Tag Archives: ontario

You Can Leave Your Hat On

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You Can Leave Your Hat On

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Handmade Schwerdtfeger hats Wanita got at their auction and gave to me

 

When I was a child I would accompany my Mother once a week to the hat store that sat for years on the Main Street of Cowansville, Quebec. It was a place of serenity for me as I sat quietly while my Mother “window shopped” inside. I can still remember the bright yellow walls and a lot of flowery hats perched upon the hat racks. The clerks were petite, well dressed, and all I ever seemed to hear them say was “Yes Madam”. In those days you agreed with the customer as the customer was always right.

My love of hats stemmed from that very shop in Cowansville that I used to visit once a week. Years later I have a room full of hats, mostly made by myself, but some are vintage. The vintage ones were given to me by friends as they knew I would make a home for them as I have done. Each hat has a story, and that bedroom is now almost a hat museum. My latest acquisitions were given to me this week by my friend Wanita Bates, and these vintage hats are all about local history. They once belonged to the iconic Schwerdtfeger sisters of Carleton Place, Ontario who will be remembered for life by most citizens of the town.

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Schwerdtfeger sisters

After their parents death, sisters Hazel and Gladys Schwerdtfeger, (who never married) lived together in the old family home in my rural town in Ontario.  Hazel became a registered nurse, and the sisters lovingly kept all their mother’s millinery sundries. After the last sister’s death most of it was auctioned off, and some of the collection went to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

But these were not ordinary sisters–most people feared them when they walked down the street as they were so unusual. They were real mad hatters. One sister always lead the way with her quick gait, and the other one  would huff and puff behind her trying to keep up to her sister’s pace. The daughters of former milliner Bertha Mayhew Schwerdtfeger were also known by their dainty hats they sported at every outing. One wore red, and the other blue.

 

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Linda and Wanita in Linda’s hat room

 

So today when I went to vote at the advance provincial election poll I wore one of my hats. I am sure I too was thought of in the same manner as the Schwerdtfeger sisters, but I didn’t really care. Hats are far more nostalgic than practical in my life, but it all stems back to the hat store back in Cowansville for me. I’m not trying to be edgy and vintage, but my Grandmother always reminded me that ladies never went out without a hat.  

Hats are about emotion, and how it makes you feel. Really, it’s about what went in the inside, not what’s on the outside. I can still remember every one of Mother’s and Grandmother’s hats as expressions of a identity, pride, dignity and strength. When I wear a hat it reminds me that like them, I have now become the keeper of past memories. Style endures, and so do the memories.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

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Six Women in Town but Lots of Logging

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Six Women in Town but Lots of Logging

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Black and white photograph of women at Halladay Cemetery in Elgin, Ontario around 1910

 

When Mr. James Scannell, of Chelsea, went to Portland township with his parents in the year 1860, Portland was still almost a virgin wilderness. The township had not long been opened for settlement. Mr. Scannell’s father, John B. Scannell, had left the third line of Huntley and had gone into Portland to take advantage of the fine and cheap timber land which was there being offered to settlers.

Mr. James Scannell was fifteen years of age in 1860, and therefore old enough to be able to give an intelligent story of things as they were in Portland in 1860. At that time the roads were mere trails through the virgin forest and the settlers were few and far between. Over 85 per cent of the settlers were single men, who were “proving” their claims. Some of them were from Eastern Ontario, but most were from Western Ontario.

Mr. Scannell tells that in 1860 out of a total number of settlers of about 60 there were only six women. When a young settlers decided to take to himself a helpmate on his farm, he usually went back for a time to his old home and secured one. In Carleton Place they were missing men and had too many women.

The first settlers spent nearly all their time cutting the pine and oak off their farms and hauling them the nearest creeks, where the lumber jobbers took them off their hands. The creeks in question all fed into the Lievre river.

Mr. Scannell saw the beginnings and growth of the village of Portland. The start of the store and other enterprises of Wm. F. Bonsall and the erection of the churches. For fifteen years from 1860 Portland township did not know what a doctor looked like.

There was practically no ordinary illness, and when anyone happened to break their leg or arm there was always somebody in the settlement who could set the limb. If the injury happened to be serious the victim was hauled to Ottawa or Hull on a buck-board. In later years Mr. Scannell left Portland township and moved to Kirk’s Ferry, where he ran a grocery store. Still later he moved to Chelsea village, where he and Mrs. Scannell conducted a summer hotel for years.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

There was No Shortage of Wives in Carleton Place

It Wasn’t Raining Men in Carleton Place!

