Tag Archives: names

Almonte Public Utilities Salaries??? November 1940

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Almonte Public Utilities Salaries??? November 1940

At the last regular meeting of the Almonte Public Utilities Commission, held Thursday night, Oct. 31, several of the employees were granted small pay increases. In a letter sent to the Commission about, two months ago, the three operators at the generating plant— Messrs. Wm. McClymont, Duncan Forgie and O. L. James asked for more remuneration. They based their plea on the fact they had never been given any more money through the years and that the cost of living was advancing since war broke out.

 The rate of pay received by these men worked out at 30 cents an hour for an eight hour day, seven days a week. This meant a weekly salary of $16.80. The superintendent of the system, Mr. Edgar Lee received $28 a week; his assistant, Mr. Prank Honeyborne, $25 a week; the secretary, who has charge of accounting and collections, $22.50 a week. When this question first came before the Commission, Mr. James Edmonds, representative of the Mayor on the Board, felt that the request of the men should receive favorable consideration. He offered a motion to that effect but was blocked by the chairman, Dr. A. A. Metcalfe, who demanded that notice of motion be given. This was done.

Mississippi River Power Corp. Dr. Metcalfe

When the matter came up on the night of Thursday, Oct. 31st, Dr. Metcalfe was absent. In support of his application for an increase, Mr. Lee urged the same reasons as the operators, as did Mr. Honeybome. Mr. Kelly took the same stand but added that since the imposition of a Federal tax on electric power, the duties of his office had been increased considerably—-so much so, that he had to do quite a bit of overtime for which he received no monetary consideration.

After a good deal of discussion it was decided to give Mr. Lee and Mr. Kelly a dollar a week more plus five percent of their former salary. Mr. Honeybourne’s request was not entertained. The three operators were allowed a five per cent increase on what they were getting, but were not given any straight raise such as the dollar added in the case of two employees above mentioned. The result of this concession on the part of the commission, as it worked out for the three men in the generating plant who had asked for 35 cents an hour instead of 30 cents, was almost amusing if it was so insignificant. It meant that instead of receiving $16.80 a week, they will get $17.63—-an increase, of a fraction under 1 1-2 cents an hour, or to put it otherwise 83 cents a week.

Naturally, the consensus of opinion among the three operators, who work eight hours;a day, seven days a week, is that the commissioners might better have rejected their application than insulted them. How the Minimum Wage Board of Ontario would view remuneration paid to these men, in view of the hours they work, is a point that raises interesting speculation. In view of the magnanimous action of the commission the three power house operators have concluded that so far as they are concerned, Santa Claus visited them almost two months earlier than usual

Nov 7 1940- Almonte Gazette

Mississippi River Power Corp.
Mississippi River Power CorpMississippi River Power Corp.In the photo from left to right are:
W.H. Black
R.A. Jamieson
Peter Matthews (with contractor Barber & Sons Ltd.)
H.W. Cole
W.E. Scott
Dunce. Forgie
James Muir
Oliver Smith (also with Barber)
With the shovel – Dr. W.C. Young (Chairman of the Commission)

Almonte Hunting Parties — November 1941– Names Names and more Names

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Almonte Hunting Parties — November 1941– Names Names and more Names

Greville Toshack poses with his hunting dog and rifle.
1900
Almonte Mill of Kintail Conservation Area Lanark, Ontario Photo

November 1941- Almonte Gazette

The old saying about distant fields looking green certainly applies to deer hunting this year. While more hunters than usual are roaming the wild country around the Black Donald and Matawatchan, and the northern parts of Lanark and Frontenac Counties deer have walked right into town as if they knew all the crack shots were far away.

The other day a deer swam across the river landing just above the fairgrounds. This may have been the same buck that appeared on Tuesday in the Spring Bush, now a part of Gemmill Park. The animal was spied on by the Separate School pupils and as it was nearly time for the junior room to be let out the class was dismissed. Another deer swam the river and landed at John Grace’s farm on highway 29.

Other similar instances are being reported from many points and it is hard to keep track of them all or to verify the stories. W. A, Jamieson, E. C. Gourlay, Jas. McDonald and Louis Peterson are hunting up at White Lake. Reports have reached civilization that Mr. Gourlay got a deer. Another buck or has it that the party bagged a large bear. Whether it is a polar bear, a grizzly bear or a common brown bear has not been learned nor is it clear which one of the Nimrods shot it although some give credit to Mr. Jamieson.

On the other hand Mr. Peterson has long been considered an authority on bears since one night, long ago, when he and a friend hid all night in his car at the Black Donald while a bear sniffed around near them. Robt. Cochran shot a deer right near his home in the woods on R. A. Stewart’s farm. In this party were Wilbert McKay, Jim McKay, Harvey Boal, Russell Cochran and Archie Lockhart. This was on Monday.

