Tag Archives: playfair

The Old Playfair Dam 1909

Standard
The Old Playfair Dam 1909
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
05 May 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
10 May 1909, Mon  •  Page 3
Read this- So Where Was This?

Many years ago James Brothers , George and Lawrence of Perth had a park here along the shores of the Mississippi where people loved to picnic. It was said swimming was not the best in this area. Years ago Ken Millar from Snow Road brought his cream to the Playfair Bridge where it was transferred to the cream truck. While waiting for the creamtruck to arrive they decided to take a dip and found the bottom full of pointy stones and they needed sneakers.

CLIPPED FROM
The Daily Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
01 Jun 1909, Tue  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 Oct 1896, Wed  •  Page 1


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
18 Jun 1913, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 Jun 1897, Wed  •  Page 1
From the Canadian Mississippi River- Hilda Geddes

Fallbrook and Playfair Playfairville 101– Names Names Names

What Can You Add to this Story? Patrick Mulrooney

Inhabiting Playfairville Once Again?

Rosamond History– The “Damn” Dam Case 1870

Clippings and Comments about the Hydro Dam

The Leaky Chancery Dam –The Forgie’s of Almonte Part 2

So Where Was This?

Entire Dam Above Smiths Falls Swept Away

Swimming at the Dam, St. James Park and Other Things

The Power of the Mississippi River Dam in Carleton Place

This Old Dam

Did You Know About the Crotch Lake Disaster?

Have You Heard of Stump Lake?

The Tragic Saga of James Frew and Family 1898

Standard
The Tragic Saga of James Frew and Family 1898
LIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Mar 1898, Wed  •  Page 4

March 1898 Lanark

Word was brought to the foreman that W.C. Caldwell’s mill had been broken into and a quantity of flour,- cornmeal, oatmeal and had been taken away. On going down to the mill about 8:30 that morning he saw that one of the windows in the store room adjoining the mill had been pried up and an entrance had been made there. The doors into the mill had been pried open.

His miller, Mr. Wm. Richardson, told him that he thought about ten bags of flour, one fifty pound paper sack of flour, one bag of a bag of oatmeal and some cummeal had been taken. During that Monday and the following Tuesday he secured sufficient evidence to warrant him in getting a search warrant to search the premise of the prisoner.

The search was made and a quantity of flour, oatmeal and cornmeal was obtained. He noticed that the bag containing the oatmeal, that was found in the prisoner’s house, bore the stamp of his firm whose meal he sold. Mr. Wm. Legary, the next witness, testified to finding a paper bag containing cornmeal while out on the Playfair road early on Monday morning. The bag was found on what he thought the most direct road to the prisoners farm.

Constable James and Webster testified to the result of the searching of ths prisoners house. Upstairs they found four bags of flour, one paper sack of flour, while downstairs they found a fifth bag of flour and some oatmeal. The latter waa in a barrel, while beside the barrel was an empty hag which bore the name of D. R. Boas, and which they thought had contained oatmeal. Tha floor upstairs bore marks of flour dust as though the bags had been emptied or filled there.

They brought the flour and meal back to Mr. Caldwell’s mill, where it was left in charge of Mr. Richardson. The most interesting evidence wss that given by Mr. Richardson, miller, who swore that the flour seized on the prisoner’s premises and returned to the mill was real ground flour. On counting the flour returned, he found it corresponded exactly with that contained in the pile of bags in which the flour was musing. He also identified the bag which contained the oatmeal.

The evidence submitted seemed to point to the prisoner’s guilt and the magistrate accordingly committed him to the county gaol to submit his trial at the spring assure or to be summarily tried before the county judge according as the prisoner may choose. The prosecution are collecting further evidence against him to he submitted when he comes up for trial.

In the afternoon the younger Frew, a youth of not more than ten or twelve yean, appeared before the magistrates, but he was dismissed as no evidence against him was submitted. The boy is a bright and smart looking youth, and it seems sad indeed that he should be brought up under such an unwholesome circumstance.

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
11 Mar 1898, Fri  •  Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
30 Mar 1898, Wed  •  Page 1

W. C. Caldwells Aberdeen Mills, Lanark Ontario. Grist and carding mill. Photo: Ewan R. Caldwell Collection, Negative No. PA-135197. Public Archives of Canada.

James Frew was just trying to feed his family. Not the way to go about it, but he was a few decades older than his wife Susanne who died at an early age leaving him with a very young family. His oldest son had founded a shingles business in his early 20s, died two years before his father was arrested for the robbery at Clyde Mills with his youngest son, Robert. Robert was also stopped in February of 1898 for stealing a ham from John Miller’s butcher shop just before his father came up for trial.

Robert, son was also arrested for the Clyde Flour Mill robbery with his father and then stole a ham from John Miller’s butcher shop just before his father came up for trial.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Mar 1898, Wed  •  Page 1

Oldest son- Andrew Frew passes away from a cerebral hemorrhage or stroke.

The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Wed, Dec 16, 1896 · Page 5
CLIPPED FROM

The Lanark Era

Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Dec 1896, Wed  • 

1891 Census

NAME:James Frew
GENDER:Male
MARITAL STATUS:Widowed
AGE:61
BIRTH YEAR:1830
BIRTH PLACE:Ontario
RESIDENCE DATE:1891
RESIDENCE PLACE:Dalhousie and Sherbrooke North, Lanark North, Ontario, Canada
RELATION TO HEAD:Head
RELIGION:Free Church
OCCUPATION:Farmer
CAN READ:Yes
CAN WRITE:Yes
FRENCH CANADIAN:No
FATHER’S BIRTH PLACE:Scotland
MOTHER’S BIRTH PLACE:Nova Scotia
NEIGHBOURS:View others on page
HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS:NameAgeJames Frew61Alexander Frew22James Frew14Martha Frew12Robert Frew9

The Sad Saga of The Almonte Furniture Factory

The Saga of a James Street Home— Christina McEwen Muirhead

The Continuing Saga of Christena McEwen Muirhead—The McLaren Mill

The Townend Saga is Solved

Remembering Haying in Lanark County- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Standard
Remembering Haying in Lanark County- The Buchanan Scrapbooks
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..
From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill
From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

Related reading

Remembering and Documenting The Loose Hay Loader

Vacationing with the Lanark County Folks in 1000 Islands 1938

Standard
Vacationing with the Lanark County Folks in 1000 Islands 1938
maybe some of you would be crossing the 1000 Island Bridge if the borders were not shut down.1000 Island Bridge 1938 from Jay Playfair’s album from Lanark County/ courtesy Laurie Yuill
opening day 1938 thousand island bridge

1000 Island Bridge 1938 from Jay Playfair’s album from Middleville –Lanark County/ courtesy Laurie Yuill

All Postcards from 1938 from Jay Playfair’s album from Lanark County/ courtesy Laurie Yuill

Photo Linda Seccaspina 1000 Islands US Bridge and Canadian flag.
When the colonists in New York City found out about the Declaration of Independence from George Washington who read it in front of City Hall on July 9, 1776, a riot broke out, in part as a reaction to the fact that British naval ships were occupying the harbor at the time. During the riot, a statue of King George III was torn down… and melted down to make 42,000 musket balls for the revolutionary army

Related reading

The Tale of a Pirate named Bill Johnston with Pirate Dog Supermodels

Assassinated Gossip about Lincoln, Payne and the Thousand Islands

Is there Still Gold on Wellesley Island ?

Did you Know About the Wedding Cake Cottage?

Murder on Maple Island

Stories from Ash Island

The Almost Tragic Story of Robert Henry

The Lost Island– Now You See it- Now You Don’t!

Gold Mines and Disappearances

Did Anyone Find the Lost Barrel of Silver Coins That Lies at the Bottom of the Rideau Canal?

So Where Was This?

Standard
So Where Was This?
Thanks to the Lanark Village Community Group on Facebook

Here is one for you.. This is From the photo album of Jay Playfair thanks to Laurie Yuill– somewhere in Lanark County.. a reaaaaaaaaaaaaal long shot.. but any idea?? ( middleville lanark village playfair area) late 1920s

Robert Playfair–AdminPretty sure that’s the dam on Mississippi, just above playfairville.

Robert MilotteMy Father and uncles used to call it Smith’s Dam it’s located just behind Oral Pretty’s house!!

Ken BarrMy parents in law, Neville and Gwen Wall, owned the property that this dam was a part of. It is on the Iron Mine road.

Photos Hilda Geddes

Related reading

Inhabiting Playfairville Once Again?

Fallbrook and Playfair Playfairville 101–

Names Names Names

Photos of Men at Work – 1920s — Don’t Forget About Me!

Standard
Photos of Men at Work – 1920s — Don’t Forget About Me!

All these photos came from the Playfair family in the Lanark/ Middleville/Playfair area. Thanks to local historian Laurie Yuill. All circa 1920s except for the corduroy road photo second to last– That photo is earlier. Some look like railroads and some do not–

All these photos came from the Playfair family in the Lanark/ Middleville/Playfair area. Thanks to local historian Laurie Yuill. All circa 1920s except for the corduroy road photo second to last– That photo is earlier. Some look like railroads and some do not–

Canada’s first provincial Dept of Highways was created by Québec in 1914. Two years later Ontario, which had had a provincial instructor in charge of roadmaking attached to the Dept of Agriculture since 1896, formed its own separate highways department.

Through the 1920s cars became cheaper and their numbers multiplied; registration of motor vehicles increased from 408 790 to nearly 1.62 million by the end of the decade. Good roads associations, national and provincial, led the crusade for improved road travel, and expenditures on roads by all governments tripled. By 1930 the annual outlay was $94 million. Methods and technology for building roads improved as horse-drawn scrapers and graders gave way to steam power for shovels and rollers. However, road building in most provinces ceased and maintenance was reduced during the Great Depression and WWII as men and materials were urgently needed in the war effort. The few good paved roads that had been built were almost completely destroyed by heavy wartime traffic, particularly in industrial areas. The Canadian Encyclopedia

For Whom the Toll Gates Tolled– Revised

The Lanark County Back Roads Tour

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

The Toll Gates of Lanark County on Roads that Were Not Fit for Corpses

almonte gazette 1930

Primitive Bridges –Where was this Bridge?

Standard
Primitive Bridges –Where was this Bridge?
Photo Jay Playfair album thanks to Laurie Yuill
Photo Jay Playfair album thanks to Laurie Yuill

This was from Jay Playfair’s photo album and it should be in Lanark County in the Middleville, Lanark, Playfair area. I am hoping someone will know where this primitive bridge is.

Gloria Currie

The original road into Lanark from Watson’s Corners is now the unused Concession 1 Dalhousie road that goes off to the right just before the top of Connors Hill on County Rd. 8. That road would have had to cross the Clyde River at some point so that might have been the bridge for that road. I am in my 70’s – my Dad used to tell me about going into Lanark that way as a kid.

Terry DonaldsonWe called it frazers bridge

Ken BarrTerry Donaldson We also called it the cow bridge. It’s where the bridge at Timber Run is now.

Paul MilotteI remember it being called the Cow bridge as well. If memory serves me right it was used to let Cows cross the river as part of the old Plant farm. It was a huge dairy farm back in the day and the Darou family dairy business bought milk from them. The main building of the Plant farm is the old Caldwell mansion that is now a bead and breakfast. Anybody remember the Red barn behind the main house? I think the same family converted the the old mansion into a nursing home after the farming operation had stopped.

Judy ArnottPaul Milotte I remember the barn. I remember when it was the nursing home and they had cattle and a vicious bull.

