Tag Archives: perth

From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

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From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

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Earthquake monitoring began in Canada in the late 1800s. The first known, instrumentally detected earthquake in Canada was the March 23, 1897  in the Montreal-area event, recorded on a 3-component seismograph at McGill University in Montreal, Québec (QC). The first continuously operating seismographs in Canada were located in Toronto, Ontario (ON) (installed September, 1897) and Victoria, BC (starting September 3, 1898). These were low-gain Milne seismographs (most sensitive to large, distant earthquakes), which were a part of the global network established by the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

From January to June of 1897 various earthquakes were listed throughout our area.

June 4 1897-Almonte Gazette
A severe shock of earthquake was felt in Almonte about a quarter past
ten o’clock last Thursday night. Mr. D. M. Fraser held his watch in hand
and said the rumbling and shock lasted about 45 seconds.

About eleven o’clock a minor shock was felt. Several ladies who were attending
the theatres in Montreal fainted through fear and had to be carried
out. In Almonte dishes rattled, doors flew open, and many of our female
citizens were badly scared.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 May 1897, FriPage 1

 

 

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 10 Jul 1911, Mon, Page 3 What happened to a local Perth gal when she came back to Canada after the San Francisco earthquake.

January 13 1888

 

On Wednesday morning of this week, between three and four o’clock, two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt throughout Almonte, with an interval of a few seconds between each shock. The first was the more violent of the two* and lasted several minutes. It was sufficiently strong enough to vibrate buildings. Many of our townspeople felt the quake, and it caused many of them to quake also.

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 May 1897, FriPage 1

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal02 Jan 1897, SatPage 7

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Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune31 Mar 1897, WedPage 5

 

 

January 13 1888

 

On Wednesday morning of this week, between three and four o’clock, two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt throughout Almonte, with an interval of a few seconds between each shock. The first was the more violent of the two* and lasted several minutes. It was sufficiently strong enough to vibrate buildings. Many of our townspeople felt the quake, and it caused many of them to quake also.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Feb 1971, SatPage 22

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

 

 

The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

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The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

 

 

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       Visit Lanark County this weekend!!

 

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   of Lanark County

 

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Photo-Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists

 

The Seven Wonders of Lanark County are:

From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

 

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Five-Span Stone Bridge – Pakenham:
Built in 1903, this one-of-a-kind bridge was constructed by Scottish stonemasons who used locally quarried stone. Five stone arches with piers stretch 82 metres across the Mississippi River and make a spectacular view from the riverbank. The bridge is believed to be unique to North America and around the world – with the exception of Russia.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-Dickson Hall Fire Pakenham-H. H. Dickson and other stories

 

 

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Photo-Flickr


St. Peter Celestine Church – Pakenham:

This Roman Catholic Church is the only known church in Lanark County to be built in the French Classic style. St. Peter Celestine’s preserved Classic Italianate interior of elaborate paintings, faux marble finishes, and statuary collection is remarkable to see in person – and only two other churches within Canada have also retained these original decorations. Climb the church’s bell tower for a far-reaching view of the Mississippi Valley.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read —Prominent Merchant of Pakenham Expired After Opening Up For The Day

 

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Mill of Kintail – Mississippi Mills

Visit the Mill of Kintail, the restored studio and home of the great Canadian artist, philosopher, and physician Robert Tait. Located in the town of Mississippi Mills, this 152-acre conservation site along the Indian River acts as a museum showcasing Tait’s work in sculpture, his teachings in physical education, and other memorabilia from his life.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-“The Mounties Will Arrest You if You Step on a Trillium”

 

 

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The Passionate Hiker – blogger

Blueberry Mountain – Lanark County
Trek to the summit of Blueberry Mountain for a stunning view of the natural forests and wetlands that stretch for more than 500 hectares below. Located within the Alba Wilderness of the Lanark Highlands, Blueberry Mountain is a wildlife sanctuary to numerous plant and animal species and a natural gem within the community.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

 

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Plants of Lanark County, Ontario Photo


Showy Lady’s Slippers Orchids – Purdon Conservation Area
The lady slippers in Lanark Highlands spread far and wide across the grounds of the Purdon Conservation Area. This cluster of more than 10,000 flower plants is the largest orchid colony in all of Canada. The flowers make quite a stunning site in mid-June and July when they are in full bloom. The Conservation Area features boardwalks, viewing areas, and educational signage to further enrich your experience.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-Orchids in Gemmils Swamp June 1901

 

 

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Photo-The View from You | Ontario Highlands Tourism


Silver Queen Mica Mine – Murphys Point Provincial Park
The Silver Queen Mica Mine operated between 1903 and 1920 and produced an abundance of mica, feldspar, and apatite. The tunnel mines burrow 60 feet deep into the earth and were hand-dug by local farmers looking to make extra income. Located in Murphys Point Provincial Park, you can visit the mine during summer months on a guided, interpretive tour.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-My Daddy was a Miner — was Yours?

