Tag Archives: photos

More Photos Union Station – Broad Street — Sadler Photos

Standard
More Photos Union Station – Broad Street — Sadler Photos

Photos from the Sadler family collection.. They lived in Pakenham and Ottawa

Photos from the Sadler family collection.. They lived in Pakenham and Ottawa

Photos from the Sadler family collection.. They lived in Pakenham and Ottawa

Photos from the Sadler family collection.. They lived in Pakenham and Ottawa

Photos from the Sadler family collection.. They lived in Pakenham and Ottawa

Andrew Jeanes

I can’t identify the cemetery photo, but I think the photos of CPR locomotive No. 210 were taken at CP’s station at Broad Street on the Lebreton Flats before 1920. At that time this station was referred to as “Union Station” because it had been shared by various railway companies that were eventually all absorbed by the CPR. In 1920, CP closed this station and moved into the Grand Trunk Central Station, which then became known as Union Station.

This is the train which conveyed the casket containing the remains of Sir John A. Macdonald from Ottawa to Kingston, Ontario, on June 6, 1891. It is standing in the Canadian Pacific Queen Street or Broad Street station, originally opened by the Canada Central Railway on September 15, 1870, and which was subsequently destroyed in the great Ottawa-Hull fire of April 26, 1900.

The locomotive, #283, was a 4-4-0 built by Hinckley in August 1883. It was subsequently wrecked in a collision with #354 at Stittsville, Ontario, in October 1897. On this auspicious occasion Jack Hollyoak was the engineer and Harry Fraser the fireman.

That day all engines on Canadian Pacific were decorated with black crepe. The casket was conveyed in an express car which was completely covered with black crepe, both inside and out. Stops were made at Carleton Place and Smiths Falls on the way to Kingston where crowds of our townsfolk pressed around the funeral car that was draped in purple and black. A floral offering was offered at Smiths Falls by a contingent of local Liberals and Conservatives. The train stations all through Canada, including Carleton Place, had black mourning displays for one week.

David Jeanes

The CPR stations on Broad Street were always called Union Station, because the first wooden station in 1881 was built jointly by the Canada Central Railway (to Carleton Place) and the Quebec Montreal Ottawa and Occidental Railway (to Montreal via Lachute), shortly before both railways were purchased by Canadian Pacific. This was the station north of the aqueduct which was damaged by fire in 1895 and destroyed in the 1900 fire. The stone and brick station south of the aqueduct was built by the CPR immediately after the fire in 1900 but was called Union Station, because it was also used by the Pontiac & Pacific Junction Railway and the Ottawa & Gatineau Railway. Both of them were also purchased by the CPR in 1902. However the Union Station name remained until all passenger trains were transferred to the Grand Trunk Central Station on Rideau Street in 1920, which then took the Union Station name.

Lost Ottawa

Ottawa’s big train station in 1900 was the Canadian Pacific Station on Board Street in Lebreton Flats — complete with streetcar service to downtown and special cars to pick up the mail.

This station was located just north of Albert and south of the aqueduct on the now lost Broad Street. I notice in the Goad Maps of 1902, revised to 1912, that this station is called “Union Station.”

Query, is this a picture the station that burned in the Great Fire of 1900? Also, I said Broad Street was lost, but keep an eye out for our next post …

(LAC PA-008676)

Colin Churcher photo

John Makadi

Jaan Kolk It seems the first station was built on Broad Street in 1881 to handle Canada Central, and Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa and Occidental trains. This station burned down in a fire in 1895. Here is illustration of that first station fire courtesy of the Colin Churcher’s website. The replacement station was rebuilt by CPR and opened in 1896. But its tenture was short-lived as it burned in the 1900 Great Fire.

Lost Ottawa

  · 

It wouldn’t be lost Ottawa without … a fire!

Here is a shot of the CPR Station on Broad Street after the Great Fire of 1900. The truck wheels teel the story. Each of set of wheels had a wooden box car on top of them before the fire. Gone, like the station.

CMST DEB (originally Topley).

Jaan Kolk

I wondered if there was any chance that the OP photo was of the replacement station build after the 1895 fire, but Colin Churher reports that the replacement was remarkably similar. A Jan. 11, 1896 Journal note on the replacement station said it was externally identical to the old one, and earlier notes indicated it was rebuilt at the original location.

The OP photo is, then, definitely the the station built after the fire of 1900.

David Jeanes

Jaan Kolk The station as rebuilt after the 1895 fire appears in an 1897 photo, (City of Ottawa Archives CA-90025). It appears to have been rebuilt exactly as shown in the newspaper illustration and a photo taken earlier from the west.

