Tag Archives: norma ford

Memories of James Moulton by Norma Ford

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Memories of James Moulton by Norma Ford
photo- Norma Ford-Picture of Grandpa taken in 1960, he died in 1962.

Norma Ford

James Moulton was my Grandfather and lived across the street from us on Sarah Street in Carleton Place. He was crushed in an accident and he lived to be 87, but he was never the same, could only do light work.

The CPR gave them a free pass for anyone in the family that could be used in their lifetime as payment from them, and it was used a few times that I know of.

They had a small farm on Sarah stretching as far as what is now the subdivision on the east end of Woodward Street. His hay field was where Caldwell Street School is now, and they ended up selling they the property to the school board.

I remember him as only having the one cow, lots of chickens and I earned my Girl Guide Badge for working on the farm and milking a cow. Grandpa was old, smoked a pipe and chewed chewing tobacco, when I was a kid.

I picked up his chewing tobacco at McCann’s Pool Hall (imagine a girl going into the pool hall) and it seemed that everybody stopped what they were doing to look, every time I went in there.

He was a wonderful man, couldn’t read or write but made sure all his children, 9 of them went through to grade 13. The girls all went to Taber Business College, the boys apprenticed in Findlays, all but one of them. What memories I have of him.

On Monday afternoon Mr. James Moulton of the C.P.R. shops in Carleton Place was seriously injured whilst engaged in assisting in repairing a snowplow. In some way the wing was put into motion and Mr. Moulton was caught and most severely crushed. He was rushed to the public hospital in Smiths Falls with little delay and everything is being done to save his life with very little hope of success. Mr. Moulton is 48 years of age and has a wife and seven children depending on him. 1925-02-06- Almonte Gazette

Read-Accident at the C.P.R. Shop –James Moulton

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Norma Ford

Ted Hurdis  my grandmother and her sisters Maude McGonagall, and Ruby Featherstone use to pick wild raspberries up on that property every year

Norma Ford We all played in those fields. Back then (1950’s for me) you could walk through the pasture right through to Lake Park. There were two farms but we went around them, It was a wonderful life for us kids back then. Grandpa didn’t like us trying to ride his calves. lol

Amanda Jane Norma Ford years ago we found an old tombstone in the soccer field next to the apartment buildings in that area.

Norma Ford I will also add that Mrs. Harriet Moulton, his wife and my Grandmother, gave birth to a daughter the same day


Carol Ethridge
 He was my grandfather also. I was only 7 when he died, don’t have as many memories as Norma but I do remember him giving me a metal cup with milk straight from the udder. I took a big mouthful of it and spit it on the barn floor lol

This is a picture of Norma Ford’s family cow on the old Caldwell Street farm.  Donna McLaren posted it as she loves this cow..thank you
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Nov 1940, Wed  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Mar 1968, Sat  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 May 1962, Wed  •  Page 36

Marjorie and Charlie Rintoul–The Rest of the Story– Thanks to Norma Ford

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Marjorie and Charlie Rintoul–The Rest of the Story– Thanks to Norma Ford

 

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Photo- Charlie and Marjory from Norma Ford

 

Yesterday I wrote about Mrs. Charlie Rintoul. People of Lanark County — Mrs. Charlie Rintoul. Norma Ford was able to help me out and now we know the rest of the story thanks to Norma.

I think I can help. Not sure about your story, before my time but mine picks up after 1948. Mrs. Charlie Rintoul maiden name was Marjory Douglas and they lived beside us on Sarah Street in Carleton Place. Her parents were Howard Douglas and Marietta nee Price. Charlie Rintoul delivered ice to people around the Sarah Street area from a horse and wagon and I got to “drive” the horse on a Saturday morning around the years 1950 – 52.

They had a store that jutted into the Mississippi River on the North shore before the bridge on Hwy 7. (I believe one of the Rintoul’s still own property and live there). Marjorie made jewellery and other crafts and sold them at this store in the summer time to the boaters, etc. (I donated a brooch that Marjory had made to the Carleton Place & Beckwith Heritage Museum a couple of years ago).

 

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Howard and Marietta Douglas – Photo Norma Ford

Charlie had his ice house storage barn behind the store. In the summer they stayed in the back of the store, winter months living with Marjory’s parents on Sarah Street. Marjory was born in 1904 and died in 1961 (I was told from a ruptured gall bladder, she waited too long to go to a doctor). I am not sure of the date of Charlie’s death. I am sending a picture of Charlie and Marjory, a picture of Marjory’s headstone and a picture of her parents Howard and Marietta Douglas (terrible picture but the only one I have of them sitting in their back yard). Howard Douglas had a forge in a barn on his property on Sarah Street and he made well casings and pumps for a living.

Marjory and Charlie had no children, I was the closest to a daughter they had and both of them as well as Marjory’s parents were my surrogate parents. Bill Rintoul, not sure what relationship to Charlie but I think a nephew gave some of Charlie’s ice tools to the Middleville Museum and I sent the picture of Charlie up to them as well. The Douglas’s and the Rintoul’s were fantastic neighbours and substitute parents to me.

Norma Ford

 

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St. James Cemetery

 

Thursday, March 9th, 1961  —We are very sorry to learn of the passing of Mrs. Charles Rintoul, Carleton Place and extend our sincerest sympathy to her husband and parents.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

People of Lanark County — Mrs. Charlie Rintoul

A Settler’s Love Story

The Love Story of the Lanark County Brakeman

A McDonalds Corners Love Story

I just Wanted Someone to Love Me- 1868

True Love Story

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Accident at the C.P.R. Shop –James Moulton

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Accident at the C.P.R. Shop –James Moulton

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Hi Linda

 The attached articles are about my Grandfather, James Moulton.  The day his accident happened, my Grandmother, Harriet Walker Fisher Moulton gave birth to their youngest daughter which made 8 children.  They eventually had two more sons.

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James Moulton was my Grandfather and Harriet Walker Fisher my Grandmother
who had a farm across the street from us on Sarah Street.All the children were born at 26 Sarah Street, in later years it was changed to 92 Sarah Street.

On Monday afternoon Mr. James Moulton of the C.P.R. shops in Carleton Place was seriously injured whilst engaged in assisting in repairing a snowplow. In some way the wing was put into motion and Mr. Moulton was caught and most severely crushed. He was rushed to the public hospital in Smiths Falls with little delay and everything is being done to save his life with very little hope of success. Mr. Moulton is  48 years of age and has a wife and seven children depending on him. 1925-02-06- Almonte Gazette

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The CPR gave my Grandparents a lifetime pass with the railroad and it was used a couple of times, mainly to go to Montreal when there had been other serious accidents in the family (Montreal seemed to be the place to go for medical care).  As far as I know, he did not receive any other financial benefits, and I don’t know if the CPR paid for his stay in hospital.  My Grandpa did not go back to work at the CPR, he was never very healthy after the accident.  He farmed on Sarah Street, Caldwell Street (where the school is now) and also a few acres on Woodward Street.  He lived to be 87 and died November 8, 1962 of “hardening of the arteries”, known as Alzheimer’s now. —-Norma Ford

 

 

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My favourite picture of my Grandfather James Moulton (how I remember him) and some of your readers will remember him from this picture.–Norma Ford

 

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Screenshot 2017-09-14 at 11

Norma and I still have not found out when he was released from the Smiths Falls Hospital and returned to Carleton Place in the newspaper archives.

I know when he was sent home we was still bedridden.  My Grandmother did what a physical therapist would do today – rubbed him down, made sure he was turned and made him exercise his limbs.  She was credited with getting him walking again.  Something we think nothing about today but it must have been a real hardship back then with a bedridden husband, a new baby and 7 other children.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Mar 1968, Sat,  Page 5

 They (the family) said he was never the same physically again although I remember him milking the cows, other farm related work and he had a massive garden that he maintained although I now realize why he worked slower than my Dad.  —Norma Ford

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Nov 1962, Fri,  Page 3

 

 

 

historicalnotes

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This is a picture of Norma Ford’s family cow on the old Caldwell Street farm.  Donna McLaren posted it as she loves this cow..thank you!

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Today’s photo is of workers taking a break at the CPR Engine Repair Shops. Built in 1890 as a round house and repair shop for the Canadian Pacific Railway, it employed about 200 workers. After operations were moved to Smiths Falls, the building was purchased by the Canadian Cooperative Woolgrowers. Iron tracks from the turntable in the roundhouse were sold as scrap to help the war effort in 1940. Can you help us identify any of these men?–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Jun 1904, Mon,  Page 8

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Nov 1907, Mon,  Page 8

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Norma Ford

A Carleton Place Fenian Soldier’s Photo

Carleton Place Wins Prizes for their Wool!

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place– Wooly Bully!!!! Part 6

Before The Carleton Place Mews?

 

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

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DORMAN William Hilton - 35 years with Findlay Foundry.jpg

 

Hi Linda

Would you post the attached photo and see if I can get some of them identified.  This is a picture of employees of Findlay Foundry that celebrated 35 years working there.  The only ones I can identify are:  4th standing from the left is Moff Blaine; my father – Hilton Dorman is standing 7th from the left and the 11th from the left standing is Tom Labron.  That’s all I know in the picture.  These 3 individuals celebrated 35 years at the foundry and the guy sitting in the middle is holding the silver tray that was presented to each of these men.  I don’t know if all of them worked there for 35 years or not.  Linda Stewart, Tom Labron’s daughter gave me a copy of this picture. Any help to identify the men would be appreciated.

 Norma Ford

Robert Hawkins-Feduke added: 

The gentleman, first row, fourth from the left, is my uncle, “Buck” Hawkins, who was a long time employee of the foundry.

Want to see more? Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

RELATED READING:

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Norma Ford

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Photos Courtesy of Norma Ford

 

This is how The Tales of Carleton Place  on Facebook goes.  I write, people comment on my posts, and I document them on the story. Then some send me stories which I love. Another guest author today– Carleton Place’s very own Norma Ford– Thank you Norma!

James Moulton was my Grandfather and Harriet Walker Fisher my Grandmother
who had a farm across the street from us on Sarah Street.All the children were born at 26 Sarah Street, in later years it was changed to 92 Sarah Street.  They owned the
land that Caldwell Street is built on (used as their hay field for the
cattle) and also owned land at what was the end of Woodward Street where the
subdivision is now.  They sold it to Allan Doucett,  Councilman Brian Doucett’s father for a
housing development when they were unable to farm any more, probably the late
1950’s.

My grade was one of the first classes to attend Caldwell Street
School and because it had been a hay field before that, at recess the boys
would find the snakes and throw them at the girls.  I had one wrapped around
my neck (it was alive) and I just about died of a heart attack.  To this day
when I see one but my sweetie is kind to me, kills them, and gets rid of them
so I don’t see them.

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Joseph Moulton and Mary Ford- Photos Courtesy of Norma Ford

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My Grandparents had the last farm in Carleton Place and I had the pleasure
of milking the cows and shovelling ‘what they produced intestinally” as a young girl.  My sister and I were the only Girl Guides to get the milking badge in Carleton Place as we
had access to a cow.  We learned how to separate and make butter and loved the left
over, fantastic buttermilk.–Norma Ford

 

historicalnotes

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This is a picture of Norma Ford’s family cow on the old Caldwell Street farm.  Donna McLaren posted it as she loves this cow..thank you!

 

 

Guest Author Series-

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Lynne Johnson

A Carleton Place Fenian Soldier’s Photo

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Samuel Fisher Photo from Carleton Place’s very own Norma Ford

Norma thinks this is a picture of Samuel Fisher, born July 1848 in Perth and died April 14, 1919 in Almonte. 

“When I was going through my Grandmother’s writings, she said there was a picture of her Great-Grandfather at the museum in Perth.  I went to check with them and this is the only picture they have from that time period.  I have his military records where he served in Prescott at the time of the Fenian Raids although they did not see any action in that area. A great picture whether it is my Great Grandfather or not.”–Norma Ford Carleton Place, Ontario.

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Linda, something else interesting about Samuel Fisher. He is buried in the Anglican Cemetery outside of Almonte. His son, James Fisher owned a bronze factory in Burlington and made the headstone, picture attached. I can’t believe how well the headstone has survived the test of time, maybe all headstones should be made of bronze.

historicalnotes

Perth Courier, October 29, 1897— *Samuel Fisher* is mentioned here

Upon the recommendation of Sir Richard Cartwright, Minister of Trade and Commerce, the British authorities have consented to order an issue of medals to those Canadian volunteers who took part in the suppression of the Fenian uprising or invasion in 1866 and subsequent years.  Lord Lansdowne, our former Governor General, and now Imperial Secretary, a few days ago cabled the Canadian Minister of Militia that he has recommended such a medal be struck.  To those who participated in two or more engagements they will be awarded a clasp.  Though 31 years have gone there are quite a number yet in town and elsewhere of the members of the two Perth volunteer companies who left “for the front” in March and June of 1866 and we give below the names of as many as we can gather with their present post office addresses.  Many are no longer in the land of the living and many others have after this lapse of years scattered to the four winds and their present abiding place is not known.

Perth Rifle Company

Captain Edmund Spillman in British Columbia

Lt. Thomas Moffat, Perth

Ensign Major J.S. Douglas, Shelburne(?), Ont.

Color Sergeant John Kippen, Los Angeles, California

Sgt. W. M. Kellock, Perth

Privates:

Still in Perth—Robert Lillie, Peter Lavergne, William Lawson, *Samuel Fisher*, William Watson, Benjamin Warren, James Moore.  George Steele, Smith’s Falls; George Larivee, Sand Point; William Farmer, Arnprior; D.G. Mitchell, Campbelville, Kentucky; Manasses Patterson, Almonte; W.H. Wylie, Michipecotin(?); M. McMartin

Read the Perth Courier here at Archives Lanark

 Related reading:

Fenians OR Ballygiblins? Fighting Irish 101

Looking for the Artist of this Carleton Place Painting

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This painting was donated to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum by local Carleton Place resident Norma Ford. It is slightly different than the postcard I posted below, but it gives you a general idea.

We are trying to find out who the artist is? Anyone have an idea? Please let us know.

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Debbie Gibsons dad Roy Gibson used to do quite a few paintings in town if I’m not mistaken. A lot of them you could see in Hastie Brothers window on Main Street. Tom Edwards

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Lime Kiln painting by Norma Ford’s father

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Norma Ford– It was an Italian couple that lived in the apartment beside ours on the 3rd floor of the Comba apartments above where The Blossom Shop is now. He painted for a hobby and we were friends and gave us this painting but I noticed years later that he hadn’t signed it and we don’t remember their names. They only lived there for about 4 months then moved to Ottawa I believe. Very nice couple. In early 1964.

The Lime Kiln

The Lime Kiln…99 years of history

By Mary Cook

Carleton Place Canadian, 1987

 

The Ottawa Valley, and particularly Lanark County was fast gaining a reputation in the lime industry just before the turn of this century.  An enterprising local industrialist, Napoleon Lavalee (after whom Napoleon Street was named) capitalized on that reputation and built what was to be a long lasting, Carleton Place industry.  When the end product was realized, lime was carted off to help build some of the most prestigious buildings in the Nation’s Capital.

Napoleon Lavalee built the first kiln on the very site of the present one in the mid-1800s.  It was a crude affair, but served the purpose well.  Many years later the new owner Bill Cameron updated the equipment, and laid the foundation for what was to become a major contributor to the lime industry in Eastern Ontario.

The stack kiln Bill Cameron built was more efficient than the “pits” put in by Napoleon Lavalee.  They rose high in the air, looking like big chimneys.  New buildings were added to smooth out the operation, and for many years…going into the 20s, Bill Cameron was able to offer steady employment to a clatch of hard working employees.  Then the 30s rolled in with all their ramifications.  There wasn’t an industry untouched by the depression.  There was no exception.  But Bill Cameron was a very unusual man.  He felt for his employees, most of them trying to support big families on meager wages.  To lay them off would have been devastating.

Margaret Lesway Henderson was just a little girl when her family moved next door to the lime kiln on Napoleon Street.  She remembers very clearly those depression years.  And she especially remembers how Bill Cameron did everything in his power to keep his men working.  The lime business had slowed to a crawl.  So the men were sent to the bush lots to cut cedar.  Cord after cord of cedar was hauled into the yard.  Bill Cameron must have wondered if he would ever use it all, when, and if the lime business ever picked up again.  “I was just a young girl, but I can remember so well those huge piles of cedar.  And every day the workers would haul in more.  Mr. Cameron stock piled the wood just to keep his men employed, because the alternative was to lay them off, and that would have meant terrible hardships for many of the town’s families,” Margaret recalls.

George Briscoe of Beckwith Township was Bill Cameron’s shanty man.  Through good management, the business held on all through the 30s.  With the 40s came a new interest in the lime business, and prosperity.  In 1944, Bill Cameron was ready to call it quits and he sold the Lime Kiln to another enterprising young businessman, Stuart Neilson.

The Napoleon Street business saw its greatest changes after Stuart Neilson took it over.  He moved it from a piece meal operation to an efficient, more scientifically run business.  It became a 24 hour pursuit.  It was moved from a rather primitive procedure to a sophisticated performance that saw many changes and innovations in the Napoleon Street business.

The procedure had to basically remain the same, but Mr. Neilson made vast improvements.  He changed the shape and the functions of the kilns and was able to produce twice as much lime as the old time kiln.

However, many of the jobs leading up to the burning didn’t change or changed only marginally.  Trucks replaced the horse-drawn wagons for hauling the limestone into town from the 4thand 5th concessions of Ramsay.  Shirley Sheinfield can still see in her mind’s eye those trucks lumbering up past her house on Napoleon Street, and the familiar sounds relative to the procedure of burning lime.  “You heard this steady ‘bang’ all the time.  That was when the big pieces of limestone would be dropped into the kiln.  It was like thunder, and it was constant,” she says.  She also remembers a horse by the name of Queenie.  The horse was used to power the winch which hauled the limestone up to the top of the kiln.  “Queenie was kept in a field across the road.  Of course, there were no houses there then…just an open field.  And I can still hear the man who drove the horse yelling ‘giddyup Queenie’.  I guess those are sounds you never forget, because they were so constant”, Shirley said.

John Neilson, Stuart’s son, remembers the horse powered winch very well.  He was just a young boy when his father put him to work.  “My job was to drive the horse to operate the winch.  It was a simple operation.  The lime was broken into big chunks in the quarry, then transported into town on the trucks.  This breaking process was done by hand with big mallets.  Then the pieces were loaded into big steel boxes.  The horse was driven in continuous circle to wind up the cable which hauled boxes to the top of the kiln.  Then the boxes of lime were tilted at the top by a tripper, and the limestone fell down into the kiln for burning.  But it was my job to keep that horse going”, John remembers. He also remembers his father as being a hard task master.  There were no privileges just because he was the owner’s son.  “He demanded when I did a job, that it had to be done right, or I would have to do it all over again”, he recalls.

Margaret Henderson remembers the yards as a great place for adventure.  There were many things to interest a young child back in the 30s.  Piles of stone were everywhere, and the robins and ground sparrows used to build their nests in the piles.  “We used o position ourselves in front of the piles and watch the birds in their nests.  We would even see the eggs hatch out.  I remember the horse too.  I’m not sure if it was Queenie, because the horse I remember never had a driver.  It just knew and would slow down or stop altogether, and then the man on the top of the kiln would let a roar out of him, and the horse would start up again.  I can remember that.  We used to think that was very funny.  Our biggest joy was at Christmas time.  Those sleighs filled with limestone would go up the street, and we kids would run and jump on the back of them and get a ride.  We loved that.  We weren’t allowed to go back where the lime was being ‘drawn off’.  That was considered a very dangerous place for a child.  But I remember one time two young lads were back there where they weren’t supposed to be.  Well, one dared the other to jump in the ashes which had been taken out of the bottom of the kiln.  You’d never know they were hot to look at them.  The young lad jumped in and he was very seriously burned.  He spent months in the hospital, I know.  We were never allowed back there, and I don’t know how those got there, but they did”, Margaret reflects.

She also remembers that the Lime Kiln had the only well on the street.  “We were all allowed to use it.  Everyone who lived on that part of Napoleon Street would go up to the Lime Kiln with their pails and bring the water home.  It was years later when water was finally put up the street and we didn’t have to haul it from the lime kiln any longer.”

John Neilson remembers when the business ran 11 months of the year and employed up to 15 men.  “Dad kept it going 24 hours a day.  We fired with slab wood, and it took a lot to keep it going, but it was a big business right up to about the mid-60s, and hauling in limestone was stopped altogether in the early 1970s”, he said.

By the time this account of the lime kiln is read by Canadian subscribers, most of the antique equipment will have gone on the auction block.  A sale today (Wednesday) will all but eliminate the workings of the Lime Kiln.  Old machinery, an antique truck, bits and pieces of history of one of the town’s long time industries will have gone to the highest bidder.

But for people like Shirley Sheinfield and Margaret Henderson, memories of that site will be with them always.  Last week Margaret took a walk past the lime kiln, up the street she called home for many years. “So many……..flashed that part of the old drive shed where Mr. Cameron kept a beautiful old buggy.  It was very fancy.  It had lights on it, and a lot of brass.  We kids used to pry open the little window closed to our house, and we’d crawl in and sit in that buggy and pretend we were somebody really important.  I can remember those weigh scales and the sounds of those trucks rolling over them.  I remember the day a team of horses ran away, and how if I hadn’t stepped back, they would have run right over me.  Last week I saw those piles of ashes.  We kids would get huge cardboard boxes and climb to the top of the ash pile and slide ….was having as much fun as we were having.  It will be hard to see that landmark gone.”

But that’s exactly what is going to happen to whatever remains after the auction sale today.  John Neilson said the last fragments of the yard will eventually be cleared away.  When the final board is hauled away, all that will remain will be memories.  Lime is still being manufactured.  But the process is much different.  The calcining remains the same, but large rotary lime kilns have replaced the primitive stacks.

It will take a long time to clean up the final remnants of the business Napoleon Lavalee started almost 100 years ago, but the memories of the site will remain with many for years to come.