 

 

The Storm of 1952 –McKeen’s Hotel Window’s Smashed- Dogs Cats and Fowl Die in Barrage

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The Storm of 1952 –McKeen’s Hotel Window’s Smashed- Dogs Cats and Fowl Die in Barrage

 - Immigra-I of. tast-vtew Pound-Size Pound-Size... - sssoci- " ll. Au inouw Kemptville Agrttul-...

 - ; . ! stones were still lying in shaded 'spots...
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Fri, Jun 27, 1952 – Page 16
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You would think that if 500 animals died, and there were pound size hail, that there would be a photo somewhere. After searching for an hour through 1950s dairy photos from the 50s in the archives there was nothing. Just nothing– so I did my own photo LOL. If anyone has photos of this storm please email me at sav_77@yahoo.com.

The Deacon Murder—Away Back in Clarendon and Miller

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The Deacon Murder—Away Back in Clarendon and Miller

 

What separates Away Back in Clarendon and Miller from other historical accounts, is the delight Armstrong took in storytelling. He peppers the drier historical accounts with some ripping yarns.

The prime example of this is his account of the Deacon murder. As the story goes, in about 1870, Thomas Deacon, who lived on the Mud Lake Road, became enamoured with a Miss VanKoughnet. Mr. Deacon had a wife, however. Although his wife was ill, she was recovering, but then she suddenly died. Neighbours became suspicious when Thomas Deacon arrived at the funeral with Miss VanKoughnet. As the casket was being lowered, George Monds called a halt to the proceedings. Deacon was grabbed and placed under guard. Eventually it was revealed that Mrs. Deacon died of strychnine poisoning, and Deacon was convicted of her murder at the courthouse in Harrowsmith, after much testimony from various neighbours. Deacon was hanged for his crime.

The story eventually became the subject of a ballad, which is reproduced in the book. On several occasions the ballad repeats a line that reveals certain prejudices of the time, and twas by a foolish serving girl that he was led astray

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From Clarendon and Miller Archives.

 

Charlie Armstrong was born in Mountain Grove, Ontario, on September 27, 1908. He moved to Plevna in Clarendon and Miller in 1911. In 1928, he left for business college and a 30-year career in the Air Force. He continued in life insurance and real estate before finally retiring to devote himself to his Plevna retreat. Away Back in Clarendon and Miller was the first of several manuscripts that kept him busy when he wasn’t gardening, or hunting, or fishing or just relaxing with a book and his beloved pipe. He died in July 2003.

 

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Found on Amazon Canada

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

The Buck Lake Murderer

The Saylor Store on Snow Road (McLaren Depot)

Margaret Closs Lanark and Snow Road- Genealogy

History of McLaren’s Depot — by Evelyn Gemmill and Elaine DeLisle

The old Cornucopia Lodge on Snow Road

A History of Snow Road & McLaren’s Depot

Mississippi Station?

Charleston Lake Village 1800s Directory

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Charleston Lake Village 1800s Directory

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Approximately 10 km from the village of Athens is Charleston village and it’s jewel, Charleston Lake. The village features quaint, well-kept homes in a peaceful neighbourhood. The local marinas offer many services, including boat tours. Charleston Lake offers fishing for bass and lake trout and hosts The Renegade Bass Tournament.

Ontario Gazetter 1800s.. (no date)

Charleston. — A Village on Charleston Lake, in the Township of Escott, County Leeds, 18 miles from Brockville



Beale, Benjamin, saw mill prop.

Booth, A, C, J. P.

Booth, R. L., inn keeper

Burrows, Wiliam, grist mill prop.

GREEN, P. F., Postmaster, general merchant



Hamilton David, J. P.
Hicks, WUlium, wagon maker
Johnston, Henry, J. P,
Melvina, John, inn keeper
Slack & Frost saw mill props.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

The Story of Caroline La Rose– Charleston Lake

House of Industry Athens Farmersville

Farmersville 1859 County Directory (Athens)

More Lake Monsters–Moose or Monster?

The Killarney of Canada in Lanark County

Ontario’s Version of the Marks Bros-Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

So Where Was Charleville?

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So Where Was Charleville?

