Tag Archives: mcfarlane

British Hotel Pakenham –Mrs. McFarlane

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The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
27 Aug 1857, Thu  •  Page 4

William McFarlane passed away in 1838 and Mrs. Isabella McFarlane, being a strong woman, took over the simple log hotel that same year. It had opened in 1832, yet Mrs. McFarlane had no idea her old house would be used almost similiar to an army fort when Chief McNabb came into the village attempting a hostile take over. The volunteers ran to Mrs. MacFarlane’s place and grabbed what they could, whether that be:frying pans. kettles or other cleaning and cooking utensils they could take into battle. Word was the battle lasted all night and they did not have to serve Chief McNab.

After it burnt doqn she later bought some land from Andrew Dickson and built a large building on Graham Street at the weatern approach to the bridge and Isabella Mcfarlane’s pubilc house was known as sylish and became known as THE place to stop. It was also considered respectable and many a meeting was held at her hotel. She provided stabling for 6 horses and had spare beds and a sitting room seperate from the bar room.

I imagine keeping a 24/7 inn in those days was hard and in 1859 she placed an advert selling her inn and in 1859 James Cowan took it over. It was probabaly a good thing as the railway coming through Pakenham brought a large amount of rough and tough railway workers and the hotels were full of these railroaderds who spent their time drinking and arguing.

with files from: Whiskey and Wickedness- Larry Cotton Pakenham 1823-1860( Verna Ross McGiffen)


CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Mar 1862, Sat  •  Page 1

From the 1869 Gazeteer below.


Capital Gems
Five Span Bridge – CapitalGems.ca

Pakenham School Rules 1841

Documenting Mary Rose Paige from Pakenham

History Clippings of the the Centennial Restaurant – Pakenham

The Pakenham House—- Thomas Lowe House

Pakenham Community Centre Photos

John Graham — Mail Carrier — Pakenham 1860s

Francis Shaw Pakenham Postmaster Gone Missing —Elizabeth Shaw — Residential School Teacher

The Pakenham Landslide April 1987

The Pakenham Bridge is Falling Down 1873

What Happened to Lena May Connery of Pakenham? Connery Melanson Genealogy

The Bi Way Tour Margie Argue- Pakenham #1 and #2

The Bi Way Tour Margie Argue- Pakenham #3 and #4–Maps

Ingram Scott Pakenham

Prominent Merchant of Pakenham Expired After Opening Up For The Day

Clippings of Scott’s General Store

R Scott & Son Pakenham Gents Furnishing Dept.

Pakenham 1953

Photos of Early Pakenham

Needham Notations Pakenham Genealogy

The Pakenham Brush Fire of July 1939

The Pakenham Fire of June 1939 –Names Names Names

Mayne Store–Memories of the Pakenham Fire 1940

  1. The Pakenham Fire of 1940
  2. July 8, 1940 Fire at the Mayne Store Pakenham
  3. Dickson Hall Fire Pakenham-H. H. Dickson
  4. Fire at Pakenham Woollen Factory with Town Directory

The Three Stone Houses.. thanks Donna McFarlane

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The Three Stone Houses.. thanks Donna McFarlane

Jesse Mackenzie asks:Do you know anything about the 3 stone homes out of the same quarry on old hwy 7?The house next to Fumerton, the next over the Devereux and the house across from them? I’ve been to the quarry it’s spectacular!

From Historian Donna McFarlane

Someone had requested info about the stone house beside Fumertons and I cannot find their message.. that property lot 25 conc 11 was deeded from crown to William Whyte and remained in the white family until at least 1955. wm whyte would be my husband Johns g g g grandfather.

this is mary whyte cram and her husband james d of Thomas

This is Christina Whyte Mcfarlane and her husband William McFarlane

This is Agnes Whyte Mcfarlane and her husband James…she is daughter of Thomas

This is John Mcfarlane and his wife Ellen christina Cram she is daughter of Mary Whyte and James Cram

the above article refers to thomas whyte building the stone house…. Bertie was a granddaughter of his

this is mary McLaren wife of Malcolm whyte mother of Bertie malcolm was son of thomas

Gwladys Williams Menzies– Celebrating a Local Girl who Made Good

Irish Sweepstakes 1948 Two Men Stood to Win 100,000!!

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Irish Sweepstakes 1948 Two Men Stood to Win 100,000!!

