Tag Archives: ontario

Grandma Yuill ‘ Life is Full of Meaning’ Glenda Mahoney

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Feeling very nostalgic today. Is that Grandma Yuills writing with the date on the cover page . Just need to know so I can cry harder. We did not know how incredibly lucky we were. We did not even know we were making memories , we were just having fun. Glenda Mahoney

Pages from Glenda Mahoney

The Life and Times of Cora Yuill

Cora Munro Yuill — Arthur Yuill — For Glenda Mahoney with Love

Remembering Isabel Yuill

Conversations with Agatha Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook

Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28
The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill
Clippings of Mrs. Joseph Yuill – Margaret Yuill
Ralph and Iris Yuill
The Hart Children of Lanark — Laurie Yuill

Notes on Alexander and Joseph Yuill
Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter
Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

Turning Back to the Clock Agnes “Aggie” Yuill– The Buchanan Scrapbook

Archie Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Aggie Yuill Remembers Christmas and the Yuill French Loaf

Central Canadian Fire January 1923

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Central Canadian Fire January 1923
1898 Toronto Star corner Emily and Bridge

present day

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum..photo

In 1861, the McLean’s owned the building. In 1877, William McDiarmid gained
ownership of the premises after Struthers owned it. William McDiarmid took over
William Neelin’s general store in 1870 – the Golden Lion Store on the North West
corner of Bridge and Emily Street. By 1882, the store had gas lighting.

At 120 Bridge Street between 1882 and 1905 Duncan and William McDiarmid operated a store together. Later Mr. Pollock operated a music store at this location. The Central Canadian’s Office was located at 120 until the 1923 fire prior to merging with the Herald.

The Central Canadian’s editor was W.W. Cliff. In 1876, Cliff started the Canadian. Cliff was at the helm of the Central Canadian for thirty five years until F.A.J. Davis took over. In 1927 the name of the Central Canadian was changed to the Carleton Place Canadian.

The photo of the burned out building was taken on January 7, 1923, this photo shows the aftermath of a fire at the Herald/Central Canadian Newspaper office located on the north-west corner of Bridge and Elgin/ Emily Street in Carleton Place. This is now the site of Body Graphics Tattoo.

It was 10 pm when the fire was discovered in the office of the Central Canadian. It took over two hours to get the fire under control-but in no time the roof had fallen in and the floors collapsed in several places.The newspaper plant and stock valued at $13,000 was destroyed, and the building frame veneered with brick was a wreck estimated at $5000 in damages.

The flames had spread upward to the second floor where the heavier type of metal machinery was and it became too dangerous for the firemen to enter, less the floor give way. Mr. F.A. Davis the owner had insurance of $6000 on the plant and the Wm. McDiarmid estate owners of the building $2000, so the loss was a heavy one to both parties. The brick building adjoining the burned building was saved intact –so the Central Canadian moved next door and Mr. Davis determined what arrangements he could make to get the town’s newspaper out the next day. No word if that paper did come out.

After the 1923 fire, the new building housed Leo. McDiarmid’s Sports.  Guns could be purchased or repaired, and ammunition and decoys were sold. Later Cliff Caldwell and his wife Edna operated a hair salon and lived on the second floor. About 1950 George H Doucett bought the building and his insurance company operated there until the early 70s. Mr. William S. Rowat was his office manager and after he lost an eye and could no longer drive, Mr. Doucett’s nephew Allan joined the staff. Mr.and Mrs. Dan Nichols occupied the upstairs apartment and the building was later purchased by Howard McNeely who operated a barbershop at 120 Bridge.

Almonte Gazette January 12 1923

Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

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Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

Same place..different times. Approximately 1914..Lillian, Ethel,Dave,Alec and John R. McIntosh.

Photo from Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email at rose@sarsfield.ca or call at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

Approximately late 1970’s…Dave and Alec. The original log house had been covered in board and batten. The wood shed was later removed and used as the sugar camp on what is now Bowland Road.

Clayton Ontario History

March 31, 2018  · Ed and Becky Rath Pelletier, Ethel, Lillian, Alex and Dave McIntosh. Thank you to Stuart McIntosh for sharing.

Clayton Ontario History
November 14, 2017  · 




Again we are looking for help with identification on this group of ladies outside Guthrie United Church in Clayton. They are Mrs. Cochrane, Mrs. Penman, Mrs. Wm. Dunlop, Mrs. John McIntosh, ?, ?, Mrs. Bob Paul, Mrs. Charlie McNeil, Mrs. Rintoul. Thanks to Allan Bellamy and Stuart McIntosh for the photo.


Clayton Ontario History

June 28, 2021  · Writings from the autograph book of Eleanor McIntosh 1934. Thanks to Stuart McIntosh for sharing. Mrs. M. S. Code was Mrs. Matthew S. Code, (Mabel Penman, later married Thos. Price). Mrs. Jimmy Shane was the first Mrs. Shane, Violet Moore. Notice how these ladies signed their names. It was common at the time to go by the husband’s name. Even when I was first married in 1971 my mother used to write to me and address the letters to Mrs. Brian Sarsfield.

Photo from Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email at rose@sarsfield.ca or call at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

McIntosh Clan 100 Strong Holds Picnic at Family Homestead 1953

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Overnight Lock-up Guests Should Be Fed For 25c Apiece — Little Geneaology

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Overnight Lock-up Guests Should Be Fed For 25c Apiece — Little Geneaology

The question of what kind of meal should be furnished to transient guests in Almonte lock-up was discussed at the council meeting on Tuesday night. At the present time the caretaker, Ed. Little, gives these men a breakfast that costs the town 35 cents. It was felt they should get plainer grub at not more than 25 cents and after a good deal of talk Thomas Reid, the new chairman of the police committee, was asked to interview Mrs. Little on the subject and report back to council at a special meeting, Friday night. 

This matter was brought up by Councillor Montgomery who was on the police committee last year. He pointed out that many of the men who were out of employment and sought a night’s lodging in the local jail went around saying they did not get the kind of breakfast they were entitled to when they honoured a town such as Almonte with a night’s patronage. 

This caused talk that was unfair to Mr. and Mrs. Little. Mr. Montgomery thought some set bill of fare should be arranged so as to relieve the caretaker and his wife of any responsibility and criticism. Someone suggested that Mr. Reid was the very man to draw up a menu for the unwelcome overnight/ guests the town is forced to entertain.

 It was hinted that if he made it plain enough the word might spread and there would be fewer calls on Almonte’s hospitality. Mr. Reid refused to accept responsibility. for arranging what the transients were going to eat. He thought though that a meal suitable for them could be served for .25 cents and still leave enough to reimburse Mr. and Mrs Little for their trouble. Mayor Comba felt there should be nothing fancy about the food served to these gentlemen of the road. While he did not believe in turning them out in the winter months with nothing to eat. He couldn’t see why the town should go to needless expense in the matter. His Worship instanced the case of Smiths Falls where it was decided that such transients spending a night in the lock up should get tea without milk and sugar, bread and butter. “Yes and in the end they didn’t get anything,” said Former Councillor LeMalstre who was sitting In the audience. “I guess that’s right, ” replied Mayor Comba amidst laughter. Jan 1933

In 1935, the Star published a recipe for coffee “cream” that combined egg yolk, sugar and water. The Canadian Woman’s Cook Book of 1939 contains six recipes for fake foods, including almonds made of croutons, a bisque with tomatoes but no shellfish, cherry pie with cranberries and raisins, and a mock sausage filled with mashed beans and bread crumbs.

One of Kraft Food’s most requested recipes is Mock Apple Pie, which substitutes 36 crushed Ritz crackers for apples, baked in a pie crust along with two cups of sugar, butter, lemon, cream of tartar and cinnamon. It was introduced in 1935, one year after the Ritz cracker, according to Jean Anderson’s American Century Cookbook.

Ingredients

Dough for double-crust pie

18 saltines, halved

1-1/2 cups sugar

1-1/4 cups water

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 teaspoon cream of tartar

1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions

Preheat oven to 400°. On a lightly floured surface, roll 1 half of dough to a 1/8-in.-thick circle; transfer to a 9-in. pie plate. Trim to 1/2 in. beyond rim of plate.

Layer crackers in shell; set aside. In a small saucepan, combine remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Carefully pour over crackers (filling will be very thin). Cool for 10 minutes.

Roll remaining dough to a 1/8-in.-thick circle; cut into 1-in.-wide strips. Arrange over filling in a lattice pattern. Trim and seal strips to edge of bottom crust; flute edge. Bake until crust is golden brown, 25-30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. click for more here..

Photo thanks to the scrapbooks of Lucy Connelly Poaps

Community Plowing Way Back Then —

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Community Plowing Way Back Then —

Wilda WhyteI think that pic is on Rossetta road by Stewart Rodger old farm plow truck most likey Edwin Mckirdy Laurie Whyte.

Karen LloydWilda Whyte I think you are right. That old truck is in the Museum in Ottawa.

Karen Lloyd=Stuart McIntosh no…he didn’t buy the plow until the early 50s.

Ray ThompsonLooks like his for sure. I was luckily enough to get a ride in it. Driver side was on the right. He operated the wing and drove

Stuart McIntoshElvin McKay had an army truck like that he used to clear lanes around Union Hall area.

Lyall MckayStuart McIntosh it appears to be a vee plough his was a straight plough made from a steam engine boiler

Valerie RodgerSure looks like the trees at Stewart & Isobel’s lane way.

Stuart McIntoshThanks for the pic Lyle. Great memories of that truck.

Stuart McIntoshI believe you sat on the right side to drive it. Barely enough clearance to park it at the back of his garage.

Peter MclarenErwin Gibson and Johnny Gibson both had army trucks that plowed township roads.

Robert ShanksClearing was done by Big Hitches of horses pulling and pushing road graders. The ones out front did the pulling while the ones out back pushed on an angle to stop the plow from being pushed sideways by the forces on the plow blade!

. A wintery day in the Eastern Townships of Quebec where I was born.. 1937.. Can you imagine?

Jennifer E Ferris
March 1, 2021  · 


Tonight’s snow squall on the way home. Can’t see 1/2 a km, maybe a 1/4.
Glad to be home.
Wicked north wind driving the snow across

Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International
December 27, 2021 at 12:11 PM  · 




This is what winters used to look like…when snow came in December on a regular basis and lasted until March. As a boy in Poland, where this picture was taken in the 1940s, it meant great sleigh riding and snow forts, but what a job to keep the road open!
Teams of horses pulled wooden ploughs to keep a track open, and in this photo my great Uncle Robert MacDougall is standing on the sleigh, and I think Lennox Paul may be on the right. Aunt Jessie Paul’s house and the United Church are seen in the background

One Snowy Night in Carleton Place — A Short Memoir by Dennis Lloyd

The Snowstorm of March 1947 – Jim Houston

Ya call that a Snowstorm? Linda’s Mailbag

To All the Snowmageddons I Have Loved Before

Taxi Rides –Beer Rides 1930’s and Local Taxi Driver “Kid (Norman) Bryce”

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Taxi Rides –Beer Rides 1930’s and Local Taxi Driver “Kid (Norman) Bryce”
Mademoiselle Decourcelle. The world’s first woman taxi driver, dressed in uniform, circa 1909

July 1939

As soon as hotels in Perth and Smiths Falls secure licence to sell beer and wine local taxi drivers will inaugurate a cheap nightly service from Almonte to those places it is understood. Word that no licences would be granted in Almonte or Carleton Place because of local option came as disappointment to thirsty people who had looked forward to beer by the glass in these towns.

Drivers of cars on the other hand, stand to benefit under the government’s ruling and will run a regular service to neighbouring towns as soon as the hotels open their beverage rooms. Whether the Premier will find some way of preventing these Almonte and Carleton Place commuters from patronizing hotels in other places remains to be seen. No representations have been made to him on that score up to the present time though it is possible something may be done about the situation in the near future. Local bootleggers, it is said, were overjoyed at the news that they were not going to have legitimate competition.

Almonte Taxi’s

memories of Almonte– Johnson’s Taxi– 1950s–Sandy France said “Don Johnson was the taxi driver in the early 50’s. Think he may have been an ex serviceman”

Linda Beaupre asks:Hello Linda, new member here. My mother’s family had cousins or uncles in the Almonte area the used to run a taxi service out of their home . I was wondering if you had any info on them , last name was Majaury and it was in the 60s?Anyone? Thank you!!

Don RaycroftYes, we used them when it was really cold to go to school. If you didn’t call them they would pick you up on the way if they thought it was too cold to be walking. Nice people.

Mary HurdisMargret and Jimmy Majaury had a taxi service.She loved chocolate and beer! He was related to my husband, his mother was Margaret Majaury. Try texting Elizabeth Dennie her mother was a sister of James if not I have a Majaury book

Laurie LadouceurThey lived at 49 Carleton street on the Island. My family is related. We purchased the house from them. We lived there for awhile

Taxi service in Carleton Place– Kid Bryce ( Norman)

January 1934
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Mar 1941, Sat  •  Page 32

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Sep 1930, Tue  •  Page 13

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Sep 1947, Mon  •  Page 15

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Jan 1994, Mon  •  Page 34

Mr. Dowdall purchased the brick building at Bridge and Emily and moved his business. Walter Stanzel later lived here and operated his taxi business. It was well known all around town that Mr. Stanzel had a pet skunk and and a pet raccoon as well. No word if they came for rides in his taxi!

Murray’s Taxi —- Frank Blakeley and other Rides

Walton’s Taxi and Did a Plane Really Land on Bridge Street? College and Bridge Street

Looking for Memories of Kennedy’s Taxi

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place –Part 1–Bud’s Taxi

Personal Memories of Downtown Local Business etc.

Did you Know? Bet You Didn’t!

. Mr. Graham who once lived here served in the War, worked for CPR and offered a Taxi Service to the town and lived in the little yellow house–…(Nichols) on Bridge Street

Ray Paquette’s Carleton Place Moment..-In the right corner of the advertisement for Howard McNeely’s Barber Shop, it mentions E. McNeely, Assistant. I wonder if that is Earl McNeely who later or perhaps prior to worked barbering with Howard Little and lived on Munro Street west of Rochester? As well, how many people remember Ned Root’s Shoe Repair beside the driveway for Stanzel’s Taxi?

BEFORE AND AFTER-100-102 BRIDGE STREET CARLETON PLACE–THE FRAME BUILDING WAS MRS. ROGER’S BOARDING HOUSE BEFORE SHE MOVED TO VICTORIA STREET AND THERE WAS A SMALL ADDITION AT THE REAR OF THIS BUILDING. THE BUILDING WAS BRICK AND CLAPBOARD AS THAT WERE USED TO CONSTRUCT MANY OF THE BRIDGE STREET BUILDINGS.
Asa Roe and his family occupied the house for a few year and then Richard Dowdall bought the property. Early in 1936 George Doucett moved his insurance office into one side and Dr. J.A. McEwen had his medical office on the other.
It was thus occupied until the early 1950s when Mr. Dowdall purchased the brick building at Bridge and Emily and moved his business. Walter Stanzel later lived here and operated his taxi business and when Dr. McEwen moved a couple blocks down Bridge Street both sides became dwellings. Penny Trafford mentioned that Mr. Stanzel had a pet skunk and I think a pet raccoon as well.
I remember taking clothing to the tailor that was on the right hand side of this building in the 80s? Last year I heard a story about a local woman who made teddy bears– and is this the same spot she was making them in? Still trying to find out the source of that information. Searching for Information– Teddy Bears Made in Carleton Place?
Ray Paquette added: My parents lived in the right side of the house before moving to an apartment in the Senior Citizen’s site at 126 Sussex Street. The Watty Stanzel ran a taxi service out of the left side for many years and I seem to recall Mrs. Cecil McCann and Ms Eileen Costello living in that side in later years.
Ray PaquetteI’m having a senior moment. Will somebody reminding me who ran Moore’s Taxi please?
Linda Gallipeau-Johnston Ernie Moore – I think.
Ray PaquetteWas that the same Ernie Moore who ran the store on Moore Street?