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Just got this in the LCGS inbox.. anyone know what it is? Crystal Rice said: “When I was a kid I found a metal horse sculpture near a war times black smiths shop, was wondering if someone could tell me more about it? “Looks forged, found in the area of Algonquin Rd near Charleville”

authorsnote)

I had never heard of Charleville, and even though some of your folks just stuck around in Lanark County– others did move around. So I like to know about the surrounding area and its history.

Charleville Ontario

The village of Charleville, Ontario is located north of Maynard, Ontario along Charleville Road. The name Charleville was inspired by a man named Charles Lane (Charles Lane of Charleville, Augusta Township, Grenville County, Ontario. b. between 1814 and 1815, d. after 1852. ), who was a prominent figure within the community involved in many business affairs.

Originally, the settlement was referred to as Sebastopol, which was probably a reference to the Crimean War which was being fought around the time of settlement. The South Nation River bisects the village, which made it an ideal place for erecting early sawmills. Charleville was at one point the home of Canadian abolitionist *Samuel Bass and his wife Lydia. At its height in the mid-nineteenth century, Charleville had a population of around 200 people.

 

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Most of the residents living in Charleville during the 1800s earned an income through agriculture, and like the other local communities found hops to be the most profitable crop. According to business directories from this period there were also many small, family owned businesses located within Charleville.

At one point, the village contained numerous blacksmiths, wagon makers, dress makers and masons; the area also once had its own slaughterhouse and butcher as well as a cheese factory and general store. By 1853, the community had its own post office established on April 1 of that year; the first postmaster in the area was the community’s namesake, Charles Lane.[

The Charleville Cheese Factory (Charleville Cheese & Butter Co) was constructed in 1881 and was located at the northeast corner of Charleville Road and the Fourth Concession. The building was constructed by a local resident named Rufus Earl who made the first batch of cheese there on May 1, 1881. The factory was set up for the cheesemaker to live on site. From 1881 until the end of the 1920s, the factory had changed hands many times. By the 1930s, the factory was producing both butter and cheese for the local market, however competition and a waning market lead to the factory’s closure shortly after.

 After its closure, the building was sold and later demolished, however the boiler building was salvaged and turned into a private dwelling before it burned to the ground. The spot in which the factory once stood is now the location of a modern home.

 

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In the mid 1800s, residents around the Charleville community petitioned the township council to build their own schoolhouse and become their own school section; eventually, two schools were built which served pupils from Charleville: S.S. #9 Throop’s School and S.S. #12 Perrin’s School, located in nearby Perrin’s Corners. This school was located on the corner of Charleville Road and the Fourth Concession on land purchased from the Throop family, who the school was named after. The first school was built sometime in the early-to-mid 1800s and was replaced in 1876 by a stone structure. By 1958 the building had fallen into disrepair, and was condemned from use. Students were relocated to Maynard Public School. For a period the dilapidated building was used as storage until the back wall completely caved in. The ruins of the schoolhouse remained on site until 1973 when the building was purchased, demolished and replaced with a brick bungalow; no trace of it exists today.

 

historicalnotes

14130-1910 (Grenville Co) Alder Earnest CARSON, 33, Farmer, of Charleville Ont., s/o John George. CARSON, farmer, & Alder MAHALEY, married Eva Maud HOUGH, 21, of Augusta, d/o George. HOUGH, Blacksmith, & Hester PYKE, witn: Oscar L. CARSON, M. Maud MOREY. 20 Apr 1910 Charleville.

1920 Maude MOREY F WIT 20 Apr 1910 Rufus Clarence MOREY Anne HOUGH B: ON F: ON M: ON Charleville Leeds and Grenville ON CAN 14130-1910 Witness KLN Anne Hough Morey Forum Email 1720 ON

 

*Morris and other descendants say they are only now discovering details about Samuel Bass, who left Canada sometime around 1840 and took on a series of carpentry jobs throughout the United States.

It turns out that other aspects of his life were not so honourable — census records show he left behind a wife, Catherine Lydia Lane, and four daughters: Catherine, Hannah, Martha Maria and Zeruah Bass, says Bonnie Gaylord of the Grenville County Historical Society in Prescott, Ont.

Morris’ 75-year-old mother says that could be why she had never heard of Samuel Bass until 12 Years a Slave

 

Did you know? Charleville was spelled Charlyville and Charleyville. This was from the Gazetteer from the 1800s

Charleyville. A Village on Nation River, in the Township of Augusta, County Grenville. Population 150.



