Tag Archives: mississippi hotel

Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings

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Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1

also read-David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

1920s photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Mississippi/ Grand Hotel

Napoleon Lavallee bought the property for $50 in 1869 and opened the hotel in 1872 after he sold the Leland Hotel/ Carleton House on Bridge Street.  The McIlquham family bought it 11 years later in 1883 and when Joe Belisle worked there from 1917-1920 it had ornate woodwork, a grand staircase and the stone facade had wooden white wrap-around verandas. The elegant dining room tables were covered in  fine lace linen and gleaming cutlery, and the Mississippi Hotel became known for its homemade food and attracted travelling salesman from far and wide. The salesmen set up trunks in their rooms offering everything from dishes to clothing that was scooped up by local merchants that came to buy at the hotel. The place was packed daily with fans from Stittsville, Smiths Falls and Perth–and if you talk to Gerald Hastie people came in early for the fresh baked pies, and by noon they were pretty well sold out.The only known photo of Napoleon Lavallee sits on my wall–read-The Napoleon of Carleton Place

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 Jan 1897, Wed  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Sep 1919, Fri  •  Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Dec 1909, Mon  •  Page 3
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Mar 1902, Wed  •  Page 5
Karen LloydIn the 1950s Buck Fraser lived at the Mississippi Hotel. He used to stand out at the front in a white dress shirt having a cigarette. I don’t know where he worked .
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1913, Tue  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Aug 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
Jennifer Fenwick Irwin–Carleton Place Museum This was taken the morning after the fire.
Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire- read-Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
Buffalo robe or Sasktchewan Robe

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1899, Sat  •  Page 6
Former dinner plates from the old Mississippi Hotel/ Grand Hotel– **
Adin Wesley Daigle**

November 19 at 11:37 AM ·
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A recent addition to the collection , a couple plates from the Mississippi hotel in Carleton place 😍👍

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Sep 1912, Fri  •  Page 9
LIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1914, Sat  •  Page 12
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Jul 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

Stew Ferguson and Maggie Porteous/Ford–Tom Edwards

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Stew Ferguson and Maggie Porteous/Ford–Tom Edwards
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Hi Linda,
I was reading your article about the young lady who drowned in Carleton Place a few years ago near the Hydro dam. Stew Ferguson was working for Hydro there and I know he received an award for helping to save the girl, either the first time or he second time. I’m not sure which time it was but I will try and find out. He also bartended at the Mississippi with Ted Smith in the early 70’s when Mrs. Lemay owned it. My dad worked there part time with them.
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When I delivered my papers, I had some customers in the upstairs of the hotel. After I delivered them, I would go down to the dining room and see if he was working. Sometimes when he was, he would send me back to the dining room and Maggie Porteous/Ford, (not sure which last name), would lots of time either slip me a box of french fries, or a piece of cherry pie. Never had to pay for them, but she couldn’t always do it. I was empty handed if Mrs. Lemay was in the dining room too. LOL. I remember Dee Dee Ford working there as well. I think Maggie was her mom.
 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  10 Mar 1941, Mon,  Page 14

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

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The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel
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The clipping says the Mississippi Hotel in 1974 but which door was this? Anyone have photographs of the building from this era showing more of the building? 

Ted Hurdis- That’s the main entrance. I thought I recognized it. My wife confirmed it for me and she said *Star Sadler had a little office to the right side
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From the collection of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. Jennifer Fenwick Irwin posted it
Linda Seccaspina– Wow, what a dump
Mary Anne Harrison Linda it wasn’t any better on the inside either. 😜
Llew Lloyd– I’m guessing the whole place was renovated in 1969 or 70 . I believe you have a picture from one of the 1969 parades with the building in the background. You should be able to see whether or not the ” improved ” entrance was there .
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Tammy Marion  – This brings back a memory for me. In the summer of 1978 a guy/man asked me if I could watch his German Shepherd dog for 1 hour while he went in the Mississippi hotel. The front entrance of the hotel looked just as it does in this photo – and that is the door he went in. It was evening – near dusk. I said sure I would because I was ( and still am) a huge Shepherd lover and I didn’t want him to be alone outside.I asked the guy to make sure he was back out in 1 hour as I need to go home. He said ” I sure will”.
Three hours later he still never came back out. I couldn’t just leave the dog loose and alone and I couldn’t go inside to find this guy because I wasn’t of age and my best friend’s Mom worked there at the time and knew that. A friend came along and I asked her if she could watch the dog because I really need to get home. She did and I left. I don’t know whatever became of that dog or the guy or how much longer my friend stayed with the dog.
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Bruce “Star” Sadler 3 c1 Robert (Bob) Bruce (Star) Sadler  1947-2008               b                      ; d Carleton Place  (Gazette 11/18/08)
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Brian Carter in front of the Mississippi Hotel – 1980’s– You can see the tar marks where they took down the additions still front and side.
Jennifer Fenwick Irwin asked where the sign was– I don’t think we will ever know.. Here are the folks that made it
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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Aug 1961, Thu,  Page 18

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The Devil, a Regatta, the Enterprise and a Gale

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The Devil, a Regatta, the Enterprise and a Gale
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In preparation for  the American Canoe Association Regatta in June of 1902 the course from Nagles Shore to the Lake Park steamboat dock was measured on the ice in March.

Mounting interest in June was noted in the local newspaper by W. W. Cliff, who said :

“There are some thousands of persons who regard the coming Canoe Meet as considerably more important than the new fast trans Atlantic service, or even perhaps the end of the war in Africa.  Doubtless they are mistaken, but the world would lose a good deal if a temporary bias due to the ardor of youth did not exist.” (Howard Morton Brown)

 

The forces behind the American Canoe Association Regatta reported after the fact that the meet in Carleton Place in June of 1902 should have been cancelled. The races were postponed two days running due to the terrific winds which blew two days and nights and part of the third day. Winds higher than those on the St. Lawrence of the year before played havoc with the schedule of the national regatta held at Lake Park. In the earlier part of one day the press recorded the waves as being higher than any sea. It was one of the worst meets in the ACA history and older residents of Carleton Place said they couldn’t remember a wind of such force that went on for two days.

The visiting canoeists, numbering over two hundred, were said to be the largest group of paddlers ever gathered at one meet in Canada.  They had their tents pitched on the Lake Park grounds and remained there until the completion of the regatta.  Though the wind was very high, on the second day the principle events were completed before nightfall.

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo 1902 Lake Park

 

The trip to Lake Park was described in the newspapers as not inviting, and local management was not to be congratulated on the arrangements made for all the visitors. A couple of indifferent steam engine boats, some described almost in the condition of a shipwreck, took passengers by the steam route. Those that took the boat ride got a good wetting and many of the ladies were quite alarmed from the trip once they docked.

 

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Public Archives— Carleton Place Canoe Club photo no date

The Ottawa Journal said that every possible old rig in the county took “victims” on a long land ride on a road that was certainly innocent of any good roads movement in Ontario. Several gasoline yachts that had made their way up to Lake Park were compelled to go back or be swamped. Lake Park was deemed useless for canoe racing in a gale.

The management of the meet was most unsatisfactory with executive meetings every 5 minutes, yet nothing was done. The various canoe clubs said the local committee was lacking in knowledge of what would be required, and accommodation in every aspect was lacking. Had Thursday been a holiday over 5,000 more people would have been attended and half of them would have to sit up all night.

 

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The Carleton – Photo– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum


On the evening of  Friday the 27th the local canoeists entertained the visitors at the Leland Hotel, where a fine spread was laid by host Mr. Salter.  However no one dined before a group of the participants crowded onto the Mississippi Hotel veranda and “with bared heads” sang God Save the Queen. After the tables were cleared Mayor Patterson took the chair and then a ball was tendered for the visitors at the Lake Park Queen’s Royal Hotel, combined with a huge bonfire and a fireworks display.

 While the bonfire burned and the fireworks shot across the sky on the last night of the American Canoe Association Regatta there was another ball of fire in view. The Carleton steamer which had its top deck removed by this time docked in front of the Queen’s Hotel was burned to the water’s edge. They say the devil attended the Regatta that year and no one forgot the events for years.

Love many, trust few and always paddle your own canoe.

 

 

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Public Archives— Carleton Place Canoe Club photo no date

 

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Jun 1902, Sat,  Page 15

 

Carleton Place Canoe Club officers for the big year of 1902 were patrons Mayor Robert Patterson, William McDiarmid and Dr. George McDonald, commodore Colin McIntosh, vice-commodore R. A. Sibbett, captain W. J. Welsh, secretary treasurer J. N. Gibson, executive Frank Donald, Dr. K. C. Campbell, George Cornell, J. F. Moffatt and Fred McRostie, and auditors M. G. Howe and C. A. Roberts.  Chairmen of committees were, Racing, Fred McRostie ; Sailing, Dr. K. C. Campbell ; Entertainment, Frank Donald ; Property J. F. Moffatt.– Howard Morton Brown

The summer resort record of Lake Park, central site of  the early Canadian Canoe Club Association and Northern Division regattas goes back over 100 years. In its days Allan’s Point, and for many years later, was a favourite location for the aquatic outings and sport days of Carleton Place social organizations. It’s first small two- storey summer hotel was built in 1887. The Lake Park Company of Carleton Place Ltd. completed most of the existing lot and street subdivision of the community in 1893. To serve it with transportation the company built the Carleton ­ which was the lake ’s largest steamboat, an 80- foot double decked paddle wheeler.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

  relatedreading

The Young Olympic Hopefuls-1970’s Carleton Place Canoe Club

Know Your Carleton Place Olympians!

The Ministry of Propaganda in Carleton Place — Carleton Place Canoe Club

Looking for Information on Pooh Bell & The Powder Puffs

Three Cheers for Dave Findlay –The Movie

Who Was Mickey Morphy? Noteworthy Paddles to Portage

 

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 5

Don’t Be Scared Ladies –Steamers on the Mississippi

 

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The Dogs of Lanark County–Alex Cram

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The Dogs of Lanark County–Alex Cram

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-Photographer Annie Duff

 

In doing research for the Bridge Street, Carleton Place series I found some funny notes made by Marjorie Whyte. I have mentioned before that the Mississippi Hotel had quite the characters boarding there during the time Walter Mcllquham owned the hotel. Mcllquham doubled the room capacity to 56.

There was a Mr. McCabe who was tall, had a huge moustache, and always dressed in gray. Even though the gentleman was grand in appearance he was considered what one would have called a ‘derelict’ in those days. McCabe was often seen hanging around in the doorways of vacant stores muttering to himself.

Then there was Bill Green who wore an eyepatch and was one of the night clerks. If you remember the story about the fire in the Mississippi Hotel the devastating blaze it was caused by a defective south-end chimney right beside Bill Green’s room. Last but not least was Babe Morrison who played on the local Carleton Place hockey team.

However, one of the oddest characters living at the hotel was Alex Cram who was best known by the two-tone shoes he wore. Cram owned a fine British Bulldog that sported an odd collar and tag. It read:

“I am Alex Cram’s dog- who the hell are you?”

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-One of the Schwerdtfeger sisters (Hazel? or Gladys?) poses in the snow with her dog Perky in front of their home at 68 Lake Avenue West sometime in the 1960’s.

 

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Perth Remembered–PERTH WINTER CARNIVAL 1958
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Another great action shot of the Dog Sled Races shown here at the corner of Foster and Gore Street. Correction from yesterday’s post, (thanks to the keen eye of Brian Gilhuly to notice the correct church, I then researched the building to the left). So after the research, that is indeed St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church shown to the right in the background and James Brother’s Garage (Fred Frizell was mechanic there) to the left background. This building was bought by Bell Canada and demolished in 1962. Bell switching station is in that location now.-Perth Remembered
Bonny Dee Hamilton– I remember when they came down Harvey St. I also remember someone leaving their car door open a VW beetle and a team going into that car. What a mess they had untangling the dogs. –Perth Remembered
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A day of liesure and time for an outing 1905. Pictured ready to go for a drive in a dump-cart in the yard at Joe Ebbs’ farm, are, from left; Miss Sarah McCoy, Mrs. Thomas Ireton (who brought her knitting along), Mrs. Albery, young George Ireton the driver and Harold Albery. Between the two boys is their dog.-Perth Remembered
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Perth Remembered–Some of the Merchants of Perth advertising for the 2nd Pre-International Dog Derby, January 1955.
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Carleton Place Canadian files–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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 Horrors! We came across a dog poop sitting right on the Boulton Brown millstone! Who did that???
Not one of OUR dogs.
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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

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Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?


 

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I have posted these on the LCGS Facebook pages and do not want to lose them…

Ray Paquette’s Carleton Place Moment..-In the right corner of the advertisement for Howard McNeely’s Barber Shop, it mentions E. McNeely, Assistant. I wonder if that is Earl McNeely who later or perhaps prior to worked barbering with Howard Little and lived on Munro Street west of Rochester? As well, how many people remember Ned Root’s Shoe Repair beside the driveway for Stanzel’s Taxi?

 

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Ray Paquette on Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

What about the doughnut machine that could be viewed through the front window. It methodically churned out simple, unadorned fresh doughnuts that would melt in your mouth. My personal favourite though were the jam filled pastries. Woodcock’s was the last stop on my paper route and I rarely left the store empty handed!!!

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Linda Gallipeau-Johnston– Ned Root – oh yes – not only did we go there for shoe repair but he was just a door away on our street – Bob and Bill Root, the sons – Bob became a Minister and I have one of Bill’s DVD’s(singer).


Dale Costello-– Howard gave me many a haircut, and Ned Root performed magic on my shoes. Who remembers Mae Mulvey, Charlie Jay, Ruby McPherson at the Roxy, Kelly at the Chinese Laundry,Giffins restaurant next to the Roxy, E D Robertsons, Okilmans, Argue Hardware, and many more.



Linda Gallipeau-Johnston- Dale, I remember it all – free silverware on weekend nights at the Roxy – getting candy from Santa with the school – sitting waiting for your turn to go up onto the stage at the Roxy. I also I have a memory of a double deck bus(red) tour when I was about 4 – 1950 or 51? – it loaded at the corner of the town hall but we missed it. No one I know remembers this – Dale?? – anyone??

Allan Wing –George Eades at Eades Hardware, does anyone remember how to remember how to spell GEOGRAPHY . . . George Eades Old Goat Ran A Pig Home Yesterday


Dale Costello Remember going into Allens Shoe sore. If you spent more than $10 for a pair, you were getting expensive footware. And Abe Levine place, sold him lots of old newspapers, with rocks in the bottom to raise the weight. Bad Bad.

 

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April 26 2017– Memories of Ray Paquette
“The Mississippi Hotel was part of my paper route as well. What I remember on entering the lobby of the hotel was the number of stuffed birds and animals that adorned the walls. Frankly, as a 12 year old, I found it a bit “spooky”!”

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Blaine Cornell— I also remember the birds being in glass display cabinets. These may be the same displays that ended up in the waterworks building in riverside park. Where are they now?
Linda Gallipeau-Johnston- I so remember how dark it was at the front entrance – probably not so bad for those days – had to have been 50 or 51 – just a little kid but that memory sticks with me.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

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Related reading

The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

Signed Sealed and Delivered with Tom New — Ray Paquette

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

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David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

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This was sent to me by Beverly Salked yesterday care of the Lanark County Genealogical Society. It was an interesting account of a David McIntosh who worked at the Clyde Hotel and made his way up to working the front desk at the Mississippi Hotel.

In October he slipped and fell and his injury progressed to *blood poisoning and he died one month later at the age of 31. In memory of Thomas McIntosh.

Biography above credit: John Collins-Mcintosh family of Lanark County..

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1920s photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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This is the original register from The Mississippi Hotel (see more in historical notes) that David would have registered hotel guests at. photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Stuart McIntosh David Mcintosh, born oct.1870. On Oct.24,1901 he injured his leg while getting into the Mississippi Hotel coach, similar to the one illustrated. On Nov.1,1901 he died from blood poisoning. He served as a clerk at the hotel and would be assisting passengers with luggage at the time of his injury.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 05 Nov 1901, Tue, Page 7
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  • The first page was taken directly from The Mcintosh family of Lanark County. ( John Collins-Mcintosh family of Lanark County) David was working at the Mississippi Hotel at the time of his death second photo. David is also a Gibson descendant and was a younger brother of my Great Grandmother Mary Whyte Mcintosh Park.– Beverly Salked

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  • *Septicaemia (Septacunines) – A poisoned condition of the blood due to pathogenic bacteria; blood poisoning. marked by chills, fever, prostration and inflammation of the serous membranes and of the lungs, kidneys and other organs.

Register-This is the original register from The Mississippi Hotel, built by Napoleon Lavallee in 1872 at the corner of Bridge Street and Lake Avenue. It has a bell for getting the owner’s attention, spaces for matches on either side of a striking plate, containers for pens and cards, and many many steel plates attached to the surfaces. These plates contain advertisements for local businesses that a visitor to Carleton Place might have found useful – kind of like modern day business cards!

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The Municipal Heritage Committee of Carleton Place was pleased to present the first in a series of historical plaques describing local heritage buildings to Angelo Seccaspina, owner of Greystones, the former Mississippi Hotel building. Pictured left to right are Bernard deFrancesco, Chair, Robert Probert, Councilor Representative,
Jennifer Irwin, Manager of the Carleton Place & Beckwith Heritage Museum and Angelo Seccaspina– 2013

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Related reading

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

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Brian Carter in front of the Mississippi Hotel – 1980’s

To anyone that thinks a building like the Mississippi Hotel sitting around empty doesn’t bother you, well you would be wrong. I have been in love with this building since I moved to Carleton Place in 1981. I also hated the hotel when it was home to strippers, motorcycle groups and drug users in the 80’s. The ‘ole gal’ deserved way better than that.

My late husband bought this hotel years ago and spent a great deal of money to bring her up to date. Youngest son Perry and his wife Stephanie did a good job running it until Angelo died. After his death it became a matter of utmost importance to delegate focus and time to other family real estate, and unfortunately the Mississippi fell by the wayside.

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The only known photo of Napoleon Lavallee sits on my wall

Napoleon Lavallee bought the property for $50 in 1869 and opened the hotel in 1872 after he sold the Leland Hotel/ Carleton House on Bridge Street.  The McIlquham family bought it 11 years later in 1883 and when Joe Belisle worked there from 1917-1920 it had ornate woodwork, a grand staircase and the stone facade had wooden white wrap-around verandas. The elegant dining room tables were covered in  fine lace linen and gleaming cutlery, and the Mississippi Hotel became known for its homemade food and attracted travelling salesman from far and wide. The salesmen set up trunks in their rooms offering everything from dishes to clothing that was scooped up by local merchants that came to buy at the hotel. The place was packed daily with fans from Stittsville, Smiths Falls and Perth–and if you talk to Gerald Hastie people came in early for the fresh baked pies, and by noon they were pretty well sold out.

 

 - Mr. Mcllquham, the genial host of the ....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 11 May 1899, Thu,
  3. Page 2

 

In 1907 after Mr. McIlquham died his son Clyde took over until a fire ravaged the veranda and top storey of the hotel in the 1950s. After the devastating fire that resulted in one life lost the McIlquham’s wanted out, and Lorraine and David Lemay bought the place for $30,000 in 1964.  Lorraine was indeed the Queen of the Mississippi Hotel and during the 60’s and 70’s it was known for its country music, especially Stompin’ Tom Connors. She once said that when she bought the Mississippi it was in better shape than it became in the later years that she owned it.

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Photo- Linda Seccaspina– Dining room– Perry and Steph named it the “Eliseo Seccaspina” room after his beloved Grandfather

When anything dies or is sold,  you seem to inherit something- and Lorraine inherited a number of long-term residents who treated the hotel more like a boarding house. When she brought in loud rock music to the hotel it really wasn’t up their alley and they all soon left.

Having a business is tough–just because you own a business doesn’t mean you are rolling in the greenbacks. So once Lorraine lost the boarders she ran into financially stressed times trying to compete with local competition. Looking for ideas she decided to feature strippers and she said she was forced to bring them in to compensate for high priced rock bands. Well, it didn’t take long for the local folks to begin to criticize her even though they were not the ones paying her taxes.

Similar to the story of Art Fleming who tried to open a funeral parlour on Lake Ave West, the town citizens took matters into their own hands and began to protest in front of the hotel. Short lived, life moved on in the small town of Carleton Place, and drugs in the establishment became more of a problem than the strippers. In 1985 Lemay had just about enough and she sold the hotel to Brian Carter’s parents, who both died in a car crash three years later.

Motorcycle gangs began to hang out and the hotel was known for having the longest bar in the Valley. If you listen to gossip it was said that some bikers didn’t even bother to park outside and they just rolled right into the hotel. The average person wouldn’t dare go in there with the rows of bikes parked outside — and the hotel went into a major down slide.

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Carter closed the hotel and looked for a buyer with a price tag of $625,000 and the only offers that came in were from oil companies that wanted it for the land–not the historic hotel that it was and still is. Carter, fed up, obtained a demolition permit and the building was going to go the same way as the Prince of Wales High School, Central School, and the Findlay home on High Street. In the end it was saved by the community, inspired by the late Stompin’ Tom Connors and the rest is history.

After many years of ups and downs I can happily say the “ole lady” has been sold and this 29,000 square feet of downtown real estate is going to very good hands. What fills the eyes fills the heart, and now every passing minute is a chance to turn this hotel all around again. Old places have soul and hopefully new ideas need old buildings. No matter what the hotel is named by the new owners it will always be “The Grand Ole Lady of Carleton Place” and I personally thank them for bringing her back to life.

Let’s support these new owners! Thank you.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal27 Dec 1898, TuePage 3

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal14 Sep 1907, SatPage 1

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal24 Aug 1961, ThuPage 18

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Feb 1907, Mon,  Page 12

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Dec 1909, Mon,  Page 3

 

 

 - A. Beach. Mr. Whltcher and the other workmen...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Aug 1899, Thu,  Page 7

 

 

Related Reading

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Remembering Lucky McIlquham of Carleton Place

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Remembering  Lucky McIlquham  of Carleton Place

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal23 Jan 1956, MonPage 15

 

There used to be a former tall “gunner” who lived in Carleton Place whose claim to fame was being a brave soldier among other things. He survived a 400-foot fall into a haystack when the rear of his bomber was shot off in World War ll and made a lot of local folks proud. Sadly in January of 1956, a little more than 10 years after he came home from the war, he drowned in Mississippi Lake trying to save his son.

