Tag Archives: mcarthur island

Lizzie Brunton Goes One on One with the Carleton Place Hackberry Tree

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Lizzie Brunton Goes One on One with the Carleton Place Hackberry Tree

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Re: The McArthur Island Tree– Should it Stay or Should it Go?

 

 

Credit to Emily Nicole Stanzel for raising the issue and starting the Petition!!

Save the tree Sign the Petition

I used to be a tree sitter, but now I am lucky if I can walk around a tree. When I lived in Berkeley we had the famous UC tree sitters. They didn’t win their cause but after 21 months they finally came down– but they made their point.

I consider myself to be a tree lover, but not a tree hugger. It seems as if tree huggers want to save every single tree with leaves, no matter what. As a tree lover, I believe that some trees are assets and some trees are liabilities. This tree is an asset to our town and I would hate to see it come down.

After having had “a tree haggle myself” with the town of Carleton Place I would like to see a few outside arborists consulted about this tree before  I hear what I am expecting to hear: “it is an unhealthy tree”.

People are very proud of their local history, but don’t always express how much they value a place until it’s threatened. Because  this tree adds character and distinctiveness to an area, heritage is a fundamental in creating a ‘sense of place’ for a community– like this Grandfather Hackberry Tree that developers want to remove and replace with a smaller new Hackberry tree

 

Our Carleton Place tree sitter Lizzie Brunton

 

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The poster has been removed and now it is marked with paint.

 

The history of Carleton Place is important to its identity. Hopefully, the developers can figure out a way to accommodate both. If we lose sight of that, what have we got? If you don’t like how things are, say something, do something, as the tree can’t. They have no voice–we do.

Only when the last tree has been cut down, the last fish been caught, and the last stream poisoned, will we realize we cannot eat money.” –― Cree Indian Prophecy 

Living in a rural town you hear all sorts of stories.. The tree isn’t coming down– it’s coming down for a traffic circle. Yesterday I heard from a source that the Tim Horton’s tree is on the docket too. Okay, tonight is the the council meeting we will find out for sure.. One thing is I just don’t trust anyone.. and you can quote me on that.. Meanwhile Lizzie Brunton went to sooth the tree yesterