Tag Archives: perth

The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

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The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

Increased horseshoeing charges, to fifty cents per shoe, were quoted in a joint announcement of fourteen blacksmith shops.  They were those of Duncan Cameron, Richard Dowdall, Robert Kenny, McGregor Bros. (Forbes and Neil), and James Warren & Son, all of Carleton Place ; Edward Bradley, William Jackson, Edward Lemaistre and William McCaughan, all of Almonte ; and George Turner of Appleton, George Kemp at Black’s Corners, S. Robertson at Ashton, Robert Evoy at Innisville and Michael Hogan at Clayton. 1898 Almonte Gazette

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

1912 BLACKSMITHS‘ PRICE LIST from the LCGS Online Resource Library–click here..

An original of this printed broadsheet is in the
Perth Museum, Perth, Ont.

 

NOTICE

We the undersigned Blacksmiths of the district have
arranged a new schedule for horseshoeing to take
affect (sic) on and after the 15th day of Nov. 1912.
New Shoes No. 0, 1, 2 at 25c per shoe
New Shoes No. 3 & 4s at 30c per shoe
New Shoes No. 5 & up at 35c per shoe
Resetting Shoes No. 0, 1, 2 at 15c per shoe
Resetting Shoes No. 3 & up 20c per shoe
and 75c per set of 4
Bar Shoe 50c per shoe
Resetting Bar Shoes 25c each

WM. HAW, Perth A. BUCHANAN, Playfair
P. FURLONG, Perth M. McINTYRE, Elphin
J.H. McMILLAN, Perth J. WILSON, McDonald’s
Corners
M.P. WHITE, Perth S. McILRAITH, Lanark
J. ALLAN, Scotch Line N. AFFLECK, Lanark
WM. DeWITT, Eliott J. GALLINGER, Lanark
JAMES CONLON, Glen Tay A. CRAIG, Middleville
WM. NOONAN, Balderson R. SOMERVILLE,
Middleville
A. SHEPPARD, T. MOLYNEAUX, Hopetown
Ferguson’s Falls
BRUCE EDWARDS, J. LABELLE, Watson’s
Drummond Centre Corners
A. LEIGHTON, Harper W.J. WRATHALL, Poland
J.L. CAMERON, Fallbrook E.J. McFARLANE, Lavant

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

 THEN&NOW

JAMES BLACKSMITH SHOP

Edward James, whose father Benjamin came from County Wexford, Ireland, was born on the 2nd line of Drummond in 1837. Leaving the farm he opened this blacksmith shop, built by Lett James, at the corner of Drummond and North St. He then built a brick house (5 Drummond St. W.) Edward was the father of George S. James and Lawrence H. James. This is where they got their start in the iron business. It is believed that the blacksmith shop was moved to stand behind the George James residence that is shown in this picture as it is now. This home was built in 1924-25 from rock quarried from the James property on Rideau Lake

 

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Photo from Lanark & District Museum 

 

Walter Cameron, the famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook was also well known for his whimsical wooden carvings, especially later in life. We are so pleased to be able to showcase these pieces in our Walter Cameron show case. They still bring a smile. Pop by the museum this weekend and see them for yourself! See today’s other article about Walter Cameron.

 

 

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Hopetown Blacksmith shop from the 1984 book Lanark Legacy by Howard Morton Brown- Have you read it?

 

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At the time of the registration of William Jr.’s birth, William Sr. was listed on the birth registration as a carpenter. Later, William worked at the police station, and Jane cooked meals for the prisoners. They lived at 52 Market St., Smiths Falls. William had children, Madeline, James and Horatio, from his first marriage (Marian Rathey 1842-1872). Jane and William’s son Stan worked on the CPR. William (called Ginny) was a butcher, with no family. Mary was known as Minnie.

James, Horatio and William were among the people who migrated into Smiths Falls in the 1870s and 1880s. James was a carpenter. Horatio was a grocer. William was a blacksmith. CLICK HERE for more The Weekes Family

Descended from Joseph Weekes and Jane Fullerton, immigrants to Ontario in 1839 from County Antrim, Ireland (plus a few related families)

 

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Blakeney School Picture 1898 – 1900

10th Line School – Ramsay Township.This picture was submitted by Alex Holtby –

Margaret Jean Stewart is second from the left “X” and was born in 1888. She was the adopted daughter of Robert Ferguson Stewart and Isabella Smith. Robert was a blacksmith in Blakeney and Almonte.

