Tag Archives: perth

Fowlers in Lanark County? Well we had a Heck of a Coroner Named Fowler

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Fowlers in Lanark County? Well we had a Heck of a Coroner Named Fowler

 

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perth remembered

 

Someone asked me how many Fowlers there were in Lanark County. How ling had the name been around? Well I found a couple of prominent Fowlers.

 

The Doctor’s House was erected in the 1840s by Dr. James Nichol who arrived in Perth from Scotland in 1837. Dr. Nichol was one of Perth’s first surgeons. He also acted as a gaol surgeon and then as a justice of the peace from 1854 until his sudden death in 1864. Following Dr. Nichol’s death, his son Dr. James Nichol Jr. occupied and practised in the building and was followed by Dr. Robert Howdon, Dr. Richard Victor Fowler and Dr. Arthur Coulson Fowler. Dr. Arthur Coulson Fowler used the residence as his home and practice until 1972.

 

 

The “Doctor’s House” at 22 Wilson St. is aptly named as it has been both residence and office/surgery for five eminent doctors. Dr. James Nichol arrived in Perth from Scotland in 1837 and around 1840 had the stone building erected with an adjoining frame building for his surgery. Dr. Nicol was gaol surgeon and justice of the peace from 1854 until his sudden death in 1864. His son, Dr. James Nichol Jr., continued the medical practice from this residence. In the early days, doctors prepared and dispensed their own medicines, so this was a drugstore as well as an office, surgery and home. For a short time, Dr. Robert Howdon, surgeon, called this place home, before two Doctors Fowler became owners. Dr. Richard Victor Fowler moved to this location in 1896 and continued until his son, Dr. Arthur Coulson Fowler took over the practice in 1926 until his retirement in 1972. It was during Dr. Richard Victor’s time that the dormer window above the front door was added to give additional light to the upstairs. During the 19th century, a narrow barnlet joined the house to the peg barn that housed the doctor’s horse, their much-needed means of travel as they made their way throughout the countryside. This well-crafted stone house is an excellent example of the skills of the early stone masons of the day.

 

Dr. Arthur Coulson Fowler

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 25 Mar 1952, Tue,
  3. Page 3 -

    Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 10 Nov 1953, Tue,
    3. Page 20 -

      Clipped from

      1. The Ottawa Journal,
      2. 23 Jan 1954, Sat,
      3. Page 9
      4. Image may contain: 10 people, people standing and suit

         

        Page Liked · September 14, 2015Edited 

        FALL 1972. Pretty sure some of you would have had one or more of these fine gentlemen as a doctor in Perth shown here at Dr. Fowler’s retirement party. Back row, left to right: Dr. David Craig and behind him is Dr.McLean, Dr. Kidd, Dr. Bell, Dr. Church and Dr.Tweedie. Sitting are Dr.Mackey, Dr. Fowler and Dr. Holmes. Dr. Vaughan and Dr . Ryan in front.

        Dr. Fowler was my first doctor, then Dr. Church and finally Dr. Craig. Thanks to Mary-Ellen Hogan for sending this picture i

         

        where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

         

        relatedreading

  4. The Doctor is In! Dr. James Stewart Nichol

  5. The Doctor is In! George Griffith of Carleton Place

  6. Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

  7. Ghostly Images at Doctor Johnson’s House?

  8. Shades of The Godfather in Dr. Preston’s Office in Carleton Place

    They Lived and Died in Lanark County

    The Nurses of Carleton Place

    Dr.Preston Was in the House — The Case of the Severed Foot

    “2,000 people on the streets”–Dr. Finlay McEwen of Carleton Place

    The Abandoned Smiths Falls Hospital 2011

    1980 Statistics for The Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital

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A Trip in the Carrying Case– Noreen Tyers

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A Trip in the Carrying Case– Noreen Tyers

 

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Linda, I recently got a new rescue dog Ruffy, he is a very tiny, black and tan chihuahua  dog and am writing some chronicles for him. I thought I would pass on the latest one.

A Trip in the Carrying Case

Now sometimes things do not always work out the way they should.  You find out that some are not really what they are cracked up to be.

These new fan dangle ways of doing things, you see my mistress thought she would try out the new Carrying Case.  She had left me a couple of times, and before she left she put me in my crate and gave me a cookie. Now for some reason this act, kind of annoys me and I start to raise a ruckus, I feel bad so I start to howl.  I hear my mistress taking the keys from her purse to lock the door, I DO NOT LIKE THE IDEA OF BEING LEFT. The keys do set me off, can you imagine she is leaving me and is she coming back? You see when a dog suffers through trauma, it does take a while to gain your confidence back after all I have had changes in the past few months.  When you hear the rattle of the keys you begin to wonder, am I going to left alone again, OH DEAR. That is the reason for the loud noises and to trust again, only time will tell.

