally at 7 that evening the engine lurched into Perth with passengers who had been on a train nearly 10 hours to travel 40 miles, and there remained the return journey. The train was supposed to return to Brockville at 8 that night but in the shunting of the train one of the cars had gotten off the track. Three more hours were spent in the cold bleak railway yard before the car was hoisted back on the rails.

 

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Photo by  Smiths Falls Railway History

 

Finally at 11 pm “all aboard” was called and the weary passengers arrived home at half past three that morning never ever to forget their first journey on the B and O Railway. But soon everyone did forget about that disastrous first journey and wanted to travel by rail. In February of 1859 The Bathurst Courier published its first advertisement featuring the first railroad time table and rates. The fare from Smiths Falls to Perth was 10 cents and from Perth to Brockville was a mere $1.50 return. Of course it wasn’t long before the Perth editor was lamenting in his newspaper that the journey to Brockville was taking business away from Perth.

 

historicalnotes

The line was extended to Carleton Place in 1859 and reached the Ottawa River through Almonte, Arnprior, and Sand Point in 1864. B & O turned over the right to build from Arnprior to Pembroke to Canada Central Railway and the line was extended through Renfrew County in the 1870s. Both companies were united under Canadian Pacific Railway Company and linked with a transcontinental network in 1881. Smiths Falls Railway History

 

Saturday October 7th & Sunday October 8th (Thanksgiving) (Tickets on sale September 2nd)

Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario

Smiths Falls, Ontario

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

James Fanning– Robert Nolan– Train Accident

When Trains Crash —Ashton Train Accident 1950

Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Memories from Carleton Place–Llew Lloyd and Peter Iveson

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

The trial of W. H. S. Simpson the Railway Mail Clerk

55 years ago–One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte

The Kick and Push Town of Folger

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Men That Road the Rails

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place

 

 

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

 

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Accident at the C.P.R. Shop –James Moulton

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Accident at the C.P.R. Shop –James Moulton

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Hi Linda

 The attached articles are about my Grandfather, James Moulton.  The day his accident happened, my Grandmother, Harriet Walker Fisher Moulton gave birth to their youngest daughter which made 8 children.  They eventually had two more sons.

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James Moulton was my Grandfather and Harriet Walker Fisher my Grandmother
who had a farm across the street from us on Sarah Street.All the children were born at 26 Sarah Street, in later years it was changed to 92 Sarah Street.

On Monday afternoon Mr. James Moulton of the C.P.R. shops in Carleton Place was seriously injured whilst engaged in assisting in repairing a snowplow. In some way the wing was put into motion and Mr. Moulton was caught and most severely crushed. He was rushed to the public hospital in Smiths Falls with little delay and everything is being done to save his life with very little hope of success. Mr. Moulton is  48 years of age and has a wife and seven children depending on him. 1925-02-06- Almonte Gazette

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The CPR gave my Grandparents a lifetime pass with the railroad and it was used a couple of times, mainly to go to Montreal when there had been other serious accidents in the family (Montreal seemed to be the place to go for medical care).  As far as I know, he did not receive any other financial benefits, and I don’t know if the CPR paid for his stay in hospital.  My Grandpa did not go back to work at the CPR, he was never very healthy after the accident.  He farmed on Sarah Street, Caldwell Street (where the school is now) and also a few acres on Woodward Street.  He lived to be 87 and died November 8, 1962 of “hardening of the arteries”, known as Alzheimer’s now. —-Norma Ford

 

 

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My favourite picture of my Grandfather James Moulton (how I remember him) and some of your readers will remember him from this picture.–Norma Ford

 

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Norma and I still have not found out when he was released from the Smiths Falls Hospital and returned to Carleton Place in the newspaper archives.

I know when he was sent home we was still bedridden.  My Grandmother did what a physical therapist would do today – rubbed him down, made sure he was turned and made him exercise his limbs.  She was credited with getting him walking again.  Something we think nothing about today but it must have been a real hardship back then with a bedridden husband, a new baby and 7 other children.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Mar 1968, Sat,  Page 5

 They (the family) said he was never the same physically again although I remember him milking the cows, other farm related work and he had a massive garden that he maintained although I now realize why he worked slower than my Dad.  —Norma Ford

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Nov 1962, Fri,  Page 3

 

 

 

historicalnotes

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This is a picture of Norma Ford’s family cow on the old Caldwell Street farm.  Donna McLaren posted it as she loves this cow..thank you!

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Today’s photo is of workers taking a break at the CPR Engine Repair Shops. Built in 1890 as a round house and repair shop for the Canadian Pacific Railway, it employed about 200 workers. After operations were moved to Smiths Falls, the building was purchased by the Canadian Cooperative Woolgrowers. Iron tracks from the turntable in the roundhouse were sold as scrap to help the war effort in 1940. Can you help us identify any of these men?–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Jun 1904, Mon,  Page 8

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Nov 1907, Mon,  Page 8

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Norma Ford

A Carleton Place Fenian Soldier’s Photo

Carleton Place Wins Prizes for their Wool!

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place– Wooly Bully!!!! Part 6

Before The Carleton Place Mews?

 

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

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The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

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In 1892 a scheme was proposed to build the Lanark County Electric Railway Company Perth, Lanark, Oliver’s Ferry, Smith’s Falls, Carleton Place, Almonte. Outside companies could help finance the venture and own a part of it. Riley and Wendler were the Americans from New York proposing the venture and locals included: Alexander H. Edwards and James Fowler from Carleton Place. In 1896 talks fell dead and as the Perth Courier said,“the whole scheme had a faraway look to it”. ..

Alexander H. Edwards 

Mayor of Carleton Place – 1897 – Lumber Manufacturer.

In 1898 and much back and forth it was defeated and Mr. Fowler formerly of Carleton Place and now of Arnprior was promoting a million dollar beet root project for sugar– and by the looks of the clipping below–water plants.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal09 May 1898, MonPage 7

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal30 Aug 1897, MonPage 8

Carleton Place 1897

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal30 Aug 1897, MonPage 8

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May 7, 1898-Mr. Jas. Fowler, the promoter of an electric railway in this county now proposes to run it from Lanark Village to Smith’s Falls via Oliver’s Ferry and Perth. He wants the corporation of Perth to give a cash bonus of $10,000 or to purchase $25,000 first mortgage 5 per cent. 20-year bonds.

May 28,1898-The promoters of the Lanark County Electric Railway are again on the warpath. They want $10,000 each from Lanark, Perth and Smith’s Falls, and promise the people of the latter .place a belt line in their town.

April 12, 1898 – Ground breaking for the County of Lanark Electric Railway was accomplished by Mr. James Doyle, of Perth, and the ground was broken on his farm at Armstrong’s Corners, near Perth.  He used his road grader for the purpose, and turned up the sod for about two acres along the proposed route.  The object was to save the company’s charter, although little else was achieved, and the line was never opened to traffic.

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Clipped from– Local Railway Newspaper Items.. the complete rise and fall is documented here. December 8,1898

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Related reading:

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

The trial of W. H. S. Simpson the Railway Mail Clerk

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

55 years ago–One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte

The Kick and Push Town of Folger

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

The Men That Road the Rails

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

 

The Love Story of the Lanark County Brakeman

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Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario

 

I found this anonymous story and had to share it. A brakeman in the service of the railway that ran through Lanark County fell between two cars of a moving train, the merciless wheels crushing off both legs. The unfortunate man was removed to a comfortable place and being told by the attending surgeon that he could not survive the injury, he was asked if he wished to send any message to his family.

He replied that he would not die until his wife could come to him and the surgeon shook his head in a doubting manner. The bleeding helpless but conscious brakeman, knowing that every one despaired of his life, again assured them this time more determinedly than before, that he would foil the plans of his master, Death, until his wife in person could receive his farewell.

 

 

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lindaseccaspina – WordPress.com-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

When one of the superintendents received telegraphic advice of the accident and the dying man’s wish, he ordered his most experienced and courageous engineer to attach his locomotive to a coach and bring his wife to the side of her husband. In ten minutes from the time the order was given the train had the wife on board even though the night was stormy.

 

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Perth Remembered

The Superintendent stood at the back of the telegraph operator, and in flashes of electricity ordered all trains on to side tracks. Through the darkness and the storm the “special” whirled upon its mission of devotion and love. The villagers who hovered around the depot stoves at way stations on winter nights crowded out upon the platforms and stood in respectful silence as the mighty locomotive dazed both sight and hearing for an instant only.

Steel rails vibrated under wheels and the engineer knew that God and a good road-bed were in his favour. As he backed his driving-wheels at the station his engine seemed as proudly conscious of victory as does the race-horse when leading under the wire. The brakeman had kept his word. Husband and wife embraced. Bystanders, blinded by pitying tears, left the two alone for a moment, only a moment. For with the kiss and the farewell the brakeman closed his eyes and died.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Related reading

 

A McDonalds Corners Love Story

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

The Holiday Train is Coming!!! Help Support the Food Bank!

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18th edition of the CP Holiday Train ready to support communities and raise awareness

As in years past, two trains will operate coast-to-coast under the Holiday Train banner, with approximately 150 shows held in November and December. The train that operates primarily through the U.S. will launch in the Montreal area on Nov. 25, while the all-Canada train’s first shows will come a day later, also in Montreal. The U.S. train will complete its final shows in Saskatchewan on Dec. 15, and the final show of the tour will take place Dec. 17 at Port Coquitlam, B.C.

“We are very excited about this year’s CP Holiday Train and are encouraging all event attendees to bring healthy, nutritious food items to the shows,” said Pam Jolliffe, Interim Executive Director, Food Banks Canada. “For the last two decades, CP has played an integral role in raising essential food for the holidays and in raising awareness of hunger-related issues.”

Every pound of food and dollar raised at each stop stays with the local food bank to help feed those in need in that community. 

Performing this year!!

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DALLAS SMITH

Platinum selling Country star Dallas Smith has blazed a path across genres in Canadian music for nearly two decades and fans continue to prove they’ll follow him wherever he wants to go. This Vancouver, BC native has an armful of JUNO and CCMA Award wins and nominations and continues one of the most talked about journeys in Canadian country music.

“Being able to help local food banks across the country is something I’m excited to be a part of. I’ve toured Canada many times but not like this. I can’t wait for this amazing experience to begin”.
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Finch Tracks adjacent to James Street between Williams Street & George Street 2016-11-27 2:30 PM 2:45 PM – 3:15 PM Dallas Smith and Odds
Merrickville 103 East Broadway & County Road #2. South side of crossing near Bay Street 2016-11-27 4:45 PM 5:00 PM – 5:30 PM Dallas Smith and Odds
Smiths Falls Smith Falls Train Station, 63 Victoria St. 2016-11-27 6:20 PM 6:30 PM – 7:00 PM Dallas Smith and Odds
Perth Rail yard near the junction of Herriott Street & Sherbrooke Street E 2016-11-27 7:40 PM 8:00 PM – 8:30 PM Dallas Smith and Odds

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad