Tag Archives: Queen

Making a Difference Linda Knight Seccaspina

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Making a Difference Linda Knight Seccaspina

Making a Difference Linda Knight Seccaspina

When I was a child we had to sing God Save the Queen each and every day at school. When we sang the words: “Long live our Noble Queen”, I always thought it meant Queen Elizabeth would live a long long time–and she did.

Between the two Queens: Elizabeth and Victoria, one looms larger than the rest — longevity.

Some protest that royalty is irrelevant in today’s world, outdated, and anti-democratic, but in all honesty, I admire this woman for her character and resilience. During WW2 she and her mother stayed with their people. Through all the turbulent years she has remained devoted to her duty.

Personally, I have  known a  few that have had a sense of duty like the late Queen Elizabeth, and I can’t imagine how hard it is to be stoic all these years. I was told a story in my life awhile ago about another person that was devoted, and today I feel like I should tell that story.

I was once great friends with a gentleman named John Manchester and his lovely wife Judy when I lived in Berkeley, Ca. I thought I knew everything about John, but I didn’t. I came home after one delightful outing and told my husband that John’s father had written some sort of book about President Kennedy. Steve gave me one of his looks and asked me if I knew who his father was.

In the next five minutes I was told that John’s father was William Manchester who had written “The Death of a President”. The book was published in 1967 by Harper and Row and became one the great American Classics. Seeing that my likes in those days consisted of celebrities, Madonna, and Sweet Valley High books, I brushed it all off.

Later that week John wrote a blog about his father and how he spent 95% of his time locked away writing. For 15 hours a day, 7 days a week he continously conducted over 1000 interviews to write a book about the assassination of John F. Kennedy behind locked doors. I read the blog three times, rolled my chair back, and began to think.

How does someone become so devoted? I will never be William Manchester, but I am very persistent in my goals. I begin at 7 am and sometimes finish around 8 pm researching and writing history, posting it on social media, and devoting a lot of time to my community as a councillor. 

Some days I am sure all of us will wonder if we are making a difference in life. Throughout my life I have tried hard to make people understand that they mattered, and hope that maybe I made their day brighter at some point in time.  But, I have always wondered if I have done enough. Had I really made a difference to anyone? Could a gal that grew up in the Eastern Townships of Quebec and now lives in rural Lanark County, Ontario ever make a difference?

Was I obsessed with my work ethic like William Manchester? Am I a writer now? Of course not; even with 6 published books– I will forever be a blogger and will never become even close to becoming a great writer like William Manchester– but I do know one thing. I have figured out that I can tell stories with my words just like the people that sat around the pickle barrel a long time ago and I am quite happy and content with that.

John Manchester was a real writer and his words made a difference to me—and that my friends is what it is all about in the very end; to be able  to make a difference in someone’s life. My purpose in life is making things better for people. That’s all–everything else is just icing on the cake.

No matter how you look at it, Queen Elizabeth maintained a dignity and class that has fallen by the wayside around the world. This has taken a great strength of character that few are capable of. For that alone, she deserves to be recognized, respected and admired. Queen Elizabeth, in death as in life,  has joined the tiny band of monarchs who have genuinely made a difference to history. I celebrate all those that show endurance and if anything, you have to give her one thing—this woman never missed a day of work.

Marion Bolger — Almonte Hockey Queen 1957

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Marion Bolger — Almonte Hockey Queen 1957

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1957, Thu  •  Page 12

1957 Marion Bolger read-

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Apr 1957, Thu  •  Page 41


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Mar 1957, Tue  •  Page 20

Here She Comes —Miss Almonte High School January 1958

Miss Almonte 1975

Still Looking for Memories of Theresa Galvin –Miss Almonte

Mr. Mississippi Beauty Pageant 1982 Joe Banks

Jean Duncan Lanark Dairy Queen

Remembering Rosy Robertson

1970s Lanark County Beauty Queens

Here She Comes Miss Almonte — Karen Hirst and other Notes

Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos

The Dark World of the Miss Civil Service Beauty Contests

  1. Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos
  2. Last Night I Saw Someone I Loved at the Halloween Parade
  3. Glamorous Marilyn Allen Miss Snow Queen and Others 1950s
  4. The Mikado ADHS 1956 Fran Cooper

1957 Lanark Snow Queen Contest — Sabourin Scrapbook

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1957 Lanark Snow Queen Contest — Sabourin Scrapbook

Photos- Jean Sabourin

back of newspaper says 1957-Photos- Jean Sabourin

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Jan 1957, Thu  •  Page 36

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jan 1957, Thu  •  Page 37

Pat Campbell entered The Miss Eastern Ontario contest but did not win. Joan Hendry of Carleton Place won.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Jan 1957, Mon  •  Page 17

Miss Bernice Campbell — Queen of the Diamond

Joan Johnston Queen of the Prom 1956

Who was Miss Peanut Queen in 1952?

