Tag Archives: murals

Just Like Mount Rushmore…

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Nearly three million people visit Mount Rushmore each year. South Dakota historian Doane Robinson is credited with conceiving the idea of carving the likenesses of famous people into the Black Hills region of South Dakota in order to promote tourism in the region.

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Mount Rushmore has become an iconic symbol of the United States, and now we too have another tribute to Carleton Place and the iconic people that believed in our town. Shaun McInnis, mural artist, is busy working on Wandering Wayne’s/ Wayne Richardson’s mural located on Allan St at the end of the Queen’s Hotel..

McInnis’s  work is all over the Town of Carleton Place, which has commissioned him to do many murals in recent years. Councillor Jerry Flynn, mural project co-ordinator, has nothing but praise for McInnis as a person and artist. “I couldn’t have asked for anyone better than Shaun McInnis.”

I am sure Wayne would have waved his hand and walked on when he saw Shaun painting his likeness– but beneath that cap on his head I’d like to think a smile would have appeared on his face as he continued his journey on the streets of Carleton Place.

 

Wayne Richards (1935-2016)

Wayne believed that one step at a time was good for the soul and he will forever be  known as Wandering Wayne to each and every person of Carleton Place. He was the last milkman that delivered door to door on a horse drawn wagon from the Carleton Place Dairy on Moore Street.  If you took the time to talk to him he could tell you more about the town and your family then you ever thought possible. Wayne requested the best of each of us in our little town and hopefully  for the most part we all met his expectations. Thanks Wayne for always reminding us to take the time to be kind–may you be walking the clouds in heaven. 

Come see all the murals in Carleton Place and those of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum too

Please keep donating to the gofundmepage created by Linda Young or drop in and see Cathie at Downtown BIA office

RELATED READING:

It’s Back On Like Donkey Kong!-Wandering Wayne

Wayne Richards -You’ll Never Walk Alone Again

The Eating Place! You’ve Got to Eat in Carleton Place!

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

Christmas in April – (Wandering) Wayne Richards

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

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Interior decoration and interior design of the Victorian era are noted for orderliness and ornamentation. A house from this period was idealistically divided in rooms, with public and private space carefully separated. The parlour was the most important room in a home and was the showcase for the homeowners where guests were entertained. A bare room was considered to be in poor taste, so every surface was filled with objects that reflected the owner’s interests and aspirations–including the walls.

Wallpaper and wall coverings became accessible for increasing numbers of householders with their wide range of designs and varying costs. This was due to the introduction of mass production techniques and, in England, the repeal in 1836 of the Wallpaper tax introduced in 1712.

Wallpaper was often made in elaborate floral patterns with primary colors (red, blue, and yellow) in the backgrounds and overprinted with colours of cream and tan. This was followed by Gothic art inspired papers in earth tones with stylized leaf and floral patterns. William Morris was one of the most influential designers of wallpaper and fabrics during the latter half of the Victorian period. Morris was inspired and used Medieval and Gothic tapestries in his work. Embossed paper were used on ceilings and friezes.

Then there were those spectacular murals.

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In Carleton Place I wrote a story about the Burgess house on Lake Ave East. In 1987, when the house was being renovated, it was discovered behind layers of wallpaper there were actual murals painted on the walls. On one wall they discovered a painting of a steam engine travelling through the Fraser Valley in BC with a snowy winter scene with a log cabin.  When all the wallpaper was completing removed, the homeowners at the time found several other scenes painted on the walls by an artist.  It is believed the artist of the wall murals was a Mr. Grant who was a brother in-law of Arthur Burgess.

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Last week I found a newspaper article about more murals that were done in Carleton Place. One has to wonder how many more secret murals there are hidden under the layers of wallpaper of our heritage homes.

March 21, 1900.

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

An American Horror Story Scenario Found in Carleton Place Home

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The wall murals in Season 1 of the popular F/X show American Horror Story are a series of odd paintings found in the living room by the new owners of a California home.

While restoring the house,  former owners Chad Warwick and Patrick covered up the murals with wallpaper.  Vivien Harmon, strips all the wallpaper when she begins to renovate, only to reveal the odd masterpieces. So have any murals been found under wallpaper here in Carleton Place? According to Heritage Carleton Place it seems there have been.

Burgess House

Address: 249 Lake Ave East, Carleton Place, Ontario

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The Burgess house was built in 1900 for Arthur Burgess who was a wealthy local businessman, and  served as Mayor of Carleton Place in 1903 and in 1922.  This grand brick home with it’s circular driveway, massive front porch, and original carriage house is a fine example of Victorian architecture of the time. The home features fine oak trim  throughout, and a grand entrance hall with a number of stained glass windows.

In 1987, when the house was being renovated, it was discovered behind layers of wallpaper there were actual murals painted on the walls. On one wall they discovered a painting of a steam engine travelling through the Fraser Valley in BC with a snowy winter scene with a log cabin.  When all the wallpaper was completing removed, the homeowners at the time found several other scenes painted on the walls by an artist.  It is believed the artist of the wall murals was a Mr. Grant who was a brother in-law of Arthur Burgess.
How cool is that?