Mayor Scott has been hunting in the Burnt Lands with the Meehan boys, Jack Command and Jack Kennedy. The first day Messrs. Command and Kennedy each got a deer. Hunting at White Lake also included Bob Leishman, Andrew and Robt. McPhail, Mel Royce, Oral Arthur and Mike Walsh. This party got two deer—one on Tuesday and another on Wednesday.

Among those from this district who are deer hunting are the following: Wm. and Mac Davis, Eddie Moone, Bob Cochran, E. C. Gourlay, Walter Moore, Carmen Munroe, Ronald Gunn, W. J. Drynan, Harry McGee, Clayton, W illard Smithson, Charles McKay, Clayton, Cyril Pierce, Herb and Elmer Rath, Clayton, James M. Brown, Gervaiss Finner, Eddie Manary, A. J. McGregor, W. A. Jamieson and Bill, Felix Finner, Michael Walsh, Jerry Price, John Gourlay, John H. Munroe, Russell Cochran, W. G. Yuill, Gordon Hanna, Andy McPhail, Wilfred Meehan, Corkery, Harvey Boal, John Command, Allan Carswell, Wilbert McEwen, Desmond Vaughan.Among those from this district who are deer hunting are the following: Wm. and Mac Davis, Eddie Moone, Bob Cochran, E. C. Gourlay, Walter Moore, Carmen Munroe, Ronald Gunn, W. J. Drynan, Harry McGee, Clayton, W illard Smithson, Charles McKay, Clayton, Cyril Pierce, Herb and Elmer Rath, Clayton, James M. Brown, Gervaiss Finner, Eddie Manary, A. J. McGregor, W. A. Jamieson and Bill, Felix Finner, Michael Walsh, Jerry Price, John Gourlay, John H. Munroe, Russell Cochran, W. G. Yuill, Gordon Hanna, Andy McPhail, Wilfred Meehan, Corkery, Harvey Boal, John Command, Allan Carswell, Wilbert McEwen, Desmond Vaughan.

In 1871 in Dalhousie Township the deer disappeared and Archibald Browning decided to put an end to it by going on a hunting spree in 1873. One of the wolves he caught was over 3 feet high, 6 feet long and weighed over 80 pounds. It was purchased by the Museum of Natural History in Montreal. Browning ended up killing 72 wolves 70 bears to save the deer population in Dalhousie Township.

Kevin Bingley–Archibald Browning recorded in the 1851 Agricultural Census living at Lavant. Item/listing # 6 Browning: Con, 7 West part lot 6 – 100 acres. Photo courtesy of Michael J. Umpherson.
When Archibald Browning was born on February 19, 1819, in Neilston, Renfrewshire, Scotland, his father, Archibald, was 39 and his mother, Janet, was 26. He married Janet “Jessie” Robertson in 1838. They had two children during their marriage. He died on February 16, 1900, in Lavant, Ontario, having lived a long life of 80 years.
Paul Rumleskie Further up the valley around Wilno the settlers hated the wolves also and I even remember my father speaking of this…
Claudia Tait You can’t judge what these people had to do to survive unless you had to feed a family without the privileges of a supermarket, a vehicle, warm winter clothes, electricity, air conditioning, central heating and medical assistance.
Elaine DeLisle Very interesting read. Back then venison was what got most families through the winter. Bear meat too. Skins were tanned and used for mitts and clothing. It was a way of life. No big supermarkets people.

Where Did the Wild Geese Go?

The Tale of a Teacher, a Duck, and the Mississippi River

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

WHO’S AFRAID OF BIG BAD BEARS? Louis Peterson and Harvey Scott

Sometimes You Just Need to Remember– Reggie Bowden

Names Names Names — Local Donation List – The Carleton County Protestant General Hospital

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Names Names Names — Local Donation List – The Carleton County Protestant General Hospital

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Oct 1880, Tue  •  Page 4

Did any of your ancestors donate to the hospital?

Pakenham

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Oct 1880, Tue  •  Page 4

Carleton Place

The Carleton County Protestant General Hospital built in 1851

https://heritageottawa.org/50years/wallis-house

The Carleton County Protestant General Hospital circa 1900 – now The Wallis House

I found this yesterday

On September 19, 1850, the corner stone for The County of Carleton Protestant General Hospital was laid; it opened in May, 1851, on the open area to the east of where Wallis House.now stands. The two-storey stone structure opened with ten beds and two employees – a steward and a matron (his wife) to tend to the sick .

A third storey was added to the hospital’s east wing in 1912 and large sun rooms constructed at the ends of the wards on Rideau Street . The last major epidemic to strike Ottawa was typhoid fever in 1912; so many patients were admitted that tents had to be set up on the grounds where the first hospital once stood. By 1920, Ottawa’s medical requirements outgrew the city’s facilities and the County of Carleton Protestant Hospital and St . Luke’s Hospital were amalgamated to form the Civic Hospital, which moved to a new building on Carling Avenue in 1924.

Tents around the Protestant General Hospital during the 1912 Typhoid Epidemic

Epidemics of typhus, typhoid, cholera and small pox continued to scourge the city, and by 1870 the first hospital was inadequate. A new hospital was designed by Robert Surtees, and construction was begun on 16 May 1873. The corner stone was laid by the Governor General Earl Dufferin with full masonic ceremonies. read–Dark Moments in Ottawa History- Porter Island

The hospital opened in 1875 with a capacity of 75 beds. It was the largest, most modern, and best equipped hospital in Ottawa, with high ceilings and segregated wards separated by long corridors. The first hospital was recast as an isolation hospital for contagious diseases, and was demolished around 1900 due to its condition.

What happened to the building?

Heritage Ottawa president at the time Louise Coates invited the media to a chilly demonstration in front of Wallis House on February 21, Heritage Day, to highlight the need for a solution that would see the building conserved. After deliberating for a month, Public Works refused an offer which would have seen the building converted into market-value apartments with townhouses to the north, and non-profit housing to the east.

Increased pressure by Heritage Ottawa, elected officials and other community groups resulted in the government re-tendering with a closing date of April 18, 1994. Heritage Ottawa wrote to Cabinet Minister Lloyd Axworthy in 1995, encouraging his support for a conservation solution:

“These offers make economic sense both because they take the price of site clean-up off the hands of Public Works, and because they restore a building so it can be used again, thereby revitalizing the street and the neighboring community.”

A purchase offer of $320,000 by Sandy Smallwood of Andrex Holdings was accepted, putting an end to the continued deterioration of a prominent heritage landmark.

The Wallis House rehabilitation and conversion into 47 loft-style condominiums was designed by Julian Smith and Associates of Ottawa and Paul Merrick Architects of Vancouver. The project was financed by selling part of the property’s land to Domicile Developments for construction of 24 townhouses along Macdonald Gardens Park called Brigadier’s Walk, and to the City of Ottawa for construction of a 7-storey social housing apartment building, Lady Stanley Place, now owned by Ottawa Community Housing.

An advanced sale of the Wallis House Condominium saw all 46 units sold in under 36 hours.

The newly-rehabilitated Wallis House officially opened on October 19, 1996, introducing the trend of “loft living” in converted historic buildings to Ottawa.

The building remains a successful example of adaptive reuse. Read more here..click

Related reading

Union Almonte and Ramsay Contagious Hospital — “The Pest House”

Becoming a Nurse — Rosamond Memorial Hospital

The Almonte Hospital Hoopla

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

Dark Moments in Ottawa History- Porter Island

So What was the Almonte Cottage Victorian Hospital?

The 1960s Almonte Fashion Show — Names Names Names

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The 1960s Almonte Fashion Show — Names Names Names

Women’s age-old interest in clothes was demonstrated again when a total of 400 which included a sprinkling of males, attended the Fashion Show in the town hall, sponsored by the Almonte Ladies Curling Club. Mrs. R. A. Jamieson was convener of the Show and practically all the members assisted in some capacity to make the event  an outstanding success. The stage which in the raw, is a most depressing sight, was transformed into a rose garden with an arbor forming the entrance to the ramp down which the models walked.

 There were rose covered trellises, a picket fence, etc., all arranged to form an attractive setting for the attractive models. Mrs. Parrett, proprietor of the Lanark Shop, opened the show and acted as commentator throughout. 

The merchandise was loaned by Pimlott’s Ladies’ Wear, Milady Dress Shop, Johnson and McCreary, Smolkin’s Men’s Wear, The Mariette Shoppe, The Lanark Shop, The Misses Hogan, J. H. Proctor, Phil. Needham and the Canada Fur Manufacturing Company of Toronto, of which Mrs. K, Burns is the local agent. Mrs. Parrett introduced the models all of whom are local. 

They were Mrs. Joyce Hill, Mrs. Muriel Hill, Miss Mary Hourigan, Mrs. Clare Kitts, Mrs. Freda Levitan and Mrs. Irene Duncan. Modelling men’s clothes were Gordon Clifford and Gerry Green. Three children who also acted as models, stole the show for a time. They were Ruth Leishman, Barbara Ann Duncan and Donald Duncan. Mrs. Clare Kitts, wearing a black gabardine suit and two piece mink neckpiece from Milady Dress Shop, was the first model. 