Now this is the reason my friend Teri brought home the travel carrying case. The other day my mistress thought she would take me with her.  She put me in my travel case and attached the collar to the leash in the bottom. Now she took the time to put my sweater on to keep me warm.  I know she has a heart and is doing her best, but a dog’s got to do what a dog has to do and right now I do not want to be left alone. I know I will have to learn but for now I do this, people do notice and I will keep working on becoming brave.

Back to my carrying case.

The mistress will have to learn the best way to get me in the car, for goodness sake don’t load yourself down and carry to many things to the car, do the second trip. (You know I am finding these chronicles very handy as you see I think I get my point across.) My mistress does read the chronicles and she learns.  Sorry every once and awhile I get off track, She sets the case by the way with me in it, on the front seat next to her that is good I can look over and see what she is doing and that’s fine. Does she bother to take the grocery bags off the seat NO, can you imagine I am all off balance, Take Your Time Noreen, it does go better.  I wiggle a few times and she get the point, I am on a slant.

I had heard her phone and order some baking from the bakery, and tell them she would be by to pick it up.  We did not travel far and she parked the car, she says I will park here so you can watch what’s going on. Explain to me just how much can a canine see in a carrying case on the seat, absolutely nothing, ESPECIALLY MY SMALL BEING.   When will humans learn to put themselves in my place, OH WELL.

She tells me she will not be long, as all she has to do is pick up and pay, be a good pup and I’ll will be back in a Jig.  There I am, as I say a dog has to do what a dog has to do, I can’t see what’s going on GIVE ME A BREAK. I begin to wiggle and what do you know I got out of my case, it was a bit of a drag as I will still attached to the bottom of the case.  You have to realize I am only a tiny dog, but I am mighty.

It was a struggle dragging the baggage behind but I made it, THE WINDOW, up I get, what do you know I can now observe the goings on.  Well here comes my mistress she does not look at all pleased, “OH GOD THE LECTURE IS COMING”. What to do, What to do, can I make my tail, go in circles, I’ll try that might just distract her enough so the lecture does not happen.

Can you believe it did not work, she was upset, and she let me know it, now it did cause a bit of a problem getting me straighten out, but she managed, mind you her MOUTH WAS GOING.  I was placed back in my carrying case and placed on the passenger seat. She was annoyed with me and gave me the story about how I could have choked myself had I turned the wrong way and shortened my lead.

Can you believe she took me home, my trial run was not a good turn out.

I SURE HOPE I SOON LEARN HER HABITS, I guess it’s back to the crate again.

RUFFY.

 

relatedreading

Just Me Growing Up in the Early 1940’s Noreen Tyers

Grandma and the Cute Little Mice– From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Another Broken Bed Incident — Stories from Richards Castle — Noreen Tyers

Lets Play Elevator- Charles Ogilvy Store — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

I am Afraid of Snakes- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Hitching a Ride Cross Town — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

My Old Orange Hat –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Out of the Old Photo Album — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

 

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Perth’s Soldier Terrible Ordeal in Prison Camp 1917 Clyde Scott

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Perth’s Soldier Terrible Ordeal in Prison Camp 1917 Clyde Scott

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 15 Feb 1917, Thu,
  3. Page 13
  4. PerthLanarkTroops-1914-644x442.jpg 
  5. THE CONTINGENT LEAVES Photo Perth Remembered

    The overseas contingent will leave Perth tonight at nine o’clock. They fall in at the grounds at eight o’clock and parade to the station headed by the Citizens’ Band. The parade state of the overseas contingent from Perth is as follows: Scott C. Lieut., Wright. W. E. Col. Serg., Brown A. C., McFaulds J., McLean W., Cameron H.G., Carr F.C., Fraser E., Joynt W.J., Pearce V.G., Wright W., Sinclair A., Spalding E.

    THE 130TH LANARK & RENFREW BATTALION

  6. 1915-March-on-Gore

     

    relatedreading

    The Names of the Exempt of Lanark County- WW1

  7. The Fighting Lads of Lanark County WW1–Who Do You Know?

  8. Our Fathers Never Talked About the War — Clippings of Norman Melville Guthrie

  9. “Nanny Shail’s Nephew”– Gerald Whyte World War 2 Veteran

  10. Remembering Private Gordon Willard Stewart WW 2 Veteran

  11. Glory Days in Carleton Place- Tom Edwards– Horrick’s and Air Raid Sirens

  12. 90 Day Fiance and Mail Order and War Brides

  13. The Home Guard of Carleton Place

  14. The War Children that Tried to Come to Canada–SS City of Benares

  15. The Children of Ross Dhu –Evacuation to Canada

  16. Does Anyone Know What This is?

  17. The Very Sad Tale of Horace Garner “Sparky” Stark of Carleton Place

  18. Did You Ever Notice This in Beckwith Park? Thanks to Gary Box

  19. George Eccles Almonte Hero!

Fresh Fairy Foot Marks Earth On a Charcoal Pit Westport Perth –McNamee

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Fresh Fairy Foot Marks Earth On a Charcoal Pit  Westport Perth –McNamee

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This is a story about Irish fairies in Canada, and the story began on the road from Perth to Westport. It was near the McNamee Farm which was at the foot of the mountain, just beyond the Scotch Line, not far from Stanleyville.  Among the stories is one which might lead to when the Irish immigrants came to the mountain top between Westport and Perth, in North Burgess. Apparently their particular family fairies came with them.

In the early 1850s Mr. McNamee’s father was working as a charcoal burner on the west, side of the mountain, close to Westport. With him he had as a helper a man named George Murphy. Those who understand charcoal burning will remember that when the wood used to be well lit it would be covered by a bed of sand or earth, so that the wood might be merely charred instead of being burned.

One morning when his father and George Murphy awoke they saw that the earth which they had put over the charcoal was covered with tiny footprints. The prints were about two inches long, and exactly the shape of a human foot. The marks of the heels and the toes were clear cut.

The whole surface of the pit was covered in tiny footprints and gave the impression that a number of little people had been dancing on the fresh earth surface. The two men were greatly surprised at what they saw. Neither had seen anything like it in Ireland. They had heard a great deal about fairies while back in the homeland, but had never seen any of their footprints.

The men were loath to disturb the earth and waited a long time for someone to come and verify what they had seen, but as nobody came they were forced finally to uncover the pit. If there has been any cameras in those days they might have taken a photo, but there were none, so they had no evidence to show their families and friends

Both Mr. McNamee and Mr. Murphy made wide inquiries as to whether anybody else had had a similar experience, but they could not find that anybody had. So they came to the conclusion that they had been specially favoured.  Some to whom they told the story suggested that the foot-marks were those of some small animal, but both men strongly averred that the marks were like those of miniature human feet much smaller than those of a new baby’s feet.

 

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Mr. J. B. McNamee tells another story that about 1870, just after they were married, his father and his mother had an experience with a banshee. They had started home from a dance at a neighbour’s and were going by way of a bush road, when they heard nearby a weird cry, unlike anything human they had ever heard. It was a half sobbing, half moaning cry, as of something in dire distress. Mrs. McNamee said: “Maurice, can that be a banshee”?

As they were not far from the house of the dance, they decided to go back and let the people know what they heard. As they walked back they heard the cry a second time, and before they had reached the home of the neighbours, they had heard it a third time. When they told the neighbour and those who were still at the dance what they had heard, they all turned out to listen. But the cries were not repeated.

Three days later a man was killed in the bush close to the house where the dance was held. , Mr McNamee says the early settlers all believed in fairies, banshees and ghosts, and that ghost stories were the favourite amusement at every evening gathering. Ghosts were not talked about at barn-raisings or daytime gatherings, as there would not be any “kick” in talking about ghosts in the broad daylight. The telling of ghost stories gave every night gathering a “kick.”

 

 

 

relatedreading

Faeries on the Malloch Farm

The Faeries of McArthur Island- Dedicated to the Bagg Children

Oddities — Lanark County Puffball Mushrooms

Beware of the Lanark County Fairy Rings

The Banshee of Kingston Mills

Just Me Growing Up in the Early 1940’s Noreen Tyers

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Just Me Growing Up in the Early 1940’s Noreen Tyers

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Now I did not come from a wealthy home, but there was always enough food on the table and my mother and the next door neighbour, as we called her Sewelly, were two thrifty individuals.  In the two families there were seven Children, three girls and four boys. Sewelly’s husband was in the Army and away at war in Italy at the time.

In this era there was Ration Books and for some things you had to use a stamp from the book  to buy certain items I am not sure of exactly what was covered in the books or what needed a coupon.  I do know that meat and sugar were two of the items also gas for your car. That did not affect us as we had no car, so the coupons were passed on to other members of the family, who did have a vehicle..

During that time money was not in abundance in our home, with four children clothes, food and accommodation to be paid, you did what you could to maintain your household.  Now Sewelly and Mom came up with an idea for noon time when the children would come home for their lunch. As parents they realized that in order to stimulate little minds, children needed nourishment with good foods.  Their solution one would cook the main meal the other desert, depending what they had on hand in the larder. I do have to say this was a great idea as the children received a good variety using different family.
recipes.

Getting close to payday maybe you did not get what you thought you should but then you were fed.  Both women were good cooks and could create something with very little. One has to remember there was not always refrigerators and one required an Ice Box to but the food that would spoil.   Meat was a problem and you would cook it up before it spoiled and then you would further create with it. Shepherd’s Pie with minced leftover roast, Soup made from Bones, be it chicken or vegetables with  meat Left over from roast. One dish I do remember was can of pork & beans with a can of Scotch Broth soup and some sliced onions for taste. Some bread crumbs on top and brown in the oven. That is when we were all introduced to soup made from ground beef, as we would say hamburger soup.  I think the name came from the fact that there were also tomatoes in the soup and it did taste good on those cold winter days.

Our family was lucky as my mother’s cousins were Butchers working for a well known Meat Shop in Ottawa and come Saturday evening would be given their share of unsold items.   We were on their share list and as a result always lucky enough to have a great Sunday Dinner Roast, be it Pork or Beef, maybe a Ham with a Bone. This then allowed a good pot of Pea Soup to be made.   You know your parents and grandparents would say WASTE NOT, WANT NOT , things were not thrown out, if you could not cook it, there was always someone who could use it, of course you knew your neighbours and you shared.     Some of the cuts of meat would be, Liver, Heart, lambs fries or sweet breads Pork Hocks, (Pigs Feed and Cabbage or Head Cheese made from these) and just any other cut that would have been on display in the counter that did not sell, sausages, ground beef   pork chops whatever. There was one thing about it the sharing was always part of the meat package. When I stop and think there were a few families that would benefit and eat well, like we did, even though you might not like the name of the creation at hand, beef steak and kidney pie.  If one just ate and did not ask the name of the dish they were just fine. Maybe it was a good idea for kids to be seen and not heard, as they would not complain.


My Mom who made delicious pies would go to the fruit store for fruit that was not just as fresh as it could be and make pies, peaches, apples, blueberries.  Rhubarb and raspberries from Grandma’s garden, in season . She would also do raison, custard, lemon, coconut Cream for Dad. Of course there was always tourtieres, always at New Years Eve, with such a great flavour and very nutritious or pigs in a blanket, now today we would be busy counting the calories instead of filling our faces, and enjoying the taste.

While on the topic of sweet things. Oh MY GOoDnEsS, my Mom’s Fudge.  To this day I have never tried to make fudge, would you believe that I convinced myself  it just would not taste the same, so therefore afraid to try. Today our children would ask how do you make it and they would start very young Rather foolish on my part as this is now something from my childhood lost.  I never did make I just ate whatever was in site, definitely did not like to share, I did under protest. There was always Fudge at Christmas, Valentine Day, sometimes Easter, Halloween and you could ask for your birthday.  My favourite was Maple with Raisins, especially when fresh Maple Syrup was available second favourite Chocolate. My mother always made a treat to take to School for Special Occasions :
NOTE;
When I think about it, my Mom would make fudge for people and they would pay her.  This was done around Christmas time and she would use the money for Santa gifts, for the family.  My Mom was a very thrifty person and with her baking and fudge was able to keep herself in pin money and any special occasion that came up she was prepared.

Her cooking and baking habits continued and after we were all in school, she took her recipes and skills to Reliance Motor Court in Eastview and became the short order cook and a baker of pies making from 20-30 pies a day more on Fridays to cover the weekend and even then the Butler Boys, would come to the house to have her make more pies.   People would come back to this establishment and ask if the pie baker was the same person. That was my Mom

Family life was good yes we lived in a poor repair, rental house and also  we wore 2nd hand clothes, did it hurt me not really, made me feel how lucky I am today with what I have now.  Yes my parents gave us the basic in material things, but gave us a lot of love, friendship and values that is all that matters to me today.

From the Pen
of Noreen
Sept 2018





Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USA

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

 

 

Grandma and the Cute Little Mice– From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Another Broken Bed Incident — Stories from Richards Castle — Noreen Tyers

Lets Play Elevator- Charles Ogilvy Store — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

I am Afraid of Snakes- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Hitching a Ride Cross Town — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

My Old Orange Hat –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Out of the Old Photo Album — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

 

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Perth – Westport Stage Over The Mountain was Romantic

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Perth – Westport Stage Over The Mountain was Romantic

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Westport from the Mountain, showing the heavily-wooded harbour-Rideau District Museum

 

In 1861 a stage between the two points twice a week and it gave travellers a kick.  If you have ever come down that road you know back in those days it must have had a spice of danger in it. With the steep hills and bad roads it would have made a heck of a reality show today.

The mail stage between Perth and Westport used to be an institution until the government started the rural mall service for the benefit of the farmers. The Perth-Westport mail which ran from Perth to Westport “over the mountain,” a distance of about 25 miles, had a stage route which had a romantic touch to it.

It wasn’t like the old stage routes in the level country in the Ottawa district years ago. There was a spice of danger in a trip from Perth to Westport. The road ran up and down some pretty bad hills. It had sharp turns and one who travelled that way never knew when an upset might take place from the high coach. Even those who travel that road today find a thrill in the route.

When the mail coach started running, things were different. One did not know whether the stage would get through or not. The road was very bad in places and the stage was often delayed by weather or other bad conditions. – The Perth-Westport mail stage in the early days made trips twice a week, Mondays and Thursdays. It made the return trip each mail day. When the stage left Westport and started up the long steep hill to the mountain top, the passengers sometimes had to get out and help push. The stage as a rule carried about 6 passengers and stage day used to be a big day on the mountain top. The farmers always left their work and came down to the roadside at stage time to see the stage go by and pass greetings with Andy Hobin, the stage driver.

If the stage was not late Andy would always stop a minute and tell the latest news in Westport or in Perth, as the case might be. In those early days everyone was news hungry and the mountain people being isolated were particularly hungry.

The mountain farmers always went to their gates on mail days to “see who was travelling,” as well as to hear the news. It was some thing to be able to tell that Pat Monahan had gone down to Perth, or that Mike Sheehan had gone to Westport.

In winter the Perth-Westport stage often had a hard time. Sometimes a blizzard would come up and the stage would have to stop and both driver and passengers would have to  be put up at farm houses wherever the block came. The McNamee family said their father often accommodated as many as six people with lodging and meals for a day or more.

Sometimes in the Winter the stage would have to stop altogether for weeks, as the mountain road would be sealed tight by drifts. Not even the local farmers could get to town during these periods. For years the Perth-Westport road has not heard the sound of the mail-stage horn, and the road has thereby lost some of its charm. The road  now is taken by American and other tourists, who visit the lake country but it will always be one of the most picturesque roads in the area.

 

historicalnotes

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

Ottawa to Perth in One Day!! James Copeland

Stagecoaches and Mail Carriers of the Past –Photos

The Last Stagecoach Driver in Lanark County

Hogging Buffalo Robes will not be Tolerated on a Stagecoach

So Where was McGonigal’s Livery Stable?

The Appleton Mail Man Who Always Got Things Straightened Away

Ottawa to Perth in One Day!! James Copeland

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Ottawa to Perth in One Day!! James Copeland

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Middleville & District Museum Photo

 

 

James Copeland in 1855 made the travelling world talk about the speed of his stage. Some people today have an idea that over a century ago that things moved very slowly in these parts.

In a way they did, but it must be remembered that in this old world everything is relative, and therefore while the spec of vehicles, for instance, may today be great, that specs may not be as great as that of the past.

For example a fast moving car may reach Perth in an hour from Ottawa over very fine roads yet a stage coach took all day to reach Perth over roads that were little more than a trail.  In other words the stage that went to Perth in a day, stopping here and there to load and unload passengers and their luggage, was driven through the ruts and mud and over corduroy roads with a greater amount of determination than the auto of today.

The stage driver of years ago had to exert the will to win over all sorts of physical objects and obstructions which impeded his progress, while the auto driver of, today, has only to exert a trifle more gas  which has his foot on the accelerator.

But to get back to the Ottawa-Perth stage, it is interesting to note that there was a fast trip made to Perth, as we find an advertisement in the Bytown Gazette of 1855 which stated that passengers who travelled by James Copeland stage line would be “taken clear through to Perth the same day”.

A couple of years earlier passengers had to stop over at Richmond or Franktown, and the trip was not made in one day. It was the same way with the stage to Montreal in the same era. Passengers stopped for the night at Hawkesbury. But In August, 1855, we find James Copeland starting something new, a new era of speed as he tells the world that passengers who leave Ottawa at 6.30 a.m. via his stage will be rushed “clear through to Perth the same day.” And all the world wondered and marvelled at the speed of the Perth coach…

 

  1. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

 

Stagecoaches and Mail Carriers of the Past –Photos

The Last Stagecoach Driver in Lanark County

Hogging Buffalo Robes will not be Tolerated on a Stagecoach

So Where was McGonigal’s Livery Stable?

The Appleton Mail Man Who Always Got Things Straightened Away