Thomas Oswald McIllquham DFM was a machinist with the Ottawa branch of the Ontario Department of Highways and his young son Scott would have been 5 years old when they both lost their lives in the cold water of Mississippi Lake. They probably thought the ice was thick enough that day their truck went through the ice near their home.

They found Thomas’s body 7 feet down, but his son’s body was found just a few scant inches away from the edge of the hole made by the settling chassis. It is believed that Thomas had valiantly tried to save his son and almost did.  His wife Oda Larsen had already seen tragedy losing her brother to an accident a few years previous and the *Queen’s Park Lodge owned by her father Swen Larsen had burned to the ground in 1955.

Before the accident Thomas had been driving around the lake visiting fisherman on the ice even though Victor Majury had warned him to be careful. A change of heart of must have occurred as they were last seen heading to Rocky Point.  Barely 400 yards from the shore facing the Lodge the ice thinned and Victor Majury, Harry Willis and Stanley Gibson all from Carleton Place told the OPP that the truck went down as if it was in slow motion.

The men were powerless to help so they went to the farm of Mrs. Percy Hay and she drove them two miles so they could use a telephone.  Lucky McIllquham had survived the heaviest fighting of the war and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal by King George.  His record was long: destroying at least two enemy fighters and the damage of many others, a parachute leap from a burning plane, and his fabulous drop into a haystack when the tail gunners section was destroyed mid air.

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Lucky was born and raised in Carleton Place and was one of the sons of Mr and Mrs Clyde McIllquham who owned the Mississippi Hotel.  He was survived by wife Oda and his 3 year-old daughter Ruth and two brothers Walter and Gilmour who were residing at the Mississippi Hotel.

How ironic and sad was it that Lucky had died in 7 feet of water on a sunny January day in Carleton Place instead of that day flying into battle in Cologne. Every time I stand at the old dock of Lake Park Lodge it will now have more meaning.

In memory of Thomas “Lucky” Oswald McIllquham. Another resident to be remembered today.

 

historicalnotes

 

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1956 accident on Mississippi Lake. City of Ottawa Archives

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal29 Jan 1955, SatPage 1

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          — Ottawa Journal 1959–

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

 

Related reading

 

Carleton Place Boy Brings Down 10th Hun Plane — Daniel Galbraith 1917

It was Friday the 13th on Napoleon Street in Carleton Place

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

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Perth Courier, July 9, 1897

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On Friday last a man named John O’Connell was brought in from Carleton Place by Chief Wilson and committed for trial by P. Struthers, J.P. charged with stealing a $5 bill and a silver watch guard from one James Scott in the Mississippi Hotel on the 28th ult.  He denies the charge and has asked for a trial without jury and before the county judge.

William Benger, aged 37, was convicted on 28 March 1829 for stealing twine. He was sentenced to seven years transportation.

Thomas Jacobs, aged 19, was convicted on 17 April 1822 for stealing a handkerchief. He was sentenced to transportation for life. which was later mitigated to 14 years.

John Ellison was convicted  12 January, 1821 of stealing his master’s shirt after a session of grog at the Spotted Dog Tavern. He was sentenced to seven years transportation.

Children were seen a nuisance in the 1800s, especially poor or needy ones. So ships full of children aged 9-16 were sent to the colonies. Like the worst school trip ever.

Crime was soaring because of a rise in population and wealth. The worst of this crime was between 1820-1840. Jails were overflowing which resulted in a lot escapees. There were riots over food costs and availability. The wealthy began carrying guns for protection from thieves.But it was not only thieves who were punished by banishment to reformat institutions and work houses. Children of all ages that were considered “at risk” of becoming a problem to society were treated and punished as if they already committed a crime. Punishment was cruel. Whipping posts sat around town. Adulterers and bigamist received more lashes of the whip than manslaughter. If a woman was believed to have been unfaithful she received thirty lashes and a big A was branded on her forehead with a hot iron so every one that saw her would know what she had done. She also had to wear a heavy device around her neck.