With this she wore a pink blouse and milan straw hat and black accessories. The next was Miss Mary Hourigan wearing a turquoise crepe dress from the Mariette Shoppe. Mrs. Freda Levitan next featured a blue and white cotton from Pimlott’s Ladies’ Wear. Mrs. Muriel Hill modelled a navy taffeta from Pimlott’s Ladies’ Wear with a hat of navy blue trimmed with taffeta and white flowers. 

Mrs. Joyce Hill was introduced next, wearing grey gabardine slacks and T-shirt from the Lanark Shop. The sixth model was Mrs. Irene Duncan, wearing a three-piece suit in rayon herringbone from Pimlott’s, with green kid shoes with platform soles from Proctor’s Shoe Store. There were 40 costumes shown in all with the models appearing more or less in rotation. One especially attractive ensemble was shown by Mrs. Joyce Hill–It was a grey kid jacket worn over a green gabardine suit The fur jacket was lined with matching green gabardine was from Milady DressShop and was supplied by the Canada Fur Manufacturing Company (J. T. Conway and Son.) Another fur coat by the same company that excited considerable pleased comment was a full length muskrat coat made with a border. This was worn by Mrs. Muriel Hill with a smart cocoa brown gabardine one-piece dress. Mrs. Irene Duncan also displayed a handsome g controlled by darts. 

The show closed with Mis. Joyce Hill and Mrs. Clare Kitts appearing as bridesmaid and bride respectively. Joyce wore a yellow bengaline taffeta with two net overskirts, gold sandals from Proctors and flowers from Misses Hogan. Mrs. Kitts’ wedding gown was. of all over chantilly lace over taffeta and she wore a floor length veil of French net with hand embroidery. Both the bridesmaid’s dress and the bride’s dress were from Milady Dress Shop.

 

related reading

1960’s Fashion Shows– Once a Huge Extravaganza!

The Alice Walker Fashion Show 1974 Carleton Place

You Better Work it Girl! Cover Girls of Carleton Place 1965

Miss Civitan Club 1976? Who Are These Women?

Mary Cook’s Deportment Classes for Young Ladies in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Mod Fashion Show 1960’s

And Then There was Cook’s– and Most of All Mary Cook

Turtle Mountain Disaster — Mathie Family Carleton Place

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Turtle Mountain Disaster — Mathie Family Carleton Place

Did you know this?

The Frank Slide was a massive rock slide that buried part of the mining town of Frank, North-West Territories, Canada, at 4:10 a.m. on April 29, 1903. Around 110 million tonnes of limestone rock slid down Turtle Mountain. The primary cause of the Frank Slide was the unstable geological structure of Turtle Mountain. Turtle Mountain was a mountain ready to fall. It was just a matter of time. Immediately following the slide, coal mining, which had begun in 1900, was blamed for the disaster.

May 8 1903- Almonte Gazette

Mr. and Mrs. Mathie of Carleton Place had no less than fifteen relatives affected by the Frank disaster, eight of these, being killed and seven injured. The killed are as follows : William Warrington, a cousin of Mrs.Mathie, and his wife and six children. Everyone was swept away. Not even the baby is left to tell the tale. 

This family spent two days in Carleton Place last year. The injured are as follows : Jas-. Warrington, a brother of Mrs. Mathie, had a thigh broken. He spent all the last winter in transition, and had only resumed work in the mountains a few weeks ago. Samuel Ennis (marked as Sennis on the liste below), a brother-in-law of Mrs. Mathie, with his wife and four children, were all sleeping when the downpour of rock occurred. His house was the second in the row of cottages. It was overturned three times in the descent. When it finally stopped Samuel discovered to his amazement that he had passed through the stone-crusher only slightly injured. He had his faculties and his limbs quickly in working order. He found to his infinite joy that his family, while all were hurled and-were not seriously hurt, and be helped them, one by one, out of their stone-bound prison. This was the only house in the avalanche whose occupants escaped death.  May 8 1903

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As before mentioned by your correspondent, the disaster happened at 4:10 a.m., when the sleeping inhabitants of Frank were suddenly awakened by a tremendous crash, followed by a shaking of the buildings. It was still dark, and for a time the greatest confusion prevailed, no one knowing just what had happened. But as soon as day dawned it was seen that the whole side of Turtle Mountain had fallen away, and that the valley for a distance of two miles was entirely choked by rocks and debris piled to an average height of sixty feet.