City of Ottawa Archives CA-90025 courtesy Dave Knowles

The above picture shows the first CPR Broad Street station with Ottawa Electric car 202 in front.  The picture was taken on 29 January 1897. Colin Churcher

read more here about Broad Street

Lost Ottawa

  · 

Detail of area around the old CPR “Union” Station on Broad Street in Lebreton, from a Goad map printed in 1912.

At bottom left are the shops of Thomas “Carbide” Wilson’s International Marine Signal Company, which manufactured gas buoys and other marine signals. Wilson was a rather prolific Canadian inventor who developed a method of turning calcium carbide into acetylene gas. His signal company was established in 1906.

read more here about Broad Street

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada21 Jul 1966, Thu  •  Page 15

Train Accidents Maberly – Haze/Hayes and Grey

Was Engine CPR 2802 a Killer Train? Brent Eades

Born in Bells Corners-The Man Who Started Out to Become a Priest and Became a Train Robber – Anecdotes about Chris Evans and Daughter Eva

The Removal of the CPR Train Station– Almonte –1978

The McKellar Train Derailment 1913

Identifying Photos– William Asa CRAM — Adin Daigle Photos

Standard
Identifying Photos– William Asa CRAM — Adin Daigle Photos

Adin Daigle put up this photo last week and it had no name. As soon as I posted it Brian Ford itentified it and then Donna McFarlane had another photo..

Brian Ford

Have the same photo. Labelled: Willard Cram, a cousin.

Donna Mcfarlane

 

this is a picture of johns great uncle Willard Cram and his wife

Willard Asa Cram

BIRTH10 Jan 1876

Beckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, CanadaDEATH25 May 1965 (aged 89)

Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, CanadaBURIAL

United CemeteriesCarleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada  Show MapPLOTPine Grove EastMEMORIAL ID192749401 · View Source

Family Members

Parents

Spouse

Siblings

Children

What Happened to Lottie Blair of Clayton and Grace Cram of Glen Isle?

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

More “Clippings” on the Local Crams

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

After I Read an Obit About Mrs. William Cram I also Found Out

So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

Donald Cram — Nobel Prize for Chemistry

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Searching for Joey Cram of Carleton Place

I Now have Part of Joey Cram

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Genealogy Chatter- Willard and Margaret E Simpson Cram

Norman Cram and Ed Sibbitt –The Rest of the Story — Lots of Genealogy

Reflections of my Old Life —Nikki Thornton Photo Files

Standard
Reflections of my Old Life —Nikki Thornton Photo Files

Please play while looking at photos..

Nikki Thornton Photos

  · 

Photos of the farm halfway between Highway 7 and Wolf Grove Rd on Ramsay Concession 1. Prints are on different material (and span large negative index numbers) so they were potentially shot at different times. Best guess late 60s to early 70s.

Country Roads– Between Highway 7 and Wolf Grove Rd on Ramsay Concession 1 — Nikki Thornton Photo Files

Almonte Hockey Club 1930-1931 Trash Talking and Egg Hurlers — Nikki Thornton Photo Files

Drill Halls and Cadets — Nikki Thornton Photo Files

Who is this Family? UPDATE — The Nikki Thorton Photo Files

Documenting Mr. Millar and his Dog Nicket- Thornton Photo Files and “It’s Your World Contest”

Winter Carnival 1973- Nancy Ryan, Gill Neil, Cindy Rosborough, Sandy Thompson and Brenda Moffatt

Country Roads– Between Highway 7 and Wolf Grove Rd on Ramsay Concession 1 — Nikki Thornton Photo Files

Standard
Country Roads– Between Highway 7 and Wolf Grove Rd on Ramsay Concession 1 — Nikki Thornton Photo Files
Please play while looking at photos…..

Nikki Thornton Photos

  · 

Photos of the farm halfway between Highway 7 and Wolf Grove Rd on Ramsay Concession 1. Prints are on different material (and span large negative index numbers) so they were potentially shot at different times. Best guess late 60s to early 70s.

Almonte Hockey Club 1930-1931 Trash Talking and Egg Hurlers — Nikki Thornton Photo Files

Drill Halls and Cadets — Nikki Thornton Photo Files

Who is this Family? UPDATE — The Nikki Thorton Photo Files

Documenting Mr. Millar and his Dog Nicket- Thornton Photo Files and “It’s Your World Contest”

Winter Carnival 1973- Nancy Ryan, Gill Neil, Cindy Rosborough, Sandy Thompson and Brenda Moffatt

Who is this Family? UPDATE — The Nikki Thorton Photo Files

Standard
Who is this Family? UPDATE — The Nikki Thorton Photo Files

Nikki Thornton

  · 

This is a family that lived past Union Hall.

Thank to Nikki for all the photos he has been sending.

So who was this family??

Duncan Family Margaret and Hugh Duncan

Stuart McIntosh

Duncans

Marilyn Vallentyne Gendron

Great family and photo.

Angela Giles

Margaret and Hugh Duncan and family

Cathy McRae Sharbot

The Duncan Family, they lived on the Clayton Road

Kathy Duncan

Thats me on the right with the skinny legs…lol..our family in the 1970’s

Anne Marie Duncan

Sometimes we got their mail by mistake – we were the Duncans on Perth Road past Union Hall.

Read-The Egg House on the Hill — The Duncans

May1956

It took only three quarters of an hour for fire to destroy the modern egg grading plant of Hugh Duncan, Clayton Road, Ramsay, on Monday afternoon. It is located about two miles from this town. Flames were seen by an employee at 4.45 and by 5.30 the building of cinder blocks, which was only two years old, had been consumed together with machinery, other equipment and 150 cases of eggs—30 doz. to the case. READ- DUNCAN EGG GRADING Fire — 1956

Resident of the Month: Margaret Duncan 

Margaret’s history as a community leader and elected official is well known both in Mississippi Mills and surrounding area—from High School teacher in Carleton Place, to a successful farm business partnership, to Councilor in Ramsay Township, (first woman), to Reeve of Ramsay Township, to Warden of Lanark County. Her many policies and political accomplishments continue to impact Mississippi Mills and she continues to be involved in community groups, including fundraising for the Almonte General Hospital/ Fairview Manor. While on council, she was responsible for securing significant funding for a variety of rural projects such as the Clayton Housing Project, Lyn Bower, and many new paved roads which encouraged tourism in the area. 

Margaret met her husband, Hugh Duncan, at Guelph university. Hugh returned to his home in Almonte and Margaret arrived as a new bride in 1951. They worked hard to create a successful farm and egg marketing business. They raised 5 children in their home on Clayton Road and employed many local residents over their 39 years of business. 

After the death of Hugh, Margaret met and married Stanley Brunton. After only a short 4 1/2 years, he passed. She was fortunate to have even more family that were a great part of her life. Few know of her roots—her early life in a small, rural farming community in Guelph Township, seven miles from Guelph. Margaret’s father was largely self-educated, given the demands of work on the family farm. The rich land, her father’s hard work and determination throughout his life, made him a successful dairy farmer and active community leader serving as Guelph Township Councilor and Reeve, and as the Clerk of his Township. 

Margaret has fond memories of her mother’s sweet temperament, love of flowers, soloist in the church choir and her stylish appearance. The sadness of her early death remains with her today.  Margaret’s character was shaped by her parents’ values, personal commitment to community, deep religious beliefs, determination and self-sufficiency. Margaret’s family forged deep values in this rural community of self-sufficient farmers and they managed well throughout the Depression years. As children, Margaret along with her brother and sister, participated in local debates, public speaking, social events, recitals and local dances. Margaret’s five children are all currently living in the Almonte and Ottawa area and she stays close with her in-laws, grandchildren and great grandchildren. Her large extended family and friends continue to love to visit her at her new, beautiful home at Orchard View by the Mississippi.

From the Orchard View newsletter 2018

Margaret Duncan, Almonte Ontario

Born on May 2, 1924
Died on March 24, 2022 The Millstone

On March 24, 2022, Margaret Duncan concluded her long, prosperous and healthy life.  In her 98th year, Margaret was a successful businesswoman, an elected municipal official, a community fundraiser, a mother, grandmother, great grandmother, wife, sister, aunt, cousin and friend.

 Predeceased by husbands Raymond Hugh Duncan and Stanley Brunton; sister Penelope Klinck; and brother John M. Gilchrist. She will be missed by her companion, Jack Hayes.

Survived by her children Isabel Metcalfe (Herb Metcalfe), Pennie Eagen (Pat Eagen), Kathy Duncan, Allan Duncan (Tammy Connors), Christine Moses (Darcy Moses); her grandchildren Julie Metcalfe (Tim O’Malley), Dan Metcalfe (Mandy Metcalfe), Dr. Kathleen Metcalfe,  Elizabeth Eagen (Trevor McKay), Allison Eagen (Brad Hewton), Charlotte Eagen (Colin MacKenzie), Andrew Eagen (Katie Kelly), Jonas Vaskas (Nicola Swanby), Tessa Vaskas (Tyler Stanton), Chris Duncan (Sidney Morgan), Connor Duncan (Annie Bergeron-Oliver), Taylor Duncan (Brandon Watt), Josh Goodwin, Tom Moses, Jack Moses (Courtney Bradley);  and her great grandchildren Grace O’Malley, Maisie O’Malley, Scarlett O’Malley, Maeve Metcalfe, Ryan McKay, Isaac McKay, James Hewton, Norah Hewton and Hazel Hewton.

