Tag Archives: ottawa journal

Dust on the Wind –Ashton Social Notes 1887-1897 Names Names Names

Standard
Dust on the Wind –Ashton Social Notes 1887-1897 Names Names Names

 

 

31867850264_d876684b51_b.jpg

Photo-Fiveprime

 - ASHTON, Sugar Making la Again In Full Swing. ;...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Apr 1897, Thu,  Page 5

 - ASHTON. Engineer Engaged Locating a Proper...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Aug 1897, Fri,  Page 3

 

 Beckwith Councilor Faye Campbell added: Just wanted to tell you that Robert Presley, who operated the saw mill in the Village of Ashton, was my great grandfather

 

 - ASHTON. The Lacrosse Club Gives a Concert '. ....

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Mar 1897, Wed,  Page 5

 

Image result for ashton ontario old

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 May 1897, Fri,  Page 2

 

 - Ashton. Building operations are beginning to...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Apr 1887, Thu,  Page 3

 - ASHTON. Accident to a Bridal Party. A Timely...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 Oct 1896, Wed,  Page 3

 - - ' . ASHTON. March 16. Master Harry Burns and...

 - ASHTON. The Templars Have a Successful Picnic...

 - naviog procured J & cumber of row boats, the...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Sep 1897, Wed,  Page 5

 - ASHTON. Two Local Skaters Have Their S leafs...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Feb 1897, Wed,  Page 2

Clippings About Viking Helicopters

Standard
Clippings About Viking Helicopters

 - jMiL -zl -zl "' Mora Allen Journal Photo A hot...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Jun 1979, Fri,  [First Edition],  Page 1

Viking Helicopters moved close to Carleton Place, and into the grand old stone house, which was used as the office building and the hangars were nearby. After a number of years the stone house caught fire and the contents were destroyed. A couple of the “overnighters” narrowly escaped that night.

27544822_10155547684156886_4185248189375665714_n.jpg

Carleton Place Parade 1977 Viking Helicopters

27752513_10213817863133417_4142117919875678627_n

Carla Coker sent in this photo

This was a float by Viking Helicopters (complete with a helicopter)! My dad, Roy Coker, worked there. He was dressed as Klinger in one of my mom’s coats with gaudy costume jewellry and looked the part. Wish I had a photo of him!

Ross Johnson The helicopter on the float has history… it was the first commercially certified helicopter in the USA… 

 - CP photo Larry Camphaug, president of Ottawa's...

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Chimneys and Black Boxes —Leigh Instruments

Remembering Industry in Carleton Place- Digital and Leigh Instruments

Bomb Scare in Carleton Place

It was Friday the 13th on Napoleon Street in Carleton Place

Waiting at the Perley Gates? Perley Home for Incurables

Standard
Waiting at the Perley Gates? Perley Home for Incurables

img.jpeg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Jan 1898, Thu,  Page 7

10152516_696564947051938_7387020866238306251_n.jpg

The Ottawa Jewish Archives —The original Perley Home for Incurables on Wellington Street.The attached photo shows a group of top benefactors of the Perley Home and it was taken in their original location on Wellington Street before the expropriation of the house and land in 1912. A.J. and Lillian Freiman can be seen in the image – Lillian is the woman in the dark dress standing in the middle of the staircase by the sign, while A.J. is the younger gentleman with a white pocket square standing behind the row of seated ladies. The sign reads: GIVE HERE! Your contribution to help us raise a MAINTENANCE FUND for the PERLEY HOME FOR INCURABLES.

 - MRS. FLORA AONEW, First Lady. Patient at the...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Feb 1904, Sat,  Page 11

Great Britain and North America saw a wave of new facilities for incurable patients from the middle of the nineteenth century on. The majority of nineteenth and twentieth-century homes for incurables were not primarily a refuge for terminal patients. The goal was to alleviate the suffering of the incurable sick people that were not helped by the poor sick relief efforts. But, they were not primarily a home for incurable diseases, but rather a reception house to help those with palsies, arthritis, rheumatism– and it was obvious there were no clear cut distinctions. But, they were also a forerunner to hospices of today.

In those days any family  which had a troublesome member, either old or young, attempted to pass it on to the Home for Incurables, until these institutions possessed an unhappy conglomeration of idiots, imbeciles, epileptics, insane, senile, and mentally normal people suffering from incurable diseases.