Where once existed cosy homes, fertile farms and stock ranches, there Is now nothing but huge chaotic plies of debris from the mountain, this debris bearing the appearance of a volcanic eruption. The land, which was once of great value, and was rapidly increasing in price on account of the known presence of natural gas as well as coal deposits, is now buried many feet deep with waste matter, and will be valueless for all time to come.

As there is no geological expert resident in the unfortunate town it is Impossible to ascertain exactly the true character of the force exerted, but Judging from the reports now being brought In by men who have – been working around the outskirts of the waste of rock and debris, many are now inclined to the belief that it was a huge mountain rock slide caused by an earthquake or some subterranean explosion of gas, which has been proved by mining operators to exist in large reservoirs beneath this section of the country.

The nature of the rock of which Turtle Mountain is composed is largely of the limestone variety. Another theory advanced by many of the mining men of the town is that the limestone cliff had been undermined by some subterranean branch of the Old Man River, which has been silently working away unseen for ages past. Others again incline to the belief that it was simply a huge limestone upheaval, the primary causes of which were the slacking of the lime under the Influence of the thawing weather of spring. None of the theories have so far been definitely borne out, although the general opinion now seems to prevail that the trouble was not volcanic, as at first reported.

Related reading

30th Anniversary Carleton Place Disaster– The Ottawa Citizen June 1 1940

The Titanic Disaster according to the Almonte Gazette

Did You Know About the Crotch Lake Disaster?

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

Farm Real Estate etc 1903-1908 Lanark County — Names Names Names

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1904 Almonte Gazette

Last week Mr. P. J. Young sold his farm on the ninth line, with his stock and implements, to Mr. John Oates, who has been a resident of Almonte for the past two years or so, Mr. Young ■ taking Mr. Oates’ property on Union street in part payment for the farm. The price received by Mr. Young was $7,200. The exchange of properties was made this week, and now Mr. Young and Mr.Naismith have become residents of Almonte—a welcome addition to the Citizenship of our town. April 4 1903

All the James Greig estate pro­perty in this town is shortly to be
offered for sale april 17 1903

Mr. Smith, who owned the Carleton steam laundry, has disposed of his business to Mr. Latimer, of the City New York laundry, and the latter will combine the two under the name of the Carieton Place Steam Laundry April 17 1905

Mr. Alex. R. Yuill’s sale last week was a successful one, and now the fini) Ayrshire herd of “ Meadowside Farm,” which was the oldest herd of Ayrshires in Canada and was for the past thirty-four years the winner of many prizes, is now broken up and scattered. One pleasing feature however, is that the animals all remain in the neighborhood, the ones taken furthest away being a pair of heifers bought by Mr. Robt. Metcalf, of Pakenham. The township of Ramsay still retains a large number of the animals, the Messrs. Cochran being among the largest buyers. The sale totalled $2,160.40. The farm was not sold- April 1906

The sale of the farm eSects of the late Wm. Smith, Ramsay, on Friday last was great success, particularly of the live stock. CoWs sold as high as $75, horses $175, sheep in the neighborhood of $10, and so on. The implements did not seem to be so much in demand, but the bidding on the stock-was very brisk. Mr. Jas. W. Bowes bought four head of cattle, all at good prices. April 13 1906

Mr. T. B. McGibbon, of Beckwith, last week’ sold his fine Clydesdale team to Peter McEwen, of Franktown, for the handsome sum of $400- April 13, 1905

Mr. Elias ‘Abraham was here last week from New Liskeard to purchase horses. He secured a heavy well matched span of sisters from Ben. Hilliard, paying $425 for them. His other animals, six in all, were nearly equally of superb frame and action. The Hilliard team was for the hotel ’bus ami they were clad in a $50 harness. The balance of the car was filled with oats and bay and half a dozen sets of single harness. April 1906

 Mr. James Steele recently sold the Henry farm in Ramsay to Mr. Richard Burroughs, of March. The farm has witnessed several ownerships since the Canada Company secured it from the Crown. Mr. Henry bought it in 1866. Then followed, as owners, William Hughes, Peter Turner, John Moore and Mr. Rivington. Mr. Burroughs is a. first-class farmer and is sure to become a good neighbor and a prosperous business man April 1906

Mr. A. Johnston has bought Mr. Chas. Simpson’s property on Queen street, and will become a welcome citizen of Almonte. He has also taken over Mr. Simpson’s real estate auctioneer business. Mr. Simpson intends going west on account of Mrs. Simpson’s health, and she will join him when he has decided where he will locate. He and Mr. Johnston will go somewhat extensively into horse-buying for the western markets. April 27 1906