 

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J. T. Hughes blacksmithing shop at Innisville. Photo submitted to the Perth Courier, 1984 by Mr. Crampton-Photo from Perth Remembered

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

 THEN&NOW

Balderson in 1905 boasted few trees along the dirt road which was the main road to Perth. In the top photo from the left: the original Balderson cheese factory erected in 1881, the Noonan Blacksmith Shop, Cowie home, Anglican Church and rectory. From the right: the Noonan home, Jone’s Store, Haley property (1962), J.M. McGregor property, J.C. McGregor barn and home. Balderson at one time was known as Clarksville.
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The Carleton Place Canoe Club. Pictured here are the first two clubhouses – the first was originally the blacksmith shop for the Caldwell Sawmill, located at what is now Riverside Park

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William Edward McGillivray
4.24.1877 – 1972Spouse: Etta McDonald
1877 – 1952

Grave: Hillcrest Cemetery, Smiths Falls

Parents:
William: Jane Amelia Weekes and William McGillivray
Etta: Maria F. McDonald

William was a blacksmith when he first moved to Smiths Falls from the farm. Later, he was a butcher, and was known by the name “Ginny”

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THOMAS A. SMITH
The death occurred on Monday morning of Thomas Alfred Smith, formerblacksmith at Clayton Village for over 30 years. Death was due to a heart seizure. He was 76 years of age. Born in Ramsay Twp., he learned theBlacksmith Trade and operated a shop in Clayton until five years ago when he retired. He was a veteran, of both World Wars and an active worker in St. George’s Anglican Church. In 1906 he married the former, Phamia Cochrane of Almonte who survives along with two sons, Robert of Almonte, William of Kingston, Margaret (Mrs. Archie Laramee) of Ottawa; Isobel (Mrs. Arnold Craig) of Almonte; Mabel (Mrs. Wm. Kellough of Toronto; Ruby (Mrs. Archie Murdock) of Trenton; Bernice (Mrs. Newton Campbell) of Kingston. A son Norman was killed in action at Hong Kong in World War II. Following a short service at the Comba Funeral Home, Almonte, on Wednesday morning, the body was conveyed to St. George’s Church, Clayton where a service was conducted by the rector, Rev. M. F. Oldham. Interment was in the United Cemetery, Clayton
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Years ago where the new St. James Church addition is at the corner of William. It sits, more or less, on the footprint of this big frame building from long ago. It housed James Warren’s blacksmith shop, and later, C.R. Whicher (???), House Signs and Carriage Painter. Image taken from a postcard circa. 1915.
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The trough was presented to the Town of Carleton Place by the horse Association in 1925. It was later found on the Andison property on High Street. Bill Andison kindly donated the horse trough to our museum in 1995.
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Middleville Store, Middleville, Ontario.

Tom Deachman,
remembered by old timers. as the village blacksmith at Middleville

 

 

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More Local Blacksmiths

 

Perth Courier, Feb., 1870 names names names

Devlin—Birth, at Drummond on the 5th (?) Concession on the 4th inst., the wife of Thomas Devlin, blacksmith, of a daughter.

Bathurst Courier, Aug. 29, 1834 Duncan McIntosh places an ad notifying the public he has commenced business as a blacksmith in Perth.

Perth Courier, August 20, 1897 W.J. Kirkham has sold his dwelling in the East Ward to Michael Murphy, Drummond, who is coming to reside in town. Mr. Kirkham wishes to pay or rent a house convenient to his blacksmith shop in the West Ward.

By 1812, Burritts Rapids had become a bustling hamlet. At the peak of its prosperity, it had telegraphic and daily mail, 2 general stores, a bakery, a millinery shop, 2 shoe shops, a tin and stove store, a grist mill, a woolen mill, a tannery, blacksmith shops, 3 wagon shops, a cabinet shop, 2 churches, 2 schools, 2 hotels, a bank and an Orange Lodge.

