Tag Archives: postmaster

Francis Shaw Pakenham Postmaster Gone Missing —Elizabeth Shaw — Residential School Teacher

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Francis Shaw Pakenham Postmaster Gone Missing —Elizabeth Shaw — Residential School Teacher
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Jul 1873, Thu  •  Page 1

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Mar 1874, Mon  •  Page 1

I was writing a story about a mail delivery man to Pakenham and in my newspaper archives I found the above two clippings. I became very curious to what happened to this postmaster and what happened to him. As I began to dig a story came out of all this. Get your Kleenex out reading the text and watching the video.

Francis and Elizabeth Shaw

Francis Shaw was born in 1846 and worked as post master at Pakenham. At age 25, he married Elizabeth-Lizzie Argue in January 29, 1873 in Huntley, Carleton, Ontario. Between June of 1873, and February of 1874, Francis moved to the United States. In the 1920 US Census gives Francis’ immigration date to US as 1876; (according to newspaper clipping in Perth Courier in 1873 and the Ottawa Daily Citizen, he was there earlier). He married Margaret Charlotte Hunter Shaw and died in 1922. They had one child John Erwin Shaw. Some websites indicate Elizabeth Argue and her husband, Francis Shaw divorced. A source has not been found for this information.

Frank H Shaw
BIRTH
22 Mar 1846Canada
DEATH
4 Nov 1922 (aged 76)Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, USA
BURIAL
Lindenwood Cemetery
Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, USA
PLOT
Section C
MEMORIAL ID
55415998 · View Source

So what happened to his poor wife Elizabeth Argue Shaw who was deserted in Pakenham? According to a Wiki Tree entry done by Janice Bradley this is her story:

Elizabeth was born in early 1851.

From the Wesleyan Methodist Baptismal Register:

Name of Person Baptised: Argue Elizabeth Father: Robert Mother: Mary Parents Place of Residence: Huntley Born Where: Huntley Born When: 1851-01-29 Baptised When: 1851-12-20 Baptised Where: Huntley Minister Baptising: Greener, Rev. Jas.

She attended school in Huntley Township, and went onto Ottawa Normal School to become a teacher at S.S. #14 Goulbourne

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Jan 1881, Mon  •  Page 1

At 19, she married Francis Shaw. They were married in 1873, Rev. Webster W. Leech. Francis was a postmaster at Pakenham. He was the son of James and Eliza Shaw. They were married at Lizzie’s father’s house in Huntley twp.

Francis Shaw left the marriage sometime between 1873, and 1874. He went to the U.S. and remarried.

Elizabeth went back to teaching. She taught at S.S. No. 14 Goulbourne in 1881, and ran a dress making shop.

In September of 1898, she went to Port Simpson (later known as Lax Kw’alaams) B.C. to work as a relief matron at the Crosby Home for Boys, which was a residential school. She was disturbed by what she saw at the home.

She was offered a teaching position at the Greenville Boys Mission at Greenville (now known as Laxgalts’ap) up the Naas River. She taught there and later returned to Ontario.

She lived with her sister, Louisa Fennell for several years before her health failed. She stayed for 7 years at the Eastern Hospital at Brockville.

Elizabeth Shaw died in the Brockville Asylum in 1917 at the age of 64. It was her time at Port Simpson Crosby School that deterioated her mental state.

From The Awakening of Elizabeth Shaw by- Eva Manly and Paul Manly

In 1898 Elizabeth Shaw went to the Tsimshian village of Port Simpson in Northern B.C. and worked for five weeks as the Matron of the Crosby Boys’ Home, a residential setting for First Nations children. She was extremely upset by what she saw at the home and left. Later, while teaching in Greenville-Lakalzap, she wrote a letter to the Women’s Missionary Society of the Methodist Church describing the bad food and harsh treatment at the Home and detailing a case of physical abuse of a young woman there. Excerpts were forwarded to the Superintendent of the Methodist Church in Toronto who arranged for an investigation. When the investigative report was released stating no change of management was recommended, Mrs. Shaw suffered a breakdown of her health and returned to Ontario. 

Five years later, in response to complaints of the same nature from parents and from the Village Band Council, Rev. A.E. Green, the School Inspector and former Methodist Missionary to the North Coast, initiated an investigation which resulted in the Principal’s immediate resignation.