In October of 1906 it was reported that the patient’s ages residing at the Perley Home for Incurables were anywhere from 30 to 94. There were 27 names on the list with a total of 7,010 days spent in the home by the patients, with an average of 333.81 for each. The treasure’s balance showed  receipts of $5,871.23 and $6,370.46 leaving a debt balance of $499.23.

 - 1rsaasswsssa.ss. li i m ; i .. i ' ' " v- v-...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Feb 1904, Sat,  Page 11

In 1928 the Perley Home salaries were under great criticism, but so were the other hospitals, especially the Civic Hospital. May 30th, 1956, a legal ad was placed in the Ottawa Journal to lose the Incurables word and to be known only as the Perley Home.

I noted a comment from Reid Barry on the Lost Ottawa Facebook page and agreed with him: I remember back in the early 70’s when students called it the Perley Gates. I guess we all get there some time”. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children and Folk it was not.

 - t 1 iff i'Jrv ri Lit MRS. MoLEOD, Who Has Been...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Feb 1904, Sat,  Page 11

historicalnotes

The Perley Home for Incurables – 1897 to Present–The Ottawa Jewish Archives

In the 1870’s, lumber baron William G. Perley had a beautiful stone mansion built at 415 Wellington Street for him and his family in what was then known as the Uppertown area of Ottawa. He chose this location so he could look out over the river and closely monitor his various saw mills.

Perley passed away in 1890 and seven years later, his descendents gifted the home he had built to the City to become a residence for “incurables” – those people suffering from seemingly incurable diseases. The home was given “free and without any restrictions on the title.”

By the end of their first year in 1898, the Perley Home had 16 patients residing there – both men and women – and there was a maintenance cost of 7 cents per patient per day to look after their well being.
 - i ; HELP FOR INCURABLES Generous Contributions...
In 1912, the Canadian Government filed a notice that the land the Perley home was occupying was being expropriated. The mansion was unfortunately torn down and the land used for temporary structures during WWII. Today, the Library and Archives building stands there.

 - -r-Churchill ( Perley Home Patients In Sun Room...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  16 Apr 1932, Sat,  Page 5

In 1914 the Perley Home moved to a larger building on Aylmer Avenue where it overlooked the Rideau Canal, and it continued to grow in size and scale.

It wasn’t until the 1960’s that the word “Incurable” was finally dropped from the home’s name and it simply became the Perley Hospital. Up until around that same time, patients were also still referred to as “inmates.”

In 1988, plans were made with Veteran Affairs Canada for the Perley Home to combine with the Rideau Veterans Home (built by the federal government as a temporary residence for the rehabilitation of soldiers returning from WWII), and the Veterans Wing of the National Defence Medical Centre, into a new 450-bed facility.

The first residents were relocated to the new combined facility in 1995 and it still stands there today as the Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Centre.

The Perley Home had been an uppertown mansion built in the 1870s, and converted into an incurables’ home in the 1890s as a gift from the Perleys.Perley Residence, 415 Wellington Street, today the site of the National Library and Archives.
courtesy National Library and Archives Canada MIKAN 3325724

Though the original home was described within their own literature as a “happy Christian home,” from its very beginning the Perley was always a nonsectarian institution and admitted those from all religions. But, from the 1898 newspaper articles below it looks like skin colour might have been an issue.

 - JOSEPH PORTER'S CASE Dc, EebUlard lays he...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  15 Mar 1898, Tue,  Page 3

The home did have many Jewish benefactors who freely donated both time and money to such a worthy cause. Among those were A.J. Freiman (of Freiman’s Department Store once on Rideau) and his wife Lillian Freiman, an incredibly dedicated philanthropist.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Carleton Place the Thriving Junction Town 1900

Standard
Carleton Place the Thriving Junction Town 1900

 

 

s-l1600 (32).jpg

 

1900 Postmarked Business Envelope

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Nov 1900, Sat,  Page 14

 

But down at the Junction (Carleton Place), where, sweet, waters flow The broad  Mississippi, alive and aglow, Bill Nichols and Pattie, night, morning and noon, Jump like the old cow that jumped over the moon Today it is bridges, tomorrow the roads  For here is the chairman the biggest of toads, And dark grows the puddle of taxes and rates As they ever boost  Carleton bless their innocent  They, ride in a roller with a calliope’s  scream and each one is heading along  at full steam–The Lanark County Council Scottish Poem– names names names

 

historicalnotes

  

1900 – To supply serge for British army uniforms the Canada Woollen Mills expanded its operations here at the Gillies and Hawthorne mills.

Local talent presented the Temple of Fame, an historical pageant.  The town had a day of enthusiastic celebrations when news of the Relief of Ladysmith came from South Africa.

The Carleton Place Canoe Club was reorganized as a racing association and joined the new international canoe association.  A district grouping to include Ottawa, Brockville, Aylmer, Britannia and Carleton Place clubs was planned.  This town’s club ordered its first war canoe.

Peter Salter bought and reopened the Carleton House, the oldest two storey stone building in the town.  He renamed it the Leland Hotel.

 

 

CARLETON PLACE  – 1851  DIRECTORY

A Village situated on the River Mississippi, in the Township of Beckwith, County of Lanark, C.W. – distant from Perth, 21 miles, from Bytown, 30 miles, and from Smith’s Falls, 20 miles.

Population about 500.

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PROFESSIONS, TRADES & c.

BELL, ROBERT, & Co., dealers in dry goods, groceries, crockery, hardware, & c.

CARLETON PLACE HERALD, weekly, James C. Poole, publisher

DUNNET, GEORGE, dealer in dry goods, groceries, hardware, crockery, drugs & c.

M’ARTHUR, A., & Co., general store, dry goods, groceries, hardware, crockery, & c.

POOLE, JAMES C., printing office

ROSEMOND, JAMES, woollen manufactory

Bell, Robert, M.P.P., agent for marriage licenses, town reeve, and postmaster

Bell, R., & Co., tannery

Bells & Rosemond, grist, saw, and oat mills

Constable, Rev. T.W., Wesleyan Methodist

County Agricultural Society, Robert Bell, secretary and treasurer

Duncan, James, blacksmith and axe factory

Equitable Fire Assurance Company – R. Bell & Co., agents

Fuller, Samuel, foundry

Galvin, Patrick, tailor

Graham, John, waggon and sleigh maker

Gray, Rev. Peter, Free Church

Halcroft, Rev. L., Baptist

Johnston, Robert, general store

Lavalee, Napoleon, hotelkeeper and inspector of beef and pork

M’Donald, Allen, wool-carding and cloth dressing mills

M’Gregor, Duncan, blacksmith and axe factory

M’Laren, Robert, Robert Burns tavern

M’Laughlan, Rev. James, Cameronian

Moffat, William, carpenter and builder

Murphy, Michael, tavern keeper

National Loan Fund Life Assurance Company, R. Bell & Co., agents

Nelson, Hugh, saddler and harness maker

Nelson, Johnson, classical and commercial school

Pattie, David, carpenter and builder

Peden, William, general store

Pittard, Joseph, waggon and sleigh maker

Poole, James C., clerk of division court

Pyne, Rev. A., Church of England

Wilson, Rev. Richard, Wesleyan Methodist

Wilson, William, M.D.

 

s-l1600 (33).jpg

 

Carleton Place 1960?? What year do you think? Julie Sadler said- With parking on both sides, you received your driver’s license if you could drive down the main street without hitting anything!

 - Just as the congrgegatlon were leaving leaving...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Dec 1898, Tue,  Page 3

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Almonte The Woolen Town 1900

Renfrew The Creamery Town 1900

unnamed (1)

Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos

Standard
Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos

gallipeau.jpg

Every time the end of October rolls around I think of Jeanette Gallipeau Boldt and her husband Kevin and how their lives ended way too soon when they had a tragic accident while fishing. Of course when I do research in St. James Anglican Church’s Cemetery I pay my respects too.  I will never forget her and wrote an hommage to her  in Last Night I Saw Someone I Loved at the Halloween Parade.

I stopped writing and even thinking about beauty pageants the day Jeanette Gallipeau Boldt died. For years I have carried around a yellowed newspaper picture of her in my address book and finally put it to rest in a photo album a few years ago. But today I am posting photos of Beauty Queens gone by. I am sure these women are still beauties in their own right.