 

 

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Photo-Panoramio

 

Stewart Park – Perth
This five-acre, luscious park area in Perth, Ontario, was once home to a Scotch distillery. Today, tourists and locals can enjoy a day in Stewart Park surrounded by maple trees, lavish gardens, and the sound of the Tay River. We’ve saved this spot as the final destination on the Seven Wonders of Lanark County tour so you can relax and contemplate the many remarkable sights you’ve just seen.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-Shaw’s of Perth

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Is this One of the Seven Wonders of Lanark County?

What Justin Bieber is Missing by Not Coming to Carleton Place

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

So What was in That Old Alligator Hole Anyways in Carleton Place?

Lanark Mormons and Mormon Tree?

One of the 7 Wonders in Carleton Place

Where Was Meyers Cave?

 

Just a Field of Stones Now? “The Old Perth Burying Ground” Now on Ontario Abandoned Places?

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Just a Field of Stones Now? “The Old Perth Burying Ground” Now on Ontario Abandoned Places?

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Photo-Cheryl Moss

 

Re: The Old Burying Ground — Perth

Dear Linda,

I read with great interest your article on the Ole Burying Ground in
Perth today. It’s a site near and dear to my heart.


I’ve been trying for a couple of years to have the town clean it up as
they own it and it’s a designated Heritage property here. I live a block from it and see the pickets being bent and go missing every week in this cemetery.  I started the attached letter last winter and your post has inspired me to finally send it.

Thank you very very very much Linda!   I needed the encouragement!

Cheryl

 

 

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Photos-Cheryl Moss

 

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This is the Cemetery where the stone of Robert Lyon is located. For those of you who don’t know, Robert Lyon was a law student that was killed during a duel for the hand of Elizabeth Hughes by John Wilson.
This location is imperative to our local history as the majority of the stones are from the early 1800’s, with a few being buried in the early 1900’s. As far as I can tell there is no one buried in this cemetery after roughly 1910. It is now listed on Ontario Abandoned Places. While this is a private user website, it is heartbreaking that this location of history is even considered abandoned.

While this property is not really abandoned the question of abandonment can be inferred from the acts or recitals of the parties, interpreted in the light of all the surrounding circumstances.  Such abandonment is a question of fact or a mixed question of law and fact.

A cemetery is not abandoned as long as it is kept and preserved as a resting place for the dead with anything to indicate the existence of graves, or as long as it is known and recognized by the public as a graveyard. The fact that for some years no new interments have been made and that the graves have been neglected does not operate as an abandonment and authorize the desecration of the graves, where the bodies interred in a cemetery remain therein and the spot awakens sacred memories in living persons.

“I think this illustrates why this cemetery is so important. Vital records of Births, Marriages and Deaths were only required to be kept starting in 1869 and compliance for the first decade or so was rather hit-and-miss. Many early church records are either missing or only available at archives in distant cities so monuments can sometimes be the only evidence for the births and deaths of our ancestors. Occasionally they provide genealogical gems such as the year of emigration or the exact birth locations back in the homeland that can provide that tidbit of information that smash brick walls in our research and allows us to “hop the pond” and trace the ancestral lines further in the old country. Another concern is that the monuments in this cemetery are at risk as many are weathering to the point of illegibility or victims of vandalism”.–Bruce Gordon

So the “Ole Burying ground’ is not abandoned but it is neglected and desperately needs to be rescued. Someone please help and thank you Cheryl for your love and concern!

historicalnotes

The “Old burying ground” located in Perth Ontario–Bill Daykin
GPS location: N44 53′ 56.3″  W076 14′ 26.6″

Background and history

This cemetery was used for the first hundred years and more, after the Perth military settlement was established and is the final resting place of Robert Lyon who fell in a duel with John Wilson in 1833.

Without question this site is of local and county significance. Many eminent people are buried here from representatives from Lanark and other counties who sat in the Legislative assembly for upper Canada to the settlers who helped build and shape Perth and the surrounding country. It’s interest lies in other directions too; as the first burial site the grounds were divided for use by three different denominations, and perhaps what brings so many tourists to Perth that the last fatal duel in Upper Canada was fought here, and Robert Lyon is buried in the Cemetery. This gives the cemetery provinvial significance and to some degree will influence the program for conservation and maintenance.

Happy Birthday Perth (Craig St./Pioneer Cemetery)

The beautiful village of Perth situated on the Tay River in Lanark County Ontario is celebrating the 200th anniversary this year of the founding of the Rideau Military Settlement.

