Tag Archives: pembroke

Identifying a Family in a Box — The Hoelke Family

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Identifying a Family in a Box — The Hoelke Family

Okay, everyone knows I do not care to see family photos for sale no matter where they come from. I have 121 photos from the Hoelke family. ( Florida, UK and Canada) so next week I am going to start going through them.. Anyone that knows me knows I love putting things together and getting photos back to family. Thanks to Julie Charron for telling me about them and Sarah Cavanagh you dont have to worry about them anymore.. They are in good hands— read-Are These Memories Just for Ourselves? — The Family in a Box

First photo-what military WW1 uniform is this? So I asked Ray Paquette–

I have looked at the picture of the couple posted in “Tales of Carleton Place” and after investigating the uniform, all that I was able to determine was that it would appear to be a WW I,  Other Rank uniform. The difference between “Other” and “Officer” rank is the belt on the upper body. Other ranks wear the belt right to left while officers wear the belt left to right.

I did some further investigation to see if I could find a duplicate of the Cap badge which would have indicated his regiment and country, i.e., Canada, UK or perhaps another Commonwealth nation and was unsuccessful.

To recap then, the uniform is the British  Army Service Dress, “Kitchener Pattern” as exampled in the attached PDF file. With the plethora of unit or regiment cap badges and the lack of definition in the photo, it was difficult to ascertain the regiment

Regards,
Ray

The second photo from the Hoelke family is in front of a Grand Army of the Republic memorial rock. This gentleman (photo 1900 or earlier) was in the Union army. If any of my American friends have seen this rock let me know. Please note that the Grand Army of the Republic is from the Civil War not Star wars 🙂

I would say this is early 1900s

Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), patriotic organization of American Civil War veterans who served in the Union forces, one of its purposes being the “defense of the late soldiery of the United States, morally, socially, and politically.” Founded in Springfield, Ill., early in 1866, it reached its peak in membership 

The Grand Army of the Republic was founded in 1866 in Springfield, Illinois, and grew to include hundreds of “posts” (local community units) across the nation (predominantly in the North, but also a few in the South and West). It was dissolved in 1956 at the death of its last member, Albert Woolson (1850–1956) of Duluth, Minnesota.

3rd photo This was obviously in the UK sign says: E. R. Shea Coal and Coke Oil– any ideas?

Here was another clue.. I could read what I thought was Livery Company.. but thanks to all of you.. the right answer

Kevin PercyLooks like “The Pembroke Livery Company” to me.

Jeff BrennanI see Pembroke Lumber Company.

.Brian SarsfieldProbably the Pembroke Lumber Company, beside the Ottawa River . Make be take prior to the fire of June 1918.

It’s the Pembroke Lumber Company pre 1918.. and all the photos will go back to the family but this one will go to the Pembroke Historical Society

Sunday May 2 update– I think I found the family… and will continue a bit before I contact them hoping they want these photos back. https://mdbfuneralhome.com/tribute/details/6201/Earl-Hoelke/obituary.html

Related reading

Are These Memories Just for Ourselves? — The Family in a Box

Getting the Family Paintings Home– Dr. Harold Box

When the Past Comes A Haunting- Jessie Comrie

A Time of its Own– The Mystery Photo

The Peden Family- Genealogy– Peden Saunders Sadler

Remembering Norine Duhn — Thanks to Elaine MacLean

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Remembering Norine Duhn — Thanks to Elaine MacLean

Thanks to Elaine MacLean for all the information

My sister Norine Duhn worked for the town of Almonte. Her monument is outside the old town hall by the water. I have an old article on her but she was very well liked in the community. She started girl’s basketball and the little girls played in a basketball tournament the weekend after she died. Not sure if you knew her. She died at age 32 – 27 years ago! There will be a lot of newpaper articles on her. I moved to Almonte 1.5 years ago and live in Mill Run.

Elaine MacLean

Norine Duhn Commemorative Tree

In Almonte, Ontario, just west of Queen Street between the Riverwalk and the south bank of the Mississippi River stands a tree accompanied by a plaque commemorating Norine Duhn.

From what I found, she contributed to her community. She coached for the Naismith Minor Basketball Association (NMBA). She participated as a long time volunteer organizer of the annual Terry Fox Run in Almonte. The Almonte District High School annually presents the Norine Duhn Community Involvement award. She must have died before her natural time as she predeceased both her parents, Arther and Nora Morphy.

