Tag Archives: Pool hall

The Ongoing Fight of Rooney’s and Karl’s Grocery — Part 2

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The Ongoing Fight of Rooney’s and Karl’s Grocery — Part 2

1977

The ongoing fight of Rooney’s and Karl’s Grocery— Read-It Came Out of Rooney’s Pool Hall

Sometimes a few jokes emphasize the lighter side of life and are welcome in these troublesome and depressing times. So, apropos of that we must record the latest development in a long standing exchange between Karl’s Grocery and Rooney’s Tobacco Store.

Last year these enterprising business neighbors (across the street) under cover of darkness posted signs on one another’s doors on the 17th of March and the 12th of July. – The first  one on K arl’s door read “Gone to New York for the Irish parade.” Brother Woermke of Karl’s staff was not to be outdone so when Mr. Mike Rooney arrived on the morning of July 12th there was a large placard on his door saying “Closed—gone to the Orange walk at Smiths Falls.”

The other day, the the mail, Mr. Rooney received a present of a paddy green tie from the staff across the street and he was asked to wear it at the next meeting of the Lions Club. He sent an orange colored monstrosity back to Karl and told him If he would wear it to the Club dinner if he would drape himself in the green one.

Mr. Paupst forgot Tuesday night to put on the Orange creation so to mollify the outraged Mike, glorified in his green neckerchief, he stood up and identified himself as “Karl O’Paupst.” But Mike insists that Paupst must wear the Orange tie on the 12th of July which Mr. Paupst has promised to do even if he is not an Orangeman. , —— 1952-03-20

Rooney’s Pool Room 1977

Karen Hirst

May 25, 2019  · Passing Rooney’s Pool Room corner and seeing the empty storefront, I wonder if guys and gals play pool anywhere these days?In days of yore when it was a pool room it was an active hang out for the young men of our times, a place to gather and advance their skill with a pool cue and hit those hard, brightly colored balls into the side pocket and win the challenge placed!The corner itself had a status, an image. It was ‘the’ place for adolescent boys to be seen, to gather, to smoke and look like Robert Redford in the Hustler, or the like! Boys would hang out and watch the world go by or maybe whistle at a few pretty young ladies passing by whose parents had warned them not to be standing around the pool room corner. The less than welcomed Halloween’ egg throwing antics could also be executed from the pool room corner adding to it’s reputation. Karen Hirst

Robert Hawkins-FeDuke

22 hr. ago

Hi Linda, Harold Woermke was Karl’s partner in the grocery store and my uncle. I can attest to humorous antics between the billiard room and the grocery store – all in good fun. These antics were very creative and well executed. All were members of the Lions Club and the good natured antics would continue at the monthly meetings. My uncle Dinty Scott and his brother Ed, were owners of The Superior Restaurant and the hijinks would draw in both brothers as well. Happy days and happy memories.

It Came Out of Rooney’s Pool Hall

Slot Machine a Go Go–1934 — Rooney’s Pool Hall

Before Rooney’s Pool House There Was..

Tales From McCann’s Pool Room – Rob Probert

Rack’ Em Up Lads! Pool Halls ETC. in Carleton Place

Comments About Dorothy’s Tea Room — aka The Eating Place

No Girls Allowed? Uncle Cecil’s Pool Room

Slot Machine a Go Go–1934 — Rooney’s Pool Hall

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Slot Machine a Go Go–1934 — Rooney’s Pool Hall

Slot Machine Stolen During Early Hours of Sunday Morning — Almonte Gazette November 1934

During the early hours of last Sunday morning the store and pool room of Patrick Rooney, Almonte, was entered and a slot machine stolen from the premises. The thieves gained entrance through a side window on Bridge street by breaking a pane of glass. The machine is quite large and heavy which would indicate that the theft was not the work of one man. How much money was inside the machine has not been revealed. Chief E. D. Walsh of Almonte, and Provincial Constable Wannell of Perth, were informed of the affair, and are working on -the case. A similar machine was stolen in Carleton Place recently but was recovered hidden under a pile of shavings near a planing mill. If the Almonte thieves wanted to get rid of the machine after opening it to recover the money, it is probable they would throw it in the river.

same newspaper

Thieves were busy in Carleton Place over the weekend. Blankets and underclothing were stolen from the shipping room of Bates & Innis Sunday evening and later recovered strewn along the railway tracks. The store of Baird & Riddell was entered Tuesday morning and goods stolen

Dec 1934

In a series of unexpected raids /simultaneously in Perth, Smiths Falls carried out simuitaneously in Carleton Place Friday afternoon, Provincial Police seized upwards of twenty slot machines which were being operated in pool rooms, restaurants and other places of business. The machines are controlled by Albert Dowsett of Smiths Falls, it is said, and are installed on a profit sharing basis. The slot machines in question are something along the lines of a cash register and are quite expensive owing to the complicated mechanism.