Bowling Queen of the Ottawa Valley 1962

Here She Comes —Miss Almonte High School January 1958

1970s Lanark County Beauty Queens

Miss Almonte Hockey Queen 1958

Miss Almonte 1975

Still Looking for Memories of Theresa Galvin –Miss Almonte

Mr. Mississippi Beauty Pageant 1982 Joe Banks

Miss Bernice Campbell — Queen of the Diamond

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Miss Bernice Campbell — Queen of the Diamond

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Sep 1957, Sat  •  Page 10

July 1957

Miss Bernice Campbell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ross Campbell of Almonte was chosen Queen of the Diamond at the Sterling R.A. softball contest held recently at the North Lanark Agricultural Society Fair Grounds, Almonte.

Miss Campbell was chosen from among nine contestants, three from Arnprior, Muriel McGrath, Maureen McGrath, Doreen Currie; three from Carleton Place, Marilyn McIntyre, Eileen Lowe and Helen Lay. The three from Almonte were Bernice Campbell, Dianne Clement and Carol Baird.

The judging was done by Dr. Melville Pilkey, Almonte; Mr. and Mrs. Wesley More of Arnprior. Miss Judy Guthrie of Almonte, who was recently chosen Bowling Queen, crowned Miss Campbell, Queen of the Diamond.

The address was read by Miss Marion Bolger, Hockey Queen of the Almonte Town Hockey League. Mr. Leo Lindsay, director of the Sterling ft. A presented the Lindsay Award to Miss Campbell. Mr. H. Boyes of Almonte, acted as master of ceremonies and Mr. John Currie of Arnprior, instructor for Sterling R.A. presented the contestants to the judges. Some 50 persons were present for the successful event. Mrs. Rita Couthier, District Chairman of Arnprior and Lorrain Lyons of Almonte were the convenors. Following the contest, refreshments were served and a social hour spent.

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
27 Feb 1961, Mon  •  Page 6– MISS EASTERN ONTARIO — Sandra Warner’ of Smiths Falls is bannered Miss Eastern Ontario of 1961 by Heather Black of Carleton Place last year’s title holder The judging was held in Perth Saturday 

16-year-old Sandra Warner daughter of Mr and Mrs C W Warner of Smiths Falls a Smiths Falls District Collegiate student was chosen Miss Eastern Ontario at Perth’s seventh winter carnival held Saturday night.

Seven hundred spectators packed the auditorium despite heavy downpour of rain and hazardous driving conditions. Surrounding towns were well represented. It was the second occasion that a Smiths Falls girl won the title, Marilyn Allen was the 1958 winner. There were nine girls entered in the contest. They were auditioned in Perth Collegiate Saturday afternoon and the announcement of the winner was made after the young ladies walked from the rear of the auditorium .

Judges of the contest were Renee Dornano, Jewell Graham, Pierre Belisle, and Jim Terrell of the CBC Ottawa Miss Warner was crowned by Heather Black of Carleton Place winner of the title in 1958.The pretty young miss was presented with the Courier Rose Bowl by N E H Turner and with a bouquet by Ottawa gas company. Other contestants were: Marilyn McCann, Renfrew, Jeanette Giroud Arnprior, Bernice Campbell Almonte, Janice McDowell Carleton Place, Mary R onson South Mountain, Heather Crawford Perth, and Sandra Tullis Lanark .Each of the contestants received a cheque to $50 from John Dunn of the Ottawa gas firm. William Luxton, CKWS Kingston was the master of ceremonies and Mayor E Burchell welcomed the large crowd.

Coming Events July 1957

COMING EVENTS WRESTLING, FRIDAY, JULY 26 9 p.m., Almonte Community Center.

LOCAL REGATTA AT JAS. Turner’s on Sun., July 7. Members to bring lunch and prizes. Admission free.

DANCING EVERY SATURDAY night, at the N.L.A.S. hall. Hayshakers’ Orchestra. Refreshment booth. Admission 50c.