The plaque originally went up and a tree planted at the Naismith Museum. There will be a photo of Steve and her little son Nicholas at the tree planting. When the museum shut my dad had moved to its current spot – not sure if the tree was or not. Will upload a photo of monument for you as I have a shot. It will have a year on it.

Many people would remember her. She organized the Terry Fox Run and started a youth centre. The girls who played basket ball called themselves Norine’s Dream Team.

Almonte Curling Club–Norine Duhn Award Presentation | Almonte Curling Club

It’s hard to imagine a town recreation event that hasn’t been touched by Norine Duhn. From snow volleyball  to shuffleboard the recreation programmer helped provide joy to so many in and around Almonte. Her job brought her into contact with many people in this community. 

Her cheerful and friendly manner brought her many friends, friends now saddened by the news of Norine’s death Saturday at the Ottawa Civic Hospital. The 32 year-old native came to Almonte in October, 1988. While her experience at that time had not included recreation her organizational skills and enthusiasm for her job made her a town favourite very quickly. “She just was such a helping person and a caring person about everyone. She worried about other people rather than herself. She couldn’t do enough for everyone; said Jean Neilson, who has worked with Norine for several years on the local and district seniors games. 

“She went above and beyond the call of duty. Norine was more than a recreation programmer.’ Her extra effort to make this a better community in which to live made her a friend to all. “I think she cared about everybody, no matter what program it was : kindergym all the way up to the older folks. The recent death of recreation programmer Norlne Duhn has shocked  and saddened the community.

Mr. McKay said his and Norine’s family had become good friends over the years. Mayor Dorothy Finner’s son who went far beyond what any job description would call for. “She certainly was a very special person, • she said. “We’re going to miss her.” Mayor Finner said Norine’s gift was her cheerfulness and constant desire to improve the town and what it had to offer its residents. “She’s going to leave a very, very big gap”. Almonte Gazette March 29, 1995.

Additional Reading

Remembering local Almonte Scouts — Jack Lyons and Harold McGrath

Remembering Etta Whitney Carleton Place

Remembering Robert George Wilson Glen Isle 1942

Remembering Megan Whitney of Carleton Place

Remembering Evelyn Clark — Larry Clark

Remembering Councillor Theresa Fritz

Remembering Gerald Kirby

Remembering Britt Thurston

The Pembroke Lumber Company Rare Photo

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The Pembroke Lumber Company Rare Photo

This is a pretty old photo taken before the fire in 1927– Id say it us the early 1900s-The historic sawmill of the Pembroke Lumber Co. built in 1860. I found it in a lot of photos I bought.

Kevin PercyLooks like “The Pembroke Livery Company” to me.

Jeff BrennanI see Pembroke Lumber Company.

.Brian SarsfieldProbably the Pembroke Lumber Company, beside the Ottawa River . Make be take prior to the fire of June 1918.

It’s the Pembroke Lumber Company pre 1918.. and all the photos will go back to the family but this one will go to the Pembroke Historical Society.. Thanks to everyone who identified the photo.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Dec 1899, Tue  •  Page 6

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 May 1900, Thu  •  Page 7
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Apr 1902, Tue  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Sep 1913, Wed  •  Page 20
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Apr 1916, Wed  •  Page 13

Fire June 12,1927

PEMBROKE, Ont., June 12 1927– Fire, which it is estimated caused damage to the extent of a quarter of a million dollars Saturday, threatened to wipe out the entire industrial and business section of the town, and many buildings were saved from possible destruction only by a timely change in the direction of a stiff wind when the blaze was at its height.

The flames were fortunately confined to the yards of the Pembroke Lumber Company, where millions of feet of lumber were reduced to ashes. The cause of the fire is attributed to a bathing party of boys who used part of the lumber yards in which to dress and smoke. Between five and six million feet of lumber was destroyed. The burned area covers between twelve and fifteen acres and is flanked on either side by woodworking industries, including the yards and factories of the Canadian Match and Splint Companies, immediately to the west, but behind the path of the flames.

The scene of the fire parallels the main business street of the town only two blocks away. For three hours millions of dollars of property was in jeopardy. Scores of people removed their household effects from their homes and an hour after the alarm sounded the town generally prepared itself for the worst. It was a spectacular fire. Driven by a high northwest wind, the flames leapt from one lumber pile to another, until over three hundred were on fire. The air space used for drying purposes only served as a vacuum for the flames and the ordinary hydrant stream vanished into steam immediately it struck the outer edges of the fire.

Flames shot up hundreds of feet into the air and heavy clouds of smoke hung over the entire town and countryside. Historic Sawmill Saved. The historic sawmill of the Pembroke Lumber Co., built in 1860, and which has cut millions upon millions of feet of virgin pine of the Ottawa Valley, was saved, owing to the heroic efforts of the Pembroke and Renfrew fire departments, and of the mill workmen using their own fire-fighting equipment. This mill and other buildings and wharves along the river front repeatedly caught fire but were quickly put out.

The whole area for blocks around was thoroughly drenched, records showing that over two million gallons of water was pumped at the municipal station, not taking into account what was taken from the river by the gasoline pumpers of the Pembroke and Renfrew fire departments. It was early realized that it was a fruitless task to fight the fire proper and that efforts should be confined to saving adjoining property.

The news of the threatened conflagration spread rapidly to adjoining towns and proffers of aid came from almost every town between here and Ottawa, including Ottawa City. At five o’clock, half an hour after the fire started, Mayor Duff phoned Renfrew for assistance and the creamery town fire-fighters immediately responded, making the forty-four mile trip here in an hour and twenty minutes.

The firemen did not let up until seven o’clock this morning, meals and hot drinks being served at the scene of the fire. Several of the firemen were overcome, but were able to resume. The intense heat could be felt for blocks away. It is believed that a bathing party of small boys who used a lumber pile as a dressing shelter and smoking place, was responsible for the fire which for three hours threatened the entire town.

A high northwest wind which carried the covers off the lumber piles for hundreds of yards through the air and which blew directly into the business section, suddenly veered to the southwest at seven in the evening and the situation was saved. Loss Put at $350,000. E. Dunlop, president or the Pembroke Lumber Co., today stated that the lumber was all of export number one grade, cut over the last four seasons and which had not moved owing to stagnation in the lumber industry.

He placed the loss at a quarter of a million dollars and stated that his company was one hundred percent, insured. Some of the lumber destroyed had recently been sold, Mr. Dunlop said, and he did not know whether or not insurance had been placed on this by the purchasers. He corrected a report that a section of the lumber burned was the property of the J. R. Booth Company.

Sawing for this company was due to commence tomorrow morning and would be proceeded with. Sawing operations would not be interfered with by the fire, he said, his company having between six and eight weeks piling ground available outside the fire area. The burned-over yards are a mass of wreckage, the steel rails being twisted in every conceivable form by the intense heat. The fire will smoulder for days.

The Canadian Match and Splint Corporations, with an investment of over two millions, only a stone’s throw away from the origin of the fire, took every precaution. Streams of water played constantly’on their plants and lumber exceeding ten million feet of matchwood. The chemical building was emptied of Its content, which were taken out of danger. The general opinion in Pembroke today is that the town is very fortunate in having escaped a repetition of the conflagrations which visited the town In 1908 and 1918.

Both Mr. Dunlop. of the Pembroke Lumber Co., and Mr. Woodruff, general manager of the Canadian Match Co., are high in their praise of the manner In whim the situation was handled by Fire Chief Dry and his men, assisted by the Renfrew fire department.

Read about the Stewart family click here..

THE WHITE FAMILY.

The town of Pembroke, about one hundred and twenty miles up the river from Ottawa, was founded in 1828 by Col. Peter White, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, who was for many years one of the principal timber merchants of the Ottawa Valley. His sons have been actively engaged in the lumber business and by their enterprise have done much to build up their native town. Hon. Peter White, born at Pembroke August 30, 1838, after receiving a business training from an Ottawa mercantile firm, entered into partnership with his brother, Andrew T. White, now deceased, as A. & P. White, and for many years carried on an extensive lumber business which is still continued under the firm name. Mr. White is known best, perhaps, as an active politician. He was elected to Parliament in the Conservative interest for North Renfrew in 1874 and, with the exception of a brief interval, represented the constituency steadily until 1896. He was chosen Speaker of the House in 1891 and held that position during a parliamentary term, until 1896, in which year he was defeated in the general election. He carried the constituency again in 1904. Mr. White is a member of the Privy Council of Canada, to which he was called in 1897. He is a director of the Pembroke Lumber Company and is prominently identified with many local commercial enterprises. His brother and business partner, Andrew T. White, was also in public life and for some time represented North Renfrew in the Ontario Legislature.

The Copeland House Fires

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The Copeland House Fires

 

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        Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

        McCann’s Hotel Fire in Perth

      4. Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

      5. Did the Germans Start the Fire at the Portland School in 1915?

      6. 1906 — Business Block is a Smouldering Block of Ruins– More Fires of Almonte

      7. Carleton Place 1913- A Fire in the China Shop and…

Every Foot of the House Was Crowded When the Teamsters Were Passing Through

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Every Foot of the House Was Crowded When the Teamsters Were Passing Through

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Mr. Joseph Halpenny  remembered a time when his father William and his uncle John Halpenny kept a hotel in Pembroke from the 1860s to the early 1870s when the hauling of supplies to the lumber shanties was in full swing. The Halpenny hotel at that period was headquarters for the teamsters from Lanark and Renfrew counties as they passed through Pembroke. Pembroke was an overnight stop. Though Mr. Halpenny was only a boy of about six in 1871 he has a vivW recollection of how at that time his father’s hotel would be crowded with teamsters. Every bed in the house would be occupied and every square foot of room would be occupied by men lying rolled up in their blankets on the floor. Mr. Halpenny recalls these teamsters as being big powerful men to whom the lifting of a barrel of pork was a mere trifle.

Most of the teamsters ate their meals in the Halpenny dining room, but on the other hand, many of them carried their own grub with them in boxes, and ate their meals wherever they could around the hotel. Mr. Halpenny’s greatest delight at that period of his life was to eat with the teamsters out of their boxes and to share their home-made bread, their cold fat pork, and the dainties which their wives had packed in the boxes for them.

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Mr. Halpenny recalls an elderly teamster whom he called “Uncle” Robert Livingston, whose box meal he usually shared. “Uncle” Livingston always had doughnuts in his box and these he shared liberally with the boy. Mr. Halpenny says that as many as 150 teamsters have been in his father’s hotel over night. His father had two large sheds and they could accommodate some 50 teams under cover.

 

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Prior to opening the hotel in Pembroke, Willaim Halpenny had kept a “stopping place” two miles from Forester’s Falls in Ross township. The stop of the shanty teams there was a noon stop, Grandfather John Halpenny had gone into Ross township as a farmer in the pioneer days back in the late 1840s.

William Halpenny did not live long after moving to Pembroke, In 1865. He died in 1871, the result of a cold sustained in 1869, when Prince Arthur visited Pembroke. After the death of Mr. Halpenny the Halpenny hotel was sold and became the Munroe House

 

 

historicalnotes

Pembroke was incorporated as a town in 1878 and as a city in 1971. It was named seat for Renfrew County in 1861. This set the stage for construction shortly thereafter on the Renfrew County Courthouse, which finished in 1867, and the arrival of many civil servants, much wealth and much construction. In the 20-year period following 1861, Pembroke basically became the city it is today in terms of layout and buildings, although many homes and other structures have been lost to time. A fire in 1918 destroyed much of Pembroke’s downtown.

Other historic buildings that survive in Pembroke include a historic synagogue, two original hospitals, the Dunlop mansion (Grey Gables Manor Bed & Breakfast), the ‘Munroe Block’ downtown, and two houses belonging to the White family. A fire in 1918 downtown destroyed many buildings, including the Pembroke Opera House

As shown by the quotation below, which is perhaps equal parts promotion and fact, the economic atmosphere of Pembroke during the period when our fashions graced its streets and hotels, attracted many people to set up residence here.

“Both for business purposes and residential purposes Pembroke is a most desirable town. Because of its advantageous surroundings, its commercial facilities, its advantages as a shipping and distributing point, its excellent sanitary conditions, and the thousand and one things that make the town a desirable place in which to live, it has attracted, during the past few years, capitalists and business men from afar.
The district surrounding Pembroke is one of the richest agricultural districts in Eastern Canada. The farmers are all well-to-do, while many of them have accumulated fortunes.

Taverns the Press and the other End of the Valley

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Taverns the Press and the other End of the Valley

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A long time ago journalism used to be frank and very descriptive rather than political to sell papers.

In 1887 a Perth correspondent upset a local politician because he appeared at a public meeting in one of the local taverns with his hair parted in the middle. He wore a circular comb such a little girl wears at school pushed back over his intellectual brow to keep the hair from shading his “massive, frontal developments”.

There was a “gold boom” in the township of Madoc and that overshadowed politics as it was reported that settlers along the Hasting Road had gold on the brain. The first refugees from the European-oppression countries were also arriving in the same area. These were from Poland, and the reporters at the Pembroke Observer noted that a party of Polish emigrants arrived by the steamer Jason Gould.  The steamer operated on the Muskrat from Cobden to Pembroke, and the emigrants settled temporarily on the hill at the western end of the village before moving to the back townships and were strong and healthy.

 

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The Union House on McKay street around Hunter’s store in Pembroke informed the public of “good stabling and attentive hostlers”, with “the table supplied with the” best the market affords”.  Renfrew village was prospering as the terminus of the “Iron Horse”. Its’ Dominion Hotel, under Craig and McDonnell advertised that its “Table and Bar will be kept well supplied with all that can be desired”. Its rival, the Albion Hotel, advertised that it was “at the Railway Station” and then added superfluously: “free bus to and from Pembroke, Portage du Fort and Eganville stages –call at the Albion Hotel”.

 

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The County was flourishing and Francis Hincks the Prime Minister that lasted for 10 weeks, had  made his home in Renfrew’s Exchange Hotel in Room Number Six looking for a political haven when Sir James A MacDonald’s regime began to crack.

 

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Most accommodation in those days were in private homes that had been converted into serving the general public. Of course with the growing population and the railways, private homes became too small and new public buildings were built and called hotels with everything one would need to look after the travelling public.

Of course men became to be owned by the whiskey bottle as some said. Newspapers began flexing their literary muscle with their temperance thoughts blaming those in power for the condition of the very wet counties.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

More Settler Routes from Bill Martin

Trip Advisor 1834- Richmond to Perth is the “Road to Ruin”

Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell

 

 

 

 

The Pembroke Observer Story of 1868 –NOT for the Faint of Heart

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The Pembroke Observer Story of 1868 –NOT for the Faint of Heart

 

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 - GENERAL INTELLIGENCE. AWFUL TRAGEDY. A Woman...

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  1. The McArthur Enquirer,
  2. 27 Feb 1868, Thu,
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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

The Tragic Tale of the Accidental Axe — Warning: Not All History has Good Memories

The Buck Lake Murderer

Did Samuel Pittard of Ashton Murder His Wife?

Shocking Murder in Almonte–Michigan Charlie

“Dominique, nique, nique s’en allait tout simplement”–The Pembroke Grey Nuns

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Here is another group of photos I rescued from an auction. I could not figure out which group of nuns the woman in the centre belonged to but, Lise from Peche & Poivres in Almonte said it was definitely the Grey Nuns. So after looking through the other 30 photos in the family collection I think I have found her. Mary Malvina Cahill (1892 – ) Sister Austin; in 1925 at age 33 Mary took her vows and joined Sisters of St. Joseph of Pembroke. from the Pembroke Grey Nuns. Photo- Linda Seccaspina’s Photo Collection (Griffin McManus family)

Last year the Grey Sisters marked their  90th year in Pembroke. The nursing and teaching order, the Grey Sisters of the Immaculate Conception established itself in Pembroke in 1926, taking charge of the Convent of Mary Immaculate, the Pembroke General Hospital (now the Pembroke Regional Hospital), the Continuation School in Eganville, St. Patrick’s Home in Ottawa and the General Hospital in Sault Ste. Marie. It later expanded into new areas, such as the Lorrain School of Nursing, Marianhill and Our Lady’s High School, now known as Bishop Smith Catholic High School.

The history of the Grey Sisters is as old as New France itself. It has its origins in the 1700s in the colony of Ville-Marie, located where present-day Montreal stands. This is the birthplace of Marie-Marguerite Dufrost de Lajemmerais, better known as Saint Marguerite d’Youville, who with three companions founded the order in 1737. This was then known as the Sisters of Charity of Montreal, the Grey Nuns.

In 1845, 26-year-old Elisabeth Bruyere, a member of those Grey Nuns, arrived in Bytown, later Ottawa, with five companions to found the Grey Nuns of the Cross, now known as the Sisters of Charity of Ottawa. The Pembroke community came from this Ottawa foundation nearly 100 years later as one of its members Sister St. Paul, convinced of God’s call to begin a Canadian community of English-speaking women who shared in Saint Marguerite’s charism, established the congregation with the steadfast support of Pembroke’s Bishop Thomas Ryan.

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Photo courtesy Grey Sisters/Pembroke Daily Observer/Postmedia Network Pembroke Regional Hospital had its beginnings in 1878 with this building, located at what is now 557 Pembroke Street East. It was later relocated to an expanded location at 695 Mackay Street, then to its current site at 705 Mackay. The hospital was one of the institutions which was taken over by the Grey Sisters of the Immaculate Conception when they were founded in Pembroke in 1926.

She and 76 others thus founded the Grey Sisters of the Immaculate Conception in 1926.

Besides their duties in health and education in Pembroke, the Grey Sisters undertook service in many places throughout Canada and overseas, such as in China, Japan, the Bahamas and the Dominican Republic. For years, students and staff from the Catholic high schools in Pembroke and Renfrew have been participating in the Dominican Republic Experience, a yearly opportunity for them to experience the culture and the people while contributing to projects in that country. These days, the work of the Grey Sisters frequently involves partnering with others, supporting projects as volunteers, whether by serving on boards or by personal ministry, or providing financial assistance to enable work that us consistent with their charism and mission in the world.–By Stephen Uhler, The Daily Observer

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Mary Malvina Cahill (1892 – ) Sister Austin; in 1925 at age 33 Mary took her vows and joined Sisters of St. Joseph of Pembroke.–Photo- Linda Seccaspina’s  Photo Collection-“Dominique with just one prayer–Made him hear the good Lord’s call”

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Grey Sisters Cemetery
Pembroke–click here

Gravemarker Cemetery Album Effective – September 2006

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

 

Are These Memories Just for Ourselves? — The Family in a Box

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UPDATE— The Lanark County Genealogical Society found a home for these photos and they are going back to the Zumach family in Killaloe

This is a picture of  the children that attended Central School on Bridge Street in Carleton Place where the post office stands today. They are pretty bundled up! Maybe the wood stove wasn’t throwing much heat that day? Taken in the mid 1920’s – note the bare electric bulb, inkwells, and map of North America.– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo Collection

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Collecting pictures from days gone by can tell you a lot about how people lived. I personally collect old photos to save them from being separated, and sold by dealers. Call me eccentric- but I just feel better knowing they have a home with me– for now. Most of these pictures I have in my collection were former residents of Lanark county.

A month ago I bought/rescued a box of photos that contained one family unit. Vicki Racey and I oooh and ahhed over them, and much to my surprise they were from a well-known family tree up in “the ‘frew” area. It was at that moment I knew they had to go where others could study them. The next day I showed them to Jennifer Fenwick Irwin, our curator at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. She told me the same thing. These pictures should go back to where they originated from so they could be preserved, and family lineages could be traced.

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The box contains pictures centering around three families. The Chatsicks, The Zummachs and the Zadows. Seeing there is a school and a funeral parlor named after two families it made me realize they were prominent citizens in that area.

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The issue is: the families are from the Arnprior, Renfrew and Pembroke area. Which museum should they go to? There are three families. Walter Zadow had a school named after him in Arnprior, and the Zummach funeral parlour is in Killaloe. Of course we can’t forget Snake River where John Zummach was born in 1859. Or Arnprior, where some of the photos were taken.

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Someone was entrusted with this box of family photos from the surrounding area and Germany. Some how it was given away to be sold. It’s not going anywhere now until I find the right museum– because what you forget, no one can retell. All you have to do is look at the picture above and see what was once a happy family and proud homestead in Renfrew County. Remember we keep love in photographs.

We had a devastating fire in 1995 in our family home and the restoration company was ready to dump all the photos. I don’t have that many as my father burned all our family photos in a can in the back yard the day my Mother was buried. In it was a hand written a Miller family tree book from Island Brook. At age 12 I had NO say in the matter — but I feel I need to have a say when I see dealers bidding against me who are only going to separate them and sell them. Call me crazy- but I have a home filled with old pictures that were thrown out years ago by many families in the area. I will protect them all and give them a home until I die.

UPDATE— The Lanark County Genealogical Society found a home for these photos and they are going back to the Zumach family in Killaloe

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Good morning everyone… thank to Stuart McIntosh we have this great photo and Stuart thught I might like the hat LOLOL — Stuart says:
I found this among some old family photos with no name attached to it. ..sure wish someone could identify her.

Related Reading

Identifying a Family in a Box — The Hoelke Family

Getting the Family Paintings Home– Dr. Harold Box

When the Past Comes A Haunting- Jessie Comrie

A Time of its Own– The Mystery Photo

The Peden Family- Genealogy– Peden Saunders Sadler