Nancy HudsonLinda I think the taxi driver’s name was John Moore, Ernie had the store on Moore St.
Ray PaquetteNancy Hudson I remember Watty Stanzel, Arnie McNeely, Ronnie Wing and Wib Giles but John Moore, I have no recollection of. Where did he live?
Nancy HudsonRay Paquette John Moore lived at the corner of Town Line west and Moffatt St. My Aunt and Uncle, Les and Olive Nield lived next door to him on Moffatt St

Ray PaquetteLinda Gallipeau-Johnston Ted has taken on the affectation of 2 “d’s” in his name. He is now known as Tedd. Go figure?!?!?
Doug B. McCartenRay Paquette great to see Brian and Tedd are well and enjoying life as retirees! Ask Brian if he remembers the two young ladies who were traveling through town selling magazine subscriptions? We all went back to Brian’s house to discuss our choices….. lol! I actually got a subscription for Car & Driver….. I think Brian took one of the ladies to his room to get money or something BAHAHAHA what a nice visit we had with them…….
Ray PaquetteDoug B. McCarten I sent your comment regarding the magazine sales staff to Brian who commented “…You can tell Doug that , although that little experience had slipped my mind, yes I do remember now that he mentioned it. I thought that there might have been a third guy involved but I might be wrong. I ended up getting a subscription for a year to a magazine I cared little for.Those girls were VERY good at their job.”

Ray PaquetteThere are a lot of commercial locations of earlier times that are not included on this “place mat”. Bellamy’s Restaurant, Sinclair Bros. Men’s Wear and Patterson’s Furniture to mention a few others not already noted above. I could go on but would bore most readers…
Joan StoddartRemember the rest rooms beside the Queen’s

Frozen Pipes on the Range

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Frozen Pipes on the Range

Almonte January 1926

Mrs.P. J. Campbell met with an accident last Monday morning which might easily have ended much more seriously than it did. In fact she had a narrow escape of losing her life. Mrs. Campbell had just gone into the kitchen of her home. early on Monday morning, and was about ‘her household duties’ when suddenly the cooking range exploded with a loud report. Mrs. Campfoell was thrown through the open doorway from t/he kitchen into the -dining-room, and rendered unconscious.

One of the iconic images of the 1920s kitchen is the special gas cabinet range, with its distinctive barrel-door warming oven on top. Designed for constant use by large families or boarding houses, these ranges combined three or more broiling and baking ovens with multiple burners. 

 

When she recovered consciousness she found herself lying on her back -and just beside her a large piece of the stove. It seems that one of the water pipes from the stove had became frozen, and as the steam developed it could not escape and an explosion occurred. The stove was smashed into small pieces and much damage was done both in the kitchen and in the dining room. The crockery and other articles being broken and one of the pieces of the stove hit the ceiling and damaged it also. 

The word is is that Mrs. Campbell was not hit by the flying metal, and although she was badly shaken and bruised she suffered no serious injury. Mr. Campbell was in another part of the house at the time of the explosion.