SQUARE AND ROUND DANCING at Blakeney every Friday night. Ronnie McMunn and his country cousins, from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Admission 50 cts.

SOCIAL, PAKENHAM Community Grounds on Wed., July 17. Ball games, bingo, games and barn dance. Music by Ron McMunn’s orchestra. Sponsored by Pakenham R.A.

Joan Johnston Queen of the Prom 1956

Who was Miss Peanut Queen in 1952?

Bowling Queen of the Ottawa Valley 1962

Here She Comes —Miss Almonte High School January 1958

1970s Lanark County Beauty Queens

Miss Almonte Hockey Queen 1958

Miss Almonte 1975

Still Looking for Memories of Theresa Galvin –Miss Almonte

Mr. Mississippi Beauty Pageant 1982 Joe Banks

My Personal Story About Royalty

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My Personal Story About Royalty

Before the storm at the North Lanark Regional Museum in Appleton. Mississippi Mills Mayor Christa Lowry and Lanark County MP Scott Reid and myself

A Royal of a Story Linda Knight Seccaspina– Sherbrooke Daily Record Column

The late Prince Phillip was once quoted “that when a man opens a car door for his wife, it’s either because it’s a new car, or a new wife”. My very proper British grandmother Mary Louise Deller Knight was never a fan of his, but one thing she definitely was– was a top fan of the British family. So was my Grandfather who listened religiously at noon each day to the BBC News. If anything came on about the Royal family Mary was quickly summoned from her lunch preparations to sit with him listening to details. After that great discussion was had over lunch about what was going on with the Royal family. 

For years I wondered why we had such close knit conversations about the Royal Family and one day, when she felt I was old enough my Grandmother told me. The story stemmed back to my Grandfather’s side living back in London, England. His father was a music publisher and ran British music halls and his Grandfather Henry was a barrister. Henry had a sister that was what Grampy called “worse than Princess Margaret”. 

Louisa was actually a lady in waiting for Queen Victoria and it seemed she was doing more than waiting on hand and foot. In my Grandmother’s terse diction Louisa was said to have “loose skirts”. For years I imagined Louisa wearing baggy skirts until one day while drinking a cuppa tea I figured it all out, and then proceeded to choke with laughter.

Sad to say Louisa was banished from court, but I wish to tell you just in case you are concerned at all– that she ended up marrying quite well. Louisa married a Duke of Essex and her descendants down the line owned the trucking company that hauled the milk for the Nestle Pudding Company. It goes to show you that the proof is always in the pudding as there definitely are no instant pudding stories in my ancestry.

After Harry and Meghan’s vs The Royal Family presentation on Oprah I wondered to myself what my grandparents would have thought about it. I know that my Grandmother would not have put up with it. If you were raised in a British family: it’s a stiff upper lip, even if they chop your head off. My Grandfather would have taken a quick trip to the basement, had a drop of sherry and been totally mortified. He would have looked at my grandmother and said, “Well Mary, they mucked that one up!”

I honestly don’t think they would have understood today’s modern royalty. They also would not have been amused to see their own granddaughter (me) frequently wearing tiaras to the grocery store or for council meetings. But, you know my dentist told me I needed a crown one day and I was like, “I know right?” 

A phone call would have been immediate to their granddaughter who was also writing about the history of  ‘taking sexy back’ with Brothel Bertie (King Edward the VII). My grandparents had a hard enough time with me liking the Beatles, let alone write about King Edward the VII who was secretly called “The Prince of Pleasure”. His royal highness routinely gave his mother Queen Victoria, a royal headache with his frequent trips to the Parisian brothels. They say he literally killed his father when dear old Dad found out what a “luster buster”  Edward was. 

Honestly, there’s nothing really more to say except I am grateful that my Grandparents were not alive to watch The Crown. They would not have been amused, and my Grandfather would be rolling out the Encyclopedias every ten minutes fact checking.

Anyways, the sign of a true Queen is that she holds respect for others, as well as her crown. I agree with Queen Elizabeth, some days you just have to throw on a crown and remind everyone who you are dealing with.

We send to Your Majesty our heartfelt wishes and pray that this year will bring happiness, good health and many blessings as the entire Commonwealth pays tribute to you for your constant service and duty to us all.

God Save the Queen!