Also read-

Slot Machines in Smiths Falls– Not Good For the Public

  1. The End of Easy Money in Lanark County
  2. The Not So “Silent Bell” of Lanark County

Rooney’s Pool Room 1977

Karen Hirst

May 25, 2019  · Passing Rooney’s Pool Room corner and seeing the empty storefront, I wonder if guys and gals play pool anywhere these days?In days of yore when it was a pool room it was an active hang out for the young men of our times, a place to gather and advance their skill with a pool cue and hit those hard, brightly colored balls into the side pocket and win the challenge placed!The corner itself had a status, an image. It was ‘the’ place for adolescent boys to be seen, to gather, to smoke and look like Robert Redford in the Hustler, or the like! Boys would hang out and watch the world go by or maybe whistle at a few pretty young ladies passing by whose parents had warned them not to be standing around the pool room corner. The less than welcomed Halloween’ egg throwing antics could also be executed from the pool room corner adding to it’s reputation. Karen Hirst

Almonte Gazette March 1992
Marty Taylor
“Peter Kells was reminding me that the old pool hall was THE place to hang out. Unfortunately, because of our age, we were asked to leave the premises on several occasions. Peter tells me he remembers one night, the owner actually calling his parents, asking if they knew their son was hanging out in such an establishment. What are your memories of the pool hall? Anyone remember what year it closed?”

“I guess this bank intends to stay in this place for a while at least”, Louis said to himself, unconsciously fingering the forty-two dollars which he had rolled up in his pocket in the Bank of Montreal bills, as large on the whole as ordinary notepaper. He seemed to be surrounded by mills at this place, for he could see the red brick Penman Woollen Mill, and beyond that the Yorkshire Wool Stock mill, and in behind the Gazette office he could detect an iron foundry, and another mill beyond that, and the flour mill where the railway bridge crossed the river, and which he had crossed in the train half an hour or more before.

“Busy place, Friendly, Nice people, Almonte”. The words kept recurring in his mind, and he consoled himself with the thought that he was looking around for the day anyway. He kept wondering about that empty store, and that meant he should ask somebody about it. After all, a man could wash dishes in Athens, or Montreal, or Almonte.

All the same.He went back up the street past the post office building and stopped in front of the place next door, a place that seemed to be a combination barber shop and pool room. It wasn’t that he needed a hair cut, but barber shops were fine places for finding out what’s going on. He walked in.Jim Hogan, co-proprietor with his brother-in-law, Pat Rooney, watched the stranger enter with interest. Jim was dusting off the Boston pool table, and immediately put the whisk away, for patrons, in Jim’s eyes, carried much more interest than dust specks on the green felt.

“G’day. Nice Morning,”

Jim poured out a little of his day’s words to prime the conversation pump, and started round the table to take the balls out of the pockets. He rolled them all to the end of the table and then caged them in the wooden triangle. Removing the cage, he selected a cue from the wall rack, and stood beside the table, elaborately chalking the cue-tip, and surveying the stranger as he did so.

“Care to play a game?” he tossed in Louis’s direction. “What you call it?” “Pool, Boston pool. That other table’s different. It’s snooker. This one here’s for Boston pool.” “Okay.”

Photo- Almonte.com

Mr. Shipman’s last residence, built in 1837, became the Almonte House Hotel.

Related reading-

It Came Out of Rooney’s Pool Hall

Before Rooney’s Pool House There Was..

Tales From McCann’s Pool Room – Rob Probert

Rack’ Em Up Lads! Pool Halls ETC. in Carleton Place

Slot Machines in Smiths Falls– Not Good For the Public

No Girls Allowed? Uncle Cecil’s Pool Room

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No Girls Allowed? Uncle Cecil’s Pool Room

 

 

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Bill Poulin Jr. playing snooker at McCanns pool hall- Photos from the Canadian and Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum—

Thank you to all that commented and sharing your memories!

Dale Costello One of the best pool players was Bill Poulin Jr. at Uncle Cecil’s

Bill Brown Shawn Gorman and Kathy Gibson in the background watching

Cristina Mullin Definitely Billy Poulon. And Kathy Gibson

Catherine Marvin- I’m thinking we were about 14 or 15 then. I think Tommy McCann let Angela Bigras and I in to play one day before the girls went in there. We were allowed all the time after that. Doug Porteous taught me to play pool. Learned how to play Boston before anything else.

Ray Paquette That must be Bill Sr’s son in the photo. I spent a lot of my youth in the pool room and that is not the Bill Poulin I remember!!! In the ’50’s Bill Poulin was considered to be the pro of the Pool Hall and there was one table set aside for money games that was played on by a select few, Bill, Garry Clifford, Wally Lawford and a few others whose names escape me…

Norma Ford This brings back some embarrassing memories. I was sent to pick up my Grandpa’s Club Chewing tobacco at the pool room. When your about 10 years old and go into a place that only men were allowed in – not good. Grandpa always gave me a nickle a trip, would do anything for him. I can’t remember who he sent when I was too old (or too embarrassed) to step foot in there, a real taboo. Very funny now and I wish I had just stepped up and played pool, would that ever have shocked all those guys. –

Ray Paquette- In the ’50’s Bill Poulin was was considered to be the pro of the Pool Hall and there was one table set aside for money games that was played on by a selct few, Bill, Garry Clifford, Wally Lawford and a few others whose names escape me…

Terry Latham This is Jr. Was better than Bill sr.

