Tag Archives: peter mclaren

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

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I had become acquainted with the Ryan family, who lived next to the mill I operated in 1876. It appears the boys in the mill would put a nail on the end of the pole and pick the apples of their trees. The Ryans would come to me to remonstrate. This was about the time that the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway was in the air. *Mr. Hugh Ryan was a railway contractor, and one of the big men of the day. We happened to meet about the year 1879 or 1880 and he suggested that I turn my yarn into socks.

That idea from Mr. Ryan furnished me the germ that led me into the knitting game. I immediately procured some machines in Georgetown, Ontario. I obtained permission to inspect a small mill in the locality, came home and started experimenting in a room in what is now the *Maloney Block. Later I built a small frontal addition on the Haggart premises, and commenced making what has been known ever since as the Code Sock. We are still making it today in 1929 with very little change. Like everything else I attempted it when I had no previous experience. Had I had the experience I might have been broader, but caution was the keynote.

This article, being about the first of its kind machine made, was much in demand, and I operated the little plant night and day for a time. Messrs. Gault Bros. of Montreal took my output for two years paying me cash every month. This made it easy to finance; previously I had found it difficult to finance the buying of wool.

About the year 1882 I received notice from Edward Elliott, Barrister, that Messrs. McLaren & McNee who operated the Haggart flour mill at the time, requested him to give me notice that they had first right to the water and that I would have to close down until the next *freshet. I went to see Mr. McLaren (later the honourable Peter) and I remember his stern reply,

“I do not know you!”

Notwithstanding that I had done his portaging years before under his own eye, I remember him swearing at the old wagon I drove. I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

This was the time of the Winnipeg boom, and the fever was in the air. Being closed up by McLaren was a great loss to me. The *Kilpatrick Tannery was for sale, and I bought it for $2750. I made the necessary alterations, and with more room the change– as I see it– was all for the best. I still continued the sale of socks, mitts, yarn and druggett blankets in the mill, which practically paid the overhead. With experience I could handle almost any machine in the mill, and this made that part of the overhead much less. From time to time I found it necessary to make variety as the home market being limited and competition was growing.

I went to Winnipeg in 1883, going by the U.S route. When I was there I saw what was called a German fulled sock. This sock was a solid fulled fabric, the leg reaching to the knee stringed and tasselled. I learned that this article was made at the *C. E. Wakeman & Co. in Pontiac, Michigan. On my way home I called at this place, but admission to the mill was refused. Later in the day I chased up a knitter from this mill and bargained with him for ten dollars to give me the information I sought. I then bought 11 machines, and on the arrival of the machines in Perth I knit the first pair myself. The following season, having bargained with three firms to take my output. I sold the Ames Holden Co, from Montreal, goods to the value of $16,000 and the other two firms took the output. Having the initiative I landed with about 84 numbers or styles in mitts and socks. Some of them were specials, and the maker to some extent fixed the price of specials.

Later I invented the Code Loop Sock which I patented. This had a long run. Rumpel of Berlin from Kitchener, Ontario undertook to make it so I sued him. He paid me a royalty for 5 years.

Next-  The Perth Woollen Company is Formed-1897

 

historicalnotes

 

*RYANHUGH, businessman and philanthropist; b. July 1832 in County Limerick (Republic of Ireland), eldest son of Martin Ryan and Margaret Conway; m. 20 March 1858 Margaret Walsh in Perth, Upper Canada, and they had four sons and four daughters; d. 13 Feb. 1899 in Toronto.

In 1841 Hugh Ryan immigrated with his family to a farm near Montreal. At age 18 he took a construction job on the St Lawrence and Atlantic Rail-road, an experience that would lead him to make public works, especially railways, his life’s work. Many of the family moved to Perth in the 1850s, where Hugh and his brother John formed H. and J. Ryan and obtained contracts to build two sections of the Brockville and Ottawa Railway.  Read more here..

*Maloney Block Perth-Aug. 23, 1946 – MESSERS RICHARD MILLS and WILFRED HORROBIN purchased the Maloney Block on Gore Street.

*fresh·et

the flood of a river from heavy rain or melted  snow–

*The first industrial process on the Code’s Mill site, was a tannery owned by the Kilpatrick Family in 1842.  A town plan for 1863, shows the outline of the factory, similar to the building which now stands there.

*HOSIERY. — Gottlieb Hecker und Soehne, Chemnitz, Germany. Application filed May 24, 1883. …FULLED KNIT WOOLEN GOODS.–C. E. Wakeman & Co., PontiacMich. Application filed April 27, 1883.

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and  Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

                                              Letters

April 11 1929 (all these letters were glued together at the top and very fragile)

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February 25,1929

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February 26, 1929

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February 22, 1929

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Signed T. A. Code  on wax paper style paper

January 25, 1929

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3 page letter written and signed by Andrew Haydon– January 25 1929– see below

January 25, 1929

Dear Mr. Code,

If you can spare some time I wish you could send me as full an account as you can give of Innisville, its beginnings, its early life as to mills and industries. I mean the sewall? early industries and trades as well.

Also I want to know about you, your family history. When they came and where from + who they all were. I learn by family and by name. My records are significantly scarce reflecting Innisville and Ferguson Falls except in reference with newspapers where source obituaries offers a few records about the deceased.

Was Innisville and Ferguson Falls wooded and was there a lumbering trade? To what extent were your family mills returning both in time and output and did they go beyond the local trade as did the later developed mills in Almonte and Carleton Place on the same river. The village I suppose got its name from someone named Innis. Who was he and what did he do? You mention having seen Senator McLaren as a riverman. If you can add anything reflecting his beginnings, I would appreciate it.

I hope I am not a nuisance.

Kindest regards

Yours Sincerely,

Andrew Haydon

 

NEXT—Monday– A few words to Mr. Haydon from Mr. Code about his life.

 

 

historicalnotes

Andrew Haydon.jpg

Andrew Haydon (June 28, 1867 – November 10, 1932) was a Canadian lawyer and senator. Born in Pakenham, Ontario, the son of James Haydon and Eleanor Sadler,[1] he received a Master of Arts degree in 1893 and a Bachelor of Law degree in 1895 from Queen’s University. He graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1897 and was soon after called to the Ontario Bar. He practiced law in Lanark, Ontario from 1897 to 1899 and then in Ottawa. He was Secretary of the 1919 National Liberal Convention and General Secretary of the National Liberal Organization Committee from 1920 to 1922. In 1924, he was appointed to the Senate of Canada representing the senatorial division of Ottawa, Ontario. He served until his death.

He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

In 1902, he married Euphemia Macdonald Scott. They had one son, Andrew Scott Haydon.

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Peter McLaren (September 21, 1833 – May 23, 1919 was a Canadian politician.

Born in Lanark, Upper Canada, he was the son of James McLaren, an immigrant from Scotland. He married Sophia, the daughter of William Lees. McLaren was involved in the timber trade and operated sawmills in Carleton Place and at McLaren’s depot on the Kingston and Pembroke Railway line as well as in Alberta.

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Guelph Archives– Carleton Place-

In 1881, the Ontario government passed the Rivers and Streams Act, mainly due to a dispute between McLaren and a rival lumber company over access to McLaren’s timber slides on the Mississippi River. The Act was disallowed by John Alexander Macdonald, leading to a dispute over jurisdiction between the Mowat government in Ontario and the federal government. However, in 1884, the Act was upheld by the British Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in McLaren v. Caldwell.

McLaren was appointed to the Senate of Canada in 1890 on the advice of John Alexander Macdonald representing the senatorial division of Perth, Ontario. A Conservative, he served 29 years until his death in Perth in 1919.

 - Thomas A. Code Honored Guest On Diamond Jubilee...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 04 May 1936, Mon,
  3. Page 15
  4.  - CODE At Perth. Ont . on Tuesday. June 29, 1W7....

 

 - rv.f: riBTH MAN, RE-ELECTED RE-ELECTED...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Oct 1953, Thu,  Page 37 - Fashions by Canadians Soon To Vic With Paris,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  26 Oct 1954, Tue,  Page 8

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Saylor Store on Snow Road (McLaren Depot)

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The Saylor Store on Snow Road (McLaren Depot)

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Apr 1978, Thu,  [Second] REVISION,  Page 3

 

 - Landmark passes from scene with closing of... - AUCTION SALE or GROCERIES, STORE SUPPLIES,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Apr 1978, Thu,  [First Edition],  Page 55

 

D&Mstoreshot

Photo- Millar Archives click here

McLaren’s Depot Store

– About/History

What is now part of Snow Road Station was once called McLaren’s Depot. The lumberman Peter Mclaren built a small log store, with a post office and a residence on what is now the east end of Snow road. He also built large warehouses, stables and a blacksmith shop. His blacksmith was James Cameron father of Walter Cameron, the famous blacksmith and woodcarver of Fallbrook. In 1887 the Canada lumber company bought all of the McLaren interests and Peter McLaren moved to his home in Perth, Nevis Cottage. He became a Senator in 1890. The Canada Lumber Company built a larger store next to the warehouses and a house next to the store for the use of their Superintendant and Paymaster. Some prices from their time were: eggs – .10 per dozen, high laced shoes – 1.50, coal oil – .25 a gallon, chewing tobacco – .10 per plug and green tea – .25 per pound. The post office that was in the original log building was closed in 1914 when it amalgamated with the Snow Road Station post office that was at Geddes’ Store at the C.P.R station.

No automatic alt text available.

Snow Road history.. Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 22 Jan 1926, Fri, Page 18

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It remained there until John Geddes retired and it moved back to McLaren’s Depot Store in January 1949 and the post office kept the name of Snow Road Station and remains so today. In 1895 the Canada lumber company sold the McLaren’s Depot complex to Bill and Jim Richard, brothers from Massachusetts who continued to run the store. They built a large stone house farther down the road that is still there today. They operated the store until they left for western Canada about 1900. The house was bought by David Gemmill in 1909 when he obtained the rest of this property. Eventually all the buildings disappeared except the larger store, the home beside it and one old storehouse that became a garage. Read the rest here

 

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historicalnotes

 

 - Peter McLaren i ;Paid ta$t Tribute Body Beaches...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  15 Jan 1929, Tue,  Page 7 - C. M. Forbes Dies; Registrar of Deeds For...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Dec 1946, Tue,  Page 14

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

 

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

For the Love of Money-Gillies Gilmours and the McLarens

A History of Snow Road & McLaren’s Depot

The Continuing Saga of Christena McEwen Muirhead—The McLaren Mill

The Day Carleton Place was Nearly Wiped Out!

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The Day Carleton Place was Nearly Wiped Out!

 

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Site of the big lumber mill

May 1879

A fire was discovered in the lumberyard of Mr. Peter McLaren about nine Tuesday night. At that time it was so small that it might easily have been quickly extinguished had the water been convenient.

The fire began in the extensive piles centre of dry lumber and it rapidly spread in all directions along with a section of ties and rails of the Canada Central Railway. There was scarcely anything could be done to stop its progress. Mr. McLaren telegraphed to Almonte, Arnprior, Smith’s Falls, Brockville and Ottawa, for the assistance of fire engines, and these places responded as quickly as they could.

The Almonte engine was drawn up with horses, their men being too anxious to wait the arrival of the train. They also had support  from hundreds of local Carleton Place citizens helping where they could. The quantity of lumber in the yard, before the mills began cutting in the spring was roughly estimated at 13,000,000 feet, worth at the very least $100,000.

 

Clipped from The Kane Weekly Blade,  05 Jun 1879, Thu,  Page 2

 

Nearly the entire yard was swept with fire, only a few piles being left standing at one end. Several houses, one owned by a section man were burned. The lumberyard was all but reduced to ashes and the engines remained over night to watch the burning debris, but their services were not required. Mr. McLaren only had insurance of $50,000 on his lumber and the loss was severe. The fire was supposed to have originated from sparks from the express train going north at noon.

The fact the fire broke out on a windless day was a good thing or the entire town of Carleton Place would have been destroyed.  A lengthy business depression placed severe limits on the country’s prosperity.  Western migration of the district’s sons continued, and began to reach the new province of Manitoba. Canadian courts determined that the blaze had been kindled by sparks from a passing railway engine, but the CPR appealed and the matter was not settled until the Privy Council in London held the railway company liable. The lumber firm’s loss was recovered from $50,000 in insurance and $100,000 in damages paid when court decisions holding the railway company responsible were upheld five years later in England.

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Daily Review29 May 1879, ThuPage 4

 

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Clipped from Fort Scott Daily Monitor28 May 1879, WedPage 1

 

Perth Courier, January 29, 1904

The Carleton Place Herald says:  By odds the most destructive fire which has visited Carleton Place was that of Monday afternoon, barring the destruction of the McLaren Lumber Yard in 1879.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

 

Connor Family Lanark Fire- National Media

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!- Volume 1- Part 2

The “Chosen Friends” of Carleton Place –The Fire of 1904

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Because You Loved Me — A Vintage Lanark Romance

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The Central Canadian told a condensed story in one of their issues about two children who grew up farm by farm on 7th line of Drummond. Each was well favoured physically and mentally, and the mutual friendship of infancy and youth grew into a warmer feeling with added years.The young man, Peter Archibald McLaren, went west to earn a position that should match Sadie Cullen, which was one of ease and opulence. Now let us quote:“It was Jacob’s tedious footsteps he was treading”.

He came back three times to Drummond, but in each case her father, turned him down and out, and he went back to his Dakota lands with a sorrowful heart. Months later he returned, but the old gentleman was still obdurate, harder than flint this time, and warned him to begone forever.

But hearts will speak to each other in spite of locks or laws, and these two met at a schoolhouse one night. It was said there was a large meeting of good size at the Drummond schoolhouse. Sadie, heavily weighted from the wardrobe, with her father and sister, was there. Peter gave the Masonic tap on the window, and the bird arose and flew while the father’s mind was enrapt with a piece of elocution at that moment on the boards. The two retired to a friend’s house within half-a-mile: as this was as safe as a cave in the mountains.

Meantime the parental sentinel, baffled on the very parapet of duty, took on a noble rage at the close of the festival, and divining that their flight was in the direction of Carleton Place, secured a friend, and was there early in the morning. He telephoned to outlying posts in the hope of intercepting the marriage, and did all an earnest father could devise to save his daughter from Nature’s foreordination.

Now let us return to the lovers. Next morning they drove to Perth and were married without much ceremony, and the same evening returned to the beauteous haven in the country of the night before. On Wednesday they came to Carleton Place, and that night took the midnight train for the west, she sad yet in the sweet ecstasy of her lover’s embrace; he in the very acme and pitch of epic joy.

The father was courteously counselled to withdraw the dreadful sting of his anger, and dispatch a note of forgiveness and blessing. No doubt he did. In conclusion, why should we suppress names in such a perfectly delightful romance; one, moreover, that will end, we are sure, in a sweet reunion ?

The groom’s name was Peter McLaren; the bride’s Sadie Cullens; the haven of refuge was at Mr. Flintoff’s. No doubt that the 13 year age difference was a huge factor in the father’s wrath. In researching I only found the following information. I would hope they had eternal happiness.

Read in The Almonte Gazette– Read the Almonte Gazette here

 

Lanark 1897

8315-97 Peter Archibald McLAREN, 34, farmer, Drummond, same, s/o Jane (sic) & Christena, married Sadie CULLEN, 21, Drummond, same, d/o Arthur CULLEN & Mary MOORHOUSE, witness T. KENNEDY & Janet ROCK, both of Perth, 30 March 1897 at Perth

 

Name Peter Archibald Mclaren
Event Type Marriage
Event Date 30 Mar 1897
Event Place Perth, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Gender Male
Age 34
Birth Year (Estimated) 1863
Father’s Name Jane
Mother’s Name Christina
Spouse’s Name Sadie Cullen
Spouse’s Gender Female
Spouse’s Age 21
Spouse’s Birth Year (Estimated) 1876
Spouse’s Father’s Name Arthur Cullen
Spouse’s Mother’s Name Mary Moorhouse

Sarah Ellen Cullen

Ontario Births and Baptisms
Name Sarah Ellen Cullen
Gender Female
Birth Date 25 Mar 1876
Birthplace Drummond Township, Lanark, Ontario
Father’s Name Arthur Cullen
Mother’s Name Mary Moorhouse

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Would You Duel Anything For Love?