1934 Almonte gazette

In other news of January 1926

Miss Welhelmine Reid, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Reid of Ramsay, won fifith prize at the- ‘Ottawa Winter Fair’ last week for milking. She was first for the county of Lanark. Her prize was $6. The competition was open to girls under 16 years of age. Miss Reid had very poor luck. The cow she drew the ballot for was a young and nervous animal which could not be induced to stand still. This lost her a good deal of time.

DetailSource

Name:Wilhelmine Reid
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:Scotch (Scotish)
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Single
Age:13
Birth Year:abt 1908
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:28
Residence Street or Township:Ramsay Tp
Residence City, Town or Village:Township of Ramsay
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Daughter
Father’s Name:John Reid
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Margaret Reid
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Presbyterian
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Months at School:8
Municipality:Ramsay
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Ramsay (Township)
Sub-District Number:37
Enumerator:Thomas Cochrane
District Description:Polling Division No. 2 – Comprising the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th concessions from lot no. 15 to lot no. 27 inclusive also the 8th concession from lot no. 13 to lot no. 27 inclusive
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:7
Family Number:28
Household MembersAgeRelationshipJohn Reid48HeadMargaret Reid47WifeAnnie Reid15DaughterWilhelmine Reid13DaughterMable Reid9DaughterWilfred Craig17Helper

DetailSource

Name:Mary Wilhelmina Reid
Gender:Female
Age:21
Birth Year:abt 1908
Birth Place:Almonte, Ontario, Canada
Marriage Date:15 Jun 1929
Marriage Place:Ramsey, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:Jno. R. Reid
Mother:Margaret A. Reid
Spouse:Raymond Hazlewood Kemp

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

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Community Memories of  the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh
Charlie Lorimer’s farm, Ledore. Note the milk cans, butter churn and wooden eaves troughs Stuart McIntosh photo

Ben Willis–My Great Uncle Charlie’s homestead. This is “NOT ” The Dunlop Hunting Camp

The Lorimer homestead was east of uncle Charlies approx. 1 mile Building still standing ( Dunlops Hunt Camp) My great Grandfather Joesph lorimer and wife Annie mac Itosh raised 9 children here My mother Jean Bates Willis was born here in 1920.

Stuart McIntosh
January 20 at 2:49 PM  · 

Joe Lorimer, Bert Lorimer, Dave McIntosh, Dave Lorimer. Hunting on the Lorimer plateau 1941. At the home place.

Blair PaulGreat picture and stories! In the 40s and 50s you could see this house from the Poland church steps….before the bush grew up!

Peter EwartRhodena Bell where abouts would the feldspar mine be?

Rhodena BellPeter Ewart the entranceto the Feldspar mine was right across from the corner of ladore school it is all fallen in now My dad used to own Ladore school at one time

Ethel NagleWe used to sell the cream too, remember the truck coming to pick them up

Alice GilchristShelley McLeod Your grandpa picked up the cream at our farm

Leanne WalkerMy Grandmother lived here as a little girl after their home burnt. Hazel MacIntosh. Hazel Cameron would know more.

Peter EwartLeanne Walker the wooden eaves trough is most interesting…

Stuart McIntosh
January 19 at 5:20 PM  · 

Dad hunted with Joe, Doug and Dave Lorimer on what is called the Lorimer plateau.

Rhodena BellThis is owned by Hal Rodgers family from Hughesville PA now and Dunlop hunt camp now

Sandra DunlopJim Willis This farm has been passed down 3 generations now on both the Rogers family and the Dunlop family. At one point Morley Ashby owned it and sold it to Roger family

Kathy GrahamI believe Annie was my great (great) grandmother, I belong to the Lorimer-McIntosh clan, my grandfather Joseph married Elva Doucett, our reunions were held in Clayton, Ontario! I haven’t been to one in years tho’ ! My grandfathers father was Charles I believe! My maiden name is Hewitt my mother was a Lorimer!

