Tag Archives: Ottawa

1906 INDUSTRIAL AND PICTURESQUE OTTAWA CANADA – PHOTOS— Simpson Book Collection

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1906 INDUSTRIAL AND PICTURESQUE OTTAWA CANADA – PHOTOS— Simpson Book Collection

From the Simpson Book Collection-Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

There is no date however based on some of the content it appears to have been published sometime between 1905 – 1910.
It measures approximately 6 1/2″ x 11″ with 64 pages
It was published by THE CITY OF OTTAWA PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT
Information and Photographs include:

  • Panoramic view of Parliament Hill and Rideau Locks
  • Post Office 
  • Scenes of Government Driveway
  • Ottawa Palatial Houses
  • Monuments
  • His Excellency, Earl Grey
  • Ottawa University
  • Churches
  • Byrson, Graham
  • Gilmour & Hughson Mill
  • International Portland Cement Co
  • Packing Houses of the George Matthews Co. Ltd
  • Martin-Orme Piano Co
  • Britannia Was Canoe Crew, Champion of Canada
  • Hotel and Victoria 
  • and much more

ADVERTISEMENTS include:

  • The Bank of Ottawa
  • Ottawa Business College
  • The Willis Business College 
  • Canadian Pacific Railway
  • Ottawa Machinery
  • Ottawa Ladies College
  • Bank of Montreal
  • Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Company
  • John M. Garland , Son & Co
  • The Russell House Hotel
  • Ottawa Electric Railway
  • Pittaway’s Photo Studio
  • Hull Electric Railway
  • The Ottawa Stair Works 
  • and many more
E.B. Eddy’s– still running today-Jim Sharp

Simpson Book Collection

Bustling About Burritt’s Rapids– Public School Photos

Remember Lover’s Lane? Lover’s Walk? Les Chats Sauvage? Simpson Books

You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books

The Oldest Building on Ottawa and Opeongo Line

Down on Main Street– 1911-Photos- For the Discriminating and the Particular — Simpson Books

The General Hospital 1867-1929 Photos — Simpson Books

Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

Renfrew Fair 1953-1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

Did You Know? Union School #9 and Goulburn #16

When One Boat Filled the Rideau Lock–Rideau King

Women’s Institute Burritts Rapids 1902-1988

Friday Nights with Brian Murphy

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Friday Nights with Brian Murphy
Photo by Jim Roy

Every second or third Friday night for a number of years CHEZ-FM DJ Brian Murphy could be found in my store Flash Cadilac talking to me for hours. I will never understand how we became friends, as we were different as night and day. But there he was sitting on a stool next to my cash register, and we always had hours to chat about stuff. Both of us had a love of music, but no one knew more about music than Murph. I loved to tease him about his love affair with Dire Straits, and he would in turn constantly mention my extremely bad taste in music. But sometimes he would admit that some pop music wasn’t all that bad. I wonder what he would have thought of BTS. Murph, I’m going to ask you that when I hopefully got up into rock and roll heaven, unless Hell is Gothic, and well, you know, I might enjoy that.

Brian was never there to shop, and seldom took interest in my customers (even the sexy ones) unless they mentioned music. I always had a Diet Coke or two for him, as he got thirsty discussing life, and sometimes he overwhelmed me with his knowledge. You could never have a 15 minute conversation with the music genius–his musical thoughts came in volumes. He would talk endlessly about his record collection in his basement which was floor to ceiling, as well as covering the stairways and hallways. Brian, you would be happy to know (in later life) I married one of “your tribe” who had 7000 records to get rid of in Berkeley, California to move here to Canada. I know you would have told him what was more important in life LOL.

After Brian was let go amid the big CHEZ-FM shuffle I wondered what he was up to when I no longer saw him anymore. When I read his obituary I was devastated and angry at myself for not reaching out to him and hoped to God his frog collection would be taken care of. He will always be the Sultan of Swing to me and so much more.

There isn’t a day that goes by that I wonder what Brian would have to say about a particular genre of music I’m playing. When he died CHEZ-FM posted the following on their website:

“Heaven has just welcomed its new music director.”

If tears could build a stairway, 

And memories a lane.

I would walk right up to Heaven

And bring you back again.

The Brian Murphy Fund
*Application and donation links found below*
A Sub Fund of the Education Foundation of Ottawa and An Endowment Fund within the Community Foundation of Ottawa
This award is in memory of Brian Murphy, host of CHEZ 106 “The Source” “Blues 106,” “Jazz 106” and other programs. He was known as one of Ottawa’s most original people. Brian will be remembered for his encyclopedic knowledge of musi

Please leave comments so I can them all here for permanent doucmentation… thanks

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 May 1991, Sat  •  Page 51

This is Artcetera, speaking from the home of Brian Murphy, host of CHEZ’S The Source, Blues 106 and Jazz 106 programs on Sunday nights. The shows reflect Murphy’s eclectic tastes in music, a subject for which he is wildly enthusiastic. He’s also a champion talker. Let’s listen in.) Now I’m going to get myself in real serious trouble with what one friend calls the jazz ayatol-lahs, and another friend calls the jazz weasels. Because really what jazz is, even though it has become in a sense an art form ta-dah ta-dah, is pop music. MOZART WROTE POP MUSIC, or adapted pop music. And nothing makes me angrier than the jazz ayatollahs or the jazz weasels, or the BLUES ayatollas or the BLUES weasels, people who are so structured in their musical taste.

. . . I’ve always gotten from certain people in the Ottawa jazz scene the ayatollahs, the weasels the feeling that they really can’t take me seriously when it comes to jazz. Why? Because I like rock and roll. (It’s me again. We’re talking to Murphy because May 24 is his 50th birthday, and CHEZ is dedicating the day to his music, and also holding a birthday party for him at the Penguin. The radio station is broadcasting from his house that day, and they’ve asked him to pick 125 to 150 rock songs, and they will make up the playlist for the station that day.) I just took a page for every letter and as songs came into my mind I started going through them … So you got a list that starts A’s: Allman Brothers, Ramblin Man and Animals, House of the Rising Sun. B’s: The Band, The Weight, The Beach Boys, Good Vibrations, here’s a tough one, Beatles, I’ve got two, Am The Walrus and In My Life. And I’ve got Bonzo Dog in here, which will probably come out, and this particular song means a lot to me: Urban Spaceman . . . (Music magazines spill on the floors of Brian Murphy’s house.