Mr. Mcllquham began on Monday morning clearing space for a brick extension of his commercial annex. April 8 1908 ( Mississippi hotel)

Mr. Mcllquham is celebrating the quarter century mark of his purchase of the Mississippi hotel. “ Watty ” has never been derogatory to the highest enterprises. Let us hope that the next .quarter will find him just as smiling and as strenuous= April 12, 1907

Mr. George Thom has broken down the middle wall of partition in his stone block on Bridge Street in Carleton Place and so throws himself into very spacious quarters for his general business ; at the same time transferring his fancy goods section into the -Bell Block, South side. april 24 1907

Mr. L. McDonald’s auction sale was held at his farm on the tenth line of Ramsay on Thursday of last week. There was a large attendance and good prices were obtained for the stock. One team of horses bought  for $300 and the young cattle, of which there was a large stock, brought good prices. Messrs. McPhail purchased the farm some time ago, and will run it in connection with their present property on the tenth line. April 3 1908

Mr. Robt. MeLenahan has sold his brick residence on Lake Avenue, to Mr. Chas. Johnstone, and Mr. J. B. Elliott has disposed of his double house next door to Mr. Wm. Machin. Mr. C. Mclnitosh also disposed of the Shilson property o-n tfae same street, to W- C. Leech. April 3 1908

The auction sale at Mr.. Wallace’s last Thursday was well attended and good prices were, realized, cows bringing as high as $41. M r. C .Hollinger was the auctioneer, and Councillor Syme acted as clerk. April 1908

Malcolm H. Leininger, Lanark Village, has purchased the property and business of John White, merchant, Hopetown and moved up there on Saturday. Mr. Leininger until lately, carried on the sash, door and planning factory business with Archibald Affleck, having bought the same from Mr. W.W. Campbell-Perth Courier, Dec. 7, 1888

Perth Courier, Jan. 14, 1898–Auction Sale Farm Stock and Implements—Christopher Donaldson, Lot 26, 12th Concession Bathurst. Mr. Donaldson has retired from farming and everything must be sold.

Auction Sale Farm Stock and Implements: Richard T. Noonan, Lot 20, 5th Concession Burgess–Perth Courier, Feb. 19, 1897

Bonnie Mitchell is looking for.,

Hi Linda, I’m looking for any information regarding a fire at the farm of Arnold Klassen of Smiths Falls around 1970 or 1971. The only other information I have is that he was a pig farmer and lost everything in the fire. Thanks( photo is my kitchen with a Lanark County sign “Pigs for Sale”

Memories— share if you have any of farms..

Tammy MarionI remember a great vegetable stand that use to be in Franktown on the corner of Hwy#15 and #10. If I recall correctly it was a guy in a wheelchair that ran it or looked after it. Use to stop there quite often.

Tania IretonFerrier’s farm on Scotch Line. All the veggies and corn! In their back/summer kitchen I think.

Related reading

Death of Local Farms in 2025? 1975 article

Wind Storm in Ashton- Heath Ridge Farms 1976

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

The McNaughton Farm– Memories Ray Paquette

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

A Few of the Judson Street Neighbours 1891 Names Names Names

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A Few of the Judson Street Neighbours 1891 Names Names Names
Mary I ScottOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Isabella MclennanScotland1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Maggie WalkerQuebec1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Ella WalkerUnited States1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Rebecca JamesOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
John JamesOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
William W WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Eliza WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Edward T WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Elizabeth WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
William D WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Jessie WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
John WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Norman WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Katie WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Bella WilkieOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Wilfred GreigOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Harold GreigOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Donald McnabbOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Mary McnabbOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Jennie L McnabbOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Annie S K McnabbOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Katie M McnabbOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Norman M McnabbOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Jessie McnabbOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Christine MunroeOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
John CampbellOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Maggie CampbellScotland1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Eileen HicksScotland1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Duncan MccallumScotland1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
James MontewilleOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Emma MontewilleOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Eva MontewilleOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Mary MontewilleOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Jennie MontewilleOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Willie MontewilleOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
John F CramOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Albert CramOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
George CramOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Norman CramOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Mary E NolanOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
John McdonaldOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Jane L McdonaldScotland1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Ann E McdonaldOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
James GilliesOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Elenor GilliesOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canad


John S GilliesOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Mary E GilliesOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
William F GilliesOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Janet j E GilliesOntario1891 Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
A few of the neighbours that lived around Toby Randell’s house in 1891– 103 Judson Carleotn Place
Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith heritage Museum– this is the Brown’s house on Judson and the Brown children

Judson Street — Clippings History and Photos

Carleton Place Graduation Class 1958 Gord Cross Program– Names Names Names

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Carleton Place Graduation Class 1958 Gord Cross Program– Names Names Names

All photos Gord Cross

Soviet Union — Sputnik 3 Launched

The Soviet Union successfully launches the Sputnik 3 satellite on May 15th. The satellite carried twelve experiments into space and its mission was to study the composition of the atmosphere and cosmic rays while orbiting the Earth. At the time, Sputnik 3 was the largest satellite ever launched and it weighed nearly 3000 pounds. The cone-shaped satellite remained operational for 692 days before it re-entered Earth’s atmosphere in April of 1960, disintegrating upon re-entry.