Dave Craigthis is where my grandmother grew up. I have my great uncle Alecs pocket watch. Alec and Annie Lorimer never married. My middle name is Lorimer

Barry BatesKathy Graham if you read my cousin Dave’s comment below, you’ll see that Annie and Alec were never married. You must be from another branch of the Lorimer’s. You mentioned Charles. There was an Uncle Charlie and Aunt Virginia that I remember. On a Summer vacation, we visited them in Vancouver.

Kathy GrahamBarry Bates yes I think I must be from a different family! Charles and Annie I thought were married? My grandmother was also related in some way to the Paul’s in Lanark. Or Poland? (Ontario) the people who owned the store!

Cheryl Anne CooperWe used to sell cream too and fed the calves the skin milk.Oh I remember getting bunted by the calves. We shared the chores with in laws.I washed the separator parts every second day and hated it…but it had to be done!!

Photo-Rhodena BellI am trying to find pictures of the Lotimer girls I have stored

Rhodena BellBlair Paul my grandmother in middle her dad Joseph park to left and lorimer girls on either side might be uncle Jim park beside his dad

Cheryl Anne CooperWe used to sell cream too and fed the calves the skin milk.Oh I remember getting bunted by the calves. We shared the chores with in laws.I washed the separator parts every second day and hated it…but it had to be done!!

Blair PaulGreat picture and stories! In the 40s and 50s you could see this house from the Poland church steps….before the bush grew up!

Lodore Road in the winter
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Wed, Jun 08, 1904 · Page 4

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

Mary Stuart Brien –Mary Beth Wylie

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Remembering and Documenting The Loose Hay Loader

Howard and Olive Giles– Clippings

The ‘Deer-Cow hybrid’ of Carleton Place Entertains the Councillors of Almonte — ORR Genealogy

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The ‘Deer-Cow hybrid’ of  Carleton Place Entertains the Councillors of Almonte  — ORR Genealogy
Ottawa, Ontario, Journal (Dec. 9, 1932)

Though the financial situation facing Almonte and other towns in 1933 may not be as bright as could be desired there is always a silver lining to every black cloud. This was demonstrated, so far as Almonte is concerned, on Tuesday night at the first regular meeting of council, when the following letter from J . P. , Orr, Carleton Place auctioneer, was read By the clerk:—

 The Greatest Freak “

To Mayor and Council, Almonte, Ontario, Canada— 

“Dear Sirs—“I am In possession of the Greatest Freak Animal on earth that I purchased last year from a farmer of Franktown, Ont. “I have named this animal ‘Queen of the Forest,’ its mother was a cow’.and its father a buck deer. 

It is 1 years old, stands 38 inches high and weighs 211 lbs. “You have no doubt read about this animal in the papers. Everyone that has seen it says, it the strangest freak they have ever seen. 

“1 am going to show this animal in different towns this winter, and every town I show this animal in I propose to turn over 40 per cent of the money taken in, to the Mayor and Council to aid the unemployed of their town this winter. 

The price I charge to see this animal is 10 cents. “All I need is a small empty store some place in town with electric lights. . “If the Mayor and Council are interested in this, kindly let me know and I will call and arrange for some Thursday, Friday and Saturday.—

Yours very truly, J. P. Orr,

Reading of the above ‘communication produced a deep impression on the council. The idea of getting 40 percent of the gate appealed to municipal legislators who know  not where to turn in their search for revenue. Mayor Comba was glad to learn that the spirit of P. T. Barnum still lived even though the great American showman had passed to his reward.

 What Barrmm Said “I believe there are a couple of vacant” stores in town,” said His Worship, “though I do not know whether they would be suitable to serve as temporary quarters for. such a splendid animal as “Queen of the Forest.” 

He thought Mr. Orr’s letter ‘ should be answered but felt It was no part of the council’s business to provide ‘ a stopping place for “The Queen.” 

Memories of w hat Barnum said about “one being born every minute,” may have flashed across the “Mayor’s mind because he concluded by remarking that  Mr. Orr seemed to want to saddle some responsibility for the show on the council. 