There’s barely room on the kitchen table for the breakfast he eats at 4 p.m. he doesn’t go to sleep until 8 or 9 a.m. He collects things in the shape of frogs, and frogs spill along the shelves of his living room in ceramic and plastic and wood. A frog quilt spills off his bed. CDs spill out on top of the thou sands of albums kept in the boxes in his basement. Books spill on his desk. Words spill out of Brian Murphy.) First of all, above all, I’m an entertainer. I’ve got to make people feel good. That doesn’t mean that occasionally I can’t stop and make them think about something or make them angry about something that makes me angry. But at the same time as I’m entertaining, I’m kind of teaching. I’m taking all of this lore, all of this knowledge, all of this listening, and sifting them through this particular body and mind, and what comes out is some kind of synthesis of all this stuff. (May 24 is also the 50th birthday of Bob Dylan.

Above Murphy’s basement sanctuary, where he goes to turn on a record and read some science fiction and think about the connections that run through music, above that sanctuary is a sign: ‘The Most Famous Album Never Released: Bob Dylan & The Band The Basement Tapes.’ Basement. Tapes. Connections.) Dylan was the wordsmith. Dylan was the man, the person who opened the words up for everybody. In a sense, Bob Dylan made poetry acceptable to the masses. What a horrible way to have to put it. (Murphy rocks from leg to leg, from subject to subject. He loves music of all kinds, he hates people who put it into pigeonholes, he wants people to understand . . . There are only kinds of music another line I’m going to steal and it’s been attributed to Kurt Weill and it’s also been attributed to Igor Stavinsky there are two kinds of music, good music and bad music.

Take your pick. . to understand something called Sturgeon’s Law, a law that says that 90 per cent of everything is trash. Mur phy’s Corollary puts Brian Murphy that at 95 per cent. So you shouldn’t be surprised … – -J Pop music is banal and all of those things, but! lot of it more than you realize is great music. It can move you. “I’d be surprised if a lot of pop music is bad- ‘ A lot of everything is bad. But when it’s good; -” we just ask Brian Murphy.) . Part of what I try to do is I go through life trying to find these perfect records. To me the ultimate compliment about a piece of music, no matter what its genre, is it makes you feel good to be alive.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada18 May 1991, Sat  •  Page 51

Missing Berkeley Series – Larry Thrasher

Clippings of –The Naughty Boys –The Eastern Passage -60s Music

The Canadian Beatles aka The Beavers- Mike Duffy was their Road Manager –Bands of the 60s

Saturday Date with “Thee Deuce” in Almonte

Dance Hall Days with The Coachmen
The Coachmen Return!!! Born to be Wild Circa 1985

The Day I Tried to Long Tall Sally Paul McCartney

Kindle Fire Minutes of “Dancin the Feelin“ with James Brown

Music in the 60s- Memories of Herman’s Hermits

Back to The Future — Twisting Your Dignity Away

One of the First People to Die of Diphtheria – Bella McFarlane

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One of the First People to Die of Diphtheria – Bella McFarlane
Photo – Lost Ottawa

Name:
Isabella McFarlane
Cemetery:
Merivale Pinecrest Public
Burial Place:
Carleton (incl. Ottawa), Ontario, Canada
Notes:
James McFarlane Died,May,10,1850 Aged,46,y’rs. Isabella McFarlane Died,Oct.11,1865 Aged,20,y’rs. Jennie McFarlane Died.Oct.28,1936 Aged,94,Y’rs.

What was it like to die of Diphtheria in those days? One of every ten children infected died from this disease sometimes called “Boulogne sore throat”. Symptoms ranged from severe sore throat to suffocation due to a ‘false membrane’ covering the larynx. Until treatment became widely available in the 1920s, the public viewed this disease as a death sentence.

Diphtheria vaccination first appeared in the 1890s, but only became widely used in the 1920s. During this interval medical scientists labored to create a safe and effective vaccine. Antitoxin introduced in 1890 provided immunity for only two weeks. Six years later, the toxin-antitoxin mixture came into general use, providing life-long immunity. Doctors used horses to generate this antitoxin serum. Thirty years after diphtheria antitoxin first became available, Béla Schick introduced the Schick test, a cutaneous test showing if a person needed immunization. This allowed for the use of toxin-antitoxin to become widespread.

The toxin-antitoxin mixture, for all its promise, posed significant risks because it involved injecting live toxin. In 1924, Gaston Ramon developed the toxoid, a neutralized form of the toxin that would still impart permanent immunity. The toxoid-antitoxin mixtures eventually developed into the TDAP vaccine that is still in use today.

One way to help patients was removing pseudomembranes from throat by sucking through a tube or pipe. This procedure could lead to occupationally acquired infection, as seen in cases from the 1900th century presented here.

In 1860s, a child was brought to a local infirmary where Professor Syme had first performed tracheostomy. However, the ‘poisonous stuff had accumulated so much’, the child died. In 1890, it was discovered that serum made from the blood of immunized animals contained an “antitoxin” which, when injected, cured patients suffering from diphtheria.


CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Jan 1863, Sat  •  Page 1
This advertisement ran every few days in the local papers-
CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Oct 1866, Fri  •  Page 4  Hôpital de la Miséricorde ( check out those same sisters in the ad below)

Today, the building is abandoned by the living – but certainly not the dead! Considered a paranormal hotspot by ghost-hunting experts, there are many stories of disembodied children’s voices crying, sounds of clanging and abuse, not to mention the spirits of angry nuns and a fearful young mother. Click here

Related reading

What was Puking Fever? Child Bed Fever?

The Duff Dairy Diphtheria Scare

The Diphtheria Scare Fake News?

Diphtheria in Carleton Place

Life in The House of Industry

Dark Moments in Ottawa History- Porter Island

Remember Lover’s Lane? Lover’s Walk? Les Chats Sauvage? Simpson Books

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Remember Lover’s Lane? Lover’s Walk? Les Chats  Sauvage? Simpson Books




Blair Stannard
April 12, 2020  · Ottawa – 1900 – Lovers Walk

Lover’s Walk was a pathway around Parliament Hill mid-way between the top and bottom. I believe this is the eastern section, overlooking (to the left) what is now the Bytown Museum and the canal. If you kept going you would come out on Wellington. To the right are stairs and a path that would take you to the top of the hill, behind the East Block.

(Ottawa Illustrated, 1900)

Everyone talked about a Lover’s Lane when I was in High School, yet I never saw one. People giggled and whispered about parking lots or secluded rural areas to places with extraordinary views of a cityscape or other features. But, I only read about them in books. Hmm, maybe an old boyfriend did pull his MG Midget over on back Brome Lake Road, but that road was well travelled and all I could think about was a huge cliff of sand falling over on the car and killing us. It kind of took the romance away.

But this week I learned all about Lover’s Walk in Ottawa. I knew things do get busy in Major Hills Park, but never knew much about this except the headlines of someone tragically getting hurt there.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1954, Wed  •  Page 46

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Jan 1995, Tue  •  Page 41

In 1902 Ottawa had made every provision for her young people. There was a circular path between the parliament building grounds and the canal which was called The Lovers’ Walk. It was a secluded beautiful place. In summer it was charming and the sunsets seen from there are beautiful, and only those after whom the walk named are there to see nothing else but the golden sunsets, the flowing river and the pine trees, they are to be encouraged in their evening walks.

Fortunately that delightful path Is not for the young people only. Soon it will be taken advantage of by lovers of nature. whether young or old. Those who have been confined in offices all day and who find a pleasure in the pathless wood, A rapture on the lonely shore. Society, where none intrude by the deep sea and music in us roar will soon be free to enjoy all the beauty of nature that can be seen from this secluded pathway.

In nature, distance does not always lend enchantment to the view. The mountains In the distance wouid be better enjoyed if one could explore them, and the falls, one could listen to the music of its flowing waters, but all cannot find either time or money to do so. A quiet walk at eventide along this circular pathway, enjoying th beautiful sun sets, is a delight within the reach of all Ottawans.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Feb 1937, Sat  •  Page 32

Pathway Crumbling-1949 – The pathway hammered, out the caulked boots of the voyageurs and lumberjacks of Bytown and before them by the moccasion feet of the Upper Ottawa tribes is being allowed bit by bit to slip and slither down the cliffside into the river. Every now and then, from the sagging concrete underpinning, large chunks go staggering downhill to hit the water with a sullen, complaining splash. With every piece that hits rhe water goes a bit of Canada’s past.

Lovers Walk is to remain boarded and barricaded to Parlamentarians and to more simple folk alike. The old walk, the Works Department believed, was ”unsafe not in the more romantic sense of a few years’ ago; but unsafe in terms of concrete and stone and a sagging cliffside. In a day of more romantic and possibly more athletic Ministers of the Crown, Sir John A. MacDonald’s Works Minister William Macdougall had scrambled down the cliffside to inspect a ventilator butlet from, the old Parliament Buildings.

That dour Scot had felt the tug of history at his heart when he found his feet on the pathway of river-drivers a shortcut from their Chaudiere Falls landing place to their homes in Lower Town. William Macdougall had ordered the pathway buttressed by stone and concrete, and made safe by iron railings. At a time when Parliament Hill was a tangle of wild wood and shrubbery, it would serve as a pleasant promenade for senators. It wasn’t long before the elderly members of the Senate found competition heavy from local gallants and their ladies for use of the walk. Statesmanship lost out, and romance won when Lovers’ Walk reached the height of its courting popularity during World War I. Many an Ottawa couple grandparents now had plighted their troth on the ree-shadowed riverside pathway. Now the Ottawa river is waiting to receive, Lovers’ Walk.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 May 2000, Mon  •  Page 46

Today in Ottawa Lovers Walk Stirs Nostalgia of An Ottawa of Bygone Days

The historic Lovers Walk doned only after the building a quarter-mile sidehill semicircle went up in flames running about 60 feet below the cliff top of Parliament Hill. The block was still in adorned with honeysuckle, lilac and other flowering shrub. Lovers Walk was once a choice spot to loaf on a bench out of the noonday sun or for a stroll on a hot July evening. Its cinder path knew the tread of Sir John A. Macdonald, of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Sir Robert Borden, Mackenzie King and many other greats of bygone days.

An M.P. who some day may follow in the steps of these former chiefs of state recalls that the first time he kissed a girl was on a walk down this Parliament Hill path on a boyhood visit to the capital. Today the erstwhile lovely pathway is a desolate ruin of crumbling masonry, rusted and broken iron guard-rails and rotten wnoden shoring, for more than two decades closed to the public. At certain points, the former path is completely grown over with shrubs and high weeds. Gone are the cinders that overlaid. In their place is a unfortunate who fell into one narrow and hazardous trail, and was drowned, slippery from summer rains. Even this trail at spots are wiped out where the Mackenzie King earth has fallen below, or done by– by erosion.

Lover’s Walk has become a ghost trail and along its unlovely wilderness is rubbish empty wine bottles, cans, fragments of a womans shoe, and newspapers. A few burnt matches don again and short home-made cigarette butts.Today, most of the entrances were strewn beyond the papers, jarred with heavy pointed fencing sollow the dangerous pathway. Most of them half-rotted by exposure.

Lovers Walk is now nothing but a memory of the Ottawa of the old Centre Block of the Parliment Buildings, which was destroyed by fire in 1916. In 1915 the authorities realized that a determined German agent could cut the iron bars at the entrance of one of these tunnels either with cold chisel or hack. In the twenties it was becoming a public problem for two reasons: It was difficult and costly to keep up. Built in a belt around a hill which sloped from 45 to was subject to landslips and rock falls and it came more and more frequented by undesirables.

The latter factor was most evident in the dark days of the thirties. A jungle of driftwood, old tar-paper and tin-patched shacks came into being on the river bank, some 150 feet below its western entrance, and unshaven drifters lurked around and near the walk. At the eastern end, in the underbrush close to the Chateau Laurier locks, was the haunt of a rubby-dub gang, which would burst into wild shouts and screams after a bout of denatured alcohol and wine. Two fatalities have been reported on or near “Lovers Walk. One man fell off the walk. It is said that former Prime Minister King was inclined to keep it open.

Lost Ottawa
June 2, 2016  · 

Lover’s Walk around Parliament Hill (about half way up the cliff from the River). Sketched by Annie Duff from Beckwith Township, who studied art at Ottawa’s Coligny College beginning in 1890.
Who is Annie Duff? Click here.. The Female Artist from Carleton Place That Never Went Viral and –Orena Villa of Beckwith — Boy do I feel Stupid– Duff Williamson and McNeely Genealogy

.

Read “Mrs. King”, by Charlotte Gray. The book references Lovers Walk. Must read.

Read about Lover’s Walk here- CLICK

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1960, Wed  •  Page 26

CLIPPED FROM
The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
29 Apr 1989, Sat  •  Page 20

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1963, Fri  •  Page 4
John BondMy Dad used to say that some of those stairs were pretty precarious.

Brian NortonAnd you got to see feral cats, at least in the 1970s.

Blair StannardThe final feline residents were all found homes, when the shelter was dismantled. They still have a Facebook page.

Bob O’Connellyes – it was quite an event going there after dinner in the late 1990s and early 2000s to feed the cats – but also pigeons, groundhogs – an older gentleman had the pigeons eating out of his hands – he showed the kids how to do it – the odd raccoon would show up to be fed – there was always the regular people who seemed to be there every night – the tourists from other countries were entertained by all of this – my youngest son and I were part of the regular visitors – we went several times a week

I always had a bag of shelled peanuts in my car – the pigeons, groundhogs and raccoons loved them – I learned that from Gerry Power, a older man who was there nightly from early evening to dusk and who taught the kids what to do to attract the birds and animals

Al GirouardOnce a month, in late 90’s, my wife & I would bring a bag of cat food to their care taker behind center block.

Blair Stannard
December 17, 2019  · 

Ottawa – 1930s – the Noon Day Gun

Ottawa’s Noon Day Gun cleared for action on Nepean Point, sometime in the early 1930s. Interesting gazebo to the left, or “summer home,” as they liked to call them then. Across the way you can see Lover’s Walk snaking around Parliament Hill. Also seems there’s a few statues missing from the Hill.

Ottawa had its own feral cat colony on Parliament Hill. Although the members of this colony have been neutered, have shelter, and are fed, their life was one step above mere subsistence. They must protect their territory by fighting other strays, but remain vulnerable to disease and harsh weather conditions, are hunted by dogs, and are threatened by other animals and humans alike.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Jul 2001, Tue  •  Page 43

By Robert Sibley OTTAWA Parliament Hill’s cat sanctuary, an institution for decades, is gone, “disbanded” at the request of the volunteers who have been managing it, according to the federal Public Works department In its heyday, the sanctuary provided a home for more than two dozen felines. But spaying and neutering over the years has reduced the population to such an extent that as recently as a couple of weeks ago only four cats remained.

The decision was made to shut down the sanctuary and the few remaining and aging animals were adopted by volunteers. “There were kittens born here, the last ones probably 10 to 15 years ago,” Brian Caines, a former public servant who got involved in caring for the cats in the 1990s, said recently. “So now, we’re down to four.” Public Works announced the closure late last week. “The volunteers made the decision to close the sanctuary because of the age of the cats, their deteriorating health, and the prevent exposing them to predators and harsh outdoor conditions during the winter months.”

Parliament Hill cats were once prized as mousers, but by the mid-1950s the use of chemicals to control rodent infestations did the cats out of a job. However, employed or the cats would get angry if I missed a day not, they were about to abandon their parliamentary sinecure. But that created problems too many cats.

In the 1970s, volunteers began looking after the near-feral animals, providing food and shelter and, of course, plenty of TLC. A spay-and-neuter program was also introduced. Some of the volunteers became public figures, of sorts. The original guardian was Irene Desormeaux. When she died in 1987, Rene Chartrand stepped up and eventually became known as the Catman of Parliament Hill. Chartrand, a pensioner, could be seen summer and winter tending to the animals in the shelter behind the Centre Block building. “I’m not allowed to get sick. The cats would get angry if I missed a day,” the then-79-year-old Chartrand said an interview in 2000.

He retired from his task in 2008. Others came forward, too, both individuals and companies. One man, Maurice Golka, built two-storey, insulated shelters for the cats. Cat food manufacturers such as Ral-ston-Purina Canada donated bags of food. The Alta Vista animal hospital provided medical treatment Perhaps not surprisingly, the sanctuary became a favourite Ottawa tourist site. Busloads of Japanese tourists crowded around the site during the summer. It was posted on the federal government’s website. Even the National Capital Commission gave it a mention in its Discover-the-Hill brochure.

CLIPPED FROMNational PostToronto, Ontario, Canada05 Jan 2013, Sat  •  Page 8

Just a Field of Stones Now? “The Old Perth Burying Ground” Now on Ontario Abandoned Places?

Arthur Street The Burgess House and Dangerous Places- Ray Paquette

There are Places I Remember—-Photo Essay

What Could Have Been Today– The Gloucester Mineral Springs……..

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What Could Have Been Today– The Gloucester Mineral Springs……..

The wellness craze has deep roots. Beginning in the middle of the 19th century, the leisure class grew infatuated with a particular type of healthy getaway: the water cure.  If you lived in Carleton Place or Almonte, chances are your doctor would have advised you to go visit the Dominion Springs for your aches and pains in the late 1800’s.  Actually, there were two mineral springs in the area, and the Canadian Almanac made note of both of them in 1898. One was called the Dominion Springs and was located on the Dominion Springs Road just outside of Pakenham. It was also referred to as the Dominion Springs Sanatorium. The cost was ten dollars for ten baths.(There were lots of other things similar- read-My Name is Bernice — A Letter to a Daughter)

Diamond Park Mineral Water was world famous in its day, and it was located near Arnprior.  Among the components in the water were salt and sulphur. and the water was said to have curative powers dealing with rheumatic problems, hangover headaches and an aid in flushing the kidneys. Diamond Park Springs was located on the edge of Pakenham Township in the late 1800s, but was flooded by Ontario Hydro when the dam was put in place at the head pond. At one point there was a 12-room hotel on site and proved to be a popular spa in its day. The plant was later sold to Sanitaris Ltd. who continued bottling water from their plant at the corner of John and William streets behind the current LCBO in Arnprior. Read- Where Were the Miracle Salt Springs in Pakenham? I Love a Challenge! or Interesting People –R. E. Irvine — The Story of a Bottle

Mineral Springs evolved out of a newfound enthusiasm for bathing— and it was strictly defined. Hydropathy was  encompassed everything from a spell in the tub to highly regimented procedures supervised by water doctors with stopwatches. 