Sharon Bowesyes you are right Paul I remember the CGIT going there and singing Christmas Carols for the residents

Gary WhyteI use to deliver milk to nursing home.when I looked at the bridge that where I though it was now it is a bridge for golf course .a name comes to mind also lived in little house just across bridge off of mill St was bob Littlejohn

Michele ScanlanI can’t remember the bridge being that long it only went over the creek not a deep river. I think it was only one span not two.

Judy ArnottSherry Lilicos’ mom and grandmother ran the nursing home. In recent years she and her husband Brian bought the place and made it into Clyde Ha

Photo from the Perth & District Historical Society–
Mathesons Bridge-Mathesons Bridge, an old farm bridge crossing the Tay off Christie Lake

Bridge across the Mississippi River to Glen Isle- Public Archives- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

From the Perth Courier and Documentation by Ron Shaw-CLICK

March 29, 1889 – The road from Middleville to Lanark was the scene of another accident. While
Mr. A. Lawson was driving the mail from Middleville to Lanark on Monday morning the wheel
came off his buggy and, the horses taking fright, he was thrown out. In falling he came into
contact with a stone fracturing his skull and breaking his lower jaw. He died on Tuesday night at
the house of Mr. Robert Barr where he had been carried from the scene of the accident.

June 4, 1869 – A sad accident occurred on the River Clyde about two miles from Middleville at
Taylor’s Saw Mill. Waddell McFarlane, 21, son of Mr. McFarlane, postmaster of Rosetta, was
driving saw logs over the dam at Taylor’s where a jam occurred. Young McFarlane, in his
efforts to release the logs, boldly stepped on the logs immediately at the head of the chute.
When the one on which he was standing became loose he was carried over the dam.
McFarlane was carried along with it and when he arrived at the foot, the log struck him and
before assistance could be rendered, he sank to rise no more.

Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?


Lanark 1962 Centennial Photos

Standard
Lanark 1962 Centennial Photos

 

img.jpeg

 

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 07 Aug 1962, Tue - the 200- the on of Mac- the thriogTweek-long...

 

 

 

Image may contain: 1 person, standing and outdoorImage may contain: one or more people and people standing1-32A (1).jpg1-31C (2).jpgAll photos from Elaine Playfair’s album thanks to Lanark and Middleville Historian Laurie Yuill.

 

  1. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.relatedreading

    Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

    1. Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

       Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

    The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill

    HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1

    HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 

     

    HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

    Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

    HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Edward Welsh – William Lee’s Sawmill

Standard
Edward Welsh – William Lee’s Sawmill

 

22489982_10155297978961886_3288892961756860677_n.jpg

River Driving Crew in Playfairville

 

Perth Courier, June 26, 1914

Edward Welsh, who operated a shingle mill at Playfairville about thirty years ago was one of the early immigrants to the Canadian west in the ‘80’s.  He was a well known resident of Playfair district who to distinguish him from others of the same name was called “little” John Playfair.  Mr. and Mrs. Welsh are both living yet which their many friends in the old place and elsewhere will be glad to learn.

Lately they had their Golden Wedding which is thus described in the Baldur, Manitoba Gazette:  “Mr. and Mrs. Edward Welsh, old residents of this town and district, were the central figures in a very interesting event when on the afternoon and evening of Thursday, May 21, surrounded by six children and grandchildren to the fourth generation, brothers and sisters, nephews and nieces, grand-nephews and nieces, friends and neighbors, they celebrated their Golden Wedding and despite the years, the toil of the journey and the battles, by the way the faces of those two shone as radiantly as in youth as they received and entertained the merry crowd of young and old who came to rejoice with them in their attainment to a half century of happy wedded life.  Three stalwart sons, William of Baldur; George of Plunkett, Sask., and Fred of Baldur, were present to rejoice with their parents on this happy occasion.  The only real cloud on their sky was the absence in the far west of their only daughter Mrs. Smith.  Many little gifts accompanied by good wishes marked this day, one of the features of which was the presentation of a purse of gold to the bride and groom of fifty years ago, as a token of the kindly feelings of those about them and reminder of the wealth that belongs to the man and his mate who have been spared to each other for five decades.”