Elizabeth Shaw died in the Brockville Asylum in 1917

Based on Mrs. Shaw’s original letter The Awakening of Elizabeth Shaw video below combines an impassioned reading with photographs, other archival material and moving images. This video documents one white woman’s response to the unfair and inhumane treatment of First Nations children in British Columbia’s residential schools.

e-3484 Petition to the Government of Canada

SIGN THE PETITION NOW

The first Crosby Girls’ Home, residents and staff, c. 1888. The building had originally served as the mission house, where in 1875, Emma Crosby started inviting girls to live with her and her family and instructing them in the running of a “well-ordered Christian home.” Miss Sarah Hart is standing on the left, and Miss Ross, on the right. Bob Stewart Archives, Pacific Mountain Regional Council, 2-980. CLICK

The Crosby Girls’ Home, c. 1892. Opened in 1892, the new home was located outside the Tsimshian reserve. Girls no longer attended the day school in the village, and they were not permitted any vacation time. Bob Stewart Archives, Pacific Mountain Regional Council, 2-978. CLICK

Based on Mrs. Shaw’s original letter The Awakening of Elizabeth Shaw combines an impassioned reading with photographs, other archival material and moving images. This video documents one white woman’s response to the unfair and inhumane treatment of First Nations children in British Columbia’s residential schools.

Also read-Kamloops Industrial School– “A New Idea in Residential Schools” After the Fire 1925

Middleville & District Museum

June 7 at 10:30 AM  · Following are excerpts from Donna Sinclair’s “Remembered Heroes” that appeared first in the United Church Observer (2000) and was reprinted in the Lanark Era in 2000 and 2008:“Lucy Affleck was 44 years old when she took up a teaching position at Round Lake Indian Residential School near Stockholm, Sask. It was 1929. … [described as] ‘totally honest in her thinking.’That honesty led her to write a passionate, five-page confidential letter to the Superintendent of Home Missions, Dr. Alfred Barner, in Toronto, after she had been at Round Lake on a few months.Ms. Affleck was appalled at the living conditions of the children: … no heating fires in the building, ‘except for the day the inspector visited’ during the wet and windy autumn; donated quilts sold instead of used …Steps would be taken to remedy the situation, he replied. But just over a month later, Ms. Affleck wrote again to say she had been called to the principal’s office. ‘Your cheque is there on the desk … [no explanation other than] the church demands the immediate dismissal of anyone disloyal to the staff.’ …She returned to her family home in Lanark, Ont. remaining there until she died in 1949 …”For the full article, see the Journal page of our website: http://www.middlevillemuseum.org/journal

Captain Hooper was His Name

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Captain Hooper was His Name
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jul 1929, Thu  •  Page 13
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jul 1929, Thu  •  Page 13

Michael Lotan Does anyone remember Major Hooper who was the Postmaster. He was a decorated hero in both the Boer war and in WWI. One famous battle is covered in Brian Costello’s fine book. I found the original plan for this building at Public Works Canada when I worked there. Our PO Box was 103. Last point Major Hopper was a great man, a hero in two wars. He ran a tight ship at the PO. I knew him well. The den in his home was amazing with war memorabilia, weapons, and animal heads.

Jane Chamney Major Hooper was my great-uncle Will. He and his wife Mabel lived in a lovely English Cottage home where the Canadian Tire Gas Bar is now. My memories of Uncle Will were certainly not of a grumpy man. I loved playing with his grandchildren at his home and after his wife’s death, he even held a draw where each of us went home with a trinket or two. I came away with a china wall decoration of an old woman reading tea leaves. I still cherish it today.

1901 William H. Hooper, who had returned to Ottawa from the South African War, bought Charles C. Pelton’s Carleton Place photographic business.

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Unknown Lady, taken at Hooper Studio, Carleton Place, Ontario.

1914 –WW1 broke out and within two weeks, the town’s first dozen volunteers under Captain William H. Hooper left Carleton Place.

Their parade to the railway station was attended by town officials, the Carleton Place brass band, the Renfrew pipe band and hundreds of citizens.  The send off ended in the singing of Auld Lang Syne.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Mar 1916, Sat  •  Page 10

Major W. H. Hooper, husband of Mabel McNeely Hooper –home after four years’ service in the first world war including two years as a prisoner in Germany, was welcomed in a reception held outdoors. Indoor meetings had been banned by reason of deaths from a world influenza epidemic.

Carleton Place Then and Now.
Canadian Gas Bar–6 Bridge Street Carleton Place

No photo description available.
No photo description available.

Photo from John Armour–read Before the Canadian Tire Gas Bar There Was..

This land was part of the original land grant from the Crown to Edmond Morphy. In 1839 Edmond’s son Edmond owned the land. This lot was divided and passed through many hands before it became Major Hooper and his wife’s residence in 1920. Hooper’s residence was referred to as the Raloo Cottage.

Major Hooper’s wife before she was married was Mabel McNeely. It remained in the hands of the Hooper Family until 1954 when McColl Frontenac Oils purchased the land. A gas bar and convenience store has been at this location ever since and today it is a Canadian Tire Gas Bar.

Major W.H. Hooper was appointed Post Master in 1920 and served as Post Master until his retirement in 1950. During Hooper’s time in office many changes occurred.He had control of the clerk for the position of Telegraph operator until the telegraph service moved to its own building. The Central School children popped in daily to get warm on cold days and enjoy the steam heat.

Memories today–The Old Federal Building/ Post Office-The Government built a new federal building in 1891 on Bridge Street during Mr. Struthers’ term of office. This new building called the old brown stone building was the post office for years between the Franklin street site and the present post office opened in 1963. This building also housed the Customs Office and caretaker’s apartment, and later the unemployment office. Findlay McEwen was appointed Post Master in 1907 after the death of Struthers. McEwen fulfilled the role until his death in 1920. During his term of office three rural mail deliveries were established: Ashton, Innisville, and Appleton.On the first floor was the post office with Mr. Struthers as postmaster and two ladies for clerks (The Virtue Sisters). Here too as a part of the post office was the Railway Telegraph Service (Myles Shields being CPR operator with Mina Scott).

This service later moved to its own building.Major W.H. Hooper was appointed Post Master in 1920 and served as Post Master until his retirement in 1950. During Hooper’s time if office many changes occurred.He had control of the clerk for the position of Telegraph operator until the telegraph service moved to its own building. The school children popped in daily to get warm on cold days and enjoy the steam heat. The caretaker lived on the upper floor and could be counted on to appear as soon as the children entered the building and order them out. Major Hooper was also a gruff individual and his family on the corner of Lake Ave and Bridge Street.

Rodger-Holley Gardiner My grandparents bought the building after the new post office opened and lived in the apartment behind it . My grandfather converted the first floor into offices and the other two floors into apartments (I helped a little bit). I carved this piece from white oak in memory of those wonderful days.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Dec 1939, Fri  •  Page 25
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Sep 1939, Sat  •  Page 25
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Sep 1935, Thu  •  Page 10

Image may contain: 1 person, standing, text that says '11:30 come whehre overstayed Word around leave been Cont'd soldier would frem Cozetre next page 000 G ह red tree donated by the IODE's Captain Donna Grey, Fay Burgess, Maureen Slade, Jamie DAT Chapter Carleton Place the Almonte Welsford, AGH Ray Timmons, IODE Regent General Hospital Arbour Friday, cele- Peggy Gallipeau, Barbara Nauss, Florence Virgin, ration years the IODE Canada. Vince Vandenbos Audrey Proulx, Paula ictured from left to right are, Herb Johnston, Sanderson and Elizabeth Laishley. ΜΑΥ 10/2010'
Captain Hooper IODE–The IODE of Carleton Place 1985
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1954, Wed  •  Page 17
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Captain William Hooper and his wife Mabel at “Raloo Cottage”. Mabel (1879 – 1952) was the daughter of Brice McNeely Jr. and Mary MacDowell. They were married in 1905.

Entertainment in Rural Towns–Dancing Bears and Monkeys?

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Entertainment in Rural Towns–Dancing Bears and Monkeys?

 

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The Middle class Victorian families were at always happy at leisure in their drawing rooms or parlours playing chess backgammon or some other game board singing around their expensive upright pianos.

The Victorians had an appetite for the exotic and the strange, no doubt about it. They wanted novelty like the strange vaudevillian shows and feature presentations. They found joy in strolling entertainers around town such as dancing bears, *monkeys, the fire eaters and the jugglers. I have read many times that sometimes the Vaudevillian shows staying in our towns would provide a free street show at lunchtime… or some even sat in windows demonstrating their talents.

In October of 1887 a performing bear was listed as causing chaos in Lanark County. The postmaster of Perth shared his home with a travelling performer with his dancing bear. The postmaster accommodated the Bruin with a bed in the barn being careful to make sure he was chained at the stake.

In the small hours the bear got loose and went on a foraging expedition killing hens, skimming milk pans, and eating butter on the host’s supper table. The postmaster hearing a noise came down the stairs in his robe de nuit to see what was going on. When the two met face to face the Bruin hit down after feasting on the milk and butter. The postmaster escaped but his garment was rent. The bear’s owner was  made to leave quickly after that and the postmaster demanded  he had to pay $10.

 

 

historicalnotes

Lewis and Wardrobe Hippolympian appeared many times at The Chatterton House Hotel.  They performed songs and choruses, acrobatic and gymnastic feats, contortions etc. The Carleton Place Herald reported that Lewis and Wardrobe also  formed themselves into a brass band and performed in the town streets wherever they went. Nothing but talented, unique, and beautiful people.–Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Monkeys Create Chaos in Carleton Place

The Day the Hypnotist Came to Carleton Place

Uncle Tom’s Cabin in Carleton Place

Mrs. Jarley’s Wax Works -Creepy Entertainment

Mrs Jarley and her Waxworks Hits Lanark– and they call me strange:)

The Killarney of Canada in Lanark County

John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place

Ontario’s Version of the Marks Bros-Tales of the Queen’s Hotel