Tag Archives: Mississippi mills

Grandma Yuill ‘ Life is Full of Meaning’ Glenda Mahoney

Standard
Feeling very nostalgic today. Is that Grandma Yuills writing with the date on the cover page . Just need to know so I can cry harder. We did not know how incredibly lucky we were. We did not even know we were making memories , we were just having fun. Glenda Mahoney

Pages from Glenda Mahoney

The Life and Times of Cora Yuill

Cora Munro Yuill — Arthur Yuill — For Glenda Mahoney with Love

Remembering Isabel Yuill

Conversations with Agatha Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook

Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28
The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill
Clippings of Mrs. Joseph Yuill – Margaret Yuill
Ralph and Iris Yuill
The Hart Children of Lanark — Laurie Yuill

Notes on Alexander and Joseph Yuill
Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter
Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

Turning Back to the Clock Agnes “Aggie” Yuill– The Buchanan Scrapbook

Archie Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Aggie Yuill Remembers Christmas and the Yuill French Loaf

Overnight Lock-up Guests Should Be Fed For 25c Apiece — Little Geneaology

Standard
Overnight Lock-up Guests Should Be Fed For 25c Apiece — Little Geneaology

The question of what kind of meal should be furnished to transient guests in Almonte lock-up was discussed at the council meeting on Tuesday night. At the present time the caretaker, Ed. Little, gives these men a breakfast that costs the town 35 cents. It was felt they should get plainer grub at not more than 25 cents and after a good deal of talk Thomas Reid, the new chairman of the police committee, was asked to interview Mrs. Little on the subject and report back to council at a special meeting, Friday night. 

This matter was brought up by Councillor Montgomery who was on the police committee last year. He pointed out that many of the men who were out of employment and sought a night’s lodging in the local jail went around saying they did not get the kind of breakfast they were entitled to when they honoured a town such as Almonte with a night’s patronage. 

This caused talk that was unfair to Mr. and Mrs. Little. Mr. Montgomery thought some set bill of fare should be arranged so as to relieve the caretaker and his wife of any responsibility and criticism. Someone suggested that Mr. Reid was the very man to draw up a menu for the unwelcome overnight/ guests the town is forced to entertain.

 It was hinted that if he made it plain enough the word might spread and there would be fewer calls on Almonte’s hospitality. Mr. Reid refused to accept responsibility. for arranging what the transients were going to eat. He thought though that a meal suitable for them could be served for .25 cents and still leave enough to reimburse Mr. and Mrs Little for their trouble. Mayor Comba felt there should be nothing fancy about the food served to these gentlemen of the road. While he did not believe in turning them out in the winter months with nothing to eat. He couldn’t see why the town should go to needless expense in the matter. His Worship instanced the case of Smiths Falls where it was decided that such transients spending a night in the lock up should get tea without milk and sugar, bread and butter. “Yes and in the end they didn’t get anything,” said Former Councillor LeMalstre who was sitting In the audience. “I guess that’s right, ” replied Mayor Comba amidst laughter. Jan 1933

In 1935, the Star published a recipe for coffee “cream” that combined egg yolk, sugar and water. The Canadian Woman’s Cook Book of 1939 contains six recipes for fake foods, including almonds made of croutons, a bisque with tomatoes but no shellfish, cherry pie with cranberries and raisins, and a mock sausage filled with mashed beans and bread crumbs.

One of Kraft Food’s most requested recipes is Mock Apple Pie, which substitutes 36 crushed Ritz crackers for apples, baked in a pie crust along with two cups of sugar, butter, lemon, cream of tartar and cinnamon. It was introduced in 1935, one year after the Ritz cracker, according to Jean Anderson’s American Century Cookbook.

Ingredients

Dough for double-crust pie

18 saltines, halved

1-1/2 cups sugar

1-1/4 cups water

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 teaspoon cream of tartar

1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions

Preheat oven to 400°. On a lightly floured surface, roll 1 half of dough to a 1/8-in.-thick circle; transfer to a 9-in. pie plate. Trim to 1/2 in. beyond rim of plate.

Layer crackers in shell; set aside. In a small saucepan, combine remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Carefully pour over crackers (filling will be very thin). Cool for 10 minutes.

Roll remaining dough to a 1/8-in.-thick circle; cut into 1-in.-wide strips. Arrange over filling in a lattice pattern. Trim and seal strips to edge of bottom crust; flute edge. Bake until crust is golden brown, 25-30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. click for more here..