 

 

historicalnotes

Iron nails were so valuable that people burned down buildings just to get the nails back. Archaeologists have uncovered nails and nail-making tools from the early years. So nails were not unduly rare or expensive; nor were they something to waste.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 May 1955, Sat,  Page 33

 

 


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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Tour Lanark County 1980 Labour Day Weekend

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Tour Lanark County 1980 Labour Day Weekend

In the days of yore you could hop on a ByWays tour bus and tour Lanark County for a mere 10 bucks. Things have changed but you can still do the same thing in your car. Take the kids and explore Lanark County this weekend.

 

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The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

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The Ghosts of the Mill of Kintail

Mill of Kintail Conservation Area– click here

Remembering Pakenham 1976- Do You Remember These Places?

You Never Talk About Appleton

Have You Ever Paid Tribute to our Pioneers? Middleville Pioneer Cemetery

What Justin Bieber is Missing by Not Coming to Carleton Place

 

 

The Kitten Factory and the Bank Bakery Cafe may be closed, but there is a wealth of history and fun in Lanark and don’t forget to visit the Lanark & District Museum.

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

 

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Before and After in Balderson

 

 

Shaw’s of Perth

Heritage House and Their “Wards”

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

and there’s more

relatedreading

Is this One of the Seven Wonders of Lanark County?

What Justin Bieber is Missing by Not Coming to Carleton Place

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

So What was in That Old Alligator Hole Anyways in Carleton Place?

Lanark Mormons and Mormon Tree?

One of the 7 Wonders in Carleton Place

Where Was Meyers Cave?

 

Mark Your Calendars for September 16 and 17

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Perth fair Winners 1949 and The Perth Fair Story

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Perth fair Winners 1949 and The Perth Fair Story

 

 

 

 

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Comment on Perth Remembered—One of our things was finding ways to sneak into the fair without paying the entrance fee. Our best plan was, days before the fair we would dig out a space below the wire fencing on Cockburn side of the fair grounds. We would then cover it up with twigs and small branches. Then in the evening under cover of darkness…we would open up our dugout area and crawl under the wire fence. Oh those were the days!!

 

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THE PERTH FAIR  published in Perth Remembered

This picture (c. late 1800’s early 1900’s) would have been taken at the fairground location in off Wilson Street behind where the Planing Mill was and the Metro Store location now around what is now Alvin Street and Clyde Street. This land was sold as it became to small for the fairgrounds and became a housing development known as Fairholm Park. Some homes from Herriot Street were moved here when they were building the Wampole Houses. The fairgrounds were then located at the present location.

The following article is from September 2nd, 1954 – The Perth Courier

PART ONE

1817, a year after the town of Perth was founded, was one of great hardships and privation. The crop of potatoes was destroyed by frost and rust ruined the wheat crop. Some families were forced to live on wild leeks and other herbs found in the woods until the Government came to their aid with additional half rations and averted famine.

In spite of all these hardships and rigors of carving a home from the vast Canadian wilderness, these early pioneers found time to give thought to the improving of their live stock and their community. According to a newspaper clipping of 1838, an organization known as the Perth Agricultural and Live Stock Improvement Society, was organized which offered the services of a recently purchased horse of outstanding quality. It is not know exactly when this society was formed but in the July 11th issue of 1843 of the Bathurst Courier had a report of a director’s meeting of the “Perth Agricultural Society”. In 1846 the society was reorganized and renamed the South Riding of Lanark Electoral District Agricultural Society. Fortunately this awkward and unwieldy title was soon shortened to the South Lanark Agricultural Society.

The location of the first Fall Fair has apparently been lost in the lapse of time as no definite record has so far been located. In 1852 records show that the fair was held at the Town Hall and the Market and lands around the building. All prizes were listed in pounds, shillings and pence. Among the classes to be exhibited were: Best span of working horses – 1st – £1, 2nd – 10s – Best yolk of oxen over 2 years of ages – 1st £1, 2nd-15s – Best 20lbs of clover seed 1st 15s, 2nd 10s and Best bushel apples – 1st 5s – 2nd 3s.

