Tag Archives: perth

I Saved the Lives of 29 Men That Day

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I Saved the Lives of 29 Men That Day

Perth Courier, April 28, 1911

Reminiscences of Old Perth by Alexander M. Richey

How I came to have 15,000 logs at the time the bridge at Almonte was swept away is easily explained.  I left Fall River with less than 10,000 logs but the firm of Young, Winn and Company of Ottawa purchased all of John Hall’s logs, 6,000 or more and I had agreed to drive them to the mouth of the Mississippi along with my logs.  Hall’s Mills had burned down that spring.  A steam saw mill and a long haul of the lumber to the market could not pay expenses so Hall sold his logs and went back to the square timber trade again.  For the timber trade paid sometimes, the sawed lumber did not at least according to Hall.

Near Old Sly’s 1830

 

A steam saw mill in those days could not compete with a mill run by water power.  There were nearly a dozen of water rover mills nearer to market then Hall’s was.  His mill was on the north side of the river just above the bridge of the Perth and Lanark Road.  Some 90 years ago a lad named Cameron ran a ferry at this place—they called him the bare foot ferry boy.  But years after he was elected to parliament from the United Counties of Lanark and Renfrew and became Hon. Malcolm Cameron.  I found the firm of Young, Winn and Company to be a staunch friend, honest and upright and liberal in every particular.  They were from the state of Maine.  Capt. Young was the practical man of the firm.  An old river driver as well as a sailor and had been owner and captain of a lumber vessel part of the time.

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Log Jam 1883

Captain Young was with me from the time I left the mouth of the Mississippi until we got the logs separated into booms; mine for Pontiac Mills and his for Ottawa.  He and all the men except for Pat Green and I were at work clearing out what was called the blind soy but at that time we were forced to use it to get the logs past the Shaw rapids.  The soy in times past had been the outlet of the river but got choked up with drift wood, felled trees, etc.  At one time it had been quite a stream and came out in Fitzroy Harbor quite distinct from the Shaw Rapids.

 

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Photo- Mississippi Valley Textile Museum

The high water in the Ottawa River backed up higher than in the smaller one and sent nearly all the logs down the soy and it was a much better route for the logs in every way.  Green and I were getting a few scattered logs off the bank on the other side of the river; he had got the last one afloat and was polling it out of he current.  I was getting a flatted boom out of the crotch of a tree where it had floated during the freshet.  I heard some splashing but had been so busy with the boom stick that I paid no attention to Green until then.  I looked around and saw Green’s hat floating on the other side of the log.  I shouted for a canoe and swam to the hat.  I noticed air bubbles coming up and I dived down for Green.  He was standing straight up with 15 feet of water above him.  I got him up and onto the log before the canoe got to us.  He was filled with water but if his last breathing had not given me a clue to where he was he would have been past recovery before we got to him.  It took twenty or thirty minutes before he drew a long breath and thirty of us wee using our best skill on him.

 

 

Early in the summer of 1852 I was running the Shaw Rapids with a raft of timber and had gotten half the raft over in one trip as the water was high.  We landed at the head of the slide and started back for the other half when down came half a raft of Dunlop’s.  Away out of the channel was a high wind from the southwest. They were headed for the horse shoe falls.  Nothing could save the timber from going over.  My canoe a three and a half fathom bark could save the men.  I landed my men, fifteen of them, on the nearest point and I pulled for the raft in haste and not a moment too soon either for the poor fellows were rowing side oars up stream for their lives.  I tell you, when I got along side the canoe 14 men never embarked in a canoe any quicker in ten seconds.

 

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Photo- Mississippi Valley Textile Museum

 

I heard the timber crashing over the falls of thirty feet or more.  I had hardly got them landed when another raft of thirty cribs and fifteen men came down the rapids but were blown out of the channel by the wind which was by this time almost a hurricane.  I had started to take my men off the point of land when I saw this raft in as great a danger as that of Dunlop’s men so we turned to the rescue but the pilot, a French Canadian thought he could save his raft and bring it to the slide but very soon he had to give up that idea and he and his men jumped for the canoe and listened to the timber crashing over the falls.  The reason for their trying to run at the time was on account of the high wind.  They were afraid the anchors would not hold the whole raft against the wind and strong current. Well, I saved the lives of 29 men that day and only one man Mr. Dunlop returned thanks and he was not one of those rescued either but thanked me for his men’s lives.

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Loggers– Arborists– Then and Now in Lanark County

You Don’t Waltz With Timber on a Windy Day

Smoking Toking Along to the Log Driver’s Waltz

 

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

Your Mississippi River, Ontario Fact of the Day

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The Robertson Family of Lanark County

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The Robertson Family of Lanark County

 

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There were numerous Robertson families in the Lanark/Perth/Rosetta areas and they are very confusing, to say the least. Maybe I can fill you in on the little bit that I know.
John Sandlons Robertson (1811-1896) was a son of James R. and Helen Rollo. His obituary in 1896 states that he came in 1821 with his parents and settled on the 3rd line of Lanark Twp. From the settlers lists on the Lanark Genweb site, there is only one James R. who came in 1821 and settled in Lanark Twp., but on Lot 19, Con. 1, West 1/2. His son John Sandlons married Margaret Barr and moved to Robertsons Lake in Lavant Twp., Lanark Co. where he died . He and Margaret had at least 11 children (maybe more): James Rollo, Robert B., Agnes and Isabella the twins who married brothers John and William Paul, Helen, Wm., Thos., Janet, John, Mary, Charlotte (Mrs. Albert Bingley) and possibly Edward and Lena.

ANOTHER John Robertson (1818-1901) lived at Robertsons Lake, Lavant Twp. at the same time; his wife- Jane McInnes. They had a family of 5 daughters- one of whom, Annie, married Moses B. Paul (my great grandparents),another brother of the John and Wm. Paul mentioned above. She was a distant cousin of the twin Robertson sisters who married John and Wm. I haven’t found out this connection as of yet, but I’m sure there is one between Annie R. and Agnes and Isabella. This John Robertson (1818-1901) arrived with his parents John and Janet in 1820 on the ship Commerce. This MAY be the John and Janet R. buried in Lanark Village Cemetery in 1862 and 1852 respectively. John (1818-1901) had brothers Robert and Thomas and sisters Anne and Spencer (Mrs. Alex. Horn)
There is a Robertson family cemetery at Union Hall, Ramsay Twp., Rosetta area and this family is, to the best of my knowledge, not related to the previous 2 families mentioned above.


AND there was yet another Robertson family in Drummond Twp., Lanark Co. who settled on the shores of Mississippi Lake. And possibly other Robertsons that I’m not familiar with.–Michael Umpherson 2003

 

 

I have been researching the set of early Robertson families who came over in 1820-22 as “Lanark Society Settlers” for some time. The Ships’ Lists and settlement grants for these settlers provide a fairly solid record of who arrived when, their ages, and where they lived. According to the records, there were four Robertsons arriving in 1821 (James, John, William and another William) and two in 1820 (James and John). With this as the starting point, I have pieced together the following basic information about the original Robertson settlers :

(I) James Robertson (b. abt 1768) and (second marriage to) Helen Rollo (b. abt 1781) arrived with John Sandlons (b. abt. 1811). Later: Helen (b. abt 1821) and Charlotte (b. abt 1824). Possible other sons James, William and Thomas from first marriage. Glascow Trongate Society: Ship- David of London (May 1821). West Lot 18, Con 1, Lanark. Descendants settled in Lavant.

(II) John R. Robertson (b. abt 1787) and Jane Kyle (b. abt 1788) arrived with Margaret (b. 1807), John (b. 1810), William (b. 1820). Later: Archibald (b. 1822), James (b. 1824), Agnes (b. 1827), and Jane (b. 1829). Second Divison of the Abercrombie Emigration Society: Ship- David of London (May 1821). Lot 15, Con 1, Ramsay.

(III) William Robertson (b. abt 1793) and wife (b. abt. 1797) arrived with one infant boy (b. 1821). Govan Emigration Society: Ship- Commerce (May 1821). Lot 23, concession 1, Dalhousie Twp. but later moved to West lot 24, concession 3, Lanark. This family may have later located to Lavant. Possible relative of James Robertson (I) above?

(IV) William Robertson (b. abt 1783) and wife (b. abt. 1775) arrived with 3 boys (b. abt. 1803, 1805 and 1807) and 2 girls (b. abt. 1809 and 1815). Camlachie Emigration Society: Ship- Commerce (May 1821). East lot 11. Con. 10, Dalhousie? There appears to be little information on this family. May have left before completing settlement duty.

(V) James Robertson (b. ?) and Clementine Miller arrived on the Prompt (August 1820) and settled on East lot 18, Con.1, Dalhousie. Three children (Stewart, b. 1820?). Family moved to St. Vincent Township in 1836?

(VI) John Robertson (b. abt. 1782) and Janet Campbell (b. abt. 1783) arrived with Robert (b. 1808), Spencer (b. 1813), Ann (b. 1814), John “Scotch Jock” (b. 1818), and Thomas (b. 1820). Later: Janet “Jessie” (b. 1824). Arrived on the Commerce in 1820 and settled on East lot 15, Con. 2, Lanark.

J. Robertson-2003

 

and there is more..

Tracing back the Englehart Arbuckle family

The ROBERTSON family – early settlers to Upper Canada

In doing a google search for the family, I came across this website which lists one original Robertson family from Scotland that emigrated in 1821 and settled in Lanark County, then called Bathurst in Upper Canada.  This chart was really confusing to me the first time that I saw it, but luckily the ROBERTSON that we’re looking for is on the first page – written in blue – 4 c3     ?       Robertson (this is Jane; and I can’t find a contact person for this website to help them update it)

Click here for more–  READ HERE

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Names Names Names of St. James Carleton Place Genealogy

Beckwith 1820 Census Lanark County–Who Do You Know?

 

Ship Arrivals at the Port of Quebec, 1821

The following arrivals were extracted from the Montreal Gazette 1821. In 1821 the Montreal Gazette was a weekly publication. Additional information from the Quebec Mercurynote: if ships’ rigging or name of Master unpublished, it is indicated by — (The newspapers were filmed within their binding, making one side of some entries, unreadable, or only partly legible. This can lead to errors in the interpretation of the entry or missed entries. ) Be aware that there may be two or more ships of the same name, from the same, or different ports, during the same year. A few ships also made two trips in 1821.

CLICK HERE

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Hot Heritage Hues on Foster Street?

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Hot Heritage Hues on Foster Street?

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The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not
necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Lanark County Genealogical Society 

 

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina

The last thing we want to do is have a history of heritage losses or mistakes in our small towns, and the other thing we don’t want is for our towns and especially small business is to stagnate from visual boredom. I am well aware of the brouhaha that has been brewing in Perth about the new colour palette gracing Shadowfax on Foster Street. Although I have pretty strong opinions, having gone through a similar incident with the city of Ottawa 22 years ago, I will refrain from being too opinionated.

Yes, there are rules that grace this planet, and especially for heritage, but in all honesty if we lived in a “beige canopy world” and never broke a rule life would become quite boring. I also understand about setting a precedent with matters of architecture, but just because “one child does something out of the ordinary doesn’t mean your other one will too”. We should be able to control different situations when they arise.

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The lovely Colleen

 

I find it hard to go along with the steadfast “Perth Heritage Colour Palette” as I feel creativity brings business and colour to main streets. Times have changed, and Hot Heritage Hues are now being introduced with new colours that are being encouraged for heritage buildings through Canada:

Homeowners in Fredericton are being encouraged by the city’s Heritage Trust to paint their homes with bright colours.

Then there is always the argument:

“Immediately after Confederation there was an influx of paint salesmen,” said author Farley Mowat, who has written extensively about our country. “People had their first cheque and they went mad for colour.” Colour use on our heritage buildings was part of the original architectural design and intent.

 

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Sometimes colour schemes that are not authentic, such as the ‘Painted Ladies’ approach (which I file Shadowfax under) can be a playful presentation of a restored building.  I find that the store added tasteful colour to a somewhat boring colour palette on the street.

 

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So whose heritage do we really honour in a situation like this? If a building becomes architecture, then it also becomes art.  As long as people are not banging in nails and other horrible things we need to accept “colouring our lives outside the lines” sometimes. All of us are angels with only one wing and we can only fly by embracing each other and our ideas. New ideas often need old buildings.

 

Dawn McGinnisVirginia– I think the color palette is beautiful, very modern vintage and definitely reminds me of a painted lady. I live in a city with a historic district that suffers the same ills… sometimes the city needs to get out of its own way”.

 

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Shadowfax
Address67 Foster St, Perth, ON K7H 1R9

Facebook Page–Click here

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

 

Architecture Stories: ‘Once Upon a Time’ -Home of the Kool Aid Acid Test & Other Time Travel Stories

Architecture Stories: Day of the Dead at Ghostly Atherton House

Architecture Stories: The Voodoo Madam – Mary Ellen Pleasant

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

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Trip Advisor 1834- Richmond to Perth is the “Road to Ruin”

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Trip Advisor 1834- Richmond to Perth is the “Road to Ruin”

 

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The Smits on a road on their farm in Richmond hauling in potatoes. Public Archives

It’s hard to fathom that 183 years ago in 1834 most everyone walked and not on smooth roads,  but more like corduroy roads or through forest trails. Imagine those that were used to horse and carriage in the old country suddenly having to rough it when they came to this part of the bush in 1820. Some road-side taverns were not known for having luxury meals, and an average dinner at the end of a travelling day was a sparse meal of ground maize and treacle. Who could face the early unforgiving Canadian scenery on a meal like that?

They said the road to Richmond was a miserable one that led through the woods for nearly 20 miles with many swamps. What would the early settlers say today to streamlined cars hitting 60 km on a smooth paved surface? No one was impressed with Richmond in those days, but they were with Perth. At Richmond there were 30 to 40 log homes, a small tavern run by Sargent and Mrs. Hill, with tolerable accommodations- but there was no roof. However, this spot had been recommended by the Trip Advisor of the day as a “Paradise of Upper Canada” when it was no more than what some called a “Purgatory”.

 

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Richmond was surrounded by swamps, and the Main Street was below a small rivulet that ran nearly parallel with it. For 30 miles to Perth the name of the road became “Road to Ruin” because it was chiefly travelled by those ‘from the swamps’ who had to attend court in Perth and mostly empty pockets were the fruits of their journeys. Litigation was as costly then as it is now.

Perth on the other hand was a pretty little village well watered and with a desired population some wished could be transferred to their own villages. It was new lands, new traditions, and new forms of expressions of  blazing your own trail.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Re: Smit Photo above

DeBunking The Biggest Nose in Perth Story

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DeBunking The Biggest Nose in Perth Story

 

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In the Perth Courier, of March 25, 1870 there was a short sentence on the front page that the former published Courier story of a man who had a nose so big he could not blow it without the use of gunpowder was said to be a hoax.

Thank you….

Apparently something called a ‘third rate museum’ had blown through Perth which had offered the locals the attractions of a skeleton man and a Chinese Giant. There were rumours abound that they had placed an advertisement in the local papers for a man with a giant nose for some local interest. In fact the ‘museum’ didn’t want just any giant nose- they wanted the biggest nose in the world– and ‘none but monstrosities need apply’. The next day there came to the manager’s room two local men whose noses were positively gigantic.

As they waited for the manager they looked at each other and smiled.

“I suppose we both came here for the same purpose,” one said.

The other agreed, saying it was ‘as plain as the nose on his face’ and asked what it would take to make the other lad leave. The other man refused his offer of $15 and said he would be the one to exhibit his nose as he had a special talent as well. Word in the Courier was that he could not blow his nose without the use of gunpowder.

Really?

Right there I was doubtful of the whole situation as if any of you that have seen Nicolas Cage’s film Lord of War knows about mixing cocaine and gunpowder which they called “brown brown”.  None of that ended well.

I don’t know about you but I personally wouldn’t recommend putting gunpowder up anyone’s nose. Honestly, think about it. It probably wouldn’t do any permanent damage just to try it, but, I mean whats really the purpose?:confused:  Would you really do that just to get noticed in Lanark County?.

I would hope that the Perth Courier tidbit was a hoax as anybody thinking of putting gunpowder up their nose, or in their body at all, really should save the few brain cells they have left. Was it just another ploy by the ‘fly by night road show” or even the Perth Courier to sell tickets and newspapers?

Of course everyone in those days had their noses in everyone else’s business. Sounds like tales were being told, and the moral is and continues to be : “If you don’t see it with your own eyes, then don’t invent things with your small mind, and share it with your big mouth.” –– or newspapers for this fact.

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  26 Feb 1898, Sat,  Page 1

Clipped from Vancouver Daily World,  02 Apr 1898, Sat,  Page 6

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Mrs. Jarley’s Wax Works -Creepy Entertainment

 

Mrs Jarley and her Waxworks Hits Lanark– and they call me strange:)

Entertainment in Rural Towns–Dancing Bears and Monkeys?

The Day the Hypnotist Came to Carleton Place

 

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

 

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Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–
Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

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The First Train to Perth–and I Don’t Know if I’m Ever Coming Home! Seriously!

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The First Train to Perth–and I Don’t Know if I’m Ever Coming Home! Seriously!

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On January 21, 1869 smoke billowed out of the wide funnel of the wood-burning locomotive engine of the B & O train (Brockville and Ottawa Railway Company) as the temperature roared 40 degrees below zero and a blizzard blew across Brockville. The two little wooden cars were crowded with excited passengers along with a reporter for this maiden journey to the end of the line– which was Perth.

A week previous a train inspector had ‘thumbed up’ the journey and pronounced it safe and ready for business. But, it had snowed the day before, which inspectors had not anticipated, nor the passengers. The trip was reported as uneventful to Smiths Falls-but from Smiths Falls the journey was described as a ‘heap of trouble’. Snow and ice had caked on the rails of the puffing wood burner and the trains could just not gain any traction. The ‘cowcatcher’ caught all the snow in the centre tracks and turned it over on the rails now rendering progress impossible.

Some decided to go home after sitting there for awhile trusting the Perth Stage to get them home. However, the bolder folks decided to stay put on the ‘iron horse’ that had scorned the old planks roads over the swamps. The second engine had not hauled their passengers every far when it balked.  The engine was now dry and the passengers were instructed to scour the frozen ditches and creeks for water. This chore had to be done again a few miles down the road and then stalled once again barely two miles from Perth.

 

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The last train on the car came to a dead stop as the coupling of the car had given way leaving a car full of passengers all alone until the engine returned from Perth with a rope to hitch to the car. Finally at 7 that evening the engine lurched into Perth with passengers who had been on a train nearly 10 hours to travel 40 miles, and there remained the return journey. The train was supposed to return to Brockville at 8 that night but in the shunting of the train one of the cars had gotten off the track. Three more hours were spent in the cold bleak railway yard before the car was hoisted back on the rails.

 

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Photo by  Smiths Falls Railway History

 

Finally at 11 pm “all aboard” was called and the weary passengers arrived home at half past three that morning never ever to forget their first journey on the B and O Railway. But soon everyone did forget about that disastrous first journey and wanted to travel by rail. In February of 1859 The Bathurst Courier published its first advertisement featuring the first railroad time table and rates. The fare from Smiths Falls to Perth was 10 cents and from Perth to Brockville was a mere $1.50 return. Of course it wasn’t long before the Perth editor was lamenting in his newspaper that the journey to Brockville was taking business away from Perth.

 

historicalnotes

The line was extended to Carleton Place in 1859 and reached the Ottawa River through Almonte, Arnprior, and Sand Point in 1864. B & O turned over the right to build from Arnprior to Pembroke to Canada Central Railway and the line was extended through Renfrew County in the 1870s. Both companies were united under Canadian Pacific Railway Company and linked with a transcontinental network in 1881. Smiths Falls Railway History

 

Saturday October 7th & Sunday October 8th (Thanksgiving) (Tickets on sale September 2nd)

Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario

Smiths Falls, Ontario

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

James Fanning– Robert Nolan– Train Accident

When Trains Crash —Ashton Train Accident 1950

Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Memories from Carleton Place–Llew Lloyd and Peter Iveson

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

The trial of W. H. S. Simpson the Railway Mail Clerk

55 years ago–One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte

The Kick and Push Town of Folger

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Men That Road the Rails

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place

 

 

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

 

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The End of Easy Money in Lanark County

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The End of Easy Money in Lanark County

 

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Perth Remembered— Photo taken outside James Brother’s Foundry 1910. Shown here are W. Bates and D. Mayall on a cart with a shipment of sleighs from James Brothers

Perth Expositor:—’The end of a source of ‘‘easy’’ money for several residents of Smiths Falls, Carleton Place and Almonte was marked with a loud crash on Monday afternoon when Provincial Police and Almonte was marked with a loud crash on Monday afternoon when Provincial Police  under inspector Sidney Oliver of the Ontario Legislature, assailed the; the No. 9 Headquarters staff at Perth reduced and 14 machines to a mass of twisted scrap in the James Brother’s Foundry yard here.

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The machines, gambling devices. Worth many hundreds of dollars were seized in a series of raids on various business places in the three towns several weeks ago. Since then they had been stored at Police headquarters here. Crown Attorney W. W.Pollock, of Carleton Place, and County Magistrate J. T. Kirkland, of Almonte. were in Perth for the smashing ceremony, at which the odds were undoubtedly against the machine.

 

historicalnotes

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Jun 1934, Fri,  Page 1

 

1910-Canada’s Criminal Code is amended to allow pari-mutuel betting on horse races and temporary games of chance if profits for charitable or religious purposes, or at agricultural fairs.

The province of Alberta, Canada, legalizes bingo games

1920-Canada’s Criminal Code is amended to allow pari-mutuel betting system

In 1934  they began a campaign of ridding the towns of slot machines.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Pinball Was Corrupting Our Children in Lanark County

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

A Warning to Those Gambling Ladies of Carleton Place!

Gambling in Carleton Place — Viva Old Las Carleton Place

 

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street in Carleton Place (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour walk with stories of murder mayhem and BOO!.. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!!

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