Photo thanks to the scrapbooks of Lucy Connelly Poaps

Taxi Rides –Beer Rides 1930’s and Local Taxi Driver “Kid (Norman) Bryce”

Standard
Taxi Rides –Beer Rides 1930’s and Local Taxi Driver “Kid (Norman) Bryce”
Mademoiselle Decourcelle. The world’s first woman taxi driver, dressed in uniform, circa 1909

July 1939

As soon as hotels in Perth and Smiths Falls secure licence to sell beer and wine local taxi drivers will inaugurate a cheap nightly service from Almonte to those places it is understood. Word that no licences would be granted in Almonte or Carleton Place because of local option came as disappointment to thirsty people who had looked forward to beer by the glass in these towns.

Drivers of cars on the other hand, stand to benefit under the government’s ruling and will run a regular service to neighbouring towns as soon as the hotels open their beverage rooms. Whether the Premier will find some way of preventing these Almonte and Carleton Place commuters from patronizing hotels in other places remains to be seen. No representations have been made to him on that score up to the present time though it is possible something may be done about the situation in the near future. Local bootleggers, it is said, were overjoyed at the news that they were not going to have legitimate competition.

Almonte Taxi’s

memories of Almonte– Johnson’s Taxi– 1950s–Sandy France said “Don Johnson was the taxi driver in the early 50’s. Think he may have been an ex serviceman”

Linda Beaupre asks:Hello Linda, new member here. My mother’s family had cousins or uncles in the Almonte area the used to run a taxi service out of their home . I was wondering if you had any info on them , last name was Majaury and it was in the 60s?Anyone? Thank you!!

Don RaycroftYes, we used them when it was really cold to go to school. If you didn’t call them they would pick you up on the way if they thought it was too cold to be walking. Nice people.

Mary HurdisMargret and Jimmy Majaury had a taxi service.She loved chocolate and beer! He was related to my husband, his mother was Margaret Majaury. Try texting Elizabeth Dennie her mother was a sister of James if not I have a Majaury book

Laurie LadouceurThey lived at 49 Carleton street on the Island. My family is related. We purchased the house from them. We lived there for awhile

Taxi service in Carleton Place– Kid Bryce ( Norman)

January 1934
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Mar 1941, Sat  •  Page 32

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Sep 1930, Tue  •  Page 13

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Sep 1947, Mon  •  Page 15

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Jan 1994, Mon  •  Page 34

Mr. Dowdall purchased the brick building at Bridge and Emily and moved his business. Walter Stanzel later lived here and operated his taxi business. It was well known all around town that Mr. Stanzel had a pet skunk and and a pet raccoon as well. No word if they came for rides in his taxi!

Murray’s Taxi —- Frank Blakeley and other Rides

Walton’s Taxi and Did a Plane Really Land on Bridge Street? College and Bridge Street

Looking for Memories of Kennedy’s Taxi

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place –Part 1–Bud’s Taxi

Personal Memories of Downtown Local Business etc.

Did you Know? Bet You Didn’t!

. Mr. Graham who once lived here served in the War, worked for CPR and offered a Taxi Service to the town and lived in the little yellow house–…(Nichols) on Bridge Street

Ray Paquette’s Carleton Place Moment..-In the right corner of the advertisement for Howard McNeely’s Barber Shop, it mentions E. McNeely, Assistant. I wonder if that is Earl McNeely who later or perhaps prior to worked barbering with Howard Little and lived on Munro Street west of Rochester? As well, how many people remember Ned Root’s Shoe Repair beside the driveway for Stanzel’s Taxi?

BEFORE AND AFTER-100-102 BRIDGE STREET CARLETON PLACE–THE FRAME BUILDING WAS MRS. ROGER’S BOARDING HOUSE BEFORE SHE MOVED TO VICTORIA STREET AND THERE WAS A SMALL ADDITION AT THE REAR OF THIS BUILDING. THE BUILDING WAS BRICK AND CLAPBOARD AS THAT WERE USED TO CONSTRUCT MANY OF THE BRIDGE STREET BUILDINGS.
Asa Roe and his family occupied the house for a few year and then Richard Dowdall bought the property. Early in 1936 George Doucett moved his insurance office into one side and Dr. J.A. McEwen had his medical office on the other.
It was thus occupied until the early 1950s when Mr. Dowdall purchased the brick building at Bridge and Emily and moved his business. Walter Stanzel later lived here and operated his taxi business and when Dr. McEwen moved a couple blocks down Bridge Street both sides became dwellings. Penny Trafford mentioned that Mr. Stanzel had a pet skunk and I think a pet raccoon as well.
I remember taking clothing to the tailor that was on the right hand side of this building in the 80s? Last year I heard a story about a local woman who made teddy bears– and is this the same spot she was making them in? Still trying to find out the source of that information. Searching for Information– Teddy Bears Made in Carleton Place?
Ray Paquette added: My parents lived in the right side of the house before moving to an apartment in the Senior Citizen’s site at 126 Sussex Street. The Watty Stanzel ran a taxi service out of the left side for many years and I seem to recall Mrs. Cecil McCann and Ms Eileen Costello living in that side in later years.
Ray PaquetteI’m having a senior moment. Will somebody reminding me who ran Moore’s Taxi please?
Linda Gallipeau-Johnston Ernie Moore – I think.
Ray PaquetteWas that the same Ernie Moore who ran the store on Moore Street?