The first real home came in March of 1874 when the society purchased 7.5 acres of ground at a point just north of what is now the junction of Highways 7 and 15 know locally as Greenlee’s Corners. Here they erected a number of buildings.

By 1882 the society had progressed to the point where a premium list and regulations for the annual exhibition to be held at Perth, September 27, 28, and 29 was issued in booklet form with classes for live stock, fruits, flowers, vegetables and handicrafts.

As the grounds were a considerable distance from the town proper the directors of that time considered that it would be to the advantage of the society to dispose of the property in favour of a location nearer to the centre of town, As a result a new site, west of Wilson Street was purchased in July of 1891 the former ground being sold.

In a few years, however, it was decided that the new grounds were too small, so these in turn were sold and converted into a housing project, following the purchase of the present grounds at the southern boundary of the town in May of 1912. This site equipped with an excellent half-mile track had been the scene of many athletic events. The Agricultural Society immediately proceeded to erect buildings.

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THE PERTH FAIR (story appeared – September 2nd, 1954 – The Perth Courier

PART 2

With information gathered from the diaries of the early settlers, one can almost picture those first Fair days. The early morning stillness broken by the squealing of the wooden wheeled potash carts of the new settlers as they bounced and jolted their protesting way along the Rockeby road. Travelling all night or stopping at the home of some friend along the way, they were always among the first to arrive, ready to exchange their loads of potash with G.S.B. Roberts or some other merchant for groceries or dry goods and a little change to take in the Fair.

All through the morning farm wagons kept rumbling into town, Father, Mother and the youngest perched upon the high pole seat, while the other children, along with two or three of the neighbors rode in the box upon a thick carpet of marsh hay, their noisy babble adding a certain air of festivity to the occasion. Every once in a while the son of one of the older established and more prosperous farmers would pass with his girl, on the way to the fair, the new side spring buggy or two wheeled gig, drawn by a fast horse, the pride of the owners heart.

Around 10 o’clock in the morning the oldest boy, ably assisted by one or two neighbor lads of around the same age (for persons necessary to deliver live stock shalt be admitted free), began to arrive leading, pushing, driving or hanging on to some reluctant member of the animal kingdom. In fact, it can be gathered from the accounts, that persons with a broader sense of humor, had more fun watching the arrival of some of these exhibits than at the fair itself.

What with McCallum’s Tavern “setting up the good stuff”, and William Lock’s Brewery offering malt whisky at 4 shillings a gallon, it is safe to assume that some at least partook freely. Many of older members of the community can still recall the horse races on to create a diversion, or a spirited way home from Perth Fair. Neck and neck, wagon or democrate bounding on the cobblestones; it was take to the ditch and let them pass, or be run over.

Yes, Perth Fair fifty to a hundred years ago was something to look forward to and many were the hard bargains that were driven to earn the necessary funds to attend. One district resident recalled an agreement whereby he arose at five o’clock every morning from June to September and travelled more than a mile to bring the cows in from pasture for the morning milking, in order to earn 50 cents to take in Perth fair. He also recalled planting and tending widow’s garden all Summer for a dollar, extra money being required to attend the Marks Brothers Show on the evening of the fair, for it was said locally that your were not considered a man until you had been permitted to stay and see Marks’ Show, while the rest of the family went home to do the evening chores. It did not matter that you had to walk eleven miles after midnight or that your hair rose when you heard those pursuing footsteps as you passed through the loneliness part of the road.

Speaking of the Marks Brothers Show. No history of Perth Fair could be written without recalling these brothers of Christie’s Lake a few miles from Perth. On fair nights fifty years or so ago, the Perth Town Hall was crowded, as hundreds came to this big entertainment feature of the year, to watch, with necks craned above uncomfortable starched collars, the flying ankles of the dancers, or to cheer the valiant “Gerry the Tramp”, as he arose ragged and uncouth, to rescue the heroine from the clutches of the dapper villain.