Margaret graduated from Teachers College in Hamilton and taught in rural Ontario.  Her first classroom had 32 students ranging from grades one to eight. In 1951, she married Hugh Duncan and they began Duncan’s Poultry Farm in Almonte, Ontario. Together they built a business that ran for forty years, and secured egg markets throughout Eastern Ontario.

 In 1974, she was the first woman to be elected to Ramsay Township Council, and in 1994, she became the first female Warden of Lanark Country.  She loved her community, she served it well and never lost a municipal election – usually topping the polls.

When Hugh Duncan died in 1995, Margaret transitioned from municipal politics to become a sought-after community volunteer, including a board member at the Carleton Place Memorial Hospital and the Almonte General Hospital. She became a champion fundraiser for the Almonte General Hospital receiving the Senior of the Year Award in 1997 and the Bert McIntyre Memorial Fundraising Award in 2020.

Her belief in God, her love of music, flowers, people and travel sustained her throughout her active and vibrant life.  A life-long member of the Liberal Party of Canada, she followed politics, the stock market, international affairs, public policy, and of course, fashion.  She stayed current with technology and embraced online banking when she was 75, using it daily until her mid-90s.   Margaret was generous with her experience and her approach.  She was an angel investor to local businesses and a mentor to hundreds of men and women, especially people seeking public office.

As a nation builder, Margaret Duncan will be remembered for her kind and tolerant views, her inclusivity and her love of life.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada04 Aug 1961, Fri  •  Page 37

He and his wife, Margaret have four children-three girls and a boy. Mrs. Duncan keep the book. They work as a team and both husband and wife pool their judgment and experience in arriving at important decisions. Mr. Duncan went into the “started pullet” business in 1937

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada02 Aug 1961, Wed  •  Page 23

Yesterday’s chicken had to run around in the hay field scratching to get enough to eat She had to be lean and alert to avoid the neighbour’s dog. When she did have time to lay an egg she usually hid it, and the farmer’s wife had to have great ingenuity if she were to find enough eggs to fill the egg box. Today’s hen has found security in an air-conditioned house with food served up on a shiny tray. She never has to walk more than five feet to get something to eat, and has energy saved up to lay more eggs. She eats and drinks in regal style and in her contentment produces more food for man. is spent in the feeding, watering across the road, and the trip to after a chicken, providing he could catch her. Today it needs a man with a special knowledge of poultry science, like Hugh Duncan, of Almonte, Ontario, near Ottawa, who got his specialized knowledge of farming from the OntarioAgricultural College and went into the poultry business soon after he graduated.

To get experience he built up his poultry farm from a small beginning, and now is erecting the chicken palace which chickens know is the ultimate. To keep costs down one must increase efficiency. A total of 10,000 pullets are ready to start work laying egs in the new chicken house as soon as it is completed and everyone has had a chance to see it on open house day. No chicken will have claustrophobia in this 275 foot laying house, 37 feet wide, which was bought in prefabricated form and erected by local men after they had first laid a complete cement foundation.

The 5,000 hens on each side of the long building will have a pleasant day jumping from roost bar to water trough bar to feed bar and then into the nests beside the center corridor. These long wooden bars are continuous, running the length of the building on each side! continuous also are the feed troughs and water troughs. The modern hen adjusts herself rapidly to the idea of the feed juggling along in the shiny galvanized iron feeding trough. Although the fresh pellets or finely ground feed move at ten feet per minute she can select choice pieces with her beak. Any time she feels like it she can hop down to the lower bar and get a drink of water. When the level in the trough falls to a certain height a senstitive device turns on the fresh water and a pump fills up the trough again. No hen need complain about the sanitation.

On the principle that 80 per cent of the hen’s time and roosting area, the four foot wide cement troughs underneath the floor slats are equipped with automatic cleaner scrapers. V- shaped when at rest, the scrapers spread out when the machine is started twice a week, and clean the entire dropping area into central pits “which, in turn, are cleaned mechanically. If a hen thinks she can hide her egg she is mistaken in this modern chicken house, because when she gets up after laying her egg it roils gently down to the back of the nests, out of her reach, where it can be picked up with all the other newly-laid eggs as the operator walks down the long corridor. As he picks up the eggs he places them on a mobile platform suspended from a ceiling track, and he can thus move the eggs down the corridor without having to lift them. In the work room at the front of the building he can lift the 15 dozen egg container intact into a vat of cleaning solution, he leaves them for four minutes before placing them in the adjacent cold storage room.

A hen doesn’t need to worry about her egg getting spoiled. Eggs stored in the cool room for 24 hours immediately after being laid are easier to grade and of course keep much fresher. The grading process, in Hugh Duncan’s egg grading station market in insulated truck are fast enough so the eggs do not warm up again before getting to the ol counter in the grocery store. So that the air in the hen house is always nice and fresh electric fans take care of the air-conditioning, bringing fresh air into the building and taking warm air out. Unlike humans, hens like a fairly cool building and the heat from their bodies warms up the building even in very coid weather. For the operator, electric heaters installed in the work room and one in the cold storage room keep the work room at comfortable temperature and, in cool weather, keep the store room from falling below freez ing. In case anyone thinks that all this is unnecessary coddling of the hen, and by this we do not mean a pun like “coddled eggs”, then one must remember that in the chicken business like any other it is necessary to spend money to make money. Only from those healthy, well-satisfied hens and efficient, fast-working operator will production reach the steady, high level demanded by modern supermarkets, chain stores and costs be controlled to meet the demands of modern business methods. The day of the solitary, independent chicken is over.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada30 Jul 1975, Wed  •  Page 2

The Egg House on the Hill — The Duncans

DUNCAN EGG GRADING Fire — 1956

Snippets of The Duncan Farm ( Dondi Farms)

Summertime Photos of Green Acres Lanark – 1950s — Part 2 — Aikenhead Collections

Standard
Summertime Photos of Green Acres Lanark – 1950s — Part 2 — Aikenhead Collections

These are from the Millie Aikenhead photo group from the 50s. There are two parts to this. The photos were very very curly but did the best I can. Green Acres was outside Almonte, Ontario.

Brian Janet and Stephen Ardley and Ian McKechnie at Green Acres

Elise Ardley and Millie Aitkenhead

Janet Brian and Steven Ardley at Green Acres

Lynn and Ian McKechnie at Green Acres

Brian Ardley at Green Acres

Dad Heather Sheldrick and boyfriend playing volleyball at Green Acres

Someone looks like they are in trouble with their ars behind their back here

Millie Aikenhead Buzz LaBute and Glora Burnside at Green Acres

Playing tennis at Green Acres

The Aitkenhead Bakery Fire 1971

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

How to Make a Vintage Apron- Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Old fashioned Raisin Bread WITH ZEST

The Bakeries and Frame Houses of Lower Wellington Street – Aitkenhead

No Banker Left Behind – Bank of Montreal Almonte Photos

Down by the Mississippi River- Almonte Falls Photos 50s

What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Photos of the Orange Parade Almonte 1963 — Name that Band?

Summertime Photos of Green Acres Lanark – 1950s — Part 1– Aitkenhead Collection

Standard

These are from the Millie Aikenhead photo group from the 50s. There are two parts to this. The photos were very very curlybut did the best I can.

Carol Donovan July 1951

Horse on road to Green Acres

Marion Millie red and rascal

Marion Millie and Rascal

Millie

Green Acres

Marion Ardley, The Swimmer at Green Acres

Brian Ardley and Millie Aitekenheadat Green Acres on the rock.

Marion and Elsie at Green Acres

The Aitkenhead Bakery Fire 1971

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

How to Make a Vintage Apron- Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Old fashioned Raisin Bread WITH ZEST

The Bakeries and Frame Houses of Lower Wellington Street – Aitkenhead

No Banker Left Behind – Bank of Montreal Almonte Photos

Down by the Mississippi River- Almonte Falls Photos 50s

What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Photos of the Orange Parade Almonte 1963 — Name that Band?

Carleton Place Hydro Photos Thanks to Hanah White

Standard
Carleton Place Hydro Photos  Thanks to Hanah White

The old Hydro building- Friendship Club- 

Pictured below , Gail Williams , Pat Lloyd and Kay Ford in our back yard at 81 Bell St. Hydro apartment building in the background was home to the Deschamps , Fergusons , and Tombs . Photo Llew Loyd

The third man is Art Publow from Old Ontario Hydro

1972- 1973?

