Tag Archives: Ottawa

Went into Torrent at Foot of Chaudiere Falls with Thermometer at 20 Below!!! 1902

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Went into Torrent at Foot of Chaudiere Falls with Thermometer at 20 Below!!! 1902

37 Arthur Street Ottawa

Few men have had an experience such as Robert Davis of 37 Arthur street had back In 1902 and lived. Mr. Davis fell from the Booth flume (uncovered at the time) into the icy water of the river, on a day in January when the thermometer registered twenty below zero. He entered the water halfway between the falls and the bridge. A little below the bridge the river was solidly ice covered. Had he not been a strong swimmer and carried as far as the Ice in the rapidly flowing current, his death must have been certain.

But his strength as a swimmer enabled him to swim diagonally across the strong current to the north side of the river, and gain the land just east of the north pier of the bridge, from which point he was hauled to the bridge by a rope provided by the men of Booth’s mill. His escape seemed nothing short of miraculous. To understand properly what a wonderful escape Mr. Davis had it must be remembered that at that time there was no great dam as now and the water tore down under the bridge in a practically unrestricted flow and with mill-tail velocity.

1880

CATEGORY ARCHIVES: CHAUDIERE FALLS GS

When Mr. Davis came out of the water his cap was gone and he was bareheaded (as well as all wet) with the temperature 20 below. An employee of the mill took off his coat and put It over Mr. Davis’ head. This fact is mentioned to show the fine instincts of generosity which impel the average man in times of stress. Mr. Davis never forgot that act.

Just as the moment when Mr. Davis had been hauled onto the bridge there passed from Hull a hack with a Mr. McNeill (a brother of the late J. R. McNeill, the tailor) as a fare. Mr. McNeill (who was a stranger from the Northwest) He insisted on taking Mr. Davis to his home at 37 Arthur street, which he did.

As soon as Mr. Booth heard that Mr. Davis had come out of the river alive, he made quick arrangements for him to be taken to the boiler room and offer dry clothes,stimulants and a doctor. If ten men fell into the Icy current as Mr. Davis did (with a drop of between 26 and 30 feet, 9 would undoubtedly have been drowned. The chances would have been all against them. Insurance Agent’s Chance Mr. Davis’ experience had a humorous side. There was a certain young insurance agent who used to go around the mill soliciting accident Insurance. Being a good talker and a great hustler he did a land office business.

Lost Ottawa
Booth, Perley and Pattee mills on Chaudiere Island next to the Ottawa River in 1878.

These mills were built over the flume seen in our earlier map (posted at 7.30 am). The water pouring out the side has been used to power turbines that in turn power all the mill machinery in the days before electricity.

J.R. Booth would soon own all these mills.

(CSTM E.B. Eddy Collection, originally LAC PA-012497)

About six months after the Davis Incident the young man was at the mill and he did not know Mr. Davis personally. The young man wore a medal. Mr. Davis asked what it was and the young man proudly told him it was a Humane Society medal given him for saving the life of a man at the bridge about six months before. Mr. Davis looked at the medal and saw his own name on it, as the man who had been saved. He was dumbfounded for the moment.

When he recovered he asked the agent to describe the circumstances of the rescue and the agent told how the man had fallen from the Booth flume and how he had jumped into the river and saved him. Mr. Davis asked him if he would know the man again if he saw him. He replied that he thought he would. Mr. Davis then told him that he was the man who had fallen in the river and that he had got out of the water without help, and demanded to know how the agent had secured the medal.

The young man then caved in, admitted wearing the medal was not right, and begged Mr. Davis not to say anything about It, as he had found it a great aid to getting business. As Mr. Davis was glad to be alive at the time he laughed heartily and let the agent go his way.

WOW!! He said nothing??

Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

The Tragic Death of Dr. Mostyn Shocked the People of Almonte

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

Robert Drader Bill Shail Saved from Drowning May 28 1957

Booth’s Mill — Eddy’s Lumber Dock— Near Tragedies

Lake Keminiskeg Disaster Part 2 Believe it or Not

Carleton Place Was Once Featured in Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Our Haunted Heritage

Another Story- When your Number is Up — Hubert Horton

Believe it or Not– William Dedrick of Perth

A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

Booth’s Mill — Eddy’s Lumber Dock— Near Tragedies

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Booth’s Mill — Eddy’s Lumber Dock— Near Tragedies

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Oct 1928, Sat  •  Page 36

The site of that bold project of 1826-27 is now covered by the series of bridges and approaches over the Chaudiere route of today. But that first conquest of the Chaudiere still ranks as one of the greatest of pioneer engineering epics. It presented almost insuperable obstacles.In spite of dangers and difficulties MacTaggart took it all in his stride. With pride in his craftsmanship he declared: “This bridge, if we manage to build and finish It off as we ought, will surpass almost any other in the world as a wonderful piece of superstructure. It is to have eight arches; five of 60 feet span, two of 70 feet and one of 200 feet over the Big Kettle, where sounding-line hath not yet found a bottom at 300 feet deep.” (We never knew that our Chaudiere was that deep!)