Nancy HudsonLinda I think the taxi driver’s name was John Moore, Ernie had the store on Moore St.
Ray PaquetteNancy Hudson I remember Watty Stanzel, Arnie McNeely, Ronnie Wing and Wib Giles but John Moore, I have no recollection of. Where did he live?
Nancy HudsonRay Paquette John Moore lived at the corner of Town Line west and Moffatt St. My Aunt and Uncle, Les and Olive Nield lived next door to him on Moffatt St

Ray PaquetteLinda Gallipeau-Johnston Ted has taken on the affectation of 2 “d’s” in his name. He is now known as Tedd. Go figure?!?!?
Doug B. McCartenRay Paquette great to see Brian and Tedd are well and enjoying life as retirees! Ask Brian if he remembers the two young ladies who were traveling through town selling magazine subscriptions? We all went back to Brian’s house to discuss our choices….. lol! I actually got a subscription for Car & Driver….. I think Brian took one of the ladies to his room to get money or something BAHAHAHA what a nice visit we had with them…….
Ray PaquetteDoug B. McCarten I sent your comment regarding the magazine sales staff to Brian who commented “…You can tell Doug that , although that little experience had slipped my mind, yes I do remember now that he mentioned it. I thought that there might have been a third guy involved but I might be wrong. I ended up getting a subscription for a year to a magazine I cared little for.Those girls were VERY good at their job.”

Ray PaquetteThere are a lot of commercial locations of earlier times that are not included on this “place mat”. Bellamy’s Restaurant, Sinclair Bros. Men’s Wear and Patterson’s Furniture to mention a few others not already noted above. I could go on but would bore most readers…
Joan StoddartRemember the rest rooms beside the Queen’s

Frozen Pipes on the Range

Standard
Frozen Pipes on the Range

Almonte January 1926

Mrs.P. J. Campbell met with an accident last Monday morning which might easily have ended much more seriously than it did. In fact she had a narrow escape of losing her life. Mrs. Campbell had just gone into the kitchen of her home. early on Monday morning, and was about ‘her household duties’ when suddenly the cooking range exploded with a loud report. Mrs. Campfoell was thrown through the open doorway from t/he kitchen into the -dining-room, and rendered unconscious.

One of the iconic images of the 1920s kitchen is the special gas cabinet range, with its distinctive barrel-door warming oven on top. Designed for constant use by large families or boarding houses, these ranges combined three or more broiling and baking ovens with multiple burners. 

 

When she recovered consciousness she found herself lying on her back -and just beside her a large piece of the stove. It seems that one of the water pipes from the stove had became frozen, and as the steam developed it could not escape and an explosion occurred. The stove was smashed into small pieces and much damage was done both in the kitchen and in the dining room. The crockery and other articles being broken and one of the pieces of the stove hit the ceiling and damaged it also. 

The word is is that Mrs. Campbell was not hit by the flying metal, and although she was badly shaken and bruised she suffered no serious injury. Mr. Campbell was in another part of the house at the time of the explosion.

1934 Almonte gazette

In other news of January 1926

Miss Welhelmine Reid, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Reid of Ramsay, won fifith prize at the- ‘Ottawa Winter Fair’ last week for milking. She was first for the county of Lanark. Her prize was $6. The competition was open to girls under 16 years of age. Miss Reid had very poor luck. The cow she drew the ballot for was a young and nervous animal which could not be induced to stand still. This lost her a good deal of time.

DetailSource

Name:Wilhelmine Reid
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:Scotch (Scotish)
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Single
Age:13
Birth Year:abt 1908
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:28
Residence Street or Township:Ramsay Tp
Residence City, Town or Village:Township of Ramsay
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Daughter
Father’s Name:John Reid
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Margaret Reid
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Presbyterian
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Months at School:8
Municipality:Ramsay
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Ramsay (Township)
Sub-District Number:37
Enumerator:Thomas Cochrane
District Description:Polling Division No. 2 – Comprising the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th concessions from lot no. 15 to lot no. 27 inclusive also the 8th concession from lot no. 13 to lot no. 27 inclusive
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:7
Family Number:28
Household MembersAgeRelationshipJohn Reid48HeadMargaret Reid47WifeAnnie Reid15DaughterWilhelmine Reid13DaughterMable Reid9DaughterWilfred Craig17Helper

DetailSource

Name:Mary Wilhelmina Reid
Gender:Female
Age:21
Birth Year:abt 1908
Birth Place:Almonte, Ontario, Canada
Marriage Date:15 Jun 1929
Marriage Place:Ramsey, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:Jno. R. Reid
Mother:Margaret A. Reid
Spouse:Raymond Hazlewood Kemp

The ‘Deer-Cow hybrid’ of Carleton Place Entertains the Councillors of Almonte — ORR Genealogy

Standard
The ‘Deer-Cow hybrid’ of  Carleton Place Entertains the Councillors of Almonte  — ORR Genealogy
Ottawa, Ontario, Journal (Dec. 9, 1932)

Though the financial situation facing Almonte and other towns in 1933 may not be as bright as could be desired there is always a silver lining to every black cloud. This was demonstrated, so far as Almonte is concerned, on Tuesday night at the first regular meeting of council, when the following letter from J . P. , Orr, Carleton Place auctioneer, was read By the clerk:—

 The Greatest Freak “

To Mayor and Council, Almonte, Ontario, Canada— 

“Dear Sirs—“I am In possession of the Greatest Freak Animal on earth that I purchased last year from a farmer of Franktown, Ont. “I have named this animal ‘Queen of the Forest,’ its mother was a cow’.and its father a buck deer. 

It is 1 years old, stands 38 inches high and weighs 211 lbs. “You have no doubt read about this animal in the papers. Everyone that has seen it says, it the strangest freak they have ever seen. 

“1 am going to show this animal in different towns this winter, and every town I show this animal in I propose to turn over 40 per cent of the money taken in, to the Mayor and Council to aid the unemployed of their town this winter. 

The price I charge to see this animal is 10 cents. “All I need is a small empty store some place in town with electric lights. . “If the Mayor and Council are interested in this, kindly let me know and I will call and arrange for some Thursday, Friday and Saturday.—

Yours very truly, J. P. Orr,

Reading of the above ‘communication produced a deep impression on the council. The idea of getting 40 percent of the gate appealed to municipal legislators who know  not where to turn in their search for revenue. Mayor Comba was glad to learn that the spirit of P. T. Barnum still lived even though the great American showman had passed to his reward.

 What Barrmm Said “I believe there are a couple of vacant” stores in town,” said His Worship, “though I do not know whether they would be suitable to serve as temporary quarters for. such a splendid animal as “Queen of the Forest.” 

He thought Mr. Orr’s letter ‘ should be answered but felt It was no part of the council’s business to provide ‘ a stopping place for “The Queen.” 

Memories of w hat Barnum said about “one being born every minute,” may have flashed across the “Mayor’s mind because he concluded by remarking that  Mr. Orr seemed to want to saddle some responsibility for the show on the council. 

Apparently Mr. Comba wasn’t going to see the new council in the class indicated so contemptuously by the sarcastic Bamum. Councillor Montgomery suggested that the old bar In the Belmont Hotel would be an excellent place to exhibit “Queen of the Forest.” 

He offered to act as doorman and take the money if Mr. Orr wished  to bring his protege to town.  It was agreed, finally, that a letter be sent to Mr. Orr from the council giving him permission to exhibit “Queen of the Forest,” but declining to take any responsibility in respect to providing her with quarters while she was a guest of Almonte. 

 Jan 1933

A deer cow hybird is called a DOW click here for more..

Update– I scoured every issue of the Almonte Gazette and Orr’s cow/deer never went anywhere..

LIPPED FROM
The Sun Times
Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada
13 Dec 1932, Tue  •  Page 2


CLIPPED FROM
The Sault Star
Sault St. Marie, Ontario, Canada
13 Dec 1932, Tue  •  Page 6

Should read Franktown not Kranktown

Perils of the Cows of Carleton Place or Where’s the Beefalo?

Should Cows and Smart Cars be Tipped?

January 1920– Church Street School in the Winter — PLUS PHOTOS

Standard
January 1920–  Church Street School in the Winter — PLUS PHOTOS
Karen Hirst
June 12, 2018  · 
Church Street Public School, Almonte…memories were made within these classroom walls….if only they could talk what would they recall?
With a new school build, Church Street Apartments now occupies the site.

1866- The Church Street Schoolbuilt at a cost of $3,175—contract price.Almonte Church Street Public School, 1950/51 -MARG DRENNAN-

January 1920

Schools reopened on Monday after the Christmias holidays, with good attendance. Unfortunately the Church Street school was so cold that the children had to go home again. This has occurred several times this winter, and the explanation given is that the furnace is too small. There is a new teacher engaged in the person of Miss Eileen Staley, of Wolfe Island. She succeeds MissKate MacDonald, who resigned before Christmas. Miss Robeson, who also resigned before Christmas, is doing duty until a successor has been appointed. January 1920

Buddyzee FisherI lived in that building for a few years. Great place with huge high ceiling and similar heating bills. Lol.

In the 1890s P.C. Dowdall’s Drug Store was on Bridge St. in Almonte near the railway. In the entrance, the weather forecasts were posted up daily, providing a point of interest each day for the children walking to and from the Church Street school.

PUPILS WERE READY TO TESTIFY AGAINST PRINCIPAL OF SCHOOL (By Dugald Campbell) It has been a long time now since this little item happened. But it was back in Almonte around the latter 1800s likely. The old town had two’ famous school principals. One of course, was the redoubtable P. C. McGregor, patron saint of Queen’s University at Kingston, and for many years principal of Almonte High School. P. C. was really something. My story, however, concerns another principal, the late John McCarter. He was an old dour, stubborn Scot with a single mindedness and a stern approach to life. He held forth in the Church Street School, and he trudged, summer and winter, across the Bay Hill and up Mill Street. John McCarter was a stem disciplinarian aland he did not hesitate to lay on the birch rod at times. His arder in this direction brought him into trouble.The old man licked a lad named Jack Carney rather heavily, and there was such a rumpus kicked up that the case was sent up to the higher court in Perth. The late E. W. Smith (Almonte magistrate) did not wish to get into trouble with the two principals in the affair, so he wisely sent the case up to the county court. Mr. A. M. Greig represented School Teacher McCarter, and W. H. Stafford represented Jack Carney. The presiding judge was Judge Senkler at Perth. Carney’s lawyer took a cart load of school youths to witness that Carney took a shellacking. I was not one of the kids, but it was a great day when the prosecuting lawyer took the kids over to Perth. The late Sandy Robinson took his famous side-seater to Perth with his team of steppers.Twenty two miles was a long trip in those days, and there was a lot of heat generated around town because of the interest in the case. John McCarter had many friends and it would have been suicidal had he lost the case, but because of the youth of the lads, who were keyed up to take their oath re the licking of the Carney lad, the wise old judge dismissed the case. No evidence was taken because of the youth of the witnesses for Carney. Jack Carney’s health was not abated one whit, and maybe it was a good thing for the discipline of the town, but it was hot stuff when it lasted.

Also read—

Miss Christena Dunlop –Teacher Church Street School

Almonte Church Street Public School, 1950/51 -MARG DRENNAN

Thank you to Fran Cooper
Good morning, Linda,
Church Street Public School, Almonte that was taken on the lawn near the school for 1950-51.
I want to try to get everyone’s name and then I am going to donate the photo to the North Lanark Museum at Appleton so many people can enjoy it.
Fran Cooper.
Almonte Public School 1950-51 Photo
Back Row: Left to Right: Mrs. Howard Giles, Miss Edna Ross, Miss Agnes Gillies (later Mrs. Stuart King), Miss Marion McGill (Mrs. Murray Cavanagh), Miss Margaret Rodgers, Diane Larocque, _____________, Donna Honeyborne, Ruth Craig?,
Next Row: (short row)
Mr. Hal Farnham, Principal, John Sutherland, Miss Elizabeth Schoular
Next Row: _________, Raymond Morton, Jackie Philips, Garnet Rodger, __________,
Bob McClymont, Bob Andrews, _________________, ______________,
Second Row: Earl Needham, Hugh McMullan, Bert McIntosh, Donnie Andrews,
___________, Arthur (Artie) Wilson, Gordon Paterson, ______________,
_____________, ____________,
First Row: Elgin Miller?, ____________, ____________, ____________,
Deannie Lotan, Earl More, Billy McClymont,

Brent Eades
October 6, 2020  · 
School in Almonte 100 years ago, give or take. This is Church Street School in the early 20th century, exact date unknown. It’s now an apartment building.

From Frank will Fix it..
Linda, here’s a picture you might find interesting. Church Street School, Grade 1 class picture 1959-1960. I’m in the 2nd row, 3rd from the right. Frank Blakeley

Bob Smithson grandpa and Cameron smithson middle row

Alice CharleboisJohn Dalgity , your Uncle Jack is in first row 5 from left, Gordie Lotan 3 over from him. Your dad Garry second row, 7th from left. I have that picture with the names.
Karen Hirst
September 4, 2019  · 
Church Street Public School

Gwen OneillI loved that school playing ball at recess was my favourite time there. Haha
Sheila Mueck and I were there at same time.

church street school -CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1971, Wed • Page 2

Catherine LehewShe was known TINA DUNLOP..she taught GL Comba (my mothers father) in grade school.
She was tall woman always worn dress very Victorian.. my mom had Ms Ross Gr 1..Tina Dunlop had grade 2 1934. Very stern..walk around with a pointer line us up along the wall to learn your authentic very stern.
She possibly my mother’s grandmothers cousin
My grandmother was Jenny Dunlop married Charles Comba originally from Pakenham.
My us Emily Comba

Judy Reid Hamre
July 8, 2021  · 
I went to Church Street School until grade 5. This was grade 3 not sure why it says G.L. Comba because everybody in the pic can confirm it wasn’t Comba!

Comments-

Church Street School-Hello Linda,My mom was born & raised in Almonte along with her 8 siblings. My Uncle worked the print shop for the Almonte Gazette, Uncle Fred was reeve at on time, my aunts worked in the flour mill Grandpa Clement built homes and helped build St. Mary’s church twice ! Thanks to Lin Jones

Almonte Public School 1959This school had a girls’ entrance on the East end and a separate boys’ entrance on the West end. The playground was even divided into a girls’ playground and a boys’ playground and we didn’t dare cross the line. The full basement was divided into a basement for boys and a basement for girls to use in inclement weather at recesses. Also, a girls’ cloakroom and a boys’ cloakroom on each floor and a girls’ stairs and a boys’ stairs to the second floor and to the basement.Anyone remember Church Street Public School? With Miss Ross on the piano?- Ian McDougall Tokyo Every morning the whole student body would gather in the foyer and sing, God save the Queen, Oh Canada and Don’t Fence Me In. I lived there for a short time, less than a year, but remember that I really loved the town.-Prudence Hutton Florida

More about the Church Street school-A hostel on Church Street?? Do tell…. Clipped from The Ottawa Citizen, 10 Jul 1971, Sat, Page 37 CLICK to read all..
Judy Reid Hamre I went to school @ Church St. and I remember thinking how cool it was to have a drop in centre (I was 11)
Glenn Arthur I remember that and the descrption that the teens were given by Mr Galligan. I also was a Volunteer at the Centre along with other teens in town that that all turned out to be pretty good citizens of Almonte and area
Judy Reid Hamre
January 10, 2020  · 
This is the clock that hung in my classroom. My father rescued it after the school closed

Cathy PatersonSure do grade1 to 6 awesome to sets of stairs going up two down to the cloakroom boys side and girls side lining up outside to go in ! Off to classroom then assembly then singing God Save The Queen then The flag would go up of Elmer the Saftey Elephant of no accidents! School patrols out on the corners

Marty TaylorThink I only went there 1 year? Don’t remember much except the whole class got half a day off due to the smell after I threw up on some girls back in the classroom.

Sandy FranceThe grade 8 boys were tasked with wrapping the Union Jack flag so it could be unfurled by yanking on a cord during the singing of God Save the King. One day some wag filled the flag with small pebbles. Mr. Farnham was not impressed by the ensuing clatter.

Donna TimminsI went to the high school for Gr.1 with Miss Rodger, then Church St for Grade 2, 3, 4 &5 with Miss Rodger, Miss Gillies who later married Stuart King & Mrs. Penman for Grade 5. Mr. Sutherland in Gr. 6 which at Easter we transferred to the new GLComba and then back to Church St. for Gr. 8 with Hal Farnham. Lots of fond memories.

Judy Reid Hamre
January 11, 2020  · 
I bought Miss Schoular’s Singer treadle sewing machine at a flea market in Carleton Place in the late 70’s. It had every accessory imaginable and sews beautifully

Don RaycroftGlenn Arthur A “beautiful” addition if I recall.😊I remember Ed Giffen teaching us the football basics and how to win. When he started the program I remember him saying you guys will be able to hit each other without visiting Mr. Farnham.It didn’t seem funny at the time but I have often laughed about it over the years.And I have no idea how he got in his Austin Mini. Maybe he took the front seat out??

Remembering Daniel Ensley Larocque

Standard
Remembering Daniel Ensley Larocque

January 1955

 Almonte lost a popular resident Friday night in the sudden death of Daniel Ensley Larocque at the early age of 44. He was. an enthusiastic athlete, a former member of the Almonte hockey team which reached its peak in the early 1930’s. An hour before the heart seizure which proved fatal, he had been on skates again playing a pick-up game in the local arena. It is thought that this exertion was too much for him and brought on his-untimely end. Danny, as he was better known to his friends, was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Larocque, Almonte, and was bom in Darling Twp. 44 years ago. 20 years ago he married the former Jean Clarke of Ottawa and Almonte, who survives with one daughter and two sons, Diane, 14, Danny, 12, at home and Clarke, 18, of Toronto. Besides his parents he is also survived by three sisters and two brothers, Carmel (Mrs. John Kennedy) of Kinburn; Florence (Mrs. George Hourigan) and Alma (Mrs. Joseph Coady) both of Almonte, and George of Almonte and William of Lanark. 

Mr. Larocque joined the Almonte volunteer fire brigade 18 years ago and worked his way up to be captain of the brigade, a position he still held at the time of his death. He was also a member of the local Legion, having served overseas during World War II with the Canadian armed forces. He started his hockey career 25 years ago when he played with the Almonte team when it was at the peak of its winning streak and he had been active in that sport ever since in one capacity or another. 

When he was not refereeing a hockey game played by the younger generation, he was acting as time-keeper in the penalty box for the intermediate games. Following the town league game he played on Friday night, a short time before his death, he had made arrangements with the rink manager, Harry Nontell to give up playing and referee the town league games for the remainder of the season. During the Summer months Dan could always be seen playing softball, another of his favorite sports. In later years he took up curling in his spare time. 

As a young man he was employed by Taylor Brothers hardware store for a number of years. In 1941 he joined the Army and went overseas where he served in England, Italy and other parts of Europe. Following his discharge he took over the delivery service of the Canadian Pacific Express office and he also transported the mail between the trains and the post office. After seven leirs in the employ of the CPE, he built a service station and lunch bar which he operated for a short time before selling out in the Fall of 1954. 

On Sunday night the local firemen paraded in a body to the Comba funeral home and paid their final respects to th^jr captain. During the afternoon members of the local legion attended the largely attended funeral was held Monday morning to St. Mary’s Catholic Church for requiem mass at nine a.m., and thence to St. Mary’s Cemetery. Rev. Maurice Egan, P.P., conducted the service. 

The pallbearers were: Messrs Geo. Hourigan, Joe Coady, John Kennedy, Don Houston, Douglas Houston and Geo. Villeneuve. Among many old friends who attended the funeral from a distance were Messrs Wllmot Little and Jack Washburn of Temiskaming, Quebec.

Remembering Isabel Yuill

Remembering People of Carleton Place —Clara Morris

Remembering Community Business — #supportinglocal Series– The Bagel Oven

Remembering Nash the Slash at The Black Swan Pub

Remembering Debbie Lowe Roy

Remembering Theresa Margaret Crawford Brown

Remembering Stephen Yanor John Forrest Lanark 1962

Remembering The Old Cow Bell — Don Crawford — The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Remembering Haying in Lanark County- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Remembering Albert Mitchell– The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Remembering the Old Log Timber Slide

Robert Bryson and Stuart Dunn — Canoeing Down the Timber Slide

Standard
Robert Bryson and Stuart Dunn — Canoeing Down the Timber Slide
Victoria Mill Slide- Almonte.com

Almonte Gazette

That fine old Scotch couple, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bryson, once of Union street, had an interesting chat about the days long gone by, and learned of an incident which he takes the liberty of telling the readers of this paper. It was away back in 1835 or there about that the  first “ timber slide” was built in Almonte, for the purpose of avoiding the great height of falls which the lumbermen had to overcome in some way. 

In 1835  Hon. (then plain Mr.) George Bryson and Mr. Simon Dunn established shanties throughout-Ramsay in the neighbourhood of where the Drummonds and the Kennedys and other pioneers lived then, as some of them still do. In those days the logs were hauled to a point opposite Messrs. Timmins & Co’s present store, and were left there until the river opened in the spring, when they were put down the slide into the Bay below. 

At that time the slide extended from the Bay up to the lower end of Mill street. When the logs had all been put through the slide in 1835 there was great talk among the shantymen about running the slide in canoes, to avoid portaging, but when it came to the point most of the men thought twice.   

However, Mr. Robert Bryson, then a sturdy young fellow of 18, decided to risk the trip, in company with his brother’s partner, Mr. Simon Dunn. They had a splendid large pine log canoe, and ventured on their risky trip, full of courage, both being skilful canoeists. The canoe and its occupants shot down the steep decline at a rapid gait —as rapidly as a toboggan goes down its slide in winter—and all went well until they came to the fourteen feet of a drop from the end of the slide into tho Bay.

As soon as the canoe left the slide it split into two pieces—right down the middle—and the two passengers were immediately submerged in the rapids below. However, they were soon- fished out and given attention, and were none the worse for their involuntary endeavour, and they were many a time afterward congratulated on their nerve and daring expedition and established a record for the first trip by boat down the Almonte slide. They lost a fine canoe, but that was a small matter compared with the fact that they accomplished what none of the other men dared to attempt. Afterwards “ aprons’ were put on the various slides, rendering them navigable for canoes when skilfully handled. 

https://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/shingle-bolt-flume-in-capilano-canyon

Vintage logging – flumes and sluiceways click

Remembering the Old Log Timber Slide

Vintage Murders in Lanark County — Documented Titles

Standard
Vintage Murders in Lanark County — Documented Titles
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
06 Nov 1895, Wed  •  Page 2
CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
20 Apr 1934, Fri  •  Page 1

read-Dr. Wilton Pratt — Murder of his Housekeeper in Smiths Falls

I had a lot of people ask me about vintage crime in Lanark County, so if you look below you will find a series of titles that will interest the crime reader

Related reading….

The Tragic Life of Mary Paul–Hood’s Settlement- Mary Beth Wylie

The Story of Wild Bob Ferguson of Dalhousie Township

Dr. Wilton Pratt — Murder of his Housekeeper in Smiths Falls

Murder on Island Street — Henry Gray

The Deacon Murder—Away Back in Clarendon and Miller

The Buck Lake Murderer

Was it Murder?

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Not Guilty in the Murder of His Grandmother –George Watt Jr.

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

Murder in Carleton Place –Peter Cairns

The Buck Lake Murderer

The Media Then and Now–Johnny Gillies Had a Gun

Shocking Murder in Almonte–Michigan Charlie

Murder on Maple Island

Bitten by the Kissing Bug — A Shocking Conclusion to the Life of Carleton Place’s Daniel E. Sheppard

The Tale of a Pirate named Bill Johnston with Pirate Dog Supermodels

Assassinated Gossip about Lincoln, Payne and the Thousand Islands

The Man Who Would Be The Revenant

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Did Samuel Pittard of Ashton Murder His Wife?

Here She Comes —Miss Almonte High School January 1958

Standard
Here She Comes —Miss Almonte High School January 1958
Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Downey of Pakenham announce the engagement of their daughter, Kathleen Ada (Downey), to Mr. David Snedden, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Snedden of Almonte. The wedding will take place on Saturday, Aug. 25, at 7 p.m., in St. Mark’s Anglican Church, Pakenham. Miss Downey is on the teaching staff of the Ontario School for the Deaf, Belleville, and Mr. Snedden is a 1961 graduate of Queen’s University in civil engineering.

1958

Miss Kathleen Downey was chosen as “Miss Almonte High School ” at the regular meeting of the Almonte Lions Club held in St Mary’s Assembly Hall on Tuesday evening in the form of a banquet at which time the six contestants in the contest were guests of the club. Judith Scott placed second and, Marilyn Robertson third in the contest which was jointly sponsored by the Almonte Chamber of Commerce and the local Lions Club.

Others vying for the honour of being the “queen” were Gayle Mohr, Dorothy Walters and Donna Rintoul. Col. E. D. P. Taylor, president of the Almonte C. of C. was present and said that this was the first time th at Almonte had ever been entered in a contest such as this. He said the winner would now go to Perth for the contest when the winners from the various towns participating in this event would try for the title of “Miss Eastern Ontario.”

His Worship, Mayor George Gomme presented th e winner and the two runners-up with suitable gifts for their part in this affair. The Mayor was acting on behalf of the Lions Club and the Chamber of Commerce in this capacity. Under the chairmanship of Lion Harry Gunn the judging was done by Mrs. Anigus Morrison, Almonte; Mrs. Clarke McGlashan of Bell’s Corners and John Robertson of Ottawa In the contest points were given for the following: Poise, Personality, Dress, Natural Beauty, Academic Standing, Athletic Prowess and Outside Interests.

Guest speaker for the evening was John Clarice McGlashan, of McGlashan Silverware Limited, Bell’s Corners, who was introduced by president W ard McGill and thanked by Dr. Jim Coupland. The speaker who attended the Duke of Edinburgh’s Commonwealth Conference on “LabourManagement Trends,” gave a brief but interesting talk on the subject. One of the topics brought out in his talk was on “How to live, with Unions and visa versa.” Lion Stewart Lee, speaking foi the committee in charge of thel annually sponsored Public Speak-, ing Contest, announced that the event this year would be on Friday, Jan. 31st when the contestants would battle it out for the T. A. Thompson Trophy and the Almonte Lions Club prizes. The area finals are to be held in Smiths Falls in early March. Dr. Otto Schulte, speaking on behalf of th e gathering, thanked the ladies of St. Mary’s Church for catering to the banquet. Jan 1958

Sandy FranceMarilyn Syme, Mary Snedden, Rosalyn Robertson 9 read Remembering Rosy Robertson
), Iris Guthrie, Gwen Egan, ?? , Noreen Armstrong–Photo- Thanks to Isabel Fox

Iris Guthrie May Queen Almonte High School around 1959

Miss Almonte 1975

Still Looking for Memories of Theresa Galvin –Miss Almonte

Mr. Mississippi Beauty Pageant 1982 Joe Banks

Jean Duncan Lanark Dairy Queen

Remembering Rosy Robertson

1970s Lanark County Beauty Queens

Here She Comes Miss Almonte — Karen Hirst and other Notes

Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos

The Dark World of the Miss Civil Service Beauty Contests

  1. Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos
  2. Last Night I Saw Someone I Loved at the Halloween Parade
  3. Glamorous Marilyn Allen Miss Snow Queen and Others 1950s