Spa at Carlsbad Springs in what used to be Gloucester- Photo- Lost Ottawa-Jaan KolkIt is long gone. The Gloucester Historical Society identifies this as an 1876 photo of the Dominion House at Carlsbad Springs (then known as Eastman’s Springs.) It was destroyed by fire and replaced.

Then there was Eastman Springs-  About 11 miles from Ottawa on the Russell Road lived Alexander Hall, one of the first settlers in the vicinity of Eastman’s Springs. Mr. Hall went to that district with his parents in the year 1854. Mr. Hall was then only six years of age. William Hall, the father, had come from the North of Ireland some time in the late 1830s, had worked first up the Gatineau, chiefly in Cantley, and later had worked in the McKay flour mills in New Edinburgh.

It was from New Edinburgh that the Hall family went out to the Eastman’s Springs district. Mrs. Hall had been Margaret Smith a Cantley girl. If it had not been for the roads which the lumbermen had built for their own purposes, they could not have reached their new home. As it was, they had to travel part of the way on the Ice of “The Brook”. (Bear Brook)

The lumbermen’s roads largely followed the ridge of high ground that rose south of the brook. As the early settlers could not travel on the swampy land through where Russell Road now runs they had to use the lumbermen deserted roads. Mr. Hall had experience of the mineral springs when they were in a state of nature and long before Dan Eastman had put them on the map. There was one main spring which had a habit of periodically bubbling, as though some internal force was pushing the water.

On such occasions, say half an hour apart, the water would bubble a full foot above the ground level. Whenever this spring bubbled, there was an emanation of gas of some sort, which could be ignited by anyone who had a match handy. Mr. Hall, when a small boy, often ignited these emanations. The gas would burn brightly as long as the bubbling continued. The hole from which the water and gas bubbled was about two feet in diameter.

An interesting fact about the early days of the springs was that when Mr. Hall saw them first the ground around the main spring was padded down by the feet of deer and other wild animals which came there to drink. Deer trails led to the spring from various directions. Mr. Hall said that in the 1850s the country around Eastman’s Springs was thick with deer. Many of the deer fell victim to the packs of wolves which used to roam the country.

Eastman’s Springs near Canada’s Ottawa was first known as Boyd’s Mills, after the proprietor of the local mill on the Bear Brook, first to process white pine lumber, later a grain mill when the land was cleared in the early 19th century and wheat farming began, later as Eastman’s Springs, for Danny Eastman, who built the first inn to lodge travelers.

 In 1870, businessmen including future Ottawa mayor C.W. Bangs formed and was part owner of the Dominion Springs Company to build a spa-hotel, offering as a recreational and medical benefit the highly mineralized water found in most local areas. “Hydropathy” Could Cure Everything from Burping to Cancer.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Jul 1913, Sat  •  Page 4

Family farms and the big hotels helped the communities grow in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but Carlsbad Springs’ boom as a resort ended in the Great Depression of the 1930s, and by World War II, the resort and spa business dwindled. Most of the surrounding land was small dairy or chicken farms (up to 200 acres).

Carlsbad Springs Sanatorium, Ontario, Canada History: Mineral Spa-Hotel Era: 1870-1930 This community outside of Canada’s capital city of Ottawa was first known as Eastman’s Springs. The community’s intitial name came from Danny Eastman, who built the first inn to lodge travelers from Ottawa who came by stagecoach or horse-and-buggy. In 1870, a group of businessmen which included future Ottawa mayor C.W. Bangs formed the Dominion Springs Company to build a spa-hotel. The spa-hotel allowed visitors to drink the mineral waters and bathe in the sulphur waters. Some of the water was also shipped and sold throughout North America. In 1882, the construction of a railway through the area brought travelers from a wider range of Ontario and Quebec towns. In addition to the mineral springs and spa activities, hotel operators eventually provided a range of other leisure activities including guest lecturers, walking paths, horseback riding facilities, archery, billiards, and lawn games . The town was renamed Carlsbad Springs in 1906 after the English name of the famous spa in the Czech Republic , Karlovy Vary

Most of the mineral springs in the area fell into a state of prolonged decline in the 20th century. The trains stopped running; the visitors stopped arriving; the grand hotels closed, collapsed, or burned. perceived medical value of hydropathy dropped after the discovery of penicillin and the polio vaccine. But there were other factors at work, too. Bathing, like other old-time leisure pursuits, simply wasn’t cool anymore.

Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario
June 15  · 

Originally Bear Brook, renamed Eastman’s Springs prior to the arrival of the Canada Atlantic. In 1906, it was renamed Carlsbad Springs. It was located west of Vars on the Alexandria Sub….(Photo: The Canada Atlantic Railway Research Site)

Peter J. James…The replacement hotel was finally knocked down, after many years of neglect, about 15 years ago or so. I don’t know about in 1876, but in modern times the mosquitoes make being outside prohibitive. The replacement hotel was finally knocked down, after many years of neglect, about 15 years ago or so. I don’t know about in 1876, but in modern times the mosquitoes make being outside prohibitive.

Jaan KolkIt is long gone. The Gloucester Historical Society identifies the above an 1876 photo of the Dominion House at Carlsbad Springs (then known as Eastman’s Springs.) It was destroyed by fire and replaced.

At the time of the photo, it was known as Eastman’s Springs. It was also known as Cathartic. From the 1879 Belden Atlas:

Lost Ottawa Comments

Also read-Carlsbad Springs: The Last Days of the Boyd Hotel Cookhouse

Read- Where Were the Miracle Salt Springs in Pakenham? I Love a Challenge! or

Interesting People –R. E. Irvine — The Story of a Bottle

Whale Sightings in Pakenham and Smiths Falls – Holy SeaWorld!

My Name is Bernice — A Letter to a Daughter


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Aug 1913, Mon  •  Page 1

Bears at Lansdowne Park- From a Bear Feeding Ground to Terrible Ted

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Bears at Lansdowne Park- From a Bear Feeding Ground to Terrible Ted

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Feb 1939, Sat  •  Page 30

In 1868-The Ottawa Agricultural Society acquires 19 acres of land east of Bank Street and adjacent the Rideau Canal for the purpose of a fairground.The fields used for the Exhibition are later turned into a permanent park. Many citizens question the location of the park so far out in the country. Ottawa at the time does not extend much beyond Bank Street and Maria Street (later Laurier Ave. West). Southwards, Bank Street is little more than a trail with fields on either side, but there is a toll gate where McLeod Street now intersects Bank Street. A three-plank boardwalk runs down one side, but comes to an end near McLeod Street. It seems that the bears went away after that and only were mentioned when the famous beloved wrestling bear Terrible Ted came to the Civic Centre.