Apparently Mr. Comba wasn’t going to see the new council in the class indicated so contemptuously by the sarcastic Bamum. Councillor Montgomery suggested that the old bar In the Belmont Hotel would be an excellent place to exhibit “Queen of the Forest.” 

He offered to act as doorman and take the money if Mr. Orr wished  to bring his protege to town.  It was agreed, finally, that a letter be sent to Mr. Orr from the council giving him permission to exhibit “Queen of the Forest,” but declining to take any responsibility in respect to providing her with quarters while she was a guest of Almonte. 

 Jan 1933

A deer cow hybird is called a DOW click here for more..

Update– I scoured every issue of the Almonte Gazette and Orr’s cow/deer never went anywhere..

LIPPED FROM
The Sun Times
Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada
13 Dec 1932, Tue  •  Page 2


CLIPPED FROM
The Sault Star
Sault St. Marie, Ontario, Canada
13 Dec 1932, Tue  •  Page 6

Should read Franktown not Kranktown

Perils of the Cows of Carleton Place or Where’s the Beefalo?

Should Cows and Smart Cars be Tipped?

First Woman School Trustee — Mrs. W . A. Gilmour — Hazelwood School

Standard
First Woman School Trustee — Mrs. W . A. Gilmour — Hazelwood School

from the Almonte Gazette…Ramsay # 5 1959-1960 school year

January 1920

The township of Ramsay’s first lady school trustee is Mrs. W . A. Gilmour. At the annual meeting of School Section No. 5, Ramsay, held on Wednesday, Mrs. Gilmour was elected to fill the position for the next three years.

Mrs. Gilmour has a high reputation as an educationist, and there is much satisfaction that she should be tendered this appointment and that she should accept it. She is a daughter of the late Robert Yuill at Ramsay, and was married to Mr. William A. Gilmour, one of the most prominent agriculturists in Ramsay. Both Yuills and Giimours were amongst the first settlers from Scotland in this part of the area.

S.S. No. 5 Ramsay – Galbraith School

Daniel Galbraith purchased land on the West half of Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay township in 1855. He sold half an acre to the trustees in 1870 for $1.00. The first teacher was Nell Forest. Ratepayers became enraged when the Ramsay Township School Boarded voted to close the school, so in 1958, S.S. No. 5 became a separate school section. Ratepayers donated two cords of wood per family. A new piano was purchased and a music teacher was hired. In 1969, the rural pupils were bussed to Almonte or Carleton Place. .

Photo- Jennifer E Ferris-The Forgotten Galbraith School House

S.S. No. 5 Ramsay – Galbraith School—Daniel Galbraith purchased land on the West half of Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay township in 1855. He sold half an acre to the trustees in 1870 for $1.00. The first teacher was Nell Forest. Ratepayers became enraged when the Ramsay Township School Boarded voted to close the school, so in 1958, S.S. No. 5 became a separate school section. Ratepayers donated two cords of wood per family. A new piano was purchased and a music teacher was hired. In 1969, the rural pupils were bussed to Almonte or Carleton Place. The school was moved across the road to become Bert Hazelwood’s cabin in his bush. Read-Recollections of Bert Hazelwood 1973

North Lanark Regional Museum

August 21, 2021  · It’s almost back-to-school and we’re going through our school books collection! This copy of ‘Vitalized English’ was used in the S.S. No. 5 Ramsay school – called the Galbraith School. The land (Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay Township) was purchased in 1855 by Daniel Galbraith, who sold half an acre of that land to school trustees in 1870 for $1.

The school operated until 1969 when the Government of Ontario mandated the consolidation of county school boards, and students were bussed to either Almonte or Carleton Place for their education.

For the Love of Money-Gillies Gilmours and the McLarens

2702 Words of History About Grieg’s School Ramsay–Miss Ruby Wilson

Norman Paul Talks About the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

Recollections of Bert Hazelwood 1973