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PHOTO: Two different eras with a track and field event on the race track in the early 1900’s to the popular harness racing at the Perth Fair. The picture on the top would be at the fairground location in off Wilson Street behind where the Planing Mill was and the Metro Store. This was known as Fairholm Park. The picture at the bottom at the current location.

THE PERTH FAIR – September 2nd, 1954 – The Perth Courier

PART THREE

In this day of speed, a bicycle race would arouse but little interest. This was not the case away back in the era of the “High Fronts”, when only the more daring young gentlemen of the community even dared to clamber up upon “those infernal contraptions”, as angered horsemen were wont to call the first bicycles, with their high front wheel and small rear one, that rattled along doing its best to support the rider perched high above the wide spread handle bars.

It was only natural then that the bicycle race held at Perth Fair, some time in the late eighties was considered an event of great importance. The race, a quarter mile affair, was held on the road before the grounds, with the finishing line somewhere between the two gates. Down the road they came, with the rider of the bicycle having the largest front wheel well in the lead. The pedals being fixed to the front axle, the riders swung their feet free as they crossed the finish line, and coasted on down the road, the winner swerving sharply through the gate, to strike a cow that was being led to the ring. The resulting excitement still bringing smiles to the faces of those recalling the incident.

One of the last events to take place at the old fair grounds at Greenslees’ Corners was the balloon ascent. Although the passage of time dimmed the event in the memory of many residents of the district, here are some of the details upon which most accounts agree:

The balloonist and crew, having spent the morning and most of the afternoon inflating the bag over a fire in a pit, made final preparations for the ascent by hauling the parachute into a tube-like affair suspended above the balloon. The balloonist clambered into the basket and upon a given signal the crew cut the anchor ropes. Up shot the balloon leaving a breathless, spellbound crowd below. When considerable height was reached, the balloonist proceeded to do acrobatics on a trapeze, finally dropping from the basket feet first, followed by the parachute, which opened after an agonizing second or two. A great cheer went up as the south wind begin to drift the parachute and its passenger off towards the marsh lands north of the town. With one accord the young and more energetic set out in hot pursuit, breaking part of the high board fence at the back of the grounds in their haste. The balloonist meantime had drifted ever so gently down to land, (so some reports say), in a small tree, from which he was assisted by many willing hands and a couple of fence rails.

The feature attraction of the 1913 fair was a Texan show, complete with wild horses and beautiful cow girls. The first evening in town, the star bucker of the show, “The hoss that hed neva bin rid’n”, decided to prove that he was all that they said he was, by kicking the end out of the horse barn. One farmer in recalling the incident, said he thought more people went to see the hole in the stable wall, than went to see the Show.

In 1945 the society was able to purchase a large shed from one of the local Churches, and was moved to the fair grounds where it was placed upon a permanent concrete foundation.

I am sure there are countless memories and stories of the Perth Fair. Do you have one? Come and bring the family and enjoy yourselves to this years edition of the Perth Fair and make more memories.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Scrapbook Clippings of Wampole

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Scrapbook Clippings of Wampole

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Photo-Perth Remembered–

On the left side of Sherbrooke Street next to the corner of Herriott Street was the site of the demolished Drill Hall (1870-1905), where the Fencibles militia trained. This building was used for many town community activities, including skating in winter, band practices and dances. In 1905 H.K. Wampole & Co. built a 4-storey factory to produce a new tasteless extract preparation of cod liver and other pharmaceutical products. The factory was demolished in 1963 when the Company moved to a modem complex on Dufferin Street along #7 Highway. However in 1991 it was sold and in 1994 Rhone Poulenc of France moved (the business) to Montreal. (The 1931 one-storey, brick annex Wampole box factory is now Grant Edmonds’ Enterprises Ltd. Printing.) –A Walking Tour of Perth – Tour 4

Henry K Wampole Company established in Perth in 1905. The original building situated near the Jergen’s Factory and the Perth Shoe Factory, later the Brown Shoe Factory, close to the Perth Railway Station. Wampole’s later moved to a modern building in the late 1960’s situated on HWY 7. That building has since been torn down.

Almonte Gazette January 30 1920

The Wampole Company is having plans prepared for an immense new building to their plant which will be erected next spring. It will be four stories, on Herriott street, adjoining their present laboratory, and a number of new lines will fee manufactured.

June 7 1912 Perth Courier

“Perth will have another new industry. For some time, negotiations have been in progress between Henry K. Wampole & Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio to take care of the Canadian business for the Jergens company. The Jergens company is the second largest manufacturer in the United States of high class toilet soaps.. the two companies are coming together to handle the soap, perfume and toilet business in Canada. A new company, with headquarters as Perth, is being incorporated to be known as the Andrew Jergens Co. Limited.”

 

 

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Photo-Perth Remembered–

Perth Courier, September 7, 1942

Pte. Edward D. Young Passed Away in England

Town Clerk Ed Young and Mrs. Young received a cable from overseas on Wednesday conveying the sad news that their son Pte. Edward D. Young had died in England that morning.  A member of the postal corps, Pte Young had been overseas only a few months; enlisting about ten months ago, he left Ottawa with an overseas contingent early in April.  In his last letter to his parents, Pte. Young mentioned that he was not enjoying as good health as usual but there was no further word of his being so seriously ill until the receipt of the cable on Wednesday announcing his demise.  Pte. Young was born at Perth 27 years ago; he received his education here and about four years ago joined the local post office staff; for the past two years he had been on the night staff of the local office and was a permanent member of the civil service.  Remaining to mourn his loss besides his sorrowing parents are six sisters, Miss Edna Young of the Wampole Company staff; Helen, Mrs. Frank Clyne of New York; Natalie, Mrs. John Flett of Perth; Marie, Mrs. Quentin J. Guilet(?) of Ottawa; Veronica, Mrs. Gerald Young of Ottawa and Miss Carmel Young of the local post office staff.

 

 

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Wampole’s manufactured many pharmaceuticals in Perth. WAMPOLES GRAPE SALTS SAMPLE TIN FROM HENRY K. WAMPOLE & CO. LIMITED PERTH ONTARIO. “Cleanses the system..cools the blood” slogan. Tin is circa 1910. Photo-Perth Remembered–
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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Jul 1961, Sat,  Page 22

 

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

relatedreading

Did You Know this About the Perth Campus?- Algonquin College–Attention Genealogists!

Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

James Miller Steam Engine Man from Perth

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From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

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From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

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Earthquake monitoring began in Canada in the late 1800s. The first known, instrumentally detected earthquake in Canada was the March 23, 1897  in the Montreal-area event, recorded on a 3-component seismograph at McGill University in Montreal, Québec (QC). The first continuously operating seismographs in Canada were located in Toronto, Ontario (ON) (installed September, 1897) and Victoria, BC (starting September 3, 1898). These were low-gain Milne seismographs (most sensitive to large, distant earthquakes), which were a part of the global network established by the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

From January to June of 1897 various earthquakes were listed throughout our area.

June 4 1897-Almonte Gazette
A severe shock of earthquake was felt in Almonte about a quarter past
ten o’clock last Thursday night. Mr. D. M. Fraser held his watch in hand
and said the rumbling and shock lasted about 45 seconds.

About eleven o’clock a minor shock was felt. Several ladies who were attending
the theatres in Montreal fainted through fear and had to be carried
out. In Almonte dishes rattled, doors flew open, and many of our female
citizens were badly scared.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 May 1897, FriPage 1

 

 

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 10 Jul 1911, Mon, Page 3 What happened to a local Perth gal when she came back to Canada after the San Francisco earthquake.

January 13 1888

 

On Wednesday morning of this week, between three and four o’clock, two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt throughout Almonte, with an interval of a few seconds between each shock. The first was the more violent of the two* and lasted several minutes. It was sufficiently strong enough to vibrate buildings. Many of our townspeople felt the quake, and it caused many of them to quake also.

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 May 1897, FriPage 1

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal02 Jan 1897, SatPage 7

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Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune31 Mar 1897, WedPage 5

 

 

January 13 1888

 

On Wednesday morning of this week, between three and four o’clock, two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt throughout Almonte, with an interval of a few seconds between each shock. The first was the more violent of the two* and lasted several minutes. It was sufficiently strong enough to vibrate buildings. Many of our townspeople felt the quake, and it caused many of them to quake also.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Feb 1971, SatPage 22

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

 

 

The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

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The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

 

 

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       Visit Lanark County this weekend!!

