Tag Archives: muirhead

Snippets of Bell Street we Should Not Forget

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Snippets of Bell Street we Should Not Forget
This would be at the former train crossing going down to the back bridges– See the Gillies Mill in the background—Llew Lloyd-sent this photo- View from Bell Street 1957 Carleton Place

I found this photo and wanted to make sure it was documented so in an article from Howard Brown I found some other things I had no idea about either

Llew Lloyd This picture predates the development of all the property on the river side of Bell street from the Anglican Church to the CPR bridge . It was a great time to live in that area. This picture also predates the two apartment buildings built between this property and the park across from the Anglican Church. The whole shoreline was our playground.

Stephen Giles Now there are three Houses built in the property

Sherene Baird Flint Use to love hearing the train blow it’s whistle as it went over the streets in that part of town!! It was great as an alarm to get up in the mornings to get ready for school!

The stone home on Bell Street was occupied by Miss Evelyn Wilson was built by her grandfather, Dr. Wilson. In 1834 the first Anglican Church was erected. It was a frame structure and in 1881 was replaced by the present stone building.

Rosamond built and lived in the stone home once owned by the Muirhead estate. He operated a woollen factory across the street, but had some dispute abort the lease on his property and in disgust left Carleton Place and established his business in Almonte.

Between the Muirhead home and Bridge Street there were the following businesses:

john McEwen’s weaving room, a confectionery store, a hotel first owned by Kelly, and secondly by McCaffery and third by Wilson. Waugh’s harness shop, Galvin’s Tailor Shop Willams and Halliday’s Drugstore. Gover’s Shoe Shop, a barber shop, and the Arcade on the corner of Bridge and Bell. Across the Anglican church, Campbell and Morphy owned a store and the post office occupied part of this store.

After Mr. Rosamond moved to Almonte, Dr. Hurd who had married one of the Rosamond daughters, lived in the stone home. He erected the long frame building across the street. His office and Sinclair’s office was on the ground floor, while he rented the hall above for concerts and penny readings. Between this building and Bridge Street was Tanner McNeelys home and back of it on the bank of the river still stands his tannery.

Ad from Carleton Place newspaper 1873 from .. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jun 1989, Sat  •  Page 109

relatedreading

The Most Photographed Home in Carleton Place- Bell Street

Jules “Julie” Pilon of the Leland Hotel– Weather Man

Down by The Mississippi River with The Jessops

Recollections of the Peden Store

Was the Devil in Peden’s Store? When Matches First Came to Carleton Place

Bell Street– Carleton Place Ontario

When the Past Comes A Haunting- Jessie Comrie

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When the Past Comes A Haunting- Jessie Comrie

 

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Photo- Linda Seccaspina

 

Sometimes the past seems to come visit me even though I am not looking for a particular subject. I have told the tale of journeys through the cemeteries where names stand out and I have to go look them up as soon as I get home. Crazy? Maybe- but there is no doubt sometime thing happened like that today!

 

In trying to finish a piece about David Armitage Gillies I went to my file of Gillies Funeral notices looking to see if I had anything on him. A small card seemed to fly into the air and fall on the ground. When I picked it up it was the 1928 funeral notice of Miss Jessie Comrie who died on September 2, 1928. The last name seemed to hit me in the face and I went back to my computer to see what I had on her.

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*Jessie Comrie- Nurse to all the Muirhead children Death Notice–Mary Gillies Muirhead posted this note on this death card.–From the collection of Linda Seccaspina–The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued

 

St. Fillian’s Cemetery in Beckwith

Lo and behold she was the woman who had met her fate drowned in a flume in the Bates and Innes Mill. No explanation had been found as to the way the accident occurred although examination of the body revealed many scratches about the limbs. In the 1920s to the 1950s a proportion of female homicide victims were generally ignored for the most part. For months the citizens of Carleton Place gossiped about what might have happened to Miss Comrie as some could not believe that she took a misstep.

 

There had been no other description about her other than she was a lifelong resident of Carleton Place and was trained nurse and was on call that Sunday night. Jessie was to relieve a nurse at James McIntosh’s home and she was enroute there when she fell, or was pushed  into a flume from maybe an attempted robbery.

In finding her funeral card I was able to piece together why the card was among the Gillies/Mierhrad ephemera.  Jessie Comrie had helped bring some of the Muirhead children into the world in the red brick James Street home.  Jessie’s funeral took place 1:30 at the residence of her brother-in-law, Mr. Peter McDonald, Caldwell Street, Carleton Place and  on Wednesday afternoon, the 5th instant, at 1:30 o’clock and interment at 2 o’clock  in St. Fillian’s Cemetery in Beckwith.