Popular Films

  • The Bridge on the River Kwai
  • South Pacific
  • Gigi
  • King Creole
  • Vertigo

Popular Singers

  • Elvis Presley
  • Billie Holiday
  • Ricky Nelson
  • Frank Sinatra
  • The Everly Brothers
  • Ella Fitzgerald
  • Jerry Lee Lewis

Popular TV Programmes

  • Candid Camera
  • The Ed Sullivan Show
  • Come Dancing
  • The Jack Benny Show
  • Panorama
  • Alfred Hitchcock Presents
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 May 1958, Wed  •  Page 48
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Aug 1958, Sat  •  Page 12

Carleton Place Names 1899 — It’s A Good Spicy Newspaper!

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Carleton Place Names 1899 — It’s A Good Spicy Newspaper!
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Dec 1899, Sat  •  Page 9

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Dec 1899, Wed  •  Page 2

If you notice that in the first newspaper clipping Dr. Winters said ‘it was a good spicy newspaper’ Who was he? Read Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

Related reading

Carleton Place Boys in Uniform World War 2 — Names Names Names –Roger Rattray

Carleton Place 1857- Your Butcher Your Baker and Your Candlestick Maker -Names Names Names

  1. CARLETON PLACE – 1851 DIRECTORY
  2. 1898-1899 Carleton Place Directory
  3. Carleton Place 1903 Business Directory –Names Names Names
  4. Carleton Place Directory 1859
  5. Carleton Place Public School— Circular 27 Rural — Names Names Names
  6. Public School Pass List Carleton Place 1916– Names Names Names
  7. Carleton Place Subscription List 1900 Names Names Names
  8. Graduation Names- Carleton Place High School 1949– Names Names Names

Spending the Holidays in Clayton 1955

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Spending the Holidays in Clayton 1955
Photo from Rose Mary’s book-Rose Mary Sarsfield
December 8 at 8:02 PM  · 
There are still a few copies of my book available for those who haven’t gotten a copy yet, or as a Christmas gift to someone with ties to Clayton. They are available at the Clayton Store, the Lanark Era office or from me. rose@sarsfield.ca

We extend congratulations to Mr. Wm. J. Drynan who celebrated his 82nd birthday on Monday, Dec. 12th. Mr. Drynan is enjoying fairly good health and was out in hunting season to try his luck in getting a deer. 

Service in St. George’s Church on Sunday, Dec. 18th, will be in the morning at 10.30. There will be no service in the United Church on Sunday, Dec. 18th.

 We are glad to report Mr. Joseph Ladouceur somewhat improved following an operation on his knee. Mrs. J. Kirk has gone to spend some time in Almonte. 

The many friends of Mr. Gordon Currie were sorry to hear of his illness, and hope he will soon be his usual self again. Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Drynan and sons, Robert and Boss, of Smiths Falls, visited with Mr. Wm. J. Drynan on his birthday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Curran and family of Smiths Falls spent Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. McGee. A large number attended the Lafrance-Cameron wedding in the community hall on Friday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alden Jones and family of Ottawa spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Virgin.

The W.A. of St. George’s Church held their December meeting at the home of Mrs. Ernie Moulton, with a good attendance. During the afternoon, a quilt was quilted for the bale. The ladies also made plans for the annual Christmas entertainment. 

Mrs. A. Nolan has gone to spend the winter with Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Loynes in Ottawa. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. McCreary spent Saturday evening with Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Virgin.

 Mr. and Mrs. Austin Rathwell and Frances of Perth spent Sunday with Mr. Wm. J. Drynan and George. Mr. Kenneth McGee left on Monday for Petawawa, after spending a week at his home here. 

Friends here received word of the death of Mr. Ben Code at Bounty, Sask. 

The monthly meeting of the W.A. of the United Church was held on Thursday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Thomas Price, with a good attendance. The meeting was opened with a Tiymn and Scripture reading. Mrs. J. Currie and Mrs. McIntosh thanked the members for cards that had been sent. Mrs. Price vacated the chair for the election of officers, and Mrs Robertson presided. It was decided that all the officers remain the same for 1956. At the close of the’ meeting, lunch was served and a half hour enjoyed by all.