Eddy’s Lumber Docks Wikimedia Commons

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Oct 1928, Sat  •  Page 36

Down at Old McIlquham’s Bridge

Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

Robert Drader Bill Shail Saved from Drowning May 28 1957

Tales from the Mississippi Rapids

A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

Spring 1909 Pakenham — James Lunny William David Story

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

The Sad Tale of Alexander Gillies and Peter Peden

The Dangers of the Mississippi River-Arnold Boner 

HIGH SCHOOL CADETS RESCUE CHILD IN RIVER

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

The Tragic Death of Dr. Mostyn Shocked the People of Almonte

The Appleton Incident 1954

Debbie Dixon and The CPR Bridge Incident in Carleton Place–Linda’s Mailbag

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Hidden Creeks, the Bywash and Sinkholes

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Hidden Creeks, the Bywash and Sinkholes

A brand new story of a lowertown creek of the 1860s, and celebrated the spring which fed it, is told by Mr. Robillard, 106 Clarence street. This creek, according to Mr. Robillard, started in the hill between Daly avenue and Besserer street, just behind the present St. Alban’s church. The spring, which was a heavy year round flower, rose on the property of Mr. Romain Page (father of Mr. Edouard Page, foreman of No. 6 station).

No 6 Station- read more here.. click

Mr. Page had the spring covered by a shed, but let all his neighbors freely draw water from it. Ice was dear and scarce in those times and Mr. Page used the spring to keep his milk and meat cold. The spring was as good as a refrigerator, the water was so cold.

After leaving the spring house, the overflow water ran in a goodly stream down the hill to Rideau street, which It crossed (being covered by planks), and ran down King street. It did not join the Bywash creek, as might have been supposed, but continued an easterly course of its own and finally flowed into the Rideau river below St. Patrick street.

Mr. Robillard says this spring and creek was kept in existence until about 1877 when the modern sewerage system was started. While talking of lowertown old creeks, Mr. Robillard told how in the 1860s he often saw large burbots in the Bywash Creek

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada07 Jul 1928, Sat  •  Page 32

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Pierre Pharand

I remember my colleague telling me about this in a a very detailed fashion. It was mind-blowing to me. He also made the link with the sinkhole and how water often always takes the path with which it is most familiar. The sinkhole happened at the location of where the By Wash crossed Rideau Street.

Nicholas R. R. LeckeyThis is the oldest known photo of the Bywash, “King St” decorated with its signature line of trees. It indeed doubled as a drain for the cedar swamp that would become the By Ward, but was primarily an overflow channel for the canal construction.
http://web.ncf.ca/es568/mapbytown1842.jpg

The Bywash ran through Lower Town a short distance south of the Entrance Locks, emptying eventually into the Rideau River.Following the completion of the Rideau Canal the Bywash was routed along York Street to  the Rideau River. The volume of water in the Bywash was sufficient to allow the passage of delivery barges right through Lower Town. This offered businesses and the market a cheap, quick and affordable means of having goods delivered to their doorsteps.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Apr 1926, Sat  •  Page 2

Lost Ottawa

Came across this surprising photo in the Ottawa Archives, described as the “By Wash that used to run down the middle of King Edward Street.” Dated, alas, only to “188-?” …
We’ve had several drawings and maps showing the By Wash, which was built by Colonel By to drain the east turning basin of the canal (and before that the swamp that was there, if I recall correctly). It’s thought to be the original reason King Edward is a boulevard.

The By Wash crossed Rideau Street, ran through the Byward Market, then down King Eddy, and eventually drained into the Rideau. We never had a picture before!
(City of Ottawa Archives CA002229. The picture is very small, so I blew it up some)

This photo was disputed as not being the Bywash photo

Jaan Kolk

Geoff Baker: it is curious. I’m not saying that the photo is not what it claims to be, but it would seem to go against what has been reported for the history of the by wash. If it really is what that caption says, it is very significant historically. It would be worthwhile to try to get a higher resolution scan of this glass slide. Unfortunately, according to the City Archives it is fairly small and has been at least partially hand-coloured (a magic lantern slide, I guess.)

David Jeanes

I went to the City archives to study this original glass slide. I am convinced that it was just part of a slide show about urban waterworks and nothing specifically to do with Ottawa. There are certainly many items in the picture that do not match the site or the era for Ottawa and the By Wash.

Glenn Clark

I remember seeing another picture of the Bywash that was equally questionable. I just looked at the 1879 Belden Atlas and only a tiny remnant of the Bywash remained next to the turning basin. There was nothing left running down King Street (King Edward)

Lost Ottawa

Postcard from Ottawa, looking south down King Edward Avenue, circa 1905-1910, after the Ottawa Improvement Commission had given the street a beautification. Those saplings would grow up to make a nice tree-lined park in the middle of the street.
The fire station is still there and used as a residence, sans tower.
The postcard might also show why there was a boulevard in the first place. The park was over the top of a major sewer — a descendent of the By Wash that once ran through the market and down King Eddy and was used to help drain the Rideau Canal.

Lost Ottawa
 Earlier this morning we had a map of downtown Ottawa, showing the turning basin of the Rideau Canal and the By Wash, which was a watercourse that drained out of the basin through market and down King Edward.
Here is a watercolor of the basin area painted by Thomas Burrowes in 1845. It shows the east side of the canal with the basin and the entrance to the wash. Not much on the west side at that time!
I posted the photo at quite a large size. Hopefully, you will be able to zoom in and see the details.
(Archives of Ontario C 1-0-0-0-12)

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Aug 1937, Sat  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Oct 1928, Sat 

Walking the Bywash click

“The Tim Horton’s River” Under my House.. Is That the Way To Fraggle Rock?

The Mysterious Princess Louise Falls

Buttermilk Falls — Location Location Location

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

Did You Know we had a %^&* Creek in Carleton Place?