Baine Cornell  Bill Poulin Sr. was one of the best. I remember Bill playing an exhibition against George Chenier the reigning Canadian snooker champ at the pool room.

Bill Russell I remember when Cliff Thorburn came to the pool hall.

Keith Giffin I saw that game as well Blaine Cornell ,very good game . Allie Hastie loved to play straight pool, had a few games with him. The shirt and the vest were 2 of my favourites to play against Jim and Benny Clarke.

 

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leo bruce hempell‏ @BruceHempell posted this old photo on Twiter–
This 90’s photo is of a snowsuit pool tournament in the old Almonte Hotel. #almonteontario #poolgame#almontephoto

 

Bill Brown When ya played in Almonte pool hall – they always positioned the pink ball to the side of the red balls!! Weird

Llew Lloyd Bill Sr. was still playing when I frequented the billiard hall . I believe in my time you had to be 16 or have a note from your mother . It was a bit tense at Sunday dinner when mom saw the note she had written for the first time 

Doug B. McCarten You actually had your Mom sign a note? BAHAHAHA

Mary Lou Stafford Not exactly ..that’s why I was tense. Lol
I remember many of those hand written notes my Mom wrote LOL😂

Ray Paquette By the way, when did girls begin to frequent the pool hall? I hope that is not interpreted as a “sexist” comment…

Bill Brown 70s for sure !!

Doug B. McCarten Never in my time! Women were never allowed nor were they interested! It was strictly a mens room in the 60’s! Cecil restricted males as well until they were 16!

Ray Paquette Do you remember standing outside and watching the pedestrian traffic, particularly the young ladies, go by with an occasional remark from one of the young “gents” causing a witty comeback from the girl it was directed at?

Dale Costello Never uttered a comment detrimental to the beauty walking before us.

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Shows east side of Bridge street, pool hall is right where the two gentleman are standing. It was called McCann’s run by Cecil McCann. The building at left is on the corner of Franklin Street. Built in 1880’s by William McDirarmid. Rest of block destroyed by fire and rebuilt c. 1897.Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Ray Paquette Hey! Maybe its a senior moment, but I can’t remember the name of any of any of the less than perfect gentlemen who this comment applies to.
Norma Jackson As a shy teenager I used to cross the street rather than walk by the pool hall where all the guys watched you walk by. Then it was just beside Remembrance Gift shop if I remember correctly.

Mary Lou Stafford I remember going in and it would have been 76/77 and being worried one of the guys would complain because that’s when the girls were first welcome by a few and they were a little choosy about who went in!

Tom Edwards I remember my grandfather going in there to buy Irish Sweepstakes tickets. Do you ever remember of that with your dad Norma?

Norma Ford My Dad got them at work in Findlay’s. He had such great hopes, it was a ritual.

 

Tom Edwards I don’t even believe they were legal. I can remember my grandfather getting them at the pool hall. I think Stewart Ferguson got them at the pool hall too. They were a pretty big deal. I used to have some but I don’t know where they went.
Norma Ford Mom didn’t save them but she sure saved a lot of other things – ration coupons, the permit for dynamite when they built their house, licenses for their radio that I still have, a real gold mine for my “family tree”. We certainly have lived in the worlds best years.
Bill Brown Recall Miss Hitsman our teacher who’s mother won 240k in the Irish sweepstakes about 1971

Tom Edwards No one has mentioned Jack Belisle working there. I used to go in to play that nickel pinball machine. LOL Cece would let me stay but Jack always put the run on me. I used to watch Winston Simpson, Wes Lynch, Jack Bracewell, Bill Poulin JR and Senior play golf on the pool table. Yes Earl Waugh was a favorite.

Tom Edwards  Remember those little wooden pins they used to use and set them up in front of each pocket.

Bill Brown  Dad used to play the nickel machines and if there was a payoff – we would have pizza at the Olympia!!

Ted Hurdis What about Earl Waugh?
Dale CostelloI so appreciated the watchful eyes that kept us out of trouble. However, for some if us, that watchful eye didn’t extend quite far enough. Not sure if extended vision binoculars would have helped. Of course, any trouble incurred was totally not manifested by we law abiding citizens, but we just seemed to invite calamity after calamity. It was like a bear raiding a honey bee hive, and getting stung repeatedly.
Ray Paquette As I review the various comments, I realize that McCann’s Billiards was a focal point for a number of generations of Carleton Place males. Cecil McCann, Gordon Lackey and Bill Poulin kept a watchful eye over my generation, allowing us to enjoy many games of pool but ensuring that we didn’t get into any serious trouble…
Llew Lloyd Ok . Some great memories out there. Now we’re going to go to the bonus round . Who won the 1959 Carleton Place public speaking contest with an opening sentence that said : “my mother always told me that whenever I walked downtown, don’t walk on the pool room side of the street ” .

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

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