The annual joint Christmas tree and entertainment held on Thursday night by St. George’s Church and the United Church Sunday Schools, was a decided su c c e ss . There was a large attendance. Hev. M. M. Hawley acted as chairman, and the various schools in the district put on a very interesting program which opened with choruses by all the children. There were a couple of short plays, _ “The Two Santas,” by No. 6 School, and “ Without A Name,” by Hall’s Mills school; monologues by Heather Thompson and Gloria Ireton; Service in the United Church On Sunday* Jan. 1st, will be in the morning at 11 o’clock, and will be communion service. ’ Mr. Kenneth Bolger of St. Catharines spent Christmas and the holiday with friends here and in Almonte. The schools in this district all closed on Thursday for the holiday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Benford Allan and Charlene of London spent this week with their many friends “here and in Almonte.

 Mr. and Mrs. Keith McMunn and Mr. and Mrs. D. Caldwell Were guests on Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. Linton Johnston and family of Pakenham district.

 Mrs. F. Paterson, Gary, Wayne and Heather, of Ottawa, and Mr. and Mrs. Willard Kellough spent Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Kellough. 

Guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Hudson for Christmas were Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Erskine of Almonte, Mr. and Mrs. C. Stanley, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Hudson and’ Gary. 

Miss Mary Stewart, Reg. N., of Smiths Falls, spent the holiday at her home here.

 A family gathering was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Drynan on Christmas Day. Visitors at the home of Mr. Edward Shane and Mr. and Mr recitations were given by Norma Munro, Helen Miller, Eunice Rath, Charlie Rath, Leonard Watt and Elaine Rath; songs by the Drynan children, Gladys Munro, Mildred Cameron, Doris Munro, Norma Munro, Beverley Robertson, Jackie Munro, Willard Rath, Rose Mary Richards, Mary McIntosh, Evaleen McIntosh aiid Dorothy Drynan; a chorus by No. 6 school; duet by Anne and Ethel McArthur. Those presiding at the piano throughout the program were Mrs. H. Rath, Mrs. Gordon Drynan, Mrs. John James and Margaret Cochran. 

At the close of the entertainment, Santa arrived and distributed gifts and candy to all the children from a beautifully decorated tree. Service in St. George’s Church on Sunday, Jan. 1st, will be in the morning at 10.30 

James Shane on Christmas Day.were Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Shane and baby, Barbara Jean, and Mr. and Mrs. N. Patifie and Doreen of Ottawa. 

Those spending Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Virgin were Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Stewart and family of Almonte, Mr. and Mrs. F. Hamilton and children of Appleton District and Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Virgin and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Rath of Toronto spent Christmas and the holiday with their many friends here.

 Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Giles and Jimmie and Clark Fraser of Cedar Hill visited on Friday evening with Miss Mary A. Giles. 

Those spending Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Halpenny were Mrs. O. M. Montgomery and Miss Ann Halpenny of Almonte, Mr. N. Halpenny and Albert of Halpenny district and Mr. A. Ireton. Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Virgin spent Christmas and the holiday with Mr. and Mrs. Alden Jones and family in Ottawa, and with Mr. and Mrs. Garwood Warren and family at Chantry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Bobertson of Hespeler visited on Christmas Day with Mr. and Mrs. Roy Robertson. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. McGee and sons, Kenneth, Harry and Clarence, spent Christmas with Mr, and Mrs. Len Curran at Smiths Falls. 

A family gathering was held on Christmas Day at the home of Mr. and Mrs; James Rath.

Mr. and Mrs. Keith McMunn and Mr. and Mrs. George Bolger visited on Christmas Day with Mr. and Mrs. T. McMunn in Carleton Place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Hudson and Gary were guests on Friday evening at a dinner given by Mrs. M. Richards in Carleton Place. 

Mr. and, Mrs. Keith Stanley and Glen of Toronto spent Christmas and the holiday with friends here.

Almonte Gazette 1955

Skunk Street — Shane’s Field– Clayton – George Belton 1939

Louis Irwin of Clayton

Who was Patricia Thompson From Clayton?

Black Rock Clayton

So Which Island did the River Drivers of Clayton get Marooned On?

The Old Community Hall in Clayton

The Clayton Methodist Cemetery

Come all my dear companions and listen to my song–Songs of Clayton

Rocking and Rolling on the Spring Clayton Road

Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

A Trip to the Mad Hatter’s Wonderland — Well Clayton

The Social Comings and Goings of 1901 Clayton

More Notes on the Floating Bridge in Clayton

Party Ideas from Clayton 1906

Clayton News July 1897