My mother-in-law, Annie, grew up in Perth and her parents are both descended from Irish emigrants who were escaping poverty, famine and oppression back in the homeland. A few years ago out of a frustration in the paucity of early records in Ontario I visited St. Bridget’s Catholic Cemetery in the historic North Burgess Township, now part of the present-day Tay Valley Township to find and photograph monuments of these pioneer families. Each visit led to discovering new connections which, in turn, required more visits to photograph other monuments. Eventually I photographed all the monuments. Read the rest here…CLICK

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

The Old Burying Ground — Perth

Alternate Ending to The Last Duel?

Would You Duel Anything For Love?

Notice for the Perth & District Historical Society Meeting Thursday, June 15, 2017

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Notice for the Perth & District Historical Society Meeting
Thursday, June 15, 2017

Truth & Reconciliation: A Passage

Our Society’s meeting of June 15, 2017 will welcome back municipal planner and historian Glenn Tunnock. In keeping with our theme for 2017, of examining critical elements of Canada’s history, Glenn will present a review of past occurrences that led to Truth and Reconciliation, with insights into local opportunities for addressing them.

Truth and Reconciliation is on the minds of many Canadians these days as they reach out to grasp a better understanding of the interaction between the settler population and government with the Indigenous peoples of the land we now share. Glenn Tunnock, an amateur historian, will trace the historical events since colonial times that have set the context for today’s movement to reconcile the difficult relationship Canadians have with the First Nations of this country. His talk to the Historical Society will bring insights into the initiatives of the federal government and other organisations in moving towards a healing process. Even more importantly, Glenn will outline some opportunities we have locally to foster a stronger sense of social justice.

Glenn Tunnock has a long-standing passion for history, which he pursued through a post graduate degree at Queens University. He has made presentations on such topics as the Algonquin Land Claim, the War of 1812 and, more recently, on the ‘Truth about Reconciliation’. Glenn has been seen about our area re-enacting the historic personas of William Morris and Sir John A. Macdonald. In his other life, Glenn is president of Tunnock Consulting Ltd., which provides land use planning consulting services to municipalities across Ontario from his office in the Perth Area.
Please join us for this presentation at Perth’s Royal Canadian Legion,
home of the Hall of Remembrance, 26 Beckwith Street E., Perth, at 7:30pm (Toonie donation).

Our June Announcements
* A section on ‘First Nations’ history has been added to our website, after considerable search for appropriate materials; click on ‘History’, on the top bar. This is a beginning, and sources of new materials would be welcomed.

* Join expert naturalists for a fun exploration of Murphy Point Park, in Tay Valley Township, its plants and animals at BioBlitz 2017, June 10, 1:00pm to June 11, noon, see: http://www.ontarioparks.com/park/murphyspoint/event
———————–
Perth & District Historical Society is dedicated to studying and popularising our area’s rich history and culture, and providing a forum for discussion and celebration of our
heritage. Our meetings are open to the public, on the third Thursday of each month, at 7:30 pm. For more information, call 613-264 8362 or 264 0094 – or visit our website at CLICK HERE
To contact us by e-mail or to unsubscribe from our mailings, kindly address your e-mail to: perthhs@gmail.com
Perth & District Historical Society
Are you interested in the history of Perth and Area? You will like our website at: CLICK HERE

 

The Old Burying Ground — Perth

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The Old Burying Ground — Perth

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Author’s Note-There is a double gate on Brock Street with a post of list of people buried. The burial stone of Robert Lyon who died on June 13,1833 is found in the centre near a big maple tree. The Catholics are buries along Craig Street, the Protestants in the centre and the Presbyterians along Brock Street. ( Lanark County Genealogical Society)

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

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 Pioneer Cemetery
Also known as: Craig Street Cemetery, Old Burying Ground from Findagrave.com

On the 4th of July 1819 the Rev. Wm. Bell, the Presbyterian minister at Perth, recorded that he reported to a meeting of church members that the Government had granted his request for a non-denominational burial ground for the members of the Rideau Military Settlement.

Though the deed for this 4 acre plot was not formalized until 1821 the site was used for burials as early as 1817. The earliest date of death on a monument is for George Gray who died on the 10th of March, 1817 and the earliest recorded burial by Rev. Bell is that of Duncan McNaughton on the 10th of February the same year. Anecdotal evidence from the Catholic Priest Abbe de La Mothe also supports that this site may have been used for burials in 1817 and possibly earlier.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal05 Jun 1937, SatPage 16


The Cemetery is divided into 3 parts; the South half bordering Brock Street, for the Presbyterians; the middle 1/4 for the Anglicans and; the South 1/4 bordering Craig St. for the Catholics with a portion on the west part of the Catholic section purportedly used by the Anglicans but most of the monuments at this end are of members of the Catholic faith.


In 1843 the Methodists in Perth established their own burial grounds, The Old Methodist Burying Ground or, as it is now known, St. Paul’s United Church Cemetery, a few blocks South on Robinson Street.


By 1869 this cemetery was getting crowded and the Town Council elected to close the cemetery to the sale of new lots but burials continued up to the 1990s.
In 1872 non-denominational Elmwood Cemetery opened North of town along the present-day Highway 7 and St. John the Baptist Catholic Cemetery opened East of this cemetery on the 8th Line of Drummond. After these two new cemeteries opened many of those interred in this and the Old Methodist Burying Ground were moved, with their monuments, to the new cemeteries as other family members passed.


All recorded burials from the start of records in 1823 until 1872 for the Catholic Parish in Perth have had memorials created here unless evidence of burial at a newer cemetery has been found. Likewise, as burials from the Presbyterian and Anglican Congregations up to 1872 are found they will have memorials created here.


Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

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Craig St. Cemetery (Old Burying Ground)


Perth, Ontario.

Burial – 1820 to 1873

 

 

relatedreading

 

The Clayton Methodist Cemetery

 

 

St. Mary’s “Old” Cemetery

In Memory of the Very Few–Adamsville Burial Site

The Oldest Cemetery in Drummond

So Who was Buried First in the Franktown Cemetery?

Kings Warks and Cemeteries–Interesting Discoveries of Lanark County

The Ghost Lights in St. James Cemetery

The Forgotten Cemetery at the End of Lake Ave West

Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

Before and After — Auld Kirk

 

 

Gravestone vandalism stirs “groundswell” response–Residents furious over senseless act–Click here

Alternate Ending to The Last Duel?

Would You Duel Anything For Love?

Did You Know this About the Perth Campus?- Algonquin College–Attention Genealogists!

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The Perth Campus of Algonquin College is known as the Heritage Institute and well known for its trade programs. It is geared to architectural preservation and authentic restoration. Their restoration programs are designed and delivered by experts in their craft.

For all you genealogists this library is a hidden gem that you may not have thought of and many residents use the collection to do their genealogical research. They have the digitized land registry copy books,  and the original indexes to Lanark County Land Registry books.

In the 1970s Librarian Connie Ebbs brought the land registry copy books to Lanark County as she was interested in the area’s history. Shortly after Anne McPhail came in as  a young assistant and for the past number of years remains the head librarian of the college. At the Algonquin library the students have a comprehensive collection that compliments their program studies with many unique maps, books, periodicals and other resource materials. The general public is always welcome.

 

(with files from the LCGS)

 

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The Perth Campus library is home to an amazing collection of Local History documents.  Many permanent and seasonal residents use the collection to do genealogical research. The public is always welcome.

Students have a comprehensive collection that compliments their program studies, with many unique books, maps, periodicals and other resource materials.

 

Library Virtual Tour–Click here

Hours of Operation.. Click here

Our unique heritage trades programs, which draw students from the local community and from across the world, get to learn in a community that was awarded the Prince of Wales Prize for its continued commitment to preserving its rich architectural heritage. Masonry and carpentry projects completed by students can be found throughout Perth and surrounding Lanark County. CLICK HERE

 

historicalnotes

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal04 Apr 1979, WedREVISIONPage 3

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

 

 

Why Am I Obsessed with History?

No More Wire Fences? John Drynan– 1908

Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

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Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

The train station was at the end of Herriott Street beside the Brown Shoe Factory building. I have a great memory of catching the midnight train in Perth enroute to Montreal to watch the Montreal Canadiens play the Detroit Red Wings with Perth’s own Floyd Smith playing for the Wings in the early 60’s.  Perth Remembered

In 1881 flat and boxcars were made at the Perth CPR car shops located in the now empty bush, but in 1905  the CPR moved all its equipment to Montreal. Livestock sheds housed cattle and other animals were soon to be shipped by train to all parts in Canada.

In 1859 the first train of the Brockville & Ottawa Railway Co. took nearly ten hours in 40 degree weather to reach Perth from Brockville. There are now few remnants of the old train station that was built from mottled stone from the Otty Lake area.

 

Clippings of memories

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal26 Mar 1974, Tue[Second Edition]Page 21

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal11 Oct 1979, ThuValley EditionPage 3

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal09 May 1968, ThuPage 8

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal25 Apr 1952, FriPage 10

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Memories from Carleton Place–Llew Lloyd and Peter Iveson

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

The trial of W. H. S. Simpson the Railway Mail Clerk

55 years ago–One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte

The Kick and Push Town of Folger

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Men That Road the Rails

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place