Alden^ Miss Jane, teacher

Alder, Miss Levice, dressmaker

Alden, William .

Anderson, Jesse

Barton, John

Basis, David

Bass, Henry

Baas, James

Bass, J. . ‘ y

Birks, Edward B.

Birk«, Kuhur^

Carson, John

Covill, Stephen

Dakins, Fuisha

Kirby, Wilson -..

Lane^ Charles, J. P.



Lane, James
Lane, Joseph
Mosher, James
Perrin, Ebenezer
Place, Wright
Stetenfloii, ? Thomas
Tanney, William
Throop, Benjamin
Throop, Justus
Throop, Samuel
WfftneJ, Calvin
Whitney, Samuel
Wiley, John
Young, Joseph

Young  Yuill ?

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

So Where was Bedell? Deegan Deighan Information

Did you Ever Hear About Hoods Corners?

Where Was Pinecraft?

Where was Bay View House in Appleton?

Where Was Hunter’s Mill and Huntersville?

So Where Was Craig’s Camp? How About Marble Bluff?

Where was Almonte’s Military Headquarters?

So Where Was the Ice Palace?

So Where was the Location of the Almonte Illustration?

Where was Prestonvale?

Update on the Hackberry Tree– Name the Tree

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Update on the Hackberry Tree– Name the Tree

Thanks to Lynne Johnson the Hackberry’s name is Barry- Barry Hackberry 🙂

 

Jim McCready  R.P.F  emailed me the other day and shared this information about our beloved Grandfather Hackberry tree on McArthur Island. If you remember we are watching this situation closely so no harm comes to it.

Ken Farr the national  Dendrologist with the Canadian Forest Service was asked what he thought of the significance of our Hackberries in Carleton Place. As Jim said, this is why we should be working with the developer to save as many of these large trees as possible as these trees are unique in more than one way.( location & size )

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Carleton Place arborist receives Eleanor Henderson Good Ambassador Award–Carleton Place arborist Jim McCready  with Wendy LeBlanc-Jan 16, 2014 Carleton Place Almonte Canadian Gazette

Ken wrote:

“Thank you for writing to me regarding the notable hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) population in Carleton Place, and particularly, of the existence of an individual with a diameter at breast height (dbh) of 97 cm.

Reference to the distribution map in the standard Canadian dendrological text Trees in Canada (Farrar, J.L. 1995) indicates that the hackberry population in Carleton Place is part of the most northerly extension of the species anywhere in North America. Trees in Canada describes the species as “sparsely distributed in Ontario and Quebec.” The Carleton Place population is unusual for the number of individuals in one place and is genetically significant given its relatively northerly distribution. I should note as well that Trees in Canada gives the “average” dbh for a mature hackberry as 50 cm, making the 97 cm individual you described highly unusual and significant.

I want to thank you for your efforts to raise the profile of this most unusual and significant population of hackberries. The ongoing challenges that Canada’s forests will face under a changing climate means that it is important for significant elements of forest biodiversity such as the Carleton Place hackberry population to be recognized and preserved, so as to increase options for adaptation and mitigation in future. Thank you once again for writing to let me know about the Carleton Place hackberry population.”

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Did you read what I read?

“The existence of an individual with a diameter at breast height (dbh) of 97 cm”. I should note as well that Trees in Canada gives the “average” dbh for a mature hackberry as 50 cm, making the 97 cm individual you described highly unusual and significant.”

So what we have Carleton Place is a very rare tree and Jim McCready and council are going to do their best to protect it.  Let’s give Grandpa Hackberry a name. I don’t think I like him just being called “an individual”. He merits more than that.

Resident and historian Linda Seccaspina expressed concern about the large hackberry tree.

However, after hearing McCready speak, she said, “Thank you, Jim McCready, I can sleep tonight with you around.”–Development plans for McArthur Island in Carleton Place cause concern about hackberry tree stand

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Town Council Speech About the Hackberry Tree– Update on ‘The Tree”

The McArthur Island Tree– Should it Stay or Should it Go?

Lizzie Brunton Goes One on One with the Carleton Place Hackberry Tree

Carleton Place Fallout– When and Where Does it End?

Development plans for McArthur Island in Carleton Place cause concern about hackberry tree stand

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Kate Hurdis— I just wanted to share this link. Anyone interested can special order Hackberry trees through the Carleton Place Nursery. Continue repopulating the Hackberry tree population and support local business.