The Queen’s Cousins — Locked in a Mental Ward

Taking Sexy Back with Brothel Bertie aka Edward the VII

Communicating About History with Humour? — Jim Sharp Comments

Tales of the Queen’s Underwear and all those “Accidents”

FACT – The Queen is Not Affiliated with Freddie Mercury
Taking Sexy Back with Brothel Bertie aka Edward the VII
The Dolls of Queen Victoria 1899
Should we Change the Name of Victoria Day? Another Assault on Dead People

Mr. Mississippi Beauty Pageant 1982 Joe Banks

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Mr. Mississippi Beauty Pageant  1982 Joe Banks

Winner Joe Banks

Almonte has a new reigning Mr Mississippi. And believe it or not, it’s our own Gazette editor, Joe Banks, (who?) was crowned (With 14 real carrots) Mr Mississippi 1982 last Thursday night. 

A total of five contestants entered the prestigious event with a panel of five female judges rendering the final verdict. Mr Banks faced stiff competition from Hank Hallas of the Lions Club (Mr Lion), Dave McFadden, Almonte Jr Farmers, Arthur Katon, Clayton Pagan Baseball Association, and Vince Carroll Lanark Jr Farmers. The contestants were escorted on stage by the Almonte beach lovely lifeguards, Susan Renwick, Monique Polis, and Teresa Dunn.

The audience broke into hysterical laughter as the contestants displayed themselves for the first time and answered an impromptu question prepared especially for them. The coolest contestant was Arthur Katon who didn’t even sweat during any of the tasks he was asked to perform. During the introduction and impromptu question Mr Katon sent greetings to his mother and to friends in Australia. When he was told the event wouldn’t be seen in Australia because Channel 12 Cablevision couldn’t broadcast that far, he took his greetings back.

The five gentlemen (?) had to give a small showing of talent, and were judged in swimwear, night attire, and a vote was taken among them for the Mr. Congeniality Award. Joe Banks and Dave McFadden tied for the honor. The best cheering section went to the Jr farmers who received a huge bag of Hershey candy-coated chocolates. 

During the talent show, Joe Banks did impersonations of Jimmy Stewart, Humphrey Bogart, Miss Piggy, Peter Lorre and Elvis Presley. He received warm applause from the audience and won the prize for the talent contest. Hank Hallas did his impersonation of a whistling top hat. What is a whistling top hat you ask? Well, that is where someone puts a giant top hat over the upper part of his body, paints a set of eyes on their stomach and a mouth over their bellybutton and puts a suit jacket on Irom the waist down. They then proceed to stick their stomach in and out to the music of Bridge on the River Kwai. What a sho

Mr Cool, Arthur Katon displayed his talent of beating a member of the audience in a walking race. Very strange. The Jr Farmers, Dave McFadden and Vince Carroll told a variety of jokes (mainly groaners) together; no comment. Hank Hallas won the “ best legs” competition and received the “ best legs” award donated by Bywater pottery. It consisted of a cup supported by two thin hairy legs cast in pottery. 

The five judges, Debbie Parry, Janet Duncan, Julia Thomas, Jan Pettes and Marge Gaw took their time in making a decision but it was with great pleasure that mistress of ceremonies Ann Schweiller announced the winners of the individual competitions. 

The winners were; swimwear, Arthur Katon, night attire, Hank Hallas, talent, Joe Banks, impromptu question, Hank Hallas, and of course the moment “ we’ve all been waiting for, Joe Banks, Mr Almonte Gazette. Whoop-pee. As the judges were making their decision, Mr Mississippi 1981, Colin Fyfe gave a speech on the duties of Mr Mississippi and some of the people who had contacted him throughout the year. 

They included the president of the Liberal party of Canada who asked Colin to be the new prime minister. Colin (said he told the man) he had no knowledge of how to run a country. The party president said it didn’t matter. One of the questions Colin was asked was if he was ACDC. He said, “ no he wasn’t the party trying to build a senior citizens building in Almonte!” When the big moment arrived Colin crowned Joe with 14 real carrots and gave him a beautiful bouquet of goldenrods. Other prizes included a toilet scat in which to frame a picture of himself, a Mr Mississippi 1982 official T-shirt, and a one year free pass to all the Centennial Choir practices. The event was organized by the Elizabeth Kelly Library board to raise funds for a new display case. Organ music was supplied by Brent McLaren and interlude music was performed by Mark DeLarge. The contest was seen on Channel 12 on August 9 at 7 pm

August 4 1982

Related reading

Jean Duncan Lanark Dairy Queen

Remembering Rosy Robertson

1970s Lanark County Beauty Queens

Here She Comes Miss Almonte — Karen Hirst and other Notes

Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos

The Dark World of the Miss Civil Service Beauty Contests

  1. Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos
  2. Last Night I Saw Someone I Loved at the Halloween Parade
  3. Glamorous Marilyn Allen Miss Snow Queen and Others 1950s

Linda’s Countdown to the Royal Wedding–May 14 –Day 3 –There was no Febreeze in Those Days!!

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Linda’s Countdown to the Royal Wedding–May 14 –Day 3 –There was no Febreeze in Those Days!!

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I bought my youngest grandchild Tenley a fancy dress to play in for her birthday. I knew the chances of either of us going to the Royal Wedding were null and void, but what the heck. Every little girl needs a dress to twirl in. I asked her mother Taryn how she was going to clean it and she didn’t even bat an eye. Said her Grandmother, Rena Hastie would know what to do and would take care of it. Now I know– next time I am in trouble with a cleaning matter I am going to call Rena up and ask her what’s what.

 

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Tenley, Me, Julia Guthrie, and Rena Hastie talking history

 

So how did they clean those fancy dresses they used in the 1800s going to fancy dress affairs?  There was no single way to spot clean a Victorian gown. Many lady’s maids had their own special mixtures, perhaps some secret combination of turpentine, benzene, or chalk. Turpentine? Imagine if Febreeze had been invented!

These dresses could be washed, but soap, when applied directly to the fabric, was equally harmful. Instead, the 1856 edition of Godey’s Lady’s Book recommends that a lady’s maid:

“Make a lather by boiling some soap and water together; let it stand until it is sufficiently cool for use, and previously to putting the dress into it, throw in a handful of salt.”

 

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My Granddaughter Tenley  May 5th 2015 in her dress I gave her. Rena Hastie knows how to cleean it.

 

 

It was double rinsed in “clear cold water” and salt. The dress was then carefully wrung out and hung to dry with the folds spread “as open as possible” so that no part of the dress was lying over another part.

The process of cleaning silk dresses was a bit more complicated than simply washing the fabric in soap and water. To remove ordinary stains, a lady’s maid generally employed some variety of spot solution. The 1861 edition of Godey’s Lady’s Book describes one such solution comprised of:

“Quarter of a pound of honey; quarter of a pound of soft soap; two wineglasses of gin; three gills of boiling water.” Gin? Did they drink it after the spot did not come out in fear of losing their job?

 

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The Belladonna Dress I designed and weighed 50 pounds that won first prize in the UK- read Greeting Old Friends and New Friends at Ladies Who Lunch in Carleton Place This cost over $150 to dry clean.

 

These ingredients were mixed well and left to stand until the solution was “blood-warm.” and then be applied to the silk with a small brush. A lady’s maid would next use a sponge to “wet the whole breadth of fabric” and to rub gently over the soiled areas. With the cleaning completed, the silk dress could be rinsed in “cold soft water” and hung up to drain. As for drying, the 1861 edition of Beeton’s Book of Household Management states that:

“Silks, when washed, should be dried in the shade, on a linen-horse, taking care that they are kept smooth and unwrinkled.”

A lady’s maid would then iron the dress while it was still damp. However, if the dress was black or dark blue, Beeton’s advises that, once dry, the dress should be spread out over a table and “sponged with gin, or whiskey, or other white spirits. Vodka sounds good to me, maybe mix it with some tomato juice and make a Bloody Mary while waiting for it to dry.

 

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Granddaughter Sophia previewed Meghan Markle’s dress for the Royal Wedding at our Mother’s Day BBQ yesterday.

 

So what about Queen Victoria’s dress- or the one coming up from the wedding of Meghan and Spencer?  On a Victorian lady’s gown, the collar and cuffs were generally soiled long before the rest of the dress. However, when collar and cuffs were made of lace, the process for washing them was a bit more difficult. For this reason, the 1861 edition of Godey’s Lady’s Book advises that every lady “should know how to wash her own thread lace.” I don’t!

The first step was to remove the lace from the gown. According to Godey’s, a lady must then “roll the lace very smoothly and securely round a clean black bottle” and “tack each end of the lace with a needle and thread to keep it smooth.” Once the lace was on the bottle, it was thoroughly sponged with “sweet oil” and then soaked in a wash kettle containing “clear water and white Castile soap.”