A sister Mrs. *Peter McDonald is the only survivor of the family.

 

 

historicalnotes

*5717-81 (Lanark Co): Peter McDONALD, 30, woolen manufacturer, Carleton Place, same, s/o Allan & Margaret, married Grace Morrison McARTHUR, 29, Beckwith twp., same, d/o Peter McARTHUR & Ann ANDERSON, witn: Daniel C. McARTHUR of Beckwith & John McDONALD of Carleton Place, 25 May 1881 at Beckwith twp

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

Tales of the Tombstones — The Crozier Children

Bitten by the Kissing Bug — A Shocking Conclusion to the Life of Carleton Place’s Daniel E. Sheppard

I’ve got a Ghost Rash… Telling Secrets from the Past??

A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

 

The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued

A Time of its Own– The Mystery Photo

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A Time of its Own– The Mystery Photo

 

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I finally have in my hand the death notices of the Gillies family and feel like I have been entrusted to find out as much as I can about each one of them. The death notice of John Stark Gillies was tucked away with a photo of a woman whose image had been taken in Washington D.C. Who was this person? No matter how hard I tried I could not seem to find a Gillies who lived in that part of the world. So while some of this story about the life of John Stark Gillies is factual, the woman’s life is not and remains a mystery.

On the 23rd of October 1938 John Stark Gillies, age 70, president of the Gillies Company was reported to have had a heart attack at the stroke of midnight. Widely recognized in all parts of the lumbering business, the late J. S. Gillies was president of a family business that bore his name and that of his grandfather, father and brothers.

John was born in Carleton Place in 1868, a son of the late James Gillies and Eleanor Ackland and was educated in the local public and High School and later attended Queen’s University in Kingston Was this woman a friend from his educational days that he had maintained contact with throughout the years?

I envisioned this Edwardian soap-and-water beauty unassuming and funny and actually felt her spirit tripping over something at John’s funeral with her soft laughter heard throughout the building.

On October 9th,1920 John married Margaret Russell of Arnprior who I am sure was aware or was friends with this woman. I looked for signs in the photo and wondered why she was unmarried or had she been? Was she simply a spinster friend of the family?

John Gillies took great interest in the affairs of the Braeside community which was made up mostly of Gillies employees. From that first sawmill that was erected above the village of Lanark on the Clyde branch of the Mississippi in 1842 to later moving to Carleton Place family history was made.

In 1853, Peter MacLaren became a partner of the Gillies and the firm became known as the Gillies and MacLaren Company. The second timber limit was acquired by the company, the Gilmour Limit on the Mississippi River in 1862. To cut the timber for this second limit, a second mill was opened in 1866 in Carleton Place. There the firm operated under the name of Gillies and MacLaren and this quiet but studious deep thinking man was known to have 100s of volumes of books in his library. Did this friend of his past spend occasional summer nights with the family reading books and discussing the affairs of the world?

The death of John Stark Gillies brought a profound loss to his hundreds of friends, not only in Braeside, but throughout the Ottawa Valley. Gillies always had great concern for his employees and was said to have no human failings by friends. What advice, would this woman in the photograph doled out to him if she had the chance to be at his deathbed?

 

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Gillies Grove and House National Historic Site of Canada–412 Gillies Grove–Arnprior, Ontario

 

The newspaper article said more than 70 cars left his late Braeside residence for Arnprior the day of his funeral  to where his interment occurred. Beautiful floral tributes covering areas from floor to ceiling filled Mr. Gillies home. The funeral parlour car was filled to the top with tributes and the cortege followed by many people on foot who slowly left the home for services.

In imagining the mystery female sitting in the sixth row at his funeral, I could see myself in this woman. She had lived a small life, as do most of us, but the world she carefully assembled was rich and meaningful in ways she never grasped, and John S Gillies appreciated her being in his life.

As the pallbearers: Robert Campbell, Brodie and Allan Gillies, and nephews Arnold  and Kenneth Muirhead  walked solemnly into the church carrying the body of John Stark Gillies you noticed that she didn’t quite fit into the family’s lifestyle. I could detect that she was holding something back in the old faded photo now sitting beside my computer.

Among the 100s of floral tributes that grazed the church her single flower revealed that it just didn’t take much for her to make a difference every day. Maybe she didn’t get to say goodbye and tell John how much his friendship meant due to the abrupt timing of his death. There is a lesson there as she probably didn’t need to say anything because her daily life was a kiss of love to all.