PHOTOS from Hanah White

I also have This picture of Dad and Jack Watt teaching in 1988

The Day they moved St. Mary’s Rectory down to Franktown Road. Taken by Hanah’s White’s Dad in the Hydro Truck

Also read-Well, We’re Movin’ On Up to Franktown Road

Things You Didn’t Know About the Moore House — or Maybe you Did

An Update to the Kennedy House — Harold “Ozzie” McNeely

Things You Didn’t Know About the Moore House — or Maybe you Did

Well, We’re Movin’ On Up to Franktown Road

Clippings and Comments about the Hydro Dam

Working on the Telephone Lines — Electrocution at Carleton Place

Swimming at the Dam, St. James Park and Other Things

The Power of the Mississippi River Dam in Carleton Place

Finding a New Photo from the Guelph Archives #Excitement

The Road to Hockeyville — What’s Next? Here is your Play by Play….

Standard
The Road to Hockeyville — What’s Next? Here is your Play by Play….

VOTING IS OVER, this is just the story

Let’s face it, I am an old woman that does not skate, and is not a rinkrat. But even though I’ll never dance on tables anymore on St. Patrick’s Day my enthusiasm and love for this town has never wavered since I moved here in 1981. My kids played hockey and Sky still plays hockey. His son Elia now plays and my late husband Angelo once owned the Carleton Place Kings. But, that’s neither here nor there is it?

This was my bottom line:

Every Saturday night I would see ads for Hockeyville and check the page to see if we were entered. We were not, and I was disappointed no one had taken up the hockey stick challenge. Would people think it was strange that the crazy old hat lady that lives on Lake Ave East with a rabbit and cow in her yard take up the charge?? LOLOL I have lived here long enough to know something would come up. LOLOL

So first things first, I spoke with Mayor Toby Randell and then Parks and Rec Joanne Henderson. Everyone said ‘go for it’ but the pain of losing 11 years ago in 2012 was still fresh and I get it, I really do. This is our town and we love it and think it’s the best! So even though it was getting late to enter I wrote the ” Submitted for Review” entry question 1 and 2. Parks and Rec Jessica Hansen wrote number three. I thought it was an amazing request. What’s the good of having an arena if kids cannot afford to play? Especially now, when every penny counts, this would be amazing to have a lending library at the arena.

You can only submit 1000 CHARACTERS.. do you know how hard that is? LOL But we did it.. But, at the bottom of blog I have included the first long one I wrote and had to condense it down to 1000 Characters. To preserve for history or something like that.

Amanda Blakeley I started loading up photos but you can only enter FIVE!!. So in they came slowly and all at once a tsunami of townsfolk and even former folks that lived here submitted photos. I love you guys and thank you from the bottom of my heart to all that helped and worked hard!! Now we wait…

Jane Churchill

  · 

1/5 is my late brother-in-law Donnie Churchill participating in the ground breaking ceremony for the new arena in Carleton Place

THE PHASES

  • NOMINATE
    & RALLYJAN. 1 – FEB. 19–DONE!!
  • JUDGING PERIOD-FEB. 20 – MAR. 11
  • TOP 4 ANNOUNCEMENTMAR. 11
  • VOTING OPEN-MAR 31 AT 9 AM ET

    APR 1 AT 5 PM ET
  • WINNER ANNOUNCEMENTAPR 1

Annik Lapensee is with Martin Puckett.

  · 

Carleton Place Atom A Team 1974.

From row left to right. Danny Jackson, John Gardener, Jeff Puckett, Mike Evoy, Herb Henderson, Paul Quinn, Andy Bryce, Kevin Quartermain.

Back row left to right. Terry Mast, Blair White, Blair Russell, Martin Puckett, Kevin Clark, Kevin Sweeney, Dale Lowe, Ross Puckett.

Our entry

1. Tell us about your community’s spirit as well as its passion for hockey. Can you describe or explain examples of how this came to life?

Years ago Carleton Place entered Hockeyville and wasn’t lucky in winning. But life says, “Sometimes you do the hard work, set the table and someone else eats the meal.”

In 1910 the first rink was to be built, but a fire broke out that nearly destroyed the whole town. So the new rink was delayed until everyone got back on their feet again. When the Beckwith Street arena was finally built, the town rejoiced. They played hockey there until the folks wore it out in 1965.

But they persevered and played on an outdoor rink at the ball diamond that was formerly the town dump. When the new arena on Neelin Street was built Doug Gibson took the lead in 1970 to install artificial ice and insisted the coach stop using Ottawa players and concentrate more on the local area boys. 

Hockey raised us all. You might never become “the great one”, but you will always be the greatest in our town. Carleton Place has never given up and great moments are born out of great opportunities. Thank you Hockeyville!

Tell us about your Arena. Why is it important to you, your family, and your community?  

Our arena is the beating heart in our town, and it’s  where our community comes together as one family! It teaches young kids to stand on their own two feet and as one senior said: lots of friendly staff to rescue us old guys when we forget to bring something. 

It still feels like home to those that come back to visit, and it’s the only time some will get out of bed on a Saturday morning to come for a 6:30 am practice. It’s where the Carleton Place Canadians play and our kids know that success is possible by knowing the past.

Hometown heroes: Roy Brown, who shot down the Red Baron played hockey here in his youth. James Cooper Smeaton, hockey player, referee and head coach served as the NHL’s referee-in-chief from 1917 until 1937. Leslie McFarlane, once a Carleton Place resident, ghost author of The Hardy Boys, contributed to our pride. Leslie’s son, Brian McFarlane became a Hockey Night in Canada commentator. Alone, we are one speck of ice. Together we are the Carleton Place arena.

Explain how your community will use the $250,000 to upgrade and improve your Arena. 
Our ask is a little different than others for upgrading our arena facility. It is solely for our children. Residents of Carleton Place know the health & social benefits that children experience from participating in hockey programs. Our community will use the $250,000 to introduce a Hockey Skate & Equipment Loaning Program at the Carleton Place arena. This program will allow children ages 4-9 the opportunity to loan hockey skates & equipment, which will assist in making the sport of hockey more. (Thanks Jessica Hansen for this idea)

Carleton Place, Ont. hoping to be the next Kraft Hockeyville Thanks Dylan Dyson

https://ottawa.ctvnews.ca/carleton-place-ont-hoping-to-be-the-next-kraft-hockeyville-1.6277472

Carleton Place vying for 2023 Kraft Hockeyville title– Thanks Tara Gesner

https://www.insideottawavalley.com/news-story/10851557-carleton-place-vying-for-2023-kraft-hockeyville-title/

Annik Lapensee is with Martin Puckett.

  · 

Carleton Place Atom A Team 1974.

From row left to right. Danny Jackson, John Gardener, Jeff Puckett, Mike Evoy, Herb Henderson, Paul Quinn, Andy Bryce, Kevin Quartermain.

Back row left to right. Terry Mast, Blair White, Blair Russell, Martin Puckett, Kevin Clark, Kevin Sweeney, Dale Lowe, Ross Puckett.

The long winded version of our history.. NOT submitted

1. Tell us about your community’s spirit as well as its passion for hockey. Can you describe or explain examples of how this came to life? 

Years ago Carleton Place entered Hockeyville and like many other towns and cities in Canada was not lucky in winning. This happens to everyone and life goes on, but sometimes it takes an emotional toll. As Brian Burke once said- “Sometimes you do the hard work and set the table and somebody else eats the meal.”

There was apprehension in entering again,  and great moments come from great opportunities which Hockeyville is. But, once again, you get out there, pull up your hockey pants, and tell Canada that Carleton Place is hard to beat. 

Back in the 1900s there was no hockey equipment and kids made do with thick rolls of newspaper as shin guards when they played hockey. Later they graduated to magazines when they played at an outdoor rink where the Carleton Place Library now stands. The first arena in Carleton Place didn’t come easily and in 1910-1911 the new rink was ready to be built. But, you see that never happened for another few years as in May of 1910 a fire broke out that nearly wiped out the whole town. A new rink was the last thing they needed, and it was pushed aside until  the town got back on its feet again.

When the Beckwith Street arena was finally built it was right in the middle of town and practically in everyone’s backyards. They skated and played hockey there until the folks in Carleton Place wore it out, condemned it, and they closed the doors in 1965.

Once the arena was torn down the kids played Midget hockey on an outdoor rink at the ball diamond that was once the town dump. Nothing was going to stop them. Meanwhile several priests living on High Street realized how important hockey was to the town and provided an outdoor rink. Most kids played there until the new arena was built, some walking a long distance carrying their hockey bags and sticks over their shoulders in the dead of winter. If they were lucky the old barn they changed in would have a fire on in an old wood stove because usually there was no heat. But, that never stopped anyone. They did what they could to keep hockey alive even down to the times it snowed and they would have to stop the game to shovel the ice. 

To keep the spirit of hockey alive Ted Shenfield also made a rink on Napoleon Street and the low part of a field off Lake Avenue that flooded in the fall and froze over in the winter became a rink also. Someone had an uncle that worked at the old Ottawa Auditorium in the days of the Ottawa Senators of the AHL. He used to provide his nephew with goalie sticks which meant that when they picked teams he invariably ended up in goal.

They finally built a new arena on Neelin Street and 

In 1970 Carleton Place resident Doug Gibson was the chairman of a drive for funds to install artificial ice in the new arena, and his team found themselves raising only a total of $18,823. 30. They desperately needed another $25,000, so they offered each contributor of $25 or more a chance for a trip to Britain donated by Branch 192 of the Canadian Legion. They ended up raising the money and this is still our current arena that now consists of two ice rinks and home to the Carleton Place Kings and many minor hockey leagues.

Gibson also managed the team when the late Bill Griese Sr. was the head coach. Griese Sr. was said to be the most vocal coach the Kings ever had. Even though Doug wrote a letter to the editor of the Ottawa Journal in 1976 about no decency left in society, he put up with with the antics of Griese Sr. Yes, Doug could not handle profanity on television; but he would just sit back at the games and let Bill rant and scream while he coached. Doug also told Coach Griese to stop bringing in so many Ottawa players, and insisted they focus more on the local area boys.

Following a winning formula Carleton Place won five Valley championships in their Junior B history including back-to-back titles in 2008 and 2009, their final two campaigns. It was important to Doug to

make sure that each player knew who they were representing– that would be the Town of Carleton Place. 

Hockey raised us all– We are all here to rally the community and tell everyone in Canada that Carleton Place loves to see our kids smile, watch the lessons the hockey coaches are teaching- not only how to play hockey, but the value of life. You might never become “the great one”, but you will become the greatest in Carleton Place. These kids know that what you put into the game of hockey is just like who we are representing– that would be our amazing Town of Carleton Place. As they say ‘great moments are born out of great opportunities” Thank you Hockeyville!

Photo- Donna Mcfarlane

“im sure this is when the canadians won the Fred Page cup.. Rob and Ruthann volunteered..

#KraftHockeyville #carletonplace

Thanks to Amanda Blakeley Charania

Thanks to Tara Grigg Gesner for sending this. Seen at Starbucks today and I know that Sarah Loftus had something to do with this. God LOVE yah girl. 

1971 –Carleton Place Minor Hockey League

Carol “Buzz” Williams – The CP Sniper — Carleton Place Hockey Hall ofFame

Who’s Who on the Carleton Place Midget HockeyTeam?

Your Carleton Place Trading Card–Meet Number 7 — BrianTrimble

You have to Paint the IceWhite?

Do you Know What This Hockey SweaterWas?

That Good Ole Hockey Game in CarletonPlace

Roy Brown HockeyPhoto

Doug Gibson–Founder of Junior Hockey in CarletonPlace

He Shoots He Scores — Carleton PlaceHockey

The Roar of the Referees and the Smell of the Hockey Bag in CarletonPlace

O Brothers Kane in Carleton Place- Where ArtThou?

Where Was One of the Open Air Rinks in CarletonPlace?

Peter Kear — Winter Life in Lanark — Photos– 1945-1963

Standard
Peter Kear — Winter Life in Lanark — Photos– 1945-1963

All images and text Peter Kears

The Lanark Village I knew (1945-63), for which I have fond memories: Getting climatized to the Village winters after our transition from ‘Toronto the Good’ in June 1945. Likely the winter of 1946-47 on Canning Street with my mother and brother, Tom, with Ben Willis’ home and farm in the background. The gentle and elderly Ben Willis would become a grandfather figure to me as I helped to care for his horses. Note the name of the sleigh, ‘Spitfire’ – great and effective marketing in the early post-WWII era!

Lots of outdoor winter fun in the Village in the late 1940s when nights at -30C were the norm! (Photo: my mother and I with dog, ‘Tipsy,’ making our way across George Street with the old Town Hall and Clock Tower in the background after yet another snow storm!

The Drysdale, Foster, Kear kids – and others, but not sure of name – enjoying winter fun between the house we rented at the time from Nettie Baird and the 1902 Zion Hall on York Street. Fortunately for me, living in the Village was truly an idyllic childhood after transitioning from ‘Toronto the Good’ on the 1st anniversary of D-Day, June 6, 1945!
For various reasons, I realized very early that my experience was not the case for all kids in the community.

Same location on York Street in front of Nettie Baird’s house on York Street. My brother, Tom, and I tobogganing with the older Blackburn brothers, Neil and Louis. Good times in the Village!

Same location and winter activity with lots of snow of building forts. In the background you can see the Clyde River frozen over and if you closely, a shingle mill on Canning Street that burned down the following year.

Photos of the Lanark Village I Once Knew–Peter Kear

Photos and Postcards of Lanark Village –Laurie Yuill

Lanark Village School Photos — 1901 Graduates names names names

Photos With a View- Lanark Village

Never Sit on Your Old Photos — Lanark Photos by Pete Kear