Godey’s recommended that a lady leave the lace to boil in the sudsy water for “an hour or more” until the lace was “clean and white all through” The suds were then drained off and the lace was left to dry in the sun. Once dry, the lace—depending on its size—could be wrapped around a ribbon-block or placed between two sheets of white paper and pressed flat in a large book.

I don’t know about you but I am tired after reading all of that and wonder if cleaning the Queen’s drawers was a lot easier than that. ( read  Tales of the Queen’s Underwear and all those “Accidents”)

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How much do I love royalty? Let me count the ways. Royalty books used to balance my dryer. Killing two birds with one stone. I can pick one of them up and have a read sometimes to lessen the chore of laundry LOL

 

                         Lanark County

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Not invited to the royal wedding? Well- “Pinky Up” and get your finery and fascinator ready!–You can still celebrate– as you are cordially invited to a High Tea – Royal Wedding style! Saturday, May 19th 3 pm! CrossroadsTea Room from Perth will be serving the best in dainties and Champagne is Included!

Prizes for Best Fascinator & Outfit–

Where? Best Western Plus Perth Parkside Inn & Spa
Get your tickets fast at The Crossroads Tearoom– You know they will be sold out quickly!

40 Gore Street East, Perth, ON, Canada

613-267-2152
crossroadstearoom@gmail.com

 

 

 

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Join the Hub for the Royal Wedding on May 19 click here

 

You are invited to the Live Screening of the Wedding of
His Royal Highness Prince Harry of Wales to Ms. Meghan Markle at the Almonte Civitan Hall.
6 AM for light refreshments
7 AM Ceremony start time
Followed by an English Breakfast and a very special Wedding Cake

MORNING WEDDING ATTIRE ENCOURAGED!

Join us for what is expected to be one of the most watched world wide events. A big screen will be set up to watch the Wedding unfold, followed by a delicious breakfast and wedding cake!
We have 20 Golden Tickets for those interested in the baking challenge and are first come first serve. Golden Cake ticket holders are asked to bake and decorate a wedding cake or dessert ( to serve 8 people).
Cakes will be on display and all attendees will have 1 vote for their favorite cake. Bragging rights and prize for the winner!

We invite you to extend your best wishes to the happy couple by bringing a card, which will be passed on to them. In lieu of gifts for the Royal Couple, and to honour their extensive charitable work, we invite you to donate to The Hub Building Fund.

Tickets are $25.00
For more info and to purchase your tickets, please call Julia Thomas at 613-256-2116, or email info@thehubalmonte.com.

OR

Tickets can be bought at Blackbirds and Gilligalou Birds in Almonte.

Proudly sponsored by THE HUB and Prior Engagements, Party & Event Rentals

 

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Get ready for the Royal Wedding and make your own Fascinator! Two workshops coming up – April 25th and May 2nd. You too could look amazing with this addition to your wardrobe! Info under a separate event for The Hub! Book your spot today!

 

 

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Dressed in their finery and enjoying their tea and cupcakes, from left: Carleton Place residents Linda Seccaspina, Laurie Graham and Jennifer Irwin. – Tara Gesner/METROLAND

Queen Elizabeth II honoured with tea party (2015) click here.

 

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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1970s Lanark County Beauty Queens

Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos

 

Miss Civitan Club 1976? Who Are These Women?

Have Hat Will Travel — Carleton Place Royal Tea — September 9th (2015)

Electrical Plugs — Hats– and Impressive Men – Putting on the Ritz in Almonte

Tales of the Queen’s Underwear and all those “Accidents”

My Journey to Become the Future Queen Mum of England

A Photo Birthday Message for the Queen-April 21 2016

The Not So Secret Society of Ladies Who Lunch — It’s Always a Good Time

Royal Canadian Mint unveils royal wedding coin created by Westport artist

Doo Wah Diddy Diddy —The 1964 Royalty? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

FACT – The Queen is Not Affiliated with Freddie Mercury

Taking Sexy Back with Brothel Bertie aka Edward the VII

The Dolls of Queen Victoria 1899

Should we Change the Name of Victoria Day? Another Assault on Dead People?

Doomsday Asteroid Could Hit Today — How About Next Week? – Zoomer

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Doomsday Asteroid Could Hit Today — How About Next Week? – Zoomer.