Three brothers and sisters remained after he died as well as his wife.  Siblings A. J. Gillies, G. A. Gillies, D. A. Gillies, Mrs. W. J. Muirhead, Mrs. N. S. Robertson and Mrs. K. C. Campbell remained to carry on the Gillies traditions.

I imagined that in the end she was just someone who once bought a ticket to the world of being friends with John Stark Gillies. She is you and she is us and she endured the most painful goodbye of words never explained or said.
But now I’ve come back again
Why do I find it hard to write the next line?
Oh, I want the truth to be said
I know this much is true

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Jul 1910, Tue,  Page 1

 

relatedreading

The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued

The Sad Tale of Alexander Gillies and Peter Peden

Channeling John Gillies

 

The Short but Illustrious Life of Dr. Daniel Muirhead

What Was it Like Living in Beckwith 1800s? Christina McEwen Muirhead

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Killed by Zulus — Duncan and James Box

Was a Boldt Castle Boathouse Once in our Midst? See the Home of the Daphne!

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

The Short but Illustrious Life of Dr. Daniel Muirhead

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McGill Montreal 1890

 

Daniel Muirhead entered McGill University in Montreal in 1885. In 1899 he graduated with an M.D. in medicine and became house surgeon at the Montreal General and Maternity Hospital 1889-1890. He served for sometime as a ship’s doctor and finally settled into private practice in Carleton Place.

On July 19, 1912 he journeyed with Norman Cram in his new top heavy Ford Runabout to visit with one of his regular patients. While attempting to pass a farmer hauling a load of hay on a small hill Dr. Dan’s front wheels caught in a rut on the rough North Gower road. His car toppled over and he was instantly killed at 46 years of age. (newspaper article says age 50)

To quote the Carleton Place Canadian from July 25, 1912:

“Quiet,skilled to an unusual degree, beloved by every person who ever met him, a valiant conqueror in a sick room–his loss is personal to all and a disaster to his profession, his town, and his country. His mother, sister and brother  W.J. survive him.”

 

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Jul 1912, Wed,  Page 3

 

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historicalnotes

 

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Brother William married Mary Gillies and took over the family home from his mother who had moved to another house she owned close by. Later on she went to live with her daughter Mrs. R.E. Box. Bill, as he was known as owned and operated a hardware store on Bridge Street in Carleton Place. He was a gentlemen, a school trustee and a leading citizen of Carleton Place, and at age 19 he became checker champion of Manitoba in an open competition.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Jan 1940, Wed,  Page 2

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 May 1901, Sat,  Page 7

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

The Saga of a James Street Home— Christina McEwen Muirhead

What Was it Like Living in Beckwith 1800s? Christina McEwen Muirhead

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Killed by Zulus — Duncan and James Box

Was a Boldt Castle Boathouse Once in our Midst? See the Home of the Daphne!

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued

 

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

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History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

 

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1974

 

It took seven long years for the McEwen’s to build this stone house on the 7th line, about a half mile west of Highway 29. Made of local limestone it has a centre door way with Cross and Bible panels, sidelights, and a square fanlight at the top. Directly over the door is proudly marked 1873, the day that the house was finally completed.

Set in a grove of lovely trees the house has a snake fence separating it from the roadway and at the rear there was once barns, a stable, a tack house and a drive shed. The house that remained in the family for decades was one of the finest homes in Beckwith at one point.

 

 

 

The dining room has a ‘dado’ once known as a chair rail, and all the rooms were finished as it was truly a house of distinction with a boxed staircase located in the centre hall. The kitchen has an interesting porthole window facing West and recessed windows are all panelled and have bubble glass panes. Beamed ceilings, golden ash woodwork, and pegged floors grace the  house as well as matching doors throughout with 6 panels and enamelled doorknobs.

That large staircase carried the feet of a family that led upwards to three bedrooms complete with floors made of Balsam Poplar or Balm of Gilead. It was once a popular tree as it also had medicinal properties of balsam poplar that lie in the winter buds. These are black, upright and sticky, and are strongly aromatic and if chewed taste tarry and hot.

It is not surprising that the buds also contain and are covered with waxy resins, terpenes and phenolics with disinfectant properties.  It is among the fastest growing trees in Canada, up to a foot each year, especially when young. The trees are short-lived, normally up to about 100 years, but used as flooring like this home it can give a golden glow to the atmosphere of the home.