 

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   of Lanark County

 

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Photo-Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists

 

The Seven Wonders of Lanark County are:

From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

 

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Five-Span Stone Bridge – Pakenham:
Built in 1903, this one-of-a-kind bridge was constructed by Scottish stonemasons who used locally quarried stone. Five stone arches with piers stretch 82 metres across the Mississippi River and make a spectacular view from the riverbank. The bridge is believed to be unique to North America and around the world – with the exception of Russia.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-Dickson Hall Fire Pakenham-H. H. Dickson and other stories

 

 

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Photo-Flickr


St. Peter Celestine Church – Pakenham:

This Roman Catholic Church is the only known church in Lanark County to be built in the French Classic style. St. Peter Celestine’s preserved Classic Italianate interior of elaborate paintings, faux marble finishes, and statuary collection is remarkable to see in person – and only two other churches within Canada have also retained these original decorations. Climb the church’s bell tower for a far-reaching view of the Mississippi Valley.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read —Prominent Merchant of Pakenham Expired After Opening Up For The Day

 

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Mill of Kintail – Mississippi Mills

Visit the Mill of Kintail, the restored studio and home of the great Canadian artist, philosopher, and physician Robert Tait. Located in the town of Mississippi Mills, this 152-acre conservation site along the Indian River acts as a museum showcasing Tait’s work in sculpture, his teachings in physical education, and other memorabilia from his life.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-“The Mounties Will Arrest You if You Step on a Trillium”

 

 

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The Passionate Hiker – blogger

Blueberry Mountain – Lanark County
Trek to the summit of Blueberry Mountain for a stunning view of the natural forests and wetlands that stretch for more than 500 hectares below. Located within the Alba Wilderness of the Lanark Highlands, Blueberry Mountain is a wildlife sanctuary to numerous plant and animal species and a natural gem within the community.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

 

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Plants of Lanark County, Ontario Photo


Showy Lady’s Slippers Orchids – Purdon Conservation Area
The lady slippers in Lanark Highlands spread far and wide across the grounds of the Purdon Conservation Area. This cluster of more than 10,000 flower plants is the largest orchid colony in all of Canada. The flowers make quite a stunning site in mid-June and July when they are in full bloom. The Conservation Area features boardwalks, viewing areas, and educational signage to further enrich your experience.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-Orchids in Gemmils Swamp June 1901

 

 

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Photo-The View from You | Ontario Highlands Tourism


Silver Queen Mica Mine – Murphys Point Provincial Park
The Silver Queen Mica Mine operated between 1903 and 1920 and produced an abundance of mica, feldspar, and apatite. The tunnel mines burrow 60 feet deep into the earth and were hand-dug by local farmers looking to make extra income. Located in Murphys Point Provincial Park, you can visit the mine during summer months on a guided, interpretive tour.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-My Daddy was a Miner — was Yours?

 

 

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Photo-Panoramio

 

Stewart Park – Perth
This five-acre, luscious park area in Perth, Ontario, was once home to a Scotch distillery. Today, tourists and locals can enjoy a day in Stewart Park surrounded by maple trees, lavish gardens, and the sound of the Tay River. We’ve saved this spot as the final destination on the Seven Wonders of Lanark County tour so you can relax and contemplate the many remarkable sights you’ve just seen.-From: OntarioHighlands.com OntarioHighlands.com

Read-Shaw’s of Perth

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Is this One of the Seven Wonders of Lanark County?

What Justin Bieber is Missing by Not Coming to Carleton Place

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

So What was in That Old Alligator Hole Anyways in Carleton Place?

Lanark Mormons and Mormon Tree?

One of the 7 Wonders in Carleton Place

Where Was Meyers Cave?

 

 

Just a Field of Stones Now? “The Old Perth Burying Ground” Now on Ontario Abandoned Places?

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Just a Field of Stones Now? “The Old Perth Burying Ground” Now on Ontario Abandoned Places?