Ron McConnellThe land was granted to the Society by my ancestors, the Williams family, who owned most of the property on both sides of the canal at the time. The condition was that an “Agricultural Fair” be held there at least once a year. When the City of Ottawa decided to move the Exhibition out to Rideau Carleton and discontinue the annual fair, they weren’t aware of the condition. Needless to say, there was a lot of backroom dealing happening for a number of months to get out of the agreement.-

Also read-The Lumsden Family at the Ottawa Exhibition 1899

Mystery Solved — Who Was Gee Gee Frederick?

Read more here Anyone Remember Terrible Ted the Wrestling Bear? Need Your Help!

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1968, Fri  •  Page 30

CLIPPED FROM
Edmonton Journal
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
15 May 1968, Wed  •  Page 75
Edmonton Journal
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
15 May 1968, Wed  •  Page 75

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jun 1968, Thu  •  Page 21
After defeating Sam Bass in Nashville in January 1974, Ted retired from professional wrestling

1971 September

Postcard from Larry Clark

Anyone Remember Terrible Ted the Wrestling Bear? Need Your Help!

The Lumsden Family at the Ottawa Exhibition 1899

Mystery Solved — Who Was Gee Gee Frederick?

Another Story About the Bears of Actinolite

Da Bears…… Remembering the Bears of Actinolite

Entertainment in Rural Towns–Dancing Bears and Monkeys?

The Mill of Kintail–Running With Scissors From Bears – Again

Remembering Nash the Slash at The Black Swan Pub

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Remembering Nash the Slash at The Black Swan Pub

Black Swan Pub- Rideau Street- Ottawa

November 18, 2017

Remembering Nash the Slash

There were lots of musicians that signed the Wall of Shame in my store Flash Cadilac, and I think I have a story about each one of them. But the person I remember most and miss was the eccentric but incredibly talented musician Nash the Slash.

In 1978 my friends Bernie and Marion brought me to the now late legendary Black Swan on Rideau Street in Ottawa. I had no idea what I was about to see, but I was promised a real treat. I remember I had on a huge Victorian ruffle style coat with a Snow White collar made out of white PVC. Bernie remarked that I had chosen the right outfit for the concert and I had no clue what he meant until the curtain went up. The whole stage was decorated in white shiny PVC vinyl like my coat and I was on the edge of my seat in anticipation.

Lost Ottawa
November 17, 2017  · 

All of a sudden a man looking much like The Invisible Man in a white tuxedo and top hat graced the stage. As soon as the first notes of his electric mandolin pierced the air I was hooked and in love with his originality. His name was Nash the Slash and he began as a solo artist in 1975 and then founded the band FM. He plays an electric mandolin and violin but also plays keyboards and the glockenspiel. His music moved me so much I had goosebumps up and down my arms for the whole show.

I wrote him a letter after the concert and asked him if he would visit my store the next time he was in town to sign autographs. Sure enough he had someone contact me that he would indeed grace my store and would like to cut up a side of beef with a chainsaw in my store window. Linda being Linda thought this would be the performance art gig of the century.

Let’s remember James Jeffrey “Jeff” Plewman (March 26, 1948 – May 10, 2014), better known by his stage name Nash the Slash.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Oct 1978, Fri  •  Page 3

Jaan Kolk

11m  · Linda, the last newspaper listing I see for the Black Swan (275 Rideau) is May 25, 1979. It became Arnold’s in July of that year, and the last lsting I see for Arnold’s is July 1984. The 1991 layer at GeoOttawa shows a very large excavation at that location.
From the Journal, July 11, 1980:

The Wall of Shame — Flash Cadilac Rideau Street Ottawa

1995 Flash Cadilac

Behind the cash register at Flash Cadilac lay the notorious Wall of Shame. There taped to the wall were 100’s of words of wisdom, and autographed photos from the “famous, and not so famous”. What no one knows is the creation of the wall began as a joke.It was a dark Montreal smoke-filled bar on Mountain Street. Idolizing Leonard Cohen, I quoted his poetry to anyone that would listen. It was the 60’s, minds were changing, and I still considered myself part of someone’s, okay, anyone’s, Beat Generation.

Years later, on my way to a Heavy Metal Convention in Los Angeles,to do a remote for CKCU and 54 Rock my friend Andrew Searle and I spotted a few celebrities on board. Cohen himself was on our flight to Los Angeles with his much younger girlfriend Rebecca De Mornay. When the plane landed, we pushed our way to the front to get a glimpse of him. I remember taking his hand while we both stood by the baggage turnstile, and gushed like a smitten teenager. Completely ignoring Christopher Plummer on the other side, I told him about my never ending love for him. He smiled, in that Leonard Cohen sort of way and said softly, “My dear the years have been kind to you”. Leonard then autographed one of my manila envelopes, and when I returned to Ottawa

I cut out his autograph from the envelope and taped it to the wall. I turned, and jokingly said to my staff: “Can you believe that man is dating someone years younger than all of us?”

Now, that’s a damn shame!”And so, “The Wall of Shame” was born. My Nash the Slash autographed album was part of it.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Dec 1977, Sat  •  Page 46

Sue WilliamsLost Ottawa see print out below for our aging eyes LOLOL

Victoria Lidia IlgacsWorked there as a cocktail waitress from what it open to closure. Made about a 100 bucks on a good night. Sharon Nate, Daughter of the owner of Nate’s delicatessen, managed the place. Saw Heart there as a bar band, Minglewood, Rough Trade, Dominic Troianno, Goddo, Dave Wilcox, The Action, Larkspur, Downchild Nlues Band, Nash the Slash, April Wine, etc. Got punched out by a couple of Satan’s Choice chicks one night. Was eventually shut down when the Choice overtook the place.