 

William Lees’ Sawmill, from 1850, had two circular saws, and a grist mill, woolen mill, carding mill (closed 1898), and shingle mill – all on the west side of Fallbrook. In 1860, he bought 300 acres (parts of Con. 10, 11, Lots 20, 21). In 1865, he added a blacksmith, which was bought by James Cameron in 1888, and later by son, Walter. The grist and woolen mills were designed by well-known area millwright Alex Wallace. A cheese factory was added in Fallbrook in 1884. The woolen mill operated to 1896 or 1897, then sold to
Christopher Donaldson, owner of the sawmill. It burned in 1902.

 

e002343904-v8.jpg

Playfair’s Mill 1895

 

The 1880-81 Bathurst map of Fallbrook area indicates a William Lee’s sawmill on the Fall River, at the exit from Bennett lake, and his sawmill, grist Lees sawmill, 1916 mill and woolen Mill, beside Fallbrook. He is also listed as (Book: ‘The Blacksmith of Fallbrook’) owning a mill at Playfairville, then and again in 1882. The carding mill, and two other sawmills, are on Bolton Creek, north and north-west respectively of the hamlet, one of which shows on the property of J. Chester (Lot 20 Con 11), presumably, the mill owner. For more information on the Fallbrook mills–The Mills of the Tay Watershed and Area
in Eastern Ontario

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 May 1922, Sat,  Page 2

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Inhabiting Playfairville Once Again?

Fallbrook and Playfair Playfairville 101–

Names Names Names

My Daddy was a Miner — was Yours?

Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook

The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

 

empty-box

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

unnamed (1)

Inhabiting Playfairville Once Again?

Standard

 

play.jpg

Playfairville, Ontario : Picnic, about 1880’s

This photo was purchased at the Walter Cameron estate auction, Fallbrook, 1989. Photo Charles DobieCan you provide names, corrections or comments?
Please email Charlie Dobie.

 

So something happened today- I realized that Playfairville was one Playfair Mills so I had some back tracking to do. You know the place- 5 miles from Armstrong’s Corners and 4 miles from Balderson. The community of Playfairville was named Playfair Rapids before it was changed to Playfairville and going back to its beginning, it was originally named Playfair Mills.

 

The unassuming little village of Playfairville, existing today is only as a small collection of homes and a church. It’s easy to miss or to pass through without thought of what once existed here. In fact, Playfairville has a long and very interesting history with worldwide connections and links to people such as mathematicians and politicians and to events including the French Revolution and the War of 1812. —Susan Murphy on Roadside Thoughts

 

20a66347-6d10-4350-83ca-e070f7875355_l.png

 

Andrew William Playfair was Scottish, born in Paris and Educated in Edinburgh. After building his dam and lumber mill, he continued to develop the area through his enterprising construction of a grist mill, a carding mill for wool, and an iron ore mine. This brought many new families to the village, which grew to include a number of houses, stores, and even a hotel and stable. Many of the village’s buildings stood along both sides of the road and some houses and the hotel stood on the hillside across the river.

 

playfair-house.jpg

Photo–Only the stone hearth chimney of Playfair’s original house and stone remnants of the dam remain along the river.Andrew Playfair & the history of Playfairville, Ontario 

The Playfair mills operated in the family for a number of generations into the future, but were eventually closed as timber and iron ore supplies dwindled. A map of Lanark County for 1879 shows that Maberly, Playfairville, Fallbrook, Balderson, Glen Tay, Allan’s Mills, Elliott, Bolingbroke, Stanleyville and Harper all had their own post offices.

Today, very little remains of the village built here, leaving few hints to the area’s past; however, almost unrecognizable remnants of Lt. Col. Playfair’s original house and dam can be found. The only buildings built by Playfair and his son ‘Big John’ remaining in their entirety today are Playfair Manor, built in 1830 on a bend in the river (now privately owned) and the United (formerly Methodist) church built in 1860 and still owned by the Playfair family today.