The former ell and woodshed was converted in the 70s by Eve and Peter Levers who bought the home from Clarence McEwen. Today the house is still there with a few minor changes.

When I had to turn either red or left on Highway 29; it was a no brainer, and I immediately felt drawn to the left. It was the right move as sure enough, barely half a mile now the road, was the McEwen home. It was set back farther than what I had originally thought and thought of living there the long cold winters in this secluded area. In fact I could still see in my mind “Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead trudging down the road after another argument with her husband with her coat hem blowing in the wind.

The barns were no longer there, but the property was well maintained and looked loved. That’s all that mattered to me, the history of the McEwen house still lives on– and that’s what counts.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

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Jayne Munro-Ouimet–Hi Linda, Here is another McEwen house in Beckwith.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading.jpg

The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Memories of Mississippi Manor

Day in the Life of a 70’s Pattie Drive Home – The Stay at Home Mom Era

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Appleton Chinchilla House

 

 

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The Saga of a James Street Home— Christina McEwen Muirhead

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The Saga of a  James Street Home— Christina McEwen Muirhead

 

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This is the home of my great grandparents Robert and Jemima Box.  Photo–Gary Box

 

Eventually Christina McEwen Muirhead moved to Carleton Place with her three children to a residence she owned in the town. The house stood on the south east corner of an otherwise vacant one acre lot. The lot was bounded on the West by William Street, on the East by Bell Street and on the South by James Street. The house was later to become the family home of William and his wife *Mary Gillies and their five children: Arnold, Eleanor,Ralph, Kenneth and Ida.

Years later when Christina’s daughter Mima (Mrs. R. E. Box) was married she was given a quarter acre lot on the South West corner (William and James). They built a large 5 bedroom brick home there in 1900. The wood trim in the house came from the family farm in White Lake. The timber logs were taken to nearby Waba, milled into the proper lumber and transported by horse and wagon to Carleton Place.

There is a beautiful oak stairway that leads to the upstairs and the dining room was panelled in oak, and very hard to come by “Bird’s Eye Maple”. The grandchildren were born in the James Street house, the funeral of Dr. Dan Muirhead, and Christina Muirhead died in this very home. Both the former Muirhead and Box homes still stand in Carleton Place and the trees planted with love from a bygone era still stand and are the lone witnesses to ongoing time.

 

Next-Dr. Dan (Dr. Daniel A. Muirhead)

 

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historicalnotes

 

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*From the collection of Linda Seccaspina-Mary Gillies Muirhead posted this note on this death card.–The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued

 

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*Jessie Comrie- Nurse to all the Muirhead children Death Notice–Mary Gillies Muirhead posted this note on this death card.–From the collection of Linda Seccaspina–The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

What Was it Like Living in Beckwith 1800s? Christina McEwen Muirhead

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Killed by Zulus — Duncan and James Box

Was a Boldt Castle Boathouse Once in our Midst? See the Home of the Daphne!

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued

The Curious World of Bill Bagg –The Deer Heads…

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The Curious World of Bill Bagg –The Deer Heads…
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Everything that Bill Bagg collected and sold had a story, and chances are if you were fortunate you heard that very same story at least two or three times. I am one of the lucky ones to have one of his pieces in my home, and although not to the extent of Bill’s passion; I sometimes feel I run a rescue for all things Lanark County. They might not be priceless antiques, but like Bill, each one has a local story- and to me that is more important than owning a Faberge egg.

 
 
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According to Gary Strike, Bill Bagg had a couple of deer heads hanging on the wall at his place,and if you didn’t know where Bill lived, well you missed a real treat. Home for Bill for the past 34 years was the Gillies and Beyer’s Canadian machine shop built in 1875 located right on the Mississippi Gorge. These were not any ordinary mounted deer that Bill had–in fact they would be about 111 years-old right now. He acquired them from Scott and Jennifer Wallace, and after hearing the story Bill realized their importance to the town of Carleton Place.
 

According to local history one of the Natives had been following a deer closely and was extremely disappointed when he suddenly lost his game to one of the founders of the town. The Native told Carleton Place settler Edmond Morphy in limited English: Read-The Natives of Carleton Place — Violins and Deer

 

“No meat in wigwam for Wife and Papoose!”

Edmund and the native quickly settled the matter justly for both and established a rule to govern in like cases. Later the Stagg’s head became the Town of Carleton Place’s logo as it represented fair play and sharing. Ironically, the artist just happened to use those two deer heads as his model for the logo.

So what is the origin of these deer? The story goes that Mr. Muirhead, Rosamond and Gillies went out hunting at Christmas in 1901. Arriving at the “Patterson Bush” where the Beer Store on Townline is located now, the men each shot one deer. Deciding to immortalize their kill, the deer went to the taxidermist and were soon hung in the dining room of the Rosamond House at 37 Bell Street.

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Town clerk, Duncan Roger’s late mother purchased the Bell Street property from Ida and Ken Muirhead in October of 1957.The Muirheads had left several items in the house one being the three deer heads. Two hung in the Roger’s dining room, and one hung in the east exterior porch for many years.

 

Rogers remembers his mother telling him that Ken Muirhead had told her that a Mr. Muirhead ( Ken Muirhead’s father he believed ) and one of his sons had shot the deer and had them mounted and hung in the home. Bill became very good friends with Arnold Muirhead, the son of Ida and Ken Muirhead, (married to a Gillies) and they lived in Arnprior.  Gary Strike’s father was the head supervisor of the Gillies Bros. Lumber Company in Braeside and ironically Mr. Muirhead was his boss, so this story was slowly coming 360.

 

When asked, Duncan didn’t know anything about the story of the Muirhead, Rosamond and Gillies hunting expedition. The deer heads remained at Duncan’s former home until he sold it in 2003 to Mr. and Mrs. Wallace. Like most women, Duncan’s wife did not express any interest in them and he left them as he felt that they were part of the history of the home.  After all, they had hung in the house for 102 years.

 

I don’t think any collector knows his true motivation but Bill had the knack of sniffing out history. Bill called some of his things primitives, some called them junk, but everything he bought and collected was an experience. Good or bad they are priceless to anyone that loves history and hopefully these deer heads will get their proper historical homes.

 
 
With files from Gary Strike
 
 
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 historicalnotes
 
Duncan Rogers still has a picture of the deer heads as they were originally hung in the dining room at the Bell Street home.
 
They are impressive, at least five point bucks and the biggest set of racks that I have seen-Gary Strike
 
 
relatedreading
This is Ed. Ed the Stag just arrived at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. Come see him! He was named Ed after Edmond Morphy.

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

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“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

 

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Dr. Eddie Box- grandson of The Belle of Beckwith-photo courtesy Box family

 

Part 1-Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

 

Now if you remember the story I wrote, The Belle of Beckwith, Christena McEwen was an outspoken lass, and now the time had come for her to wed.  Suitor William Muirhead was known in the area as “a well to do man” no questions asked and Christena’s Mother favoured the match with Muirhead. Love triumphed for William, but alas not for poor Christena.  In the stories told by Eddie Box later on, dear Christena ran back home a few times to Mum and Dad once she was married. From all facts told, it was not a happy marriage.

One would say a major factor was that William was 28 years older than dear Christena, similar to the marriage we read about yesterday between Gavin Lindsay and Elizabeth Cumming.  When she resided at the marital home ‘Bossin’ Billy’ as Christena was known, and her husband made the War of the Roses look tame. Grandson Eddie Box could never swallow those facts about his dear Grandmother as he said she was always good natured and agreeable. In fact she was more than agreeable he said– she was just like Whistler’s Mother when she sat in her rocking chair in the kitchen when he visited.

Eddie admitted she didn’t have the push and fire of his very own Mother, but she was definitely prophetic. When Eddie said goodbye to her at her Carleton Place home to go to dental school in Toronto his Grandmother looked at him and said,

“Who knows we may never see each other again!”

She was right they never did.

“Bossin Billy” aka Christena  McEwen Muirhead died in her Carleton Place home in November  of 1924.

 

 

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historicalnotes

Christina McEwen (Muirhead)

Immediate Family:
Daughter of John Newcome McEwen and Christina McEwen
Wife of William Muirhead
Mother of William John Muirhead; Jemima Muirhead and Daniel Muirhead
Sister of Catherine McEwen; John McEwen; Isabella McEwen; Mary McEwen; Janet McEwen; Margaret McEwen and Hugh McEwen

 

William Muirhead

Birthdate: 1812 (58)
Death: Died October 12, 1870
Immediate Family:
Husband of Christina McEwen
Father of William John Muirhead; Jemima Muirhead and Daniel Muirhead

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading

 

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Killed by Zulus — Duncan and James Box

Was a Boldt Castle Boathouse Once in our Midst? See the Home of the Daphne!

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?