As the newspaper clipping says above:

“Your memory will always last”

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Mar 1965, Mon,  Page 17

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Mar 1973, Fri,  Page 49

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  25 Feb 1963, Mon,  Page 17

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Mar 1973, Mon,  Page 43

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Mar 1968, Mon,  Page 1

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Feb 1960, Mon,  Page 30

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Mar 1972, Mon,  Page 3

 

27540985_10155536124821886_905714903596671672_n.jpg

1977 Miss eastern Ontario

Miss Smiths Falls Delphine Graham in front of the Queen’s Hotel (Golden Nugget) late 70s

When was the first beauty pageant?
Entrepreneur Phineas Taylor Barnum staged the first modern American pageant in 1854, but his beauty contest was closed down after public protest. Beauty contests became more popular in the 1880s. In 1888, the title of ‘beauty queen’ was awarded to an 18-year-old Creole contestant at a pageant in Spa, Belgium.

Barnum’s beauty contest was protested widely, but Barnum wasn’t going to give up so easily. Instead of continuing to hold live pageants, Barnum advertised for women to submit daguerreotypes of themselves for judgement.

About 60 years after Barnum failed to have his live beauty contests take off, the modern American beauty pageant took off in earnest. The oh-so-eloquently named “Atlantic City’s Inter-City Beauty Contest” debuted in 1921 to attract more tourists to Atlantic City over the summer, and would later morph into the Miss America Pageant.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Last Night I Saw Someone I Loved at the Halloween Parade

unnamed (1)

Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

Standard
Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

 

abnerw (1).jpg

Photo from the John Armour photo collection

John Armour–This is a picture of Abner Nichols, (very early 1900’s) from my late Grandfather Walter Armour’s collection. Abner Nichols married Eliza McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation James McNeely). My Great Grandfather, Robert Armour married Jessie McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation McNeely, Thomas Moore)

 

 

Hi Linda,

I was on line and reading some of your stories about early life in Carleton Place.. really enjoyed them and found them very interesting. I have connections to Carleton Place as follows:
My Great Great Grandfather was Abner Nichols – 1836-1905
My Great Grandfather William Abner 1870-1933
My Grandmother Eliza May Nichols 1895-1932 who was my fathers mother ( she married George Albert Clark 1878-1949)
My father son of Eliza and George – George Clark is 91  now he has a lot of stories about Carleton Place and a great memory. I took him to the Carleton Place Museum and he was very pleased to see the exhibit about the Nichols Lumber Mill. He spent a lot of time in Carleton Place as a young boy and would take the train from Ottawa.
My Name is Mandy Clark.
The reason for this email is that I am working on the Nichols family history but have run into trouble going back any farther than Anber Nichols. I do not seem to be able to find any record of his (Abner’s)  parents and was wondering if you knew the information or have ideas about where I can find it.
I am on ancestry.ca but have found nothing.
Thanks for any information you may have,
Sincerely,
Mandy Clark
I told Mandy to contact the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum to see if Jennifer had anything– but do any of you out there in cyber land have any info?
authorsnote).png
I found a few things below with the first  newspaper article and it contains quite a bit of information. Abner was actually born in Kemptville to American parents and lived for 10 years of his early life in the United States.
historicalnotes
img.jpg

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Nov 1930, Wed,  Page 7

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Sep 1906, Mon,  Page 4

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Sep 1906, Mon,  Page 4

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Jan 1898, Fri,  Page 7

 

One of the most reliable place to find the names of the parents of an individual is in the marriage record. Insofar as Abner’s marriage was prior to civil registration of marriages in Ontario (1869-present), the place to look is in the church records of the faith in which the marriage was performed.
To determine the likely faith of Abner, I checked his son William’s marriage (in civil registration records) to see what faith he was at the time of his marriage. The result is Church of England which is the Anglican Church… that leaves the potential that Abner was also Anglican.
If that is the case, Abner’s church marriage record will be at the archives of the Anglican Diocese in Ottawa. The archive is at Christ Church Cathedral. They do church register look ups for a small fee that is used to keep the archives public.
It s very likely that, if the marriage was Anglican, that the record will contain the names of Abner’s and his bride’s parents.
The archivist’s name is Glenn Lockwood. You can reach them at: http://www.ottawa.anglican.ca/Archives.html
Hope this helps more than confuses 🙂
Rick Roberts

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

The World of William Abner Nichols

An Amusing Abner Nichols and His Boat

Before and After at Centennial Park

Splinters of Sinders Nichols and Brides

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

 

 

relatedreading

Searching for Information: J.A. Stevenson and Robert and Jane Ross of Lanark

 

 

 

empty-box

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

unnamed (1)

Steam Engines– Clippings About Harold Richardson

Standard
Steam Engines– Clippings About Harold Richardson

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Oct 1903, Tue,  Page 5

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Aug 1977, Fri,  Page 42

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Aug 1977, Fri,  Page 42

 

Linda Temple– John here, Harold and his family were wonderful neighbours when I was growing up. Everyone took things to him to fix. Margaret, his wife, was an historian and geneology researcher. She and her sister Anna Gorman mapped cemeteries in Montague in the 50s and 60s. Harold’s son Ron runs the shop today.