Journal interview by Christopher Cobb

Sometimes we tend to forget that , most of -today’s rock superstars started their careers in small bars, light years away from the massive arenas that. most are now associated with. Somewhere in the dim and distant past, bands like the Rolling Stones, The Who, Pink Floyd and-hosts of others were swinging their guitars in holes in the wall, struggling to make a living. Public- health regulations wouldn’t allow many of those dives to even open their doors nowadays, but still, there continues to be a need for such places platforms for young bands to work and grow”, from.

For the past couple of- years, Ottawa’s Black Swan has been filling the gap in this city. Bands playing at the former Rideau Street garage, are invariably a cut above those usually found at high school dances, yet not of the stature to be playing big concerts, even as an opening act. The Swan with its capacity of 220, is a place for showcasing upcoming acts.

Some of them die early deaths and others go on to greater things. Either way, they rarely return once the listening public has made its decision. For travelling bands, the old bar is a place of discovery or a stage in development, and for its audience a place to go and check out the new stuff.

Sal Khan, owner of the Black Swan, (Squires and the Commercial Tavern), hasn’t had too many money losing weeks since he opened the bar a couple of years ago. Which proves something. . . . “During the past couple of years, Ottawa audiences have matured considerably,” says Khan. “At one time you could put any band In the club and you’d fill it every night. Now it’s a different story. The  audiences now are particular about what they hear and knowledgeable about the music.

Some bands we hire die an early death, but they usually deserve to. Monday nights at the Swan are always free and as such usually the most popular. The success of Tuesday onwards often depends on the reports spread around by the Monday crowd. Khan hires lots of Canadian bands who are on the regional bar circuit. He wants to provide an outlet for Canadian talent but at the same time is concerned about new restrictive immigration laws which are making It difficult for foreign artists of a certain level to get into the country.

“Many club owners are worried about this,” he says. “Immigration officials are tending to consult the musicians unions and automatically the unions are saying that there are Canadians around capable of doing the job. “What these people don’t realize is that you often need a certain number, of foreign artists to keep bars alive for the Canadians to grow in. To deny a foreign artist a work permit just because he or she is a foreigner is nonsense.” Despite awkward Immigration policies, the financial and musicial future of The Black Swan looks bright enough for improvement and expansion: And if Canadian music ever becomes a world force, the dingier, unglamorous establishments like the Swan can probably take a lot of the credit.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada02 Jun 1978, Fri  •  Page 32

In 1978 my brother Dale was manager of the black swan and the squires and the Nozzle. Sal Khans general manager. My brother Donn was manager at the Vendome for a few years. Dale ran the swan and the squires and Nozzle as well as the commercial at one time. Sal Khan owned a few bars. My brother Dwight bought the old wizard pub on bank street and made it the bankbridge arms until he sold it to the barleymow guy. Danny Delahunt

Jamie DunlopSpent too many nights at the Swan in my youth. Nash the Slash, Cornstalk,Songship, Rough Trade, even Heart managed to get mis- booked and had to play a weekend there while their first major hit album was breaking. I know Vicki Ilgacs well and handed over wads of cash to her in return for beer. It always amazes me that at the time you could afford an apartment and go out to these dives a few times a week while working a single job. Good times.

Sue JarvisGreat nights there in my day when Eugene Smith & the Warm-up band played.


Missing Berkeley Series – Larry Thrasher

Clippings of –The Naughty Boys –The Eastern Passage -60s Music

The Canadian Beatles aka The Beavers- Mike Duffy was their Road Manager –Bands of the 60s

Saturday Date with “Thee Deuce” in Almonte

Dance Hall Days with The Coachmen
The Coachmen Return!!! Born to be Wild Circa 1985

The Day I Tried to Long Tall Sally Paul McCartney

Kindle Fire Minutes of “Dancin the Feelin“ with James Brown

Music in the 60s- Memories of Herman’s Hermits

Back to The Future — Twisting Your Dignity Away

You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books

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You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books
This was a booklet that was put out in January- June 1912 by the Publicity and Industrial Bureau advertising for new business. 48 pages with giant fold out map. Thanks to Ed and Shirley Simpson I am slowly going though boxes of books from the late Ed Simpson to document and after will be donated to a proper spot-Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

Herbert Barker was in charge , a commisioner for the City Hall

This ad was in the newspapers every week

CLIPPED FROMNational PostToronto, Ontario, Canada29 Jul 1911, Sat  •  Page 10

Children are permitted in Apartments!!! Wow!!!

The Ice Pick Cometh — Ottawa Artificial Ice Co.

Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

Ottawa to Perth in One Day!! James Copeland

Several Shades of Christina Gray –Home for Friendless Women in Ottawa

The Souvenir Spoon Man of Carleton Place — Samuel Breadner — Father of Lloyd Samuel Breadner

The General Hospital 1867-1929 Photos — Simpson Books

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The General Hospital 1867-1929 Photos — Simpson Books
Thanks to Ed and Shirley Simpson I am slowly going though boxes of books from the late Ed Simpson to document and after will be donated to a proper spot-Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Feb 1929, Sat  •  Page 35

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Aug 1904, Sat  •  Page 11
Interesting advertising page fromthe booklet

David Jeanes
This part of the hospital was originally built in 1927-29 as a separate building on the east side of Parent Avenue which then ran through the hospital campus. Today it is connected to the rest of the hospital by a wing on Bruyère Street. Also two more floors were added to this building. You can still view it from the north side on Cathcart Street.–

Maybe We Should Film Oak Island in Carleton Place? The Day the Money Disappeared

Names Names Names — Local Donation List – The Carleton County Protestant General Hospital

Union Almonte and Ramsay Contagious Hospital — “The Pest House”

Becoming a Nurse — Rosamond Memorial Hospital

Dark Moments in Ottawa History- Porter Island

So What was the Almonte Cottage Victorian Hospital?

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

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What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1933, Tue  •  Page 21

I write about community and the history these folks gave us. Sometimes great little stories pop up while you are researching. I was doing a typical geneaology page for the Darou’s and Dunlops who had Darou’s Bakery on Bridge Street in Carleton Place when I came up with Minnie the Hooker’s story. Everyone needs to be remembered so now Minnie is with great joy and happiness.

Where was Darou’s?