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Mar 1948, Fri,  Page 1

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Mar 1948, Sat,  Page 1

So did they win? I couldn’t find anymore information so I guess they both split 50 bucks..

Andrew Balz on Twitter said: Their horse finished 12th, so no big payout..I also seem to recall the prize was £100,000 ($240,000?)..this when $2500 was a good salary

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historicalnotes

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Mar 1936, Sat,  Page 29

 

relatedreading

Who Won the Baby Contest in 1889?

Sixteen Tons–Carleton Place Man Wins Big!

The Publicity Club Coupon Contest of Smiths Falls 1931

Carleton Place 1940’s —- The Popularity Contest

Win a House in Carleton Place!

Dueling Shoes and Fiddles and Step Dancing Contest July 15 1974

The Stanzel Shoe Store

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

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CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Mar 1948, Fri  •  Page 1

McFarlanes –Stewart’s Fire– and Other Things in Ashton

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McFarlanes –Stewart’s Fire– and Other Things in Ashton

Donna McFarlane sent me this note yesterday:

“Sometime before 1874 the old log house across from the mill pub in Ashton was a hotel or stopping place operated by Donald McFarlane. I noticed that it was now restored to log.. Donald’s son William later opened a hotel at Youngs Point”.

So I am looking for information about the hotel. If anyone knows anything or has heard stories- leave comments, PM me, or send me an email sav_77@yahoo.com

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal15 Apr 1887, FriPage 3

 

Meanwhile I found this..

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In the old days the more outside buildings you owned around your home or farm- the more prosperous you were.  Or people thought you were. The complex at the old McFarlane farm in Ashton as it came to be known consisted of many log buildings scattered around the property.

The first building was a log shanty, and they threw it together quickly because they had too. Those buildings were the one with the large spaces between the logs that blew in the cold air in the winter. However, those shantys grew too small for growing families, so they were abandoned and usually a new frame house was built until the ultimate home could be achieved. That would be a stone home–meaning: they were now at the top of the heap in prosperity and social stature.

The McFarlane’s finally added a stone home to their complex and it had everything from the newel posts at the bottom of the stairs to the square fanlight and side lights. These were all the signatures of a master builder. But, it is the outbuildings that are a fascinating part of this farms history to me. Small medium and large log buildings frame the vista of meadows, flower and vegetable gardens making it a rich overall feel of rural contentment.

The Crown deeded the property to James McFarline in 1828. Similar to a lot of misspellings in those days his last name was later changed to McFarlane. When he died in 1867 the farm was given to his children and in 1891 his eldest son, James McFarlane was listed as the owner. James Lorne McFarlane was the last of the family dynasty to own the property obtaining the title in 1949.

In 1966 the McFarlane family ceased owning the property.

 

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Updates from Donna McFarlane– Thanks Donna!

The comments in the article above are not all accurate as the information was given by the owner at the time of the open house.
The farm lot 24 conc 10 was settled by James Mcfarlane in August of 1820
and settlement duties completed it was deeded in 1828. After his death
his youngest son James bought out his siblings (Catherine Drummond, Grace
Mccuan, Ann,Elizabeth,Janet, Martha and William) and retained this
property. James sr also owned Lot 23 conc 9 Beckwith which oldest son
William bought his siblings out and retained.
The log home was burnt and replaced by the stone home. The small two
storey log home that was used by the Mcfarlanes for a hen house was
actually moved by Lorne from lot 25 conc 10 (property that Lorne owned)
In Feb 7 1964 the properties were deeded to John Mcfarlane with Lorne and
Gladys having a life interest however because the farm could not support
two families John went to work off farm and it was sold.
Donald of Ashton and James of Beckwith and William of Goulbourn were
three brothers from Comrie Perthshire Scotland.

 

historicalnotes

 

Joseph Arthur Mcfarlane who was dean of medicine at
U of T was born on the Gordon Bourne property that his father Joseph son
of William of Goulbourn owned. He attended the Derry School.–Donna McFarlane
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Ashton Choir no idea of year–I’d say 50s??
Photos sent to me by Donna McFarlane

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal19 Feb 1897, FriPage 5

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal10 Mar 1945, SatPage 18

 

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Mary Jane was daughter of Donald of Ashton.. the other was granddaughter of James of Beckwith–Donna McFarlane

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal03 Jan 1929, ThuPage 22

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  10 Feb 1900, Sat,  Page 7

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

Related reading:

 

The Ghost of the Lanark County Old Log Cabin

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine