Tag Archives: quilts

Mae Morphy’s Quilt — Julie Sadler

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Mae Morphy’s Quilt — Julie Sadler
Mae Morphy’s quilt

Last week I reposted a story I wrote about quilts ( posted below) and how much they mean to me. One, I lost in a fire, another is hanging on by a thread and last year a Lanark County one made in 1902 was rescued at an auction. — The Lanark County Quilt and its Families

Friday morning, Julie Sadler called me up and said she had something for me. There was a precious quilt from her grandmother May Morphy. I did not know what to say as as I believe a bed without a quilt is like a sky without a star. Thank you so much Julie– it will be cherished. I asked her to send me a story about May and she did.

 May Morphy’s quilt

Mae Morphy by Julie Sadler

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1907, Mon  •  Page 14

 May Morphy ( Mrs. Warner Morphy) was my maternal grandmother. Born in Ottawa in 1895, she married Warner in 1922. He was Edmond Morphy’s great-grandson and grandpa worked at the train station. May was a very private lady. I know she is shaking her finger at me from above right now. However, her passion was quilting!

As long as I can remember, she was at the church every Wednesday afternoon quilting with the ladies. She would walk down rain or shine. They first lived on William Street and then bought my family home on Catherine Street .

My mother was born in that house and the front room always had a quilt set up. She made dozens over the years and not a sewing machine in sight! No long arms in those days! Every stitch was by hand with love and her quilts are my prized possessions! 

The Auction of the Year in Carleton Place

Ray Paquette
This house always fascinated me. When I was a lad the house was owned by a Mr. Feltham (sic) who ran a rag business out of a former hotel on the west side of Moore Street in the area beside Interval house that was torn down in the 1950’s and replaced with a Cities Service gas station.

When the Burgess house on Lake Avenue ( next to the hospital) had an auction (1940’s?) she bought their grand piano for $200.00. A lot of money for her. My grandfather knew nothing about it. She had it moved to Catherine Street, but it didn’t fit!

No problem! 

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

She herself took a sledgehammer and knocked out the plaster archway between the two front rooms. Voila, it fits ! As did the quilts. My mother played it every day. After the fire in February 1954 at the United Church, my grandparents donated the piano. It is still played there regularly. Quilts are a link to our past. They each have a story. Yours Linda was made in the mid 1920’s. Almost 100 years old! I do wish more people loved them as much as you and I do!

Julie Sadler

 May Morphy’s quilt– Thanks Julie!

For the Love of Quilts- Linda Knight Seccaspina

Memories of quilts being made and given with love were the norm in my childhood, and each quilt in our family had a memory.


Seven days after my birth I was placed in a quilt my grandmother had made and brought immediately to her home as my mother was ill. I was tucked into my crib with the same quilt I came home from the hospital in.

One night my father gathered me up in that same quilt and smuggled me into the Royal Victoria Hospital hoping my mother might remember me as she had postpartum depression. I can still see her looking down at the cards she was playing solitaire with while I was holding on to the edge of that dear quilt in fear. To this day I will never forget that image – my father says I was barely two, but I still remember the grayness of the room. While my life was sterile and cold, the quilt held warmth and security. My grandmother always said that blankets wrap you in warmth but quilts wrap you in love.

At age 12 my mother died, and my grandmother sat with me on her veranda and wrapped that same quilt around me while I cried. Life was never the same after that, and the quilt was placed on my bed like an old friend when I stayed with her. I would stare at the painting on the wall while I tried to sleep and thought that a lot of people understood art but not quilts. If I had a lot of money I would own a quilt and not a piece of art, because in the end which gives you the most comfort?

When I got married at age 21, my Grandmother sat at the dining room table for weeks and worked on a quilt for my new home. As I traveled down the road of life the quilt was always there while people came and went. Although it was aging gracefully it was still heavy and secure anytime I needed it. Through death and sickness it held comfort, and the promise that it would never desert me. This quilt held my life with all the bits and pieces, joys and sorrows, that had been stitched into it with love.

At age 47 the quilt died peacefully in my arms. A terrible house fire had destroyed it, and as I looked at the charred edges I realized the thread that held it together had bound the both of us forever. Now it was time to go down the final road by myself, and remembering the words of Herman Hesse I began the journey.

“Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.”
Linda Knight Seccaspina

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Sep 1953, Wed  •  Page 14
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Dec 1947, Thu  •  Page 16


Buttons and Quilts by Sherri Iona (Lashley)

The Lanark County Quilt and its Families

The Ladies of St. Andrews

Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

Carleton Place Makes Better Homes & Gardens!!!

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Carleton Place Makes Better Homes & Gardens!!!

I am always thrilled when a business or individual gets noticed outside of our town boundaries. Thrilled I tell you. So it was with great joy that I heard that The Pickle Dish at 24 Lake Ave West in Carleton Place got picked up for 11 glossy pages in the American magazine that has been around since I was little— “Better Homes & Gardens” (Quilt Sampler)

It is the Fall/Winter 2019 issue which you can pick up locally.

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and 4 more pages how to make the quilt…

 

Also in the magazine!!!

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Carleton Place has only one place to go and that is up!!! #supportlocal

 

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Here is the history of the house that The Pickle Dish is in.

Threads of Morals on Lake Ave West

Emotional Patchwork — Quilting Your Life Together

The Lanark County Quilt and its Families

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The Lanark County Quilt and its Families

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This was purchased at a Gallery 15 auction on Monday and was a crazy quilt and made in 1902 in Lanark County. It is signed by the approximately 30 people who had a hand in making it.

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mary jane phelan o’neill
Mary O’Donnell was my great aunt and Im sure she along with her sister Bernadette,my grandmother, would have been among the quilters. She was born near Sheridan’s Rapids Lanark county. She married Anthony Quinn and then lived in Perth. She actually went by May not Mary.What a lovely thing to see! Thank you so much Linda for sharing.
Kathleen Quinn-Ashton
I am also related to May O’Donnell, she would be my Great Grandmother. Her son Joseph Vincent Quinn is the father to my Daddy Terence Michael Quinn.
So exciting to see this!

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Emma Playfair
Father
James Playfair
Sibling
William
Birth
Ontario 1877
Residence
1901 Bathurst Lanark (south/sud) Ontario

Karen Julian Hi Linda: When I saw the name Playfair on the quilt I contacted my friend, Katherine Quinsey (nee Playfair) and here is her response that I thought you would find interesting. “Thank you so much, Karen, for the post about the Lanark quilt. Emma is probably my grandfather Ross’s (b. 1886) older sister – but I will check on that. In the meantime, I can share this on the Playfair family FB page and send the post on to my brother Phil, who is a family historian. Thank you!”

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Record information.
Name
Nellie Caldwell
Mother
Helen Caldwell
Father
John Caldwell
Sibling
Esttren Caldwell
Birth
Ontario abt 1881
Residence
Dalhousie and Sherbrooke North Lanark North Ontario

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Name
Peter Delaney
Spouse
Mary Delaney
Birth
Ontario 1864
Residence
1901 Drummond Lanark (south/sud) Ontario

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Minnie Closs
Birth
Dalhousie abt 1874
Death
19/11/1915 Lanark Ontario Canada

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Karen Andrews

I recognized several of the names on this quilt, and have since conversed with someone in Lanark Co. who was able to tell me about some of the family connections. The names that stand out the most for me are: “Uncle Jerry and Aunt ‘Kate’ Nolan of Rainny River”. Note: Jeremiah NOLAN and Catherine (MULLALLY) Nolan were my great grandparents; early pioneers who staked claim, settled/farmed in Sleeman, Ontario.. in the Rainy River District. At that time, with the railroad coming through, the town of Beaver Mills (now known as Rainy River) was a very busy community , 7 miles to the west. The census for that era can be found in Algoma Co. I imagine that Ann Nolan, who’s name is on the same quilt, would be their daughter, Anastasia Nolan. She became a nun (Sister Alexis) and she taught in various schools in that area, as well as in Old Chelsea, Quebec. (I am so very curious as to ‘who’ cousin Lorne Nolan was, because I’ve never known of any Nolan family connections there! I’ve wondered about the Nolans who were Carleton Place, but have never known a connection there either. ) By the way, Jeremian Nolan’s mother (Anastasia (Shortt) NOLAN, a widow with two young boys: Thomas and Jeremiah) married Owen O’Donnell. Both are buried in Furguson Falls, ON. They had two children: Catherine and Michael. I have a lovely picture of Mary O’Donnell…who became Mrs. Anthony Quinn…anlso named on this quilt. It was one of the few photos that were in Jeremiah and Catherine Nolan’s old velvet photo album (which I inherited), and one of the few pictures that had a name written on the back. (I was raised across the road from their homestead, in Sleeman, then later, in Rainy River, ON. After marriage, and for the past 50+ years, we have lived in the District of Kenora, ON. ….only 100 miles from Rainy River. This article, posted yesterday, about this particular quilt, is one of the most interesting, and exciting on-line discoveries that I’ve come across during my family research. A fascinating piece of history and a major treasure!! Much appreciated!

In hindsight, I’ve just noticed that this Lanark Quilt article was just posted today! It’s truly “the luck of the Irish” for me to have discovered it so quickly; on the same day! Many thanks!

September 11, 2019

Rodena Bell from the Women’s Institute South Lanark (Balderson) added more info about names of those on the quilt:

Rufus Purdon– McDonald’s Corners

A Jackson ( Bill Jackson his son was the undertaker in McDonald’s Corners)

Bella Purdon  McDonald Corners (married Arthur Forbes)

Bessie Purdon McDonald’s Corners (married Joseph Arnett)

John Purdon– McDonald’s Corners

Mr. Legary-owned the butcher shop McDonald’s Corners

From Louise Gour

The quilt was well received at the Lanark County Quilters Guild and many were fascinated by it’s history.
I did have conversations with some of our members about the quilt and how all the names are embroidered on it.  One member mentioned that this is likely a quilt that was made as a fundraiser.  Either a church or community fundraiser.   As we looked at the quilt more closely we noticed that all the stitching looks to be very consistent.  This would indicate that likely only 1 person would  have had a “hand” in quilting/making it.  This is likely Ms Mary O’Donnell as she is noted as “made by” .  When we see quilts made as part of a “quilting bee” with many people helping to make them,  we usually notice differences in how the stitches are done.  Stitching is kind of like how everyone’s hand signatures are all slightly different from person to person. What was common in that time/era was for people to contribute materials (fabric, threads, batting) or even some money for purchase of new materials.  It’s likely that the names embroidered on the quilt are those who contributed in this way to the making of the charity quilt.
This is only our thoughts on the possible history of this great treasure. Some of the ladies in my Guild have been making quilts for a very long time.  They do know their craft well. 😉   I’ve only been Quilting for 2 years now and I’m only a novice compared to them.  I trust their knowledge on this topic.

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If your museum or group would like to see this quilt or have it in your museum for two weeks– EMAIL me at sav_77@yahoo.com. I would like to see this quilt be seen by as many people in Lanark County

historicalnotes

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where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

The North Lanark Quilts

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The North Lanark Quilts

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  25 Aug 1971, Wed,  Page 41

 

Seven days after my birth I was placed in a quilt my grandmother had made and brought immediately to her home as my mother was ill. I was tucked into my crib with the same quilt I came home from the hospital in. At age 12 my mother died, and my grandmother sat with me on her veranda and wrapped that same quilt around me while I cried. Life was never the same after that, and the quilt was placed on my bed like an old friend when I stayed with her.  I would stare at the painting on the wall while I tried to sleep and thought that a lot of people understood art but not quilts. If I had a lot of money I would own a quilt and not a piece of art,  because in the end which gives you the most comfort?

Read the rest here: The Pickle Jar of Quilts

 

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This fundraising signature quilt was made in 1889 by the Scott family who owned the Pakenham General Store. Each name is beautifully signed with pen and ink. Do you see any names you recognize? All Photos-North Lanark Regional Museum 

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North Lanark Regional Museum

This (tiny) quilt belonged to Ethel Murial (West) MacFarlane

 

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Buttons and Quilts by Sherri Iona (Lashley)

The Pickle Jar of Quilts

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Emotional Patchwork at The Mississippi Valley Textile Museum

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Our neighbours at the Mississippi Valley Textile Mill Museum in Almonte are showing a wonderful display of quilts. Why should we go? Quilts are treasures that follow their owner everywhere- no questions asked. All the beloved quilts created by the Crazy Quilters of Almonte were made to celebrate events and tell a story. Sit on one of the benches and be their material witness. Every quilt is a piece of art because each one is a masterpiece within.

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Seven days after my birth I was placed in a quilt my grandmother had made and brought immediately to her home. My mother suddenly had no idea who anyone was including her brand new daughter. Doctors hospitalized her, blamed it on postpartum depression and said it would be over in a few weeks. Each night for almost two years my father made the 45 mile journey into Montreal, Quebec only to have my mother insist she had no clue who he was. While he was sitting in the cab of a neighbours semi trailer on the way home, I was being tucked into my crib with the same quilt I came home from the hospital in.

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One night my father gathered me up in that same quilt and smuggled me into the Royal Victoria Hospital hoping my mother might remember me. I can still see her looking down at the cards she was playing solitaire with while I was holding on to the edge of that dear quilt in fear. To this day I will never forget that image – my father says I was barely two but I still remember the grayness of the room. While my life was sterile and cold, the quilt held warmth and security. My grandmother always said that blankets might give you warmth, but quilts wrap you in love.

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At age 12 my mother died, and my grandmother sat with me on her veranda and wrapped that same quilt around me while I cried. Life was never the same after that, and the quilt was placed on my bed like an old friend when I stayed with her. As I traveled down the road of life that quilt was always there while people came and went. Although it was aging gracefully it was still heavy and secure anytime I needed it. Through death and sickness it held comfort and the promise that it would never desert me. This quilt held my life with all the bits and pieces, joys and sorrows that had been stitched into it with love.

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At age 47 the quilt died peacefully in my arms. A terrible house fire had destroyed it, and as I looked at the charred edges, I realized the thread that held it together still bound the both of us forever. Now it was time to go down the final road by myself and remembering the words of Herman Hesse I began the journey without my quilt.

“Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.”

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Quilting is about more than stitch lines– a quilt is nothing but an expression of love. Go see the result of expressions live at the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum. You will not regret it.

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Mississippi Valley Textile Museum

3, Rosamond St. E.
Almonte, Ontario
K0A 1A0

October to March
Tuesday to Saturday: 10 am to 4 pm.

April to September
Tuesday to Saturday: 10 am to 4 pm.
Sunday: 1 pm to 4 pm.

Children under 12 are always free

Admission $7.00
Members admitted without charge

The Pickle Jar of Quilts

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As I felt the quilts in Wisteria in Carleton Place I remembered. Memories of quilts being made and given with love were the norm in my childhood,  and each quilt in our family had a memory.

Seven days after my birth I was placed in a quilt my grandmother had made and brought immediately to her home as my mother was ill. I was tucked into my crib with the same quilt I came home from the hospital in.

One night my father gathered me up in that same quilt and smuggled me into the Royal Victoria Hospital hoping my mother might remember me as she had postpartum depression. I can still see her looking down at the cards she was playing solitaire with while I was holding on to the edge of that dear quilt in fear. To this day I will never forget that image – my father says I was barely two,  but I still remember the grayness of the room. While my life was sterile and cold, the quilt held warmth and security. My grandmother always said that blankets wrap you in warmth but quilts wrap you in love.

At age 12 my mother died, and my grandmother sat with me on her veranda and wrapped that same quilt around me while I cried. Life was never the same after that, and the quilt was placed on my bed like an old friend when I stayed with her.  I would stare at the painting on the wall while I tried to sleep and thought that a lot of people understood art but not quilts. If I had a lot of money I would own a quilt and not a piece of art,  because in the end which gives you the most comfort?

When I got married at age 21,  my Grandmother sat at the dining room table for weeks and worked on a quilt for my new home. As I traveled down the road of life the quilt was always there while people came and went. Although it was aging gracefully it was still heavy and secure anytime I needed it. Through death and sickness it held comfort, and the promise that it would never desert me. This quilt held my life with all the bits and pieces, joys and sorrows, that had been stitched into it with love.

At age 47 the quilt died peacefully in my arms. A terrible house fire had destroyed it, and as I looked at the charred edges I realized the thread that held it together had bound the both of us forever. Now it was time to go down the final road by myself,  and remembering the words of Herman Hesse I began the journey.

“Some of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.”

Shopping information: All these beautiful quilts come from:

Wisteria: ‘a little of this.. a little of that. and a whole lot of …

Wisteria

 62 Bridge Street,

 Carleton Place, Ontario

 K7C 2V3

 613-253-8097

Email: info@wisteriacp.com

The PickleDish Quilt Shop on Bridge Street
Quilters Poker Run 
Visitors will “Hop and Shop” 
in Downtown Carleton Place.
The PickleDish Quilt Shop located at 113 Bridge Street is part of a Quilters Poker Run “Shop Hop”. This is an annual event and will be held between March 20st and April 4th. It is expected over the event period that 100 or more woman from the following communities of Navan, Chesterville, Hawkesbury, Kemptville, Perth, Orleans, Rideau Ferry, Nepean, Arnprior, Vankleek Hill, Brockville, Almonte, Richmond, Kanata, and Ottawa will travel to downtown Carleton Place.
'Welcome Quilters from all over to our Downtown this Friday!The PickleDish Quilt Shop on Bridge StreetQuilters Poker Run Visitors will “Hop and Shop” in Downtown Carleton Place. The PickleDish Quilt Shop located at 113 Bridge Street is part of a Quilters Poker Run “Shop Hop”.  This is an annual event and will be held between March 20st and April 4th.   It is expected over the event period that 100 or more woman from the following communities of Navan, Chesterville, Hawkesbury, Kemptville, Perth, Orleans, Rideau Ferry, Nepean, Arnprior, Vankleek Hill, Brockville, Almonte, Richmond, Kanata, and Ottawa will travel to downtown Carleton Place.'

Christine Armstrong Channels Movie Star Betty Hutton

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Christine Armstrong's photo.
Christine Armstrong's photo.
Christine Armstrong's photo.

So this is what I have been up to the past few days. Much cleaning later, and the machine is operational and fully cleaned and sparkling. Great Grandma’s machine is ready to make quilts again. Also did a little research and found that the machine was manufactured on April 21, 1915 in Elizabeth, New Jersey and is one of 5000 made in total. It sports the wing decals that were only used from 1912 to 1920. The machine is a model 115 with the cabinet table no 2. I was able to find old original replacement parts so that the machine has all the attachments and screwdrivers it would have come with. I think she would be happy to see it cleaned up and being used over 100 years after she got it.

Ohhh, the sewing machine, the sewing machine
A girl’s best friend
If I didn’t having my sewing machine
I’d a-come to no good end
But a bobbin a bobbin and peddle a peddle
And wheel the wheel by day
So by night I feel so weary that I never get out to play.

From the film “The Perils Of Pauline” (1947)
Betty Hutton (with Joe Lilley & His Orch.) – 1947

Read Christine’s other story..

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

achruu

Carleton Place- The Happiest Damn Town in Lanark County

For the Facebook Group:


Tilting the Kilt, Vintage Whispers from Carleton Place by Linda Seccaspina is available at Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street, the Carleton Place Beckwith Museum in Carleton Place, Ontario and The Mississippi Valley Textile Mill in Almonte.  available on all Amazon sites (Canada, US, Europe) and Barnes and Noble