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Photo-Cheryl Moss

 

Re: The Old Burying Ground — Perth

Dear Linda,

I read with great interest your article on the Ole Burying Ground in
Perth today. It’s a site near and dear to my heart.


I’ve been trying for a couple of years to have the town clean it up as
they own it and it’s a designated Heritage property here. I live a block from it and see the pickets being bent and go missing every week in this cemetery.  I started the attached letter last winter and your post has inspired me to finally send it.

Thank you very very very much Linda!   I needed the encouragement!

Cheryl

 

 

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Photos-Cheryl Moss

 

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This is the Cemetery where the stone of Robert Lyon is located. For those of you who don’t know, Robert Lyon was a law student that was killed during a duel for the hand of Elizabeth Hughes by John Wilson.
This location is imperative to our local history as the majority of the stones are from the early 1800’s, with a few being buried in the early 1900’s. As far as I can tell there is no one buried in this cemetery after roughly 1910. It is now listed on Ontario Abandoned Places. While this is a private user website, it is heartbreaking that this location of history is even considered abandoned.

While this property is not really abandoned the question of abandonment can be inferred from the acts or recitals of the parties, interpreted in the light of all the surrounding circumstances.  Such abandonment is a question of fact or a mixed question of law and fact.

A cemetery is not abandoned as long as it is kept and preserved as a resting place for the dead with anything to indicate the existence of graves, or as long as it is known and recognized by the public as a graveyard. The fact that for some years no new interments have been made and that the graves have been neglected does not operate as an abandonment and authorize the desecration of the graves, where the bodies interred in a cemetery remain therein and the spot awakens sacred memories in living persons.

“I think this illustrates why this cemetery is so important. Vital records of Births, Marriages and Deaths were only required to be kept starting in 1869 and compliance for the first decade or so was rather hit-and-miss. Many early church records are either missing or only available at archives in distant cities so monuments can sometimes be the only evidence for the births and deaths of our ancestors. Occasionally they provide genealogical gems such as the year of emigration or the exact birth locations back in the homeland that can provide that tidbit of information that smash brick walls in our research and allows us to “hop the pond” and trace the ancestral lines further in the old country. Another concern is that the monuments in this cemetery are at risk as many are weathering to the point of illegibility or victims of vandalism”.–Bruce Gordon

So the “Ole Burying ground’ is not abandoned but it is neglected and desperately needs to be rescued. Someone please help and thank you Cheryl for your love and concern!

historicalnotes

The “Old burying ground” located in Perth Ontario–Bill Daykin
GPS location: N44 53′ 56.3″  W076 14′ 26.6″

Background and history

This cemetery was used for the first hundred years and more, after the Perth military settlement was established and is the final resting place of Robert Lyon who fell in a duel with John Wilson in 1833.

Without question this site is of local and county significance. Many eminent people are buried here from representatives from Lanark and other counties who sat in the Legislative assembly for upper Canada to the settlers who helped build and shape Perth and the surrounding country. It’s interest lies in other directions too; as the first burial site the grounds were divided for use by three different denominations, and perhaps what brings so many tourists to Perth that the last fatal duel in Upper Canada was fought here, and Robert Lyon is buried in the Cemetery. This gives the cemetery provinvial significance and to some degree will influence the program for conservation and maintenance.

Happy Birthday Perth (Craig St./Pioneer Cemetery)

The beautiful village of Perth situated on the Tay River in Lanark County Ontario is celebrating the 200th anniversary this year of the founding of the Rideau Military Settlement.

My mother-in-law, Annie, grew up in Perth and her parents are both descended from Irish emigrants who were escaping poverty, famine and oppression back in the homeland. A few years ago out of a frustration in the paucity of early records in Ontario I visited St. Bridget’s Catholic Cemetery in the historic North Burgess Township, now part of the present-day Tay Valley Township to find and photograph monuments of these pioneer families. Each visit led to discovering new connections which, in turn, required more visits to photograph other monuments. Eventually I photographed all the monuments. Read the rest here…CLICK

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

The Old Burying Ground — Perth

Alternate Ending to The Last Duel?

Would You Duel Anything For Love?