Ray PaquetteBeginning at the bottom of Bridge Street in Carleton Place, on the west side: the Texaco station, the Salvation Army Citadel, Levines, Hick’s Grocery, Charlie Jay Shoe Repair, Mae Mulvey’s Candy Shop. Central Grill, Galvin’s Men’s Wear, Carleton Grill ( and the Colonial Bus Lines stop), the Roxy Theatre, Harold Dowdall’s Barbersop, Denny Coyles Esso, Ned Root’s Shoe Repair, Stanzel’s Taxi, Dr. McDowell, Darou’s Bakery. Doucette Insurance, McAllister’s Bike Repair, Oona’s Applicances/Bob Flint TV, Hastie Bros Plumbing, Bruce McDonald Optometrist, Foote Photography, the public restrooms, the Queens Hotel, Woodcock’s Bakery, Lewis Reg’d Ladies Wear, Okilman’s, and Patterson’s Furniture. I probably forgot a business but I’m sure other readers can “fill in the blanks” or take exception to some of the names on the list. More to come when I crossover to the East side of bridge…

BAKERS.
BOWLAND, R. H., Bell street.
DAROU, MRS. A., Bridge street.
JENKINS, W., High street.
SWAN, JOHN, Bridge street.-Carleton Place 1903 Business Directory –Names Names Names

34 Bridge Street Carleton Place The Little Red Brick House
This brick building was built circa 1900 and was the home of Thomas Stevenson and his half sister, Miss Brisland. They took up residence in the early 1930s and first operated the little store next door later known the Central Candy Store, but it was called Thomas Stevenson Grocery. When they extended the store to make living quarters, they sold the little red brick house.
Prior to Mr. Stevenson living here one of the Burgess’s and *John Darou lived here. The parents of Jack the Kidd and *Velma Bryce, Mr. and Mrs. Bracewell, lived in this building as well as Alex and Viola Watson and Mrs. McEwan.
116 Bridge Street  Circa 1870
116 Bridge Street was the home of the Darou’s bakery for approximately sixteen years. Darou’s bakery was later operated by Minnie who was the daughter of the Darou’s and Earl Dunlop. It was under the ownership of the Dunlop’s up until 1957 when Nat Nelson purchased the building and operated a delicatessen with his wife bought the building. The Bridge Street store used to be the home base for Nate’s Delicatessen, which was run by Nelson’s parents. Paul took over when his dad died and operated a photography shop. Paul Nelson cherished, long time member of the Carleton Place Community, passed away Monday, February 28, 2011.
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1922, Fri  •  Page 6

Who was Minnie the Hooker?

By Garry Bouey Citizen staff writer

Nobody can accuse Minnie Dunlop of misspending her youth. Sure, she shoots pool a couple of times a week and may go dancing once or twice or play bingo. But after all, Minnie is almost 82 and times have changed. Minnie, who lives in a senior citizens’ high rise on MacLaren Street, looks quite comfortable with a pool cue in her hand. “C’mon baby, c’mon baby,” she says, urging the brown ball to its intended destination. “They call me Minnie the Hooker,” she says, and quickly adds an explanation: in snooker, you “hook” your opponents by leaving them without a shot. Not every ball makes it, of course. Snooker is a demanding game and Minnie didn’t take it up until last fall. “My oldest son is 53,” says Minnie, “and when he found out he said ‘Mother, don’t tell me. I never thought I’d live to see the day you’d be playing pool’.

The Dunlops operated Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place until 1953 and lived across the street from a pool hall. If you read below her husband was also the mayor of Carleton Place at one point. ( Read-Tales From McCann’s Pool Room – Rob Probert) Minnie remembers hauling her sons home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Now she shoots in a seven-team house league and enjoys it immensely. “I like anything where there’s competition,” she says. “I bowled until this winter but it got too cold to go out. With pool, I can play right in the building.” With partner John Beaulieu, Minnie leads the other six mixed teams in the league, organized . by fellow-resident Maurice Trudeau, Ottawa’s senior citizen snooker champ last year. Next year, Trudeau hopes his league can play off with representatives from other seniors’ buildings. No doubt Minnie will be there.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada29 Mar 1979, Thu  •  Page 1

Jamie DunlopThere were stories about how my dad and brothers and sister worked in the bakery when they were growing up. They delivered bread by horse and cart when they were kids. It was quite a shock to see Minnie on Facebook playing pool. I have the Citizen picture and article from when it came out in the 80s(?). She was no shrinking violet for sure. Thanks for the interest.

Minnie the Hooker’s Husband CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Sep 1960, Mon  •  Page 12

Family

John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Diane JudgeMy Mom’s parents were Ida and Charles Darou, owned the dairy in Lanark, my grandmother Ida would order meat & food from there, and they delivered to the Darou home , next to the machine shop, which they owned as well.– read John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Upper George Street, Lanark, shop of John P. Leslie, wagon maker. The shop did buggy repairs, general, built new wheels, etc. and was also an agency for the machinery shown in front. Mr. and Mrs. Leslie lived above the shop at the time. Next is the home of James Darou and next the Labelle home–.

Janet LockyerI remember some Darou’s of Lanark, in the late 1960s, dad build a cottage on the Clyde river, near the bridge dump. Jim Darou and sons had a cottage down at the point and Jim and my dad sure managed to get into some fun situations.. Thanks for giving me these memories back, had a chuckle remembering. There was one time that my dad, from the city, went off with Jim Darou to get corn for a corn roast. Jim been the leader of this expeditation, said why pay for corn, he knew where they could get it for nothing. Off they go, hours later they return, muddy, dad pants were torn up and they are laughing away. Jim took dad to a farmer’s field, surrounded by barber wire of course. They climbed the wire got lots of “free” corn. We boiled it up, smothered it with butter and salt and nearly broke our teeth trying to eat it. Dad and Jim just laughed and laughed watching us trying to eat COW corn. There really is a difference between the corn, one for humans and one for cows.

Paul MilotteI remember it being called the Cow bridge as well. If memory serves me right it was used to let Cows cross the river as part of the old Plant farm. It was a huge dairy farm back in the day and the Darou family dairy business bought milk from them. The main building of the Plant farm is the old Caldwell mansion that is now a bead and breakfast. Anybody remember the Red barn behind the main house? I think the same family converted the the old mansion into a nursing home after the farming operation had stopped.-Primitive Bridges –Where was this Bridge?

staff at Darou’s-
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Mar 1939, Thu  •  Page 21

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery

What do McLean’s Bakery and Morris Green Have in Common?

Aitkenhead Bakery Ottawa, OntarioBefore there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery