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Update — Teacher Fired in Appleton School May 1931 –Annie Neilson

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Update — Teacher Fired in Appleton School May 1931 –Annie Neilson

A bitter dispute that arose in the Appleton school section over the action of School Inspector J. C. Spence, of Carleton Place, in suspending the teaching certificate of Miss Annie Neilson, teacher of the junior room in the Appleton school, was settled, Tuesday, when Chief Inspector Greer of Toronto had a conference with Inspector Spence, the teachers and the school trustees. Appleton School has two class rooms, the senior one taught by Miss Ida Paul who has been there 34 years end the Junior form in charge of Miss Neilson who commenced her duties there at the opening of the last September term.

Miss Neilson comes from Appleton and taught school in Alberta for upwards of nine years before taking a position at home. The trouble began over the question of promoting a little girl. Miss Neilson’s predecessor is said to have recommended the pupil’s promotion when she was leaving, but Miss Neilson derided she would be better to remain a little longer in the grade -where she then was. Inspector Spence was appealed to and is said to have recom­mended that the child be promoted.

Friction followed and the Inspector, it is said, suspended the teacher’s per­mit to become effective on May 4, 1931. Trustees sided with Miss Neilson, and while the Inspector’s action made it impossible for them to use the room in the school formerly presided over by the teacher, they opened a temporary class room in the community hall and put Miss Neilson in charge of it. Lessons began there on Tuesday, May the 5th.

Several conferences were held at one of which J. A. Craig, M. L. A., for North Lanark is said to have been present to pour oil on the troubled waters. Apparently his oil was not effective, because a call was sent to the Department of Education and the chief inspector, Mr. Greer, was sent to Appleton to see what he could do about it. After a conference the purpose of which was to smooth over the difficulty it is said it was decided to leave the child where she is at present and the teacher, Miss Neilson, was reinstated in her position. The matter, it is understood, is still before the Department and the present solution may be but a temporary one.

Meanwhile several ratepayers of the Appleton School Section drew up a petition which is being circulated through the county and will be forwarded to other parts of Ontario praying the Government to discard its new legislation which greatly increases the powers of public school inspectors. Authors of the petition claim the new legislation, that came into effect recently, takes away all powers from school trustees. They can’t even buy wood without the school inspector’s sanction.

Trustees say the new control is the consolidated school system that Former Premier Ferguson tried to put over masquerading under another in the unit system. Those behind the petition claim this inspectorate is not the oniy one in which friction has arisen over the added powers the Government has given to school inspectors. It is the same in other districts and they think school boards representative of tax payers in country school sections should be given back the control over school administration that the trustees formerly enjoyed.

Under the new legislation school inspectors are no longer appointed by county councils, but by the Province had in return for this concession on the part of the county councils the Provincial Government has assumed the burden of paying the inspectors. When asked about the Appleton affair Inspector Spence said he did not care to comment. It was unfortunate, he thought, that the matter should be given publicity. There were only a couple of school sections in the district where trouble had been experienced and the more said about it the worse it would be for all concerned and particularly for the interest in education 

May 1931

read-Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Dec 1912, Thu  •  Page 14

Annie Neilson on right side of clipping

annies name is on the very bottom of the right hand column

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada19 Dec 1912, Thu  •  Page 14

John Neilson – Neilson Family – Chocolate Genealogy

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John Neilson – Neilson Family – Chocolate Genealogy

Name:John Neilson[John F. Neilson]
Gender:Male
Age:78
Birth Date:abt 1850
Birth Place:Ramsay, Ontario
Death Date:4 Nov 1928
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Cause of Death:Stroke Cerebral Hemorrhage With Fanlysie

928, Friday November 9, The Almonte Gazette front page
John Neilson Passes After A Brief Illness
Was One of the Outstanding Citizens of Almonte for Many Years
Was Born on the Pioneer Homestead of the Neilsons in Ramsay.
He was 78 Years of Age. His Wife Died 22 Years Ago.


Almonte has lost a valued and honoured citizen, in the death of Mr John Neilson, who passed away on Sunday evening. His death was a great shock to the town and district, for he had been ill only a few days. Mr Neilson was one of the outstanding citizens of the town, and was held in the highest esteem by a very large circle of friends, both in town and throughout the surrounding district. He was the son of the late Mr and Mrs James Neilson and was in his 79th year. Born in March 1850, in the old pioneer homestead on the 12th line Ramsay, where his grandfather, John Neilson, who came out from Scotland, settled there in the year 1820. Mr Neilson later moved to the 11th line Ramsay, where he successfully followed the occupation of farming for many years until he retired in 1916 and moved to Almonte, where he had since resided.


Active Church Worker
In religion the late Mr Neilson was a staunch Presbyterian. he took an active part in church work, and was a member of the Board of Session for many years. At the time of church union he held the opposite view and adhered to the Continuing body of that denomination and was a member of the Session of that church, up to the time of his death. He was predeceased by his wife, Janet McIlquam, who died twenty-two years ago, in May 1906. He is survived by four sisters, Agnes, Mrs Wilkie, of Toronto, widow of the late Rev John Wilkie, formerly of Indore, India; Marion, Mrs David Forgie, of Cleveland, Ohio; and the Misses Sarah and Jessie, both of whom resided with him at the family home here. Two brothers Matthew and William, and two sisters, Margaret and Mary, died some years ago.


The Funeral
The funeral took place on Tuesday from the family residence to the Presbyterian Church, and thence to the Auld Kirk Cemetery. Impressive services were conducted by the Rev W.H. McCracken, assisted by Rev George Thom. Mr McCracken made reference to the high character and staunch personality of the deceased elder, and there was a large congregation of mourners, many coming from long distances to pay a final tribute of respect and friendship. There were many floral offerings and messages of sympathy. The pallbearers were: Messrs Stanley Neilson, Montreal; James Neilson, Toronto; John Neilson, Welland; Robert Neilson, Ottawa; George McCallum, Carleton Place, all nephews of deceased, and Mr W. D. Aikenhead, of Pakenham.
Contributor: Gary J Byron (49329383)

Neilsen farm- Appleton side Road-Photo from the North Lanark Regional Museum

ReadWhen Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

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Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

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North Lanark Regional Museum Photos

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 May 1931, Mon,  Page 15

 

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

School Salaries of 1918

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

 

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

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neilson Photo from the North Lanark Regional Museum

Who doesn’t remember Neilson Chocolate bars? Jersey Milk, Mr. Big, Malted Milk, Sweet Marie and Crispy Crunch and PEP were common names from our childhood. So what does this have to do with our local area? If you take a drive out to the Appleton North Lanark Regional Museum, hang a left at the 3 corners. Just a short distance on your right well hidden in the distant bushes lies the farm that the Neilson family once owned.

In 1820 a Scottish weaver named John Nilson left his home in Paisley with his wife Agnes to find a new life in Canada. John Nilson at some point changed his name to Neilson for reasons unknown shortly after he arrived in Canada.

 

William Neilson, the  third child of the Neilson family, was born on that Appleton side road farm in March of 1841. After working in Almonte as a machinist William moved away from the family farm to the United States and in Rochester, N.Y. where met his future wife, Mary Eva

Kaiser. They moved to Brockville and opened a grocery store, but tragedy swept through the family and business after a fire wiped out their home and store also claiming the lives of their small son and daughter.

William’s Grandmother sent them money to make a fresh start, so Neilson decided to open a grocery store in Toronto in 1867. Sadly, he didn’t have much luck with that store and the business went bankrupt three years later. For a mere $4 a month he placed his family in a rented house on 4 acres while he went to work on his brother’s farm in North Dakota. There he sent what he could to financially support his wife and children.

Meanwhile back on that 4 acres his wife Mary sold milk from the family cow door to door and made mincemeat pies. Neilsen finally returned home after the harvest and used every penny the family had saved and invested in 7 cows and some used hand cranked ice cream makers. He decided then and there that his ice cream was going to be the very best. William insisted on using the finest cream and had a personal secret on how to get that churner to turn faster to give it a smooth taste. The result was perfection, and Neilson ice cream was a hit in the summer of 1893. The family sold 3,750 gallons and made a profit of over $3000.

With that money he built a three-storey home with an attached factory on Gladstone Avenue in Toronto but soon learned business for ice cream was slow in the winter. Neilson always insisted on treating employees like family and nothing less, so he needed to come up with some sort of new concept for the slow months. Because of his concern for his employees and his desire to keep them, that inspired the creation of Neilson chocolate and it became an instant hit.

He used local dairy products from local farmers in his new factory which was a former cheese factory in Beachville, Ontario. Sadly in 1915 he stumbled on a plank at his factory, was injured, and died of a stroke shortly after. By 1915, when William Neilson died at the age of 71, the Neilson company was producing a million pounds of ice cream every year and 500,000 pounds of chocolate.

His second son Morden took over the company after his father’s death and under his watch became the largest producer of ice cream in the British Commonwealth and the largest manufacturer of chocolates around the world.  Wiliam’s other two sons Charles was vice president  and Allan was assistant manager. After Morden’s death in 1947, William Neilson Ltd. was bought by the George Weston firm

Neilson purchased the Canadian operations of the Cadbury Confectionery Company, and started producing Dairy Milk, Caramilk and several other brands. Once again, William Neilson Ltd. was the largest candy bar manufacturer in Canada. In 1981, Neilson also got exclusive distribution rights and a manufacturing license to produce Haagen-Dazs premium ice cream. In 1990, William Neilson Ltd. sold its ice cream production business, including the Haagen-Dazs license, to Ault Foods and restructured into two separate companies.

Now, each time I drive by that stone farm on the Appleton Side Road I smile because William Neilson knew that all you needed to succeed was a lot of family love and to make sure life was full of ice cream and chocolate.

Photo of Neilson Farm (Yaremko)- donation to North Lanark Regional Museum

Many thanks to Melissa Alexander -Project Coordinator
North Lanark Historical Society–North Lanark Regional Museum
647 River Rd, Appleton, Ontario.

With some files from The Almonte Gazette

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Perth Courier, Nov. 17, 1899–One of the most esteemed residents of Ramsay, in the person of Matthew Neilson, departed this life on Monday afternoon this week at the age of 63(?)65(?).  Deceased was the youngest son of the late John Neilson one of the pioneer settlers of the township who took up land on the 12th line about three miles from Appleton.  Here the deceased was born and lived on his portion of the land until 1881 when he moved to the 11th Concession where he resided until his death.  Before moving to the 11th Line, about 1872, he purchased a farm from the late John Gemmill and had 230 acres in all.  In the year 1858 he married Emily Teskey, daughter of the late John Teskey, who survives him.  There were 7 children, three sons and four daughters:  John on the homestead; George on the Gemmill farm; Annie (Mrs. Alex Turner); Aggie (Mrs. John Thom); and Emeline, James and Jennie on the homestead.  In religion he was a Presbyterian and a life long member of that church.  In politics he was a Liberal.  At the time of his death he was a trustee of the Appleton school which position he has held for a number of years.  He was also a member of the board of education.  All his brothers have passed away but two sisters still are living—Mrs. William Smith and Mrs. Gavin Hamilton.  Almonte Times, November 11

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

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Neilson was taken over by Cadbury’s and then by Kraft foods. Here is the original packaging by Neilson that were popular when we were younger.

 

  • Häagen-Dazs ice cream licence – acquired in 1981, sold to Ault Foods in 1990.
  • Cadbury Confectionery Company Canadian operations – acquired in 1987, sold all confectionary and chocolate products back to British Cadbury in 1996. Currently licensesCaramilk and Crispy Crunch-flavoured chocolate milk.
  • Chocolate bars and confectionery – Jersey Milk, Mr. Big, Malted Milk, Sweet Marie and Crispy Crunch (for which the recipe was changed), Pep, Will-O-Pak sold back to British Cadbury in 1996. Jersey Milk and Will-O-Paks continue to have the Neilson brand name on them; however, they are now manufactured by Cadbury Canada.
  • Bite-size chocolates – Neilson sells several varieties of chocolate snacks, including Golden Buds, small milk chocolates similar to Hershey’s Kisses; Slowpokes, similar toTurtles; and Willocrisp, flaky peanut wafers dipped in chocolate, similar to Crispy Crunch.–Wikipedia

 

So what does this have to do with our local area? If you take a drive out to the Appleton North Lanark Regional Museum and hang a left at the 3 corners, just down on your right in between the bushes lies the farm that the Neilson family once owned.

Neilson Dairy

From its founding in 1893, the William Neilson Company was dedicated to “nothing but the best.”

“William Neilson”
William Neilson, the son of Scottish immigrants, was born on a farm near Almonte in Southern Ontario. Trained as a machinist, he moved to Toronto in 1890 to open a grocery store. Three years later, the business was bankrupt. William rented a house on four acres of land for $4 a month for his family, then went to work on his brother’s farm in North Dakota for $4 a day.William sent as much money back to his family as he could; meanwhile, his wife, Mary, sold her home-made mincemeat pies door to door, while their oldest son, Morden, milked the family cow and sold the milk door to door on his way to school.When William Neilson returned from North Dakota after the harvest, he took a chance, investing every penny the family had saved in seven cows and some used, hand-cranked ice cream makers.
“Nothing but the best”
From the very beginning, Neilson stood by his credo: “Nothing but the best.” Some ice-cream manufacturers may have used milk, but Neilson used only the purest cream and he had a secret other manufacturers didn’t know: to get the smoothest ice cream, you have to churn the cream faster as it gets firmer (some say that William’s insistence on this technique gave son Morden Neilson – the family’s official “churner” in the first summer – the physique that made him Canada’s amateur wrestling champion from 1900 to 1903).Neilson’s Ice Cream was an instant success. In their first summer as ice cream makers, the Neilson family sold an amazing 3,750 gallons, earning a profit of $3000 – a princely profit in 1893.The business quickly prospered and grew, and in 1904, William Neilson built a three-storey home with an attached factory on Gladstone Avenue in Toronto. The only trouble was, ice cream sales tend to fall off in the winter. Neilson knew he had to keep his 25 skilled employees working year round, so he launched a line of chocolates. Again, he used only the best ingredients, and Neilson chocolates were an instant success as Neilson’s ice cream had been.As the business grew, William ensured the critical supply of milk when he purchased a former cheese factory in Beachville, Ontario, buying dairy products from surrounding farmers.By 1915, when William Neilson died at the age of 71, the Neilson company was producing a million pounds of ice cream every year and 500,000 pounds of chocolate.
“Continuing the Tradition”
William’s second son, Morden, took over the company at his father’s death in 1915. But he had worked his way up through the company – starting as a milker and ice cream churner at the company’s founding. Under his leadership, William Neilson Ltd. became the largest producer of ice cream in the British Commonwealth and the largest manufacturer of chocolates around the world, earning international renown.Morden continued the traditions established by his father. He was a “hands-on” manager, intimately involved in the daily operations of the company. He was an innovative promoter: in summer 1921, he dressed a man in a heavy parker like an “Eskimo” to walk up and down Yonge Street to introduce Eskimo Pies. and in 1924, he used a contest to launch what became the company’s all-time best-seller: the Jersey Milk chocolate bar. The first prize: a Jersey cow.
“Treating Employees like Family”
William Neilson always treated employees like family – it was his concern for his employees and his desire to keep them that inspired the creation of Neilson chocolates. The company’s several employee picnics every year became  a local event. Morden Neilson continued this tradition with ball games, lunch hour concerts and winter sleigh rides for the employees. He knew all of his 1000 employees by name, and the names of their wives. The strong relationship between Morden and the Neilson employees was shown when Morden was diagnosed with leukemia in 1947: hundreds of employees donated blood for his treatments. All were saddened when, on August 26, 1947, Morden Neilson succumbed to his illness; he was buried beside his parents in the Forest Lawn Mausoleum in the north end of Toronto.
“The Founding Principles Today”
After Morden’s death, William Neilson Ltd. was bought by the George Weston firm. Weston continued the traditions established by William and Morden Neilson: a commitment to the best ingredients, people, processes and products, and a strong and positive relationship with employees.When it acquired William Neilson Ltd. in 1947 (for $45 a share), Weston already owned and operated two dairies: the Donlands Dairy in eastern Toronto, and the Royal Dairy in Guelph, Ontario. In 1947, Weston acquired Clark Dairy in Ottawa. Each one operated independently, each with its own label. In 1981, the company incorporated all three Under one corporate structure, giving them all the popular Neilson brand name. Now fluid milk products were part of the Neilson lineup.Meanwhile, the Gladstone Avenue plant continued to produce Neilson ice cream, from premium to economy brands, and Neilson chocolate bars such as Jersey Milk, Malted Milk, Mr. Big and others. In 1987, Neilson purchased the Canadian operations of the Cadbury Confectionery Company, and started producing Dairy Milk, Caramilk and several other brands. Once again, William Neilson Ltd. was the largest candy bar manufacturer in Canada.In 1981, Neilson also got exclusive distribution rights and a manufacturing license to produce Haagen-Dazs premium ice cream.In 1990, William Neilson Ltd. sold its ice cream production business, including the Haagen-Dazs license, to Ault Foods and restructured into two separate companies: Neilson Cadbury, based on Gladstone Ave., producing chocolates and confections; and Neilson Dairy, based in Halton Hills (Georgetown) and with a facility in the former Clark Dairy premise in Ottawa, producing milk products. George Weston Limited sold Neilson Cadbury in 1996.
“Nothing but the Best in Dairy”
The Neilson tradition of quality, excellence and dedication continues today Under its “twin manufacturing plant” system. At the premises of the former Clark Dairy, the modern, high-efficiency Ottawa Neilson Dairy supplies eastern Ontario and western Quebec. The Superdairy in Halton Hills, which opened in 1981, supplies the Greater Toronto Area, as well as the rest of Ontario. Combined, Neilson Dairy produces millions of litres of milk products annually.Built after two years of research and design, the Superdairy was the most modern dairy in North America at its opening and remains a leader in technology, innovation, design and productivity. It has also been recognized by the government as the cleanest and most sanitary dairy in Canada. Its employees are among the best in the industry and lead the dairy industry in training and development. Most important, Neilson Dairy’s employees continue the tradition of dedication to producing the best products possible.