Tag Archives: poem

The Village That Wouldn’t Die — Verna (McEwen) MacRae Unseen Photos and Poem – Buchanan Scrapbooks

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The Village That Wouldn’t Die — Verna (McEwen) MacRae Unseen Photos and Poem – Buchanan Scrapbooks
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here.
Complete fire map-NRC Publications Archives
NRC Publications Archives
NRC Publications Archives

NRC Publications Archives

NRC Publications Archives

Related reading

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

Herriott Street History — Rachel McRae Joann Voyce

Rhonda McRae Landriault — McRae Genealogy

The Henry Family — Rachel McRae

The 12 Hardships of Mr. McRae

Down at the Farm –9th line Beckwith. McRae Family Photos

Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Benson McRae

More on Those “Glads” of Carleton Place

The Mystery of the W.G. Hill Store Continues….

What Did it Cost to Stay in the Hospital?

The Farmer is the Man

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The Farmer is the Man

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

related reading

Eggs 10 Cents a dozen–Farmers Markets of Smiths Falls and Almonte 1880 and 1889

Dating A Farmer — It’s Not All Hearts And Cow Tails

Lanark Farm Life is Not so Bad- 1951

Once Upon a Time on the Farm

Farming Could be a Dangerous Business in Lanark County? Who Do You Know?

She Doesn’t Think My Tractor is Sexy–The Farmer’s Wife 1889

Memories of Scotch Corners — Mrs. E. Bolton

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Memories of Scotch Corners — Mrs. E. Bolton

From Larry Clark

Did you know that one of the landmarks for Scotch Corners used to be “to turn off Highway 7 at the lXL Cheese Factory”? It was a hopping corner with traffic jams consisting of farmers waiting to get their milk weighed in and upon leaving, a quick trip to the back to the whey vat pick up some whey to feed their pigs.

Local lad Alfie Poole had the answers to the local stories in those days and there was a reason as to why this particular cheese factory was called ‘the IXL’. Seems there was a couple of cheese factories down the road and no one wanted to mix them up. There was one past the St John’s Anglican Church on the Ferguson Falls Road called the “Fair Play” and another opposite the church called the “Grab All”. These were the actual names I kid you not.

Well the farmer’s around the McCreary settlement were having none of that, and wanted to have the best cheese factory in the area. So up the factory went and it became known as the IXL but was sadly destroyed by fire in 1969.

Related reading

The Scotch Corners Fire 1981

Scotch Corners Union S.S. #10 School Fire

Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory

The Sinclair Family Cemetery–Photos by Lawrie Sweet with Sinclair Genealogy Notes

POETRY

Ivan and Elizabeth Pretty Anniversary and Poem — Audrey Armstrong 1966

The Almonte Wreck Poem George Millar Dec 29 1942

Almonte — The Birth of a Friendly Town — A Poem

Ole King Cole of Almonte — Fran Cooper

Almonte Poetry —- Agnes Whitelaw Boyce Almonte

Memories of Dr. A. A. Metcalfe of Almonte– Florence Watt

The Life and Times of Cora Yuill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

A Poem about Innisville–By Mrs. Edith Bolton

Alice Katherine Gould– Smiths Falls — Gould Family

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Annie Patterson — Descendant of John Gemmill

Genealogist Christmas Poem

The Old Saw Mill Poem – Lanark County

Was the Rhyme Ring Around the Rosie Connected to the Plague?

Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

A Trip Along the Ramsay Sixth Line –W.J. Burns

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A Trip Along the Ramsay Sixth Line –W.J. Burns

photo Sarah More

Hi, Linda ~Don’t know if you might be interested in my Grandfather’s poem about the Sixth Line of Ramsay (now called Quarry Road)? In the 1950s, he had a farm there. Other farms on the Sixth Line belonged to McNeely, Rintoul, Thom, Sadler, Burns, Henry, Hilliards, and a new German Family ( see note from Eleanor Rintoul at the bottom) whose name escapes my Mother.  

He went by W.J. Burns. He was a 5th generation resident of Ramsay Township. Am attaching a picture of him. In 1990, my Uncle compiled a small booklet of poems written by W.J. & my Aunt.
Cheers,

Sarah More

Photo- Jayne Henry
Photo Jayne Henry

*Eleanor Rintoul sent this to me.:

Hello Linda,

I’m married to a Rintoul from the 6th line and I have seen that poem before but it was good to be reminded of it.

I knew the German family as I had the two oldest children in school and I know when the Galbraith (S.S.# 5) closed so I thought I would fill in the blanks.

The school closed in 1968 the year Naismith School opened. (I might be off by a year.)

The German family were Matthias and Erma (or Irma) Hauch. I taught the two oldest children Achmed and Rosemarie.

The family moved to a farm near Chesterville and had three more children Harold, Susan and Sandy. I don’t know where they were living when these children were born — whether on the 6th line or after they moved to Chesterville.

Rosemarie was very involved in track and field at North ( or South) Dundas High school and went on to win many awards and trophies.

Check her out on Google.

Eleanor Rintoul

I was Eleanor Clapp when I taught at Galbraith and married Frank Paul (son of Norman Paul, whom I think you knew)

The Mysterious 5th Line ?????

The Spirit of the 7th Line

What Happened to the Gold on the Ramsay 7th line?

Ivan and Elizabeth Pretty Anniversary and Poem — Audrey Armstrong 1966

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Ivan and Elizabeth Pretty Anniversary and Poem — Audrey Armstrong 1966
March 31 1966
Obituary for Ivan William PRETTY (Aged 75) -
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jul 1966, Thu  •  Page 34

Very sadly Ivan died soon after in July. How sad I was to find this.:(

George Goodson Pretty Genealogy Part 2

Clippings of George Goodson Pretty

Annie and Ethel Pretty Bridge Accident 1927

Ken Manson– Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds, Side 1 -“Did you ever hear the story about the fellow who was shot up Bob Pretty’s there”?

The Almonte Wreck Poem George Millar Dec 27 1942

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The Almonte Wreck Poem George Millar Dec 27 1942

Looking for information about George Millar.. most likely from Almonte as thanks to Jim Houston I have a copy of a poem he typed in 1942 about the Almonte train wreck.

Almonte Wreck by George F. Millar Dec, 27, 1942

This is an original copy given to me from Jim Houston

I was feeling pretty low that night, and sort of on the shelf

For I was looking forward to getting back myself

When the telephone rang, and there was Tom, I could hardly believe my ears,

A terrible wreck, just happened now, the worst in years and years

The Sunday local on the CPR to Ottawa was starting back,

The night was dark, a dirty sleet was filling up the track,

Witch coaches full,packed in the aisle, of folk from far and near

Returning again to their varied jobs, to commence a brand new year.

From Petawawa down they took on load, as each station drew nigh

The platforms again were thronged with folk and baggage piled up high.

But little was thought amid the last farewells while some a tear would hide.

That the Angel of Death was lurking near, this is their long last ride

The train pulled into Almonte, oh how we know that town.

Sure we played Lacrosse and Hockey, the Valley up and down

But now we have a different scene, a headlight glares in the night

A troop train that had just caught up to a passenger train that was running slow,

A bang, a rip, a bang, a smash, how far will that ting go?

Oh duck, get down. Oh God what’s up, she yelled and grabbed a hand.

And in the seat behind, she saw a big black monster stand.

The engine plowed through coaches two, and stood now in the third from rear.

The coaches smashed to kindling wood, and a mass of twisted gear.

Some thrown beyond the mass of wreck, others mangled in the gear.

And then the ones all shaken up, kept searching in the debris near.

A dress, a doll, a compact small, a bra and undies too.

A coat that had a sleeve torn off, a leg in a bloody shoe.

The Almonte folk now joined the scene, their doors they opened wide,

A steady stream of wounded moved, from the wreck to the warmth inside.

A call for doctors, nurses too, went out on S.O.S.

But speed and all, to answer the call, saved neither Jean or Bess

Pillows, blankets, sheets and towels in haste pulled from the bed,

With never a thought a thought of their return, let’s cover up these dead,

And while we can, bring comfort to the wounded and the maimed

There was the spirit of Almonte to us their deeds are famed,

Before the doctor was in sight right on that very train,

There was a nursing sister brave, who kept so cool and sane.

To give first aid she had no kit, but her clothing she simply tore,

And used the strips for bandages, and saved so many more.

The Town Hall soon became a morgue, the Hospital over-flowed

And more and more picked from the wreck to be bandaged and some sewed

The night wore on, and it got late, for workers no relief,

And then the train for Ottawa bent, with its load of pain and grief,

Our hearts go out to all the folk whose homes are hit so hard,

We’re trying now to ease the load, by word, or deed, or card,

And there was he of the other train, who went through a little hell,

A few more runs and he’s be through, with a record clear as a bell,

And here he was, no fault his own, just seemed to be his rate,

For fortune deals some awful hands, that local just had to be late.

He thought so much of what others might think, and all that be said.

Our hearts go out to this poor guy, in this hour of grief,

But God above is God of Love, and HE will hold no brief,

But instead He’d say, you’ve naught to pay, your load was too much to bear,

It’s me in your need, yes tis indeed, for such is the Kingdom I bear.

Pte. F.R. Whitta gave up his shirt and tunic to make bandages and tourniquets, then aided doctors in surgery for hours in the falling snow. He and another soldier, Sgt. J.W. Gillespie, were awarded the British Empire Medal for their actions that night, while Lt. Nursing Sister Anne Thorpe received the Royal Red Cross, Second Class.

http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/community-stories_histoires-de-chez-nous/almonte-train-wreck_l-accident-de-train-d-almonte/gallery/the-third-coach/

Fred Gauthier Survivor — 6 Months 1 Day –1942 Almonte Train Wreck – Vern Barr

  1. Cpl. James H. Clifford and Miss Marion  McMillan-Survivors of the Almonte Train Wreck
  2. Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage
  3. Survivor still affected by 1942 Almonte train wreck
  4. 55 years ago–One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte
  5. Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

Almonte — The Birth of a Friendly Town — A Poem

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Almonte — The Birth of a Friendly Town — A Poem
Birth of a Friendly Town-- Almonte Gazette July 30 , 1970 ( no author mentioned)


T ’was back in 1820 when the air was clear and bright,
A brawny pioneer farmer stopped his wagon for the night.
He kindled his cheery campfire to feed his hungry brood,
And vowed he’d build a cabin on the very spot he stood.
On the banks of the Mississippi, on a tract of government land,
He built his homely hovel, with axe and sweat, so grand.
He cleared his land for planting with mule and old grey mare,
He plowed and tilled and worked it with tender loving care.
His meagre supply of seedlings he spread upon the ground,
He fished the brooks and rivers and hunted the woods around.


He sent word to friends and relations of the wonderful place he had,
But with the lack of a woman’s company, his wife was very sad.
As the years went by, his family grew, with neighbours all around,
Where once there stood a lonely farm , had turned into a town.
With neighbour lads they took the fish, both with line and spear,
And all around this lonely place -was a friendly atmosphere.


The town it grew and friendliness was never left behind,
The people in this little town, always seemed so kind.
As homes sprang up with shops and stores, everything so grand,
And all the people in the town to lend a helping hand. ….
So from this campfire in the night, arose THE FRIENDLY TOWN,
Our friendliness, it’s said, has spread for miles around.
So why not come to ALMONTE and join in all the cheer.
To have some fun and celebrate our 130th year.


We promise you our friendliness, has grown from year to year,
The only thing we’re lacking is having you came here.
So plan to come and visit us when summer rolls along.
When we celebrate in ALMONTE, our friends can do no wrong

Almonte General Hospital Fairview Manor Foundation

· September 20, 2018 ·  

Sharing Smiles with the kind folks at the Mississippi Mills Animal Hospital. Who have you shared a smile with today?

Mary Sterling Jarick The first thing I saw when we came from Ireland and landed in Almonte. My father told me he had it done especially for me. lol

Clipped from The Ottawa Citizen, 13 May 1952, Tue, Page 13 

Shirley Flaxman It truly was a friendly town!!! I loved growing up there


Bob Camelon
 Born and Raised

Darlene Monette Me too – in fact still in same house! 🙂 That water tower was our view from the front door!

Ron Finner I climbed to the top of that tower and sat on the ball many times !! 😎🤠

Shirley Flaxman Home is where the heart is💖.

Mary Anne Harrison My grandparents, Jim and Cecelia Carroll lived just in front of the tower on Ottawa street. My uncle Emmett too. I have no doubt 1 or all 5 of my brothers climbed that tower at one time or another.

Peggy Byrne Yes it was a sad day. Lived for many years beside that tower and saw a few people climb to the top whenever the opportunity arose. Ronald Ford, you will remember the water house at the base of the tank where many residents that didn’t yet have running water in their homes went to fill up their containers – oh wait, maybe you’re too young for that….🤭

Ronald Ford I remember Dad would point it out at the Corkery hill. It was all long time ago. Tree grow a lot 66 yrs

We posted the photo of the 1993 water tower today– Dawn Jones fund This from the Millstone article in 2013.

Water tower slogan: still friendly, but not a town?

September 5, 2013 – 2:21 pm

Tower
Rendering of planned ‘rebranding’

by Brent Eades

The Town recently announced that as part of the current cleaning and restoration of the water tower on Paterson Street, “the tower will also be refinished with a new white and blue colour scheme along with a rebranded logo,” approved by Town Council at a meeting on April 16 2013.

A rendering of this logo is available on the Mississippi Mills website. It shows that the decades-old slogan “Almonte The Friendly Town” will be replaced with simply “Friendly Almonte.”

I can see this, I suppose. Strictly speaking we are no longer a “town” — in the purely legalistic sense of the word — but rather a ward of the amalgamated municipality of Mississippi Mills.

But it does seem a pity to lose the slogan that has been welcoming people to our community for generations. We may not be a town as far as the provincial government is concerned, but we surely are in every other sense.

Out of interest I decided to search the online Almonte Gazette archive to find out how long we’ve been “The Friendly Town.” It appears the slogan was chosen sometime prior to March 1953 by the Chamber of Commerce for use in a promotional booklet. Link (story at top-left)

I also found a reference on Google Books, from a 1952 issue of Civic Administration magazine: “As you near the town, the first thing you see is a big steel standpipe jutting skyward above the leafy trees. On it in six-foot letters are the words, WELCOME TO ALMONTE The Friendly Town.”

Marty Taylor

July 17, 2018

Just off the highway. Passed by it coming from or going to Ottawa. Was always a wonderful way to say “hello” when arriving in Almonte.

Ole King Cole of Almonte — Fran Cooper

Almonte Poetry —- Agnes Whitelaw Boyce Almonte

Memories of Dr. A. A. Metcalfe of Almonte– Florence Watt

The Life and Times of Cora Yuill

A Poem about Innisville–By Mrs. Edith Bolton

Alice Katherine Gould– Smiths Falls — Gould Family

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Annie Patterson — Descendant of John Gemmill

Genealogist Christmas Poem

The Old Saw Mill Poem – Lanark County

Was the Rhyme Ring Around the Rosie Connected to the Plague?

Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

Kim Davis
· 


I’m thinking it was my dad…maybe edited it for the 150th

Thanks to Lizzie Brunton…

Commercial Students CPHS 1937 –Kerri Ann Doe O’Rourke

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Commercial Students CPHS 1937 –Kerri Ann Doe O’Rourke

1937-CPHS-The-Commercial-Poem

 

Linda…I hope this message finds you well! When we were sorting through my mom’s things we came across a few boxes of my grandmother’s (Gladie Dowdall) that my mom hadn’t touched. In there was the CPHS graduation program from 1936 & 1937!! I emailed them to the museum earlier today. But THE absolute best find is the attached Poem written about “The Commercial” students for their 1937 graduation. Enjoy 🙂

Kerri Ann Doe O’Rourke

 

Clippings of Leita Anderson

Almonte Poetry —- Agnes Whitelaw Boyce Almonte

A Poem about Innisville–By Mrs. Edith Bolton

Alice Katherine Gould– Smiths Falls — Gould Family

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Annie Patterson — Descendant of John Gemmill

Genealogist Christmas Poem

The Old Saw Mill Poem – Lanark County

Was the Rhyme Ring Around the Rosie Connected to the Plague?

Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

Come on and Feel the Noise –Last Night’s Mini Poetry Slam

Almonte Poetry —- Agnes Whitelaw Boyce Almonte

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Almonte Poetry —- Agnes Whitelaw Boyce Almonte

almonte_grist_mill.jpg

Grist Mill- almonte.com

 

Almonte


0, peaceful dreamy town
That nestles in the vale, _
With streets and homes so pleasant,
And her people fair and hale
And grand the scene about her
That lends her charm and grace
Amid the fairest beauty town
Fair Almonte takes the place.

The winding waters of her stream
Come on serene and slow
Till o’er the falls they grandly leap,
and boil in foam below.

downriver-from-stone-bridge.jpg

Photo-almonte.com

 

The silvery moon at even, ·
A street of silver lays
Across the wind toss
Across the bends and bays
From many a height in Ramsay
The town is seen afar,
And each light looks at evening,
Just like the evening star,
While in ‘the moon tide brightness
It seems to nestledown.

 

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Almonte Boat scene-almonte.com

 

In the Mississippi Valley,
Almonte, fair Almonte town.
From just outside its borders,
Is seen a distant view,
The grand chain of Laurentians,
Lie in a haze of blue,
And the bright autumn colors,
Less than fifty miles-away,
Upon the mountain side are seen
Upon a cloudless day

cannon_mill_lower_falls.jpg

cannon mill lower falls-almonte.com


Around her here and there,
In valley and on hill,
Are wondrous woods and plains
And rippling brooks and the river
About the town so dangerous fair,
Nature with lavish hand,
Has spread out beauty everywhere,

Oh Almonte fairest Almonte
What ails thee at this time
With power and beauty around thee
Thou shouldest be in thy prime
Wake from the dreamy slumber
Arouse and take thy place,
Add to your wealth and number
And strike a progress pace.
Written and composed by
Agnes Whitelaw Boyce
Almonte

Dedication-of-the-War-Memorial_.jpg

Dedication of the War Memorial–almonte.com

 

 

historicalnotes

 -

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 27 Aug 1940, Tue,
  3. Page 8

A Poem about Innisville–By Mrs. Edith Bolton

Alice Katherine Gould– Smiths Falls — Gould Family

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Annie Patterson — Descendant of John Gemmill

Genealogist Christmas Poem

The Old Saw Mill Poem – Lanark County

Was the Rhyme Ring Around the Rosie Connected to the Plague?

Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

Come on and Feel the Noise –Last Night’s Mini Poetry Slam

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

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A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

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One sentence is missing from the top but this is all that is left so had to document it. from the McRae scrapbook.

 

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Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Update on The Manse in Beckwith