 

img.jpg

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Jul 1970, Tue,  Page 5

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Photos!! Who is With These Steam Engines?

Glory Days of Carleton Place–So What Happened to the Moore Steam Engine?

The Old Steam Engine Tractor on Mullet Street

James Miller Steam Engine Man from Perth

Hissing Steam, Parades and a 1930 Hearse–Pioneer Days Middleville

 

unnamed (1)

Appleton Notes– Who Do you Know?– Names Names Names

Standard
Appleton Notes– Who Do you Know?– Names Names Names

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Apr 1901, Thu,  Page 5

 

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Aug 1901, Sat,  Page 5

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Jan 1934, Fri,  Page 20

 

24294269_164658720945659_6337308187771155846_n.jpg

Another gem from Tom Edwards​- “These pictures are in a book. They are glued into the book so I can’t see anything on the back. Top Left says Caldwells Mills Appleton. Top Right says Caldwells Mills Appleton. Bottom Left says SS# 11 Ramsay and Bottom Right says CPR Station Bedell. There are more pics in this book. The date on a few of them are 1920” Author’s note–In 1886 Bedell was known as Kemptville Junction. It was renamed Kemptn in 1912 and then renamed again to Bedell Crossing in 1919.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  16 Dec 1889, Mon,  Page 3

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  15 Jul 1925, Wed,  Page 2

 

Early Cycling (371x550).jpg

Tandem Quadracycle Photo
NLRM 2013.9.55
c. 1930

This photo depicts a woman (Miss. Bellamine) with an unnamed young man on what appears to be an early bicycle at first glance. However, upon inspection this is actually a Coventry Rotary Quadracycle from 1885. When bicycles were just starting to take off, stability was a very big issue. In response to this, tricycles and quadracycles (4 wheels) gained momentum quickly in North America. This model is of note as it was one of the earliest quadracycles to incorporate bicycle-like foot pedals instead of foot levers.

Although it is not visible from this angle, there is a fourth wheel extending behind the machine, providing added stability. As bicycles became more stable, the quadracycle largely fell to disuse, however this photo from 1930 shows that if not as practical as they once were, quadracycles were still fun!

 

ACJB00010009 (1).jpg

Jack and Isobel Collie constructed their house between 1946 and 1947–NLRM

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

“They Didn’t Fit My Dinner”—Letters from Hilda-Maberly and Appleton– – Doug B. McCarten

Where was Bay View House in Appleton?

You Never Talk About Appleton

True Ghost Stories–Who was the Burgess Ghost?

Standard
True Ghost Stories–Who was the Burgess Ghost?

ghostburgess-644x205.jpg

he photo on the left is the Quinn home as is was in 1967. The photo on the right of a number of personalities who made the “Burges Ghost” come to life in 1935. (L-R.) John Quinn, Mrs. Quinn, Inspector Oliver, Patrick Quinn, Sergeant Story and James Kinlock

Strange occurrences were happening in 1935 at a farm in North Burgess just off the Narrows Locks road. Mr. John Quinn, his wife and two children, Michael, and Stanley, ages 13 and 11, reported innumerable phenomena taking place in their home. Stove lids, according to the Quinns, “danced” in the air, the teapot “jumped” off the stove into the wood box, three flat irons “walked” down a staircase and dishes “pranced” on the dining-room table. Word of this mysterious goings on spread quickly throughout the district. Although, perhaps skeptical, hundreds of persons from miles around flocked to the Quinn home. Read the rest here…Did You Ever Hear About the Burgess Ghost?

So who was it? Yesterday I found some newspaper clippings you might enjoy about the whole ordeal….

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Jan 1935, Thu,  Page 4

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Mar 1935, Fri,  Page 1

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Jan 1972, Tue,  Page 5wordpres seccaspina

Read the sequel on what happened-

True Ghost Stories–Who was the Burgess Ghost?

relatedreading

The Ghosts of the Mill of Kintail

Love, Lanark Legends and Ghosts

Walking With Ghosts — The Accidental Addiction

unnamed (1)