Mackie Creek – Stuart McIntosh

Floating Bridges, Toll Gates and Typhoons– Clippings of Billings Bridge

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Floating Bridges, Toll Gates and Typhoons– Clippings of Billings Bridge

Joseph Brule Sr. came from Papineauville about the year 1847 and the family had originally come from below Montreal. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brule Sr. had a family of six when they came to Billings Bridge, and several children were born after their arrival. After living on the Island at Billings Bridge for about three years, Joseph Brule went to work for his brother Thomas Brule who had a blacksmith shop at Byward market in Bytown.

The family occupied a shanty on Billings. At that time it was much larger than it is today as floods and other causes have worn away at the island. When Joseph Brule came to these parts Billings bridge was once a floating bridge. The bridge was tied to either shore with ropes. When the spring floods and ice came down the river the bridge was loosened at one end and allowed to swing to one shore until the ice and high water had gone. At such times those who were very anxious to cross, were taken over to the other side In scows.

Mr. Joseph Brule, says he did not see the floating bridge in operation, but when he was a small boy he saw the remains of it.

Map of Billings Bridge c.1879 Source:Illustrated Historical Atlas of the County of Carleton inc. City of Ottawa

The first bridge was built by Billings across the Rideau River at Bank Street in 1831. Farmer’s Bridge later known as Billings Bridge was finally completed, linking Gloucester Township with Nepean Township and Bytown. By 1859 both the bridge and the community became commonly known as Billings Bridge. This early bridge was washed out and rebuilt in 1847.Further washouts took place in 1862, 1876 and 1913.  In 1862 it is necessary to rebuild one end of Billings Bridge 

Bridges at the time were more vulnerable to this, as they only had a clearance of about 1m above the water level. The concrete central span of the bridge collapsed 21 March 1913. Construction of a new bridge began in 1914. It was inaugurated 2 September 1915. The ceremony was conducted on the North bank of the river. The mayor of Ottawa then drove across the bridge, turned around without pause and drove straight back into town. ( Wikipedia)

Mason’s blacksmith shop, Riverdale near Billings Bridge.”
Dated to October 27, 1898, this photo was taken by famous Ottawa East resident James Ballantyne.
(LAC PA-134260)

June 6th, 1888 a Cyclone devastated large portions of Gloucester particularly near Billings Bridge.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Sep 1925, Sat  •  Page 2

Hawthorne and Ramsayville. In 1920 William Birch is the last tollgate keeper at Billings Bridge..


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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Apr 1920, Mon  •  Page 15

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Feb 1852, Sat  •  Page 4

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Mar 1878, Mon  •  Page

This one is entitled “Looking south from Billings Bridge.” Not exactly the Ottawa South we know now!
No date on the picture, unfortunately, but I’m guessing 1890. There are telephone poles, at least.
(LAC PA-009202)

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 May 1876, Mon  •  Page 4
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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 May 1876, Thu  •  Page 4

Here’s the Rideau River flooding on the outskirts of Ottawa near Billings Bridge in 1926.
Flooding was an almost annual occurrence in Ottawa and surroundings back in the day, and you can almost feel the water flowing in this pic.
(Annual Report of the Ottawa Suburban Roads Commission, 1926)

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Apr 1926, Fri  •  Page 8

CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Feb 1877, Mon  •  Page 2

Larry Clark Memories : Billings Bridge, Willow Trees and the Orange Lodge

The Sharbot Lake Floating Bridge

The Sullivans —- Floating Bridge Builders

The Floating Bridge – Claudia Smith

More on The Floating Bridge– Memories of Lyall McKay

The Carp River Floating Bridge

More Memories of the Floating Bridge

More Notes on the Floating Bridge in Clayton

The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

Clayton floating bridge

Searching for the Floating Bridge?

The Floating Bridges of Lanark County

The Mystery Ruins and the Floating Sidewalk Near the McNeely Bridge

95 Beech Street — 100 Years—-Cream Jeans and “I Love I Love My Calendar Girls”

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95 Beech Street — 100 Years—-Cream Jeans and “I  Love I Love My Calendar Girls”

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Sat, Aug 23, 1980 · Page 17
CLIPPED FROM
The Vancouver Sun
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
24 Mar 1980, Mon  •  Page 19

One night Isaac Farbiasz and hit lawyer were playing backgammon, trying to come up with a name for Farbiasz’s new company. The lawyer glared across the board and said, “I’m gonna cream you.” “That’s it,” cried Farbiasz, and Ottawa’s Cream Jean Co. was born. In the four years since, Cream has sold more than $11 million worth of its jeans, cords and skirts with their well-known pleats and recce-style back pockets. “Business is just like science,” says Farbiasz, 32, who has a bachelor’s degree in zoology and a master’s in biochemistry. “Science has taught me to be analytical, and you need that in business.” all started as a student in Israel.

Although familiar with the clothing business his father was a tailor and his mother a designer Farbiasz didn’t try to design anything himself until he was a student in Israel. He designed a sheepskin coat, found someone to manufacture it, and returned to Canada with a sample. Farbiasz dropped plans to market his creation when the shipment of coats arrived all with short sleeves. His second foray into the clothing business the design of a satin-backed vest for an Ottawa boutique was more successful.

Moving to Montreal, Farbiasz managed Overseas Marketing Co. Ltd.’s denim import division before deciding to go into business for himself. He and a partner approached S. C. Walker Manufacturing Company Ltd. of Ottawa in 1975 to produce Farbiasz’s jumpsuit design. In six months, 10,000 had sold. Cream Jeans was incorporated in the fall of 1976, starting with a line of pleated pants for men.

“My father always used to make me pleated pants when I was a little boy,” he said.

The first blow to the company came when a Toronto buyer went into bankruptcy, owing Cream Jeans $10,000. “We just didn’t have the money to absorb that kind of loss,” he said. “But we learned a good lesson about guaranteed receivables.”

Since then, there’s been no stopping the company, which has its head office and warehouse at 95 Beech St. Sales have grown to more than $6 million this year from $250,000 in 1977. “We haven’t peaked yet, but I realize this kind of growth can’t last forever. “We have three styles for women and a fourth coming, plus skirts, and we have three styles for men.”

Most of the design work is done in Ottawa, as well as some pattern cutting. But the bulk of production is carried out at a factory in St. Hubert, Que., near Montreal. Stitching is contracted out to various companies, also in Quebec. Strolling through the local warehouse, now almost empty before fall production gets into full swing, Farbiasz points with pride to his product. “We’re going to be producing 7,000 to 10,000 pairs of cords a week,” he said. The fall cords, of narrow-waled cloth, come in brilliant colors like magenta, blueberry and moss.

Besides the best-selling pleated pant, Cream also markets a western-style pant with leather label, and a dressier flannel pant line. Also new for fall is an advertising campaign based on the company’s cartoon creations, Captain Cream, the lovely Jeanne and the faithful dog, Zipper. “The boom in denim over the past 10 years has been amazing,” said Farbiasz.

“Cream isn’t high fashion,” he said. “There’s an 80-per-cent market out there wanting a good fit, quality and a good price, and a 20-per-cent market wanting fashion. We are after the 80 per cent market.” Farbiasz, who has direct control over every aspect of Cream,, from new designs to production and promotion, said his next challenge is to break into the tougher markets of Quebec and the Maritimes.

“I also want more quality control,” he said. “I don’t want us to be at the mercy of contract stitchers.” The Cream factory in Quebec is in the midst of a move to a larger building in St. Hubert. As president and sole owner his partner left the company a few years ago, Farbiasz says he doesn’t have much time left for anything but work. “I’d love to get back to scientific research some day,” he said. “I keep saying I’m only going to stay here another two years. Of course, I said that two years ago.”

1980—

The Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada23 Aug 1980, Sat

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The Vancouver Sun
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
24 Mar 1980, Mon  •  Page 19
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Aug 1979, Wed  •  Page 11

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Mar 1989, Sat  •  Page 176

NINETY FIVE BEECH STREET — Cream Jeans

When driving or walking by 95 Beech, one would never guess that this condominium building was once a factory warehouse creating products for many years. In 2000 this warehouse was converted into a condominium, now called Warehouse Lofts, by a retired Ottawa real estate lawyer, Craig Callen Jones. The factory conversion included creating 30 open-concept loft units in the building that were unique to the structure, no two units are alike. The Warehouse Lofts

In 1995 shoppers crowded tables heaped high with Sour Cream jeans and shirts for a semi-annual sale. There was the occasional skirt and jacket, but the rather shabby factory, located around the corner from the Prescott Hotel on Preston Street, was the best place in town to find good cords and jeans at bargain prices. It didn’t matter that it was often a sweat box in July.

“There was usually only one full-length mirror in the hastily arranged dressing room, and women crowded around in various states of undress. I don’t know about the men’s dressing room, but you always saw familiar faces and the prices kept you coming back.

For the rest of the year, the 101-year-old brick building was a factory for Cream Jeans. Most recently, it has housed small businesses and a flea market.

Then 95 Beech St. was reborn as a sexy, urban address for men and women who want loft living and the option of buying affordable townhomes. It’s been an instant sales success, selling 18 of the 30 lofts since Oct 23, says a much relieved and very pleased Craig Callan Jones. This real estate lawyer is the spark plug behind the warehouse loft, which, when finished, will include one- and two-storey lofts in the factory and lofts located above two floors of commercial offices and stores in the second phase. “. This second phase, due to start in August of2000, will at the back of the original factory in an addition built in the 1960s and fronting on Aberdeen Street. There are plans to add two new floors for lofts on top of the existing building. Finally, phase three will include eight new-construction townhomes on the east side of the factory.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada06 Nov 1999, Sat  •  Page 95

Prices in 1999 were $199,000 — now they are $699,000.

Marty Taylor

I worked at Cream for about 6 years. Spent alternate days working with Hank filling orders in the warehouse and other days driving a 5 ton truck between Ottawa and Montreal, to pick up the clothing from the warehouse. It eventually became known as “Cream Clothing” when they started selling other clothing such as shirts, etc. I actually went with Isaac at least once to go to a Montreal Expos game. Hank and I used to spend many a day going to the Prescott across the road for pizza or meatball sandwiches and a beer or 5. Thanks for the memories!!

NINETY FIVE BEECH STREET

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Dec 1953, Tue  •  Page 1

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jan 1954, Mon  •  Page 1

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jan 1954, Mon  •  Page 1
95 Beech
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Sep 1959, Sat  •  Page 9

Where did Isaac Farbiasz go?

ByWard Market

December 7, 2016  · 

The Y in ByWard – Chapter 21: Isaac Farbiasz, Byward Fruit Market

For us, this is a post-retirement business. I didn’t do well doing nothing, so my wife and I decided to try the food business when the store came up for sale. We were in the clothing business for 20 years, and this seemed like an interesting possibility.

Originally, we wanted to do an organic store, but we ended up doing a specialty and exotic fruit and vegetable store, along with an Organic Food Club.

It’s important to establish a clientele, and you do that by listening to what people are asking for. The family who ran this store for a few decades always went for higher quality, and we went back to that approach.

Saturday mornings are great! We know everyone that comes in, it’s a real gathering…the customers get together in a sort of a community sense. I like early morning people that you get to know, and when it gets busy it’s a wholly different thing.

In supermarkets you don’t get much advice, you never get that personal hands-on experience. I’m off on Sundays, so I get a chance to cook. My staff now, all cook too. Many of us share recipes with our clients and vice versa…that also builds the sense of community.

It’s about food. Food and the beauty of eating good food; it’s not just eating, it’s also the cooking. The cultural aspect of food is in the making, and in the table…it’s everything. Good food is a passionate experience and life is all about eating.

~Isaac Farbiasz, Co-Owner
ByWard Fruit Market
36 ByWard Market Square
Ottawa ON K1N 7A2

www.bywardfruit.com

by online click

CBC Toronto 

August 7, 2020  · 

Isaac Farbiasz, who owns ByWard Fruit Market with his wife, blames the “severe downturn” squarely on the city’s decision to allow bars and restaurants to expand patio space into parking spaces and to reroute streets to accommodate other street closures.

I Miss My Howick Ballroom Jeans –The 70s Revisited

Both Skinny Jeans and Hotels need “Ball Room”

I Seldom Wash My Jeans – Personal Confessions

No! That’s NOT just MY size!

Glitter Shine and Satin – Ottawa Fashion 1978 – Flash Cadilac

Born in Bells Corners-The Man Who Started Out to Become a Priest and Became a Train Robber – Anecdotes about Chris Evans and Daughter Eva

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Born in Bells Corners-The Man Who Started Out to Become a Priest and Became a Train Robber –  Anecdotes about Chris Evans and Daughter Eva

Old Ottawa And Bytown Pics

Blair Stannard  · 16h  · 

Ottawa – 1847 – Chris Evans , Outlaw, born in Bell’s Corners–this photo is after his capture at Stone Corral–Also read-GUNFIGHT AT THE STONE CORRAL: WILD WEST OUTLAW WAS FROM OTTAWA 2016- CLICK

BornFebruary 19, 1847
Bells Corners near Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
DiedFebruary 9, 1917 (aged 69)
PortlandOregon, USA

Christopher Evans was born on February 19, 1847, in Bell’s Corner, about twelve miles from Ottawa, Canada. His parents, Thomas and Mary Ann Evans, were both Irish natives who came to Canada separately. They married in Bell’s Corner in 1837 and together they had eight children, including Chris. In various newspaper reports it was said that Chris was studying to become a priest in Bells Corners. By 1866/7 Bells Corners was a post village with a population of 150 in the township of Nepean. The village had a daily mail, two stores, a school and a church which was used by the Church of England, Presbyterians, and Wesleyan Methodists. 

In the summer of 1863, at age sixteen, Chris left home and crossed the border into the United States. They say he *joined the Civil War but no official record of this exists, assuming because he joined under a false name. In 1870, Chris moved to Visalia, California, where he began working for a lawyer named Daggett who helped Evans educate himself. A few years later, he began working as a teamster, hauling lumber to and from the mills is the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Soon after, Chris married Mary Jane “Molly” Byrd, a girl he met who ran an eating house along the road to the mills at a location known as Auckland, twenty-five miles northeast of Visalia. There, Chris and Molly Byrd married at her parents “Rattlesnake Ranch” on November 4, 1871. – Wikipedia.

Christopher Evans entered the United States at age 17 *because, as he once claimed, “the great struggle for freedom was going on and I left my home…to liberate the slave.” Newspapers painted a picture of Chris Evans as an enigmaand it was sais that he came to Tulare county in California from Bells Corners with just the blankets on his back.

He came to the West to work, he could do rough carpentering; knew how to handle horses and was generally someone that would be needed about a new community. He made no pretense to being anything more than a laborer, though the words he turned with just a shade of the Canadian twang were not such as wandering farm laborers or ordinarily used. So Chris Evans, the farm laborer, came to be a recognized as part of the communities between Fresno and Los Angeles.

Chris married Mary Jane “Molly” Byrd, a girl he met who ran an eating house along the road to the mills at a location known as Auckland, twenty-five miles northeast of Visalia. There, Chris and Molly Byrd married at her parents “Rattlesnake Ranch” on November 4, 1871

Chris, by this time a sturdy, middle-aged man, had established a character in the community. He was a solid man a man of sense and judgment, and his best friends were the Sontags, his future train robber partner.

Everybody knew how it was between his friend John Sontag and his daughter Eva. She was the oldest child a slender but strong slip of a girl with clear eyes and a resolute little mouth. The tall, quiet young man was waiting for her. The neighbors knew it and they waited, too, for a merry wedding of Chris Evans’ girl, for who in the town but liked the steady farmer! Eva married bachelor outlaw Sontag. Their union was brief because Sontag died later from his Stone Corral wounds.

Chris Evans-
Historical Crime Detective

One vice, and only one, could either Chris Evans or his son-in-law be charged with. They gambled, and gambled heavily. Still, they never went beyond their means, and with crisp bills settled their losses. Chris did not work much now. He had a timber claim and a mine up in the mountains, and these with the little orchard and what had to be done about the house and the barn took up all of his time. He and John and George were away at the mine when there was another robbery. It was at Cores and a railroad detective was shot through the throat There came a time when John and George wanted to visit their old home in the East. They had worked hard and were entitled to a holiday. George and John Sontag and Chris Evans went away from California.

George and John Sontag and Chris Evans eventually reappeared in California. The townspeople welcomed back the two young men and their older friend now a man of forty-five, a bit bent and bearded, but a sturdy man. There was some trouble about that settlement of the stable business at Modesto an unsatisfied note or something of that sort.

A man’s first duty is to his family, and Evans deeded over his timber claim and all else that he possessed. Mary, while John, like a true lover, made over all his little fortune to daughter Eva. So days went on. One morning a neighboring housewife pushed open the door of Evans’ cottage. John Sontag was within. At the opening of the door his hands went up and Eva and the rest laughed long at the joke. But the door opened once again that day and it wasn’t a neighbour. Chris was there then and no hands went up. Of the two officers who came one was left for dead and the other ran away, bleeding and scared. There had been another successful train robbery and out of the darkness of the night had shone the figure of steady, model Chris Evans, ribald and blasphemous, cruel and threatening.

And there came another night and Chris and John crept home to Mary and Eva, and again they were seen, and when the fight was done it changed into a victorious flight– a man lay writhing in the agonies of death in the stubble where Eva fed her chickens. And what did they do when father and son in law were following the sore wounded man to make his death a certainty? Why, they looked on and made no outcry. And when the Coroner and his jury considered above the murdered man, little Eva swore bravely against all the world and all possibility. And when she had told how two men had rushed into the house with drawn pistols upon father and lover she sat quite still looking at accusers and officers with her firm chin even firmer than usual and let the lawyers fire all the hard questions they had at her. And she never wavered a hair’s breath.

That is the kind of a girl John Sontag’s sweetheart was. Eva did everything she could to free her father to no avail. Mrs. Evans and her daughter Eva attracted attention in a play entitled “Evans and Sontag,” put on the stage for the dual purpose of creating sympathy for the bandits and securing money for Evans’ defense. She did theatre pieces all around the West to prove what a noble man her father was. On February 9, 1917, Eva was awakened in the middle of the night by a ringing phone. Her father the steady blonde- beared man who studied for the priesthood in Bells Corners was dead.

With files from

The San Francisco Examiner

This newspaper report says it was Chris’s wife, but it was really his daughter Eva. Molly was his wife’s name and Chris and his daughter Eva had a close relationship.

CLIPPED FROM
St. Joseph Saturday Herald
Saint Joseph, Michigan
30 Dec 1893, Sat  •  Page 4

Wikimedia Commons
File:Eva Evans(1893).jpg – Wikimedia Commons

Eva broke them out of jail and married bachelor outlaw Sontag. Their union was brief because Sontag died from his Stone Corral wounds

Chris lost one eye and injured his hand in a shootout.. but the hand amputation was done in the Visalia jail-

CLIPPED FROMSt. Joseph Saturday HeraldSaint Joseph, Michigan30 Dec 1893, Sat  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROMThe San Francisco ExaminerSan Francisco, California03 Dec 1914, Thu  •  Page 15

An Individual Opinion by Chris. Evans, Outlaw

CLIPPED FROM
The San Francisco Examiner
San Francisco, California
24 Jun 1894, Sun  •  Page 24

read-My MFA program at USC required a non-fiction book as well as a novel and a screenplay. I don’t remember who told me about Sontag and Evans but their story fascinated me. Basically, Chris Evans – a family man – and his buddy John Sontag became central California folk heroes by repeatedly robbing the hated Southern Pacific Railroad. The story everything – exciting robberies, a noble cause, escapes from jail, mountain communities aiding and abetting the outlaws and a shootout at the Stone Corral– CLICK HERE

Also read-GUNFIGHT AT THE STONE CORRAL: WILD WEST OUTLAW WAS FROM OTTAWA 2016- CLICK

The Story of Wild Bob Ferguson of Dalhousie Township

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

Going West — From Lanark County Names Names Names

Billy the Kidd’s Mistress — Roxy Theatre Time

The Tale of a Pirate named Bill Johnston

Did Anyone Find the Lost Barrel of Silver Coins That Lies at the Bottom of the Rideau Canal?

Murder on Maple Island

Stories from Ash Island

Mello-Creme Cereal – Carp– AND — Mello Creme Bread – 95 Echo Drive

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Mello-Creme Cereal – Carp– AND — Mello Creme Bread – 95 Echo Drive
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Aug 1926, Sat  •  Page 20

This Product is being made at the Carp Flour Mills at Carp– 20 miles from the Capital City, on the Pembroke Highway. In three months over 110 merchants were stocking the line in Ottawa alone. In the early part of James Kyd, a well known grocery broker of Ottawa, was secured by Mr. Hopkins to take over tbe selling and distribution of Mello-Creme, and by the spring of the same year the sales had spread over all Eastern Ontario and into Montreal, also the Eastern Townahipa of Quebec, besides Toronto, which was being given a trial. It was decided that a limited company should be formed to lake over the new cereal.

CLIPPED FROM
North Bay Nugget
North Bay, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1926, Tue  •  Page 10

CLIPPED FROM
North Bay Nugget
North Bay, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1926, Tue  •  Page 10
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1927, Sat  •  Page 25
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1927, Sat  •  Page 25
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 May 1953, Thu  •  Page 25

MELLO CREME BREAD — EWAN Bakery, Ottawa

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1927, Sat  •  Page 25

Adopted for Bread

 In conjunction with the sale of Mello-Creme for a cereal, has come its rapid adoption to the making of a whole wheat bread. Today thousands of loaves of Mello-Creme Bread are being made In Ottawa and many points as far as Windsor by the Kwan Bread Company. The popularity of the bread is demonstrated by the fact that there is never a loaf left over and the Ewan Bread Company (95 Echo Drive) is now making alterations to their building- to take care of the tremendously increased demand.-10 Dec 1927

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Oct 1929, We

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Sep 1925, Tue  •  Page 12
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Oct 1929, Wed  •  Page 18
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Oct 1929, Wed  •  Page 18

Later at 95 Echo Drive

Debby Curry — Bringing Home the Bread

Living with the Natives — Mrs Copithorne’s Bread

  1. Could This Be the Best Banana Bread Ever?
  2. Old fashioned Raisin Bread WITH ZEST
  3. Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery
  4. Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery
  5. Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery
  6. Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe
  7. Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery
  8. Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery
  9. Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?
  10. Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery
  11. Mellowing About Mello Rolls

The Grand Trunk Railway Station –Photos

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The Grand Trunk Railway Station –Photos
Adin Daigle
Yesterday at 8:13 AM  · 

A cool old Ottawa plate I recently acquired. I imagine it’s between 1912-1920 as The Grand Trunk station opened in 1912 and in 1920 became the Union station.
Lost Ottawa
December 5, 2018  · 

IN honour of the season, we’ve been revisiting all our “snow” pictures of Ottawa. Here’s one of Connaught Plaza circa 1920. You’ve got a person grabbing the streetcar in front of Union Station, the old Russell House Hotel, and the Old Post Office.
Most interesting is the delivery entrance to Chateau Laurier (where the truck is coming out).
The story goes that, when the land for the Chateau was carved out of Major’s Hill Park and given to the Grand Trunk Railway (read greedy capitalists), the citizens refused to let the hotel further ruin their favourite park by taking deliveries, leaving garbage bins etc., in the rear. Hence the road underneath the Chateau’s entrance.
(LAC PA-057587)
Lost Ottawa
October 9, 2016  · 

It will soon be that time in Ottawa again … time for the snow shoveling, that is.
Here is a Grand Trunk Railway snowplow in 1910, facing east at the Bank Street Viaduct.
Today, those gents would be standing in the middle of the Queensway. Nice hats!
(LAC PA-04484)
August 4, 2015  · 


OTTAWA 1917. Railway Station. Post card
Lost Ottawa
March 12, 2019  · 




Small but interesting picture of downtown Ottawa, circa 1900.
In front, a cab, as in cabriolet, meaning a carriage with a folding top pulled by a single horse, plus several gentleman who look like they are up to no good!
Behind them, J. R. Booth’s Canada Atlantic Station, which Union Station would replace. William Howe paint and wall-paper store and factory on the left, and the military stores building on the right. Can you make out the railway cars?
(City of Ottawa Archives CA001763)

The former Union Station building, initially known as Grand Trunk Central Station, was designed by Montreal-based architecture firm Ross & MacFarlane. The firm’s Beaux- Arts concept was praised as “strikingly beautiful” by city council and newspaper reporters of the day.  Hallmarks of the Beaux-Arts style are evident in the building’s theatrical, monumental and self-confident use of classical forms such as the columns, entablatures, pilasters, domes and arches.

Union Station was built to serve as Ottawa’s central railway station.  It was constructed on the site of the old Central Railway Depot, built in 1896 by the Canada Atlantic Railway established some eighteen years earlier by Canadian lumber baron John R. Booth.

Construction of the new station began in July 1909.  After multiple delays the station finally opened to the public in June 1912.

The Château Laurier Hotel, constructed during the same time frame and located across the street, opened on the same day. The Hotel and Station were connected by a tunnel.

The threat to the Union Station building began in the late 1940s when “The Greber Plan” recommended removal of the railways from central Ottawa in favour of a scenic driveway. Read more here.. CLICK

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Feb 1911, Tue  •  Page 12

When Trains Crash —Ashton Train Accident 1950

Train Wreck January 21, 1969– Almonte Gazette

The McKellar Train Derailment 1913

Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Memories from Carleton Place–Llew Lloyd and Peter Iveson

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

The trial of W. H. S. Simpson the Railway Mail Clerk

55 years ago–One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte

The Kick and Push Town of Folger

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Men That Road the Rails

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place

Memories of Days of Wood Piles Water Plugs and Bushwackers – Carleton Place Railroad

1898 — Accidents, Moose and Caterpillars

The Mysterious Princess Louise Falls

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The Mysterious Princess Louise Falls
Lost Ottawa
May 18, 2020  · 
Kevin Woodward‎ shares the Morning Puzzler concerning the Princess Louise Falls in Ottawa’s Fallingbrook neighbourhood (Orleans).
Writes Kevin:
“We recently moved into the Fallingbrook area and regularly walk through the trails to Princess Louise Falls.
I’m curious whether the concrete was built as a channel/retaining wall or if at some point it was a larger structure. The tops of the walls don’t look like just normal erosion, but more like a structure that was torn down at some point and then the concrete eroded.
Or am I putting way too much thought into this?”
When I was doing some research for the Ottawa Union Station I came across this interesting photo of the Princess Louise Falls on Lost Ottawa.The waterfall is named after Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, and wife of John Campbell, Canada’s fourth Governor General. Local legend has it that Princess Louise occasionally visited the area to sketch the falls, but as such sketches have never been found among those she left, so it is difficult to know if there is some truth behind this story.
In front of the falls are the ruins of a culvert marking the spot where St. Joseph Boulevard passed before it was slightly moved and straightened. It should be noted that the St. Joseph Boulevard is still very close to the waterfall (you can actually see it from the road) and the constant traffic takes away some of the charm of the place.” There are a total of 4 other waterfalls along old Hwy 17 along with this one.

The concrete chute is the remains of where old Montreal Road used to go, on its way to Montreal 50 years ago, when Highway 17 was still a railroad track. Old Highway to Montreal passed there before my day. Lots of bush parties. All farmland before Fallingbrook was built. The Rothwell farm was there and the house was located between the two ponds. It was a beautiful house that even had an indoor pool. Everything was abandoned soon after developers started building in the area. The house burnt in 1983 if I remember correctly. . Another interesting note was the indoor pool had a tile mosaic of a mermaid on the bottom. Read more CLICK HERE

In a published account in 1988, Ann Gonneau writes how “by 1862, a road, closely paralleling the current location of St. Joseph Boulevard, crossed through the area, eventually to link Bytown and Montreal. Trim Road was also in place, while there is no sign of either Innes or 10th Line Roads; the lands at the top of the escarpment modern-day Fallingbrook and Queenswood Heights lay empty and waiting.”

Mr. David Villeneuve is familiar with that “old, old” Montreal Road. The remains of that road and a former bridge that crossed Taylor Creek are still visible at the bottom of Princess Louise Falls, Fallingbrook’s best-kept secret. The fact that the falls are not visible from the road, coupled with the knowledge that their name remains a source of both controversy and mystery, were all I needed to know that Princess Louise Falls were a must-see.

The falls, as Mr. Villeneuve tells it, are part of Taylor Creek that ran from the north end of what is now Fallingbrook to the Ottawa River. The story, he writes, “is that Princess Louise, a daughter of Queen Victoria and wife of the Governor General the Marquis of Lome (around 1880), came here by buggy to sketch watercolours. Mrs. Marjorie Ward, who lived in the house just east of the falls until her death in 1989, claimed that there was a plaque near the falls to that effect.”

Like any good historian, Mr. Villeneuve sought more information on the princess and her sketches, visiting the National Archives and the National Gallery of Canada and even writing to the governor general’s staff of the day “to determine if they had any painting by Princess Louise.” While Mr. Villeneuve said he did indeed see paintings by Princess Louise, “none appeared to be of waterfalls that resembled ours. Therefore, there does not appear to be any hard evidence that this story is true.” Facts aside, the romantic in Mr. Villeneuve is quick to add, “But let us believe it is so.” Whether she did or she didn’t, Princess Louise would have loved sketching the falls, which you can reach by travelling along St. Joseph, halfway between Tenth Line Road and Trim Road.

Park on the south side of the road and follow a trail into the woods, where you will soon hear the sounds of the waterfall. Once you’ve splashed around the bottom, you can walk up a trail to the top of the escarpment for a fine view of the gorge. While you’re up there, continue along the trails, coming out to a clearing with a spectacular view of the Gatineau Hills across the way. There used to be signs showing the way to Princess Louise Falls, which lie north of the road by the same name, but they’ve been torn down by vandals over the years. And while Mr. Villeneuve insists that Fallingbrook isn’t hiding anything, one can see why keeping this natural beauty spot a secret would be appealing.

If you, too, love uncovering secrets but get lost looking for the falls, keep your eyes out for a man walking with a dog called Tiberius. He’ll happily take you there. And don’t forget to ask him “How Fallingbrook Got Its Mud,” which is another interesting tale Mr. Villeneuve will entertain you with at fallingbrook.com. With files from LINDA MONDOUX–The Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada29 Aug 2007, 

Princess Louise’s life in Canada was marred by troubles. The prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, was too drunk to meet the couple when they docked at Halifax after a rough Atlantic crossing. Then, just a few days after they arrived in Ottawa, Louise got word that her sister, Princess Alice, who lived in Germany, had died of diptheria; and she was unable to attend the funeral.

Ottawa society was uncertain about what to do with a princess in its midst, and Louise found it hard to get used to the rigours of life here. “So mesmerized were Ottawans by having a real live princess in their midst that, much in the manner of children admonished once too often to be on their best behaviour, they seemed unable to avoid behaving at their worst,” wrote Sandra Gwyn in The Private Capital.

Then in February, 1880, she was almost killed in a sleighing accident that lopped off part of an ear and left her with headaches for years afterward. “Whether or not the accident was to blame,” writes Jerrold Packard in Victoria’s Daughters, “immediately afterward Louise’s marriage dipped into a sharp spiral from which it never truly recovered.” When she tried to get away to Niagara Falls and Chicago with her brother, Prince Leopold, the American newspapers reported on their activities, breezily calling them “Vic’s Chicks.”

In the end, Princess Louise spent much of her husband’s term outside Canada. Louise’s younger brother, Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught, spent a year in Montreal in 1869-70, and returned for several extended stays before moving to Ottawa in 1911 to begin a five-year term as governor-general. 

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1939, Tue  •  Page 82

Princess Louise Falls Facebook page click here.

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Buttermilk Falls — Location Location Location

Alexander Clyde Caldwell Photos— Thanks to Chris Allen

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Alexander Clyde Caldwell Photos— Thanks to Chris Allen
These photos were taken out of an old photo book and came from Mr. Allen to document. After they will be donated to the Lanark & District Museum. I would say these are 1890-1910– because of the style of clothes. Thanks to Chris Allen…. If anyone has an idea about the names of these folks we would be much obliged. They would be part of this family below:

The Alexander Clyde Caldwell Family Part 1



CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
15 May 1902, Thu  •  Page 5
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
23 Jun 1915, Wed  •  Page 1

The Alexander Clyde Caldwell Family Part 1

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Hielans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

Dalhousie Lake in Photos –Caldwell Family Summer Vacations

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
04 Aug 1909, Wed  •  Page 1