 

 

playfair-manor-300x169.png

Photo- Playfair home–Andrew Playfair & the history of Playfairville, Ontario 

There was once a  bustle of activity that once existed in this small hamlet and the connections this small and largely unknown village has with history through its found only the stone hearth chimney of Playfair’s original house and stone remnants of the dam remain along the river.

However, Playfair Manor, a Georgian Loyalist-style stone house built in 1830 by Lt Col Andrew Playfair and his son ‘Big’ John Playfair on a bend of the ‘Little’ Mississippi still stands. It is no longer owned by any descendants of Playfair.

 

Screenshot 2017-03-20 at 15.jpg

 

A.W. Playfair was born at Playfairville, Lanark County, Ontario on May 26, 1850, the son of John and Elizabeth Playfair and brother of George and John. He married Agnes Morrow of Maberley, Ontario, in 1871. From We Made Baldur

So while I was searching for something else I found these personal notations on Playfairville and the only reason I found it was because someone spelled “which” wrong.

 

Personal Notes about  Playfairville  (would love to know more please)

Robert Kenneth John Playfair on 29-Jan-2015

Much too my delight, I am happy to report that Playfairville is once again inhabited with the Playfair blood line. As I and my parents work to restore my great uncles home behind The Playfair Historic Church which we own as well I find it all to interesting how comfortable I and my two sons feel living on this ancestral plot of land.

Although its just a small part of Colonel Playfair’s original land, it feels right. My sons Jonathan and Nicholas from what I can see are the two youngest Playfair’s in the country and I am honored to have the good fortune to raise them here were our forefathers began life in Canada. My boys love that they are the only kids in school who live in a town named after them and tell me they want to live there forever. We have started collecting historical photos and artifacts to display in the house and church to help tell the story of the Playfair family and its once thriving village. Peaceful, beautiful and full of great neighbors its a wonderful place to live.

 

Robert K. J. Playfair on 09-Mar-2015

Again our family will be growing and increasing the size of this fantastic little community. I am excited to announce that my fiancé Natalie Holmes will be moving from Kingston to live with us in Playfairville this spring. Natalie also has prominent history in the County as her Grandfather was a well respected Doctor in Lanark village for many years. We will be married in The Playfair Historic Church on Sept 19th of this year.

Author’s Note–Recently, the church was refurbished and redecorated by the current stewards Robert William Richard Playfair and James Kenneth John Playfair. The church was given a fresh coat of paint; however, the original stencils around the top of the church and above the wainscoting are the original patterns. Also to receive a restoration were the paintings that hang over the pulpit.


Gayda Errett on 04-Dec-13 2004

When we could not find a country-rural someplace in rural Alberta and British Columbia because what we could afford were ‘fixer-uppers’ demanding hundreds of thousands of dollars in renovations. The acreage and Confederation log house we purchased in Playfairville would be worth a million or more in the aforementioned provinces. However, the add-on for us is that at the time of purchase we wanted to know where in the area we were located other than the Concession and Lot numbers. Upon going to the tourism bureau in Perth to get a map, we discovered it was Playfairville.

Adding to the surprise the acreage we just purchased, was our neighbour across the Mississippi River coming over to welcome us. He asked if we knew that we were on the Playfair ancestor’s land plot. We did not despite my husband is a descendant [we did not choose the property based on his descendency. Rather it was desperation and destiny on our part seeking somewhere in Canada that we could purchase an acreage we could afford.

Purely coincidental that we are on my husband’s ancestor’s property. We learned our neighbour was living in one of the 3 Playfair homes in Playfairville. His is the first one built by Lt. Col. Andrew Playfair. [See our daughter’s information above.] When our neighbour invited us over for a dinner party, I commented to my husband, ‘Can you believe you are dining in your ancestor’s home?’ It was truly remarkable that he has ended up without intending to do so, on his ancestor’s land plot. We have a copy of the Deed. 

Christian Poupore on Nov-13 2005
I am fortunate enough to be the son of the current owner. My father purchased the Playfair estate this summer and it has been a treasure of epic proportions. I can confirm that indeed the original chimney does in fact still stand in the drive way to sit day!!!! My girlfriend and I have been taking photos all over the property. any further records you may have about this land would be extremely exciting to view. 

BJ Errett on Apr-13 2016

Playfairville: tranquil village on the Little Mississippi. Playfairville was originally known as Playfair Corners, Mills, or Rapids and at the junction of McDonald’s Corners Road and Fallbrook Road. It was named after Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew William Playfair born in Paris, France in 1790, and son of Mary Morris and famous father William Playfair who invented the Pie, Line, and Bar graphs and authored many books as a political and economic commentator still in print today. Lt. Col. Andrew Playfair is best known for his writings about the epic 1176 km historical military walk with the 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot from Fredericton to Kingston in the winter of 1813 and his engagement in the War of 1812-1814 battles at Sackett’s Harbor in May 1813, where he was wounded and a month later on June 24th, 1813, with the surrender of 500 Americans at the Battle of Beaver Dams after the British were warned about the surprise attacked planned by the Americans by Laura Secord. Lt. Col. Playfair was granted 600 acres of land along the Little Mississippi River after his service in the War of 1812-1814.

Lt. Col. Playfair built a dam, and established lumber, grist and carding mills, an iron ore mine, housing, stores and a hotel and stable until the iron ore and forests were exhausted. Only the stone hearth chimney of Playfair’s original house and remnants of the dam remain. However, Playfair Manor, a Georgian Loyalist-style stone house built in 1830 by Lt. Col. Andrew Playfair and his son Big John Playfair on a bend of the Little Mississippi still stands but is no longer owned by the Playfairs. The former Wesleyan Methodist Church and later United Church, until its closure in 1965, is located on Fallbrook Road and was built in 1860 by Lt. Col. Playfair and his son Big John in the Federal-style. The church is now privately owned and operated by the Playfair family.

 

 

historicalnotes

Playfairville United Church

McDonald’s Corners, Playfairville
Lot 21, Concession 12, Playfair, Bathurst

Andrew Playfair and Playfairville website

Playfairville Mills

Located on lot 22 of Concession 12 of the Bathurst Ward, this mill was built by Col. Andrew W. Playfair who was a retired lieutenant of the 104 th Foot Regiment, New Brunswick Fencible Infantry, who located there in 1816. In 1851, the census shows that Andrew Playfair St. is the proprietor of the grist mill, and a carding and fulling mill.

Playfairville Ontario videos click here–

The Monumental Military March of the 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot from Fredericton to Kingston departing February 16, 1813 and arriving April 12, 1813. This Epic Overland Journey from New Brunswick through Lower and part of Upper Canada (Québec and Eastern Ontario) in the Winter of 1813 through snow storms, frigid temperatures, and lack of overnight housing on snowshoes took place during the War of 1812-1814.
One of the British Officers, Lieutenant Andrew Playfair, son of William Playfair who invented the line, bar, and pie charts, wrote about the 104th Regiment’s heroic winter walk in an article published by the British Standard on January 20, 1862. Lt. (Col.) Playfair was granted 600 acres of land in Upper Canada and founded Playfairville, Ontario, housing lumber, grist, and carding mills, iron ore mine, hotel, post office, church, stores, and houses. Only the church and two stone houses remain.

 

gt_101_3_insert (Copier).jpg

JIM RAE – Single Maxim-GT 101

A – Playfairville

B – Cry, Cry, Cry

e011044793-v8.jpg

MIKAN Number
4429974


Title
Jim Rae presents poster and autographed copy of “Playfairville” single to CJET morning man, Rick Shea

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Related reading

Fallbrook and Playfair Playfairville 101–

Names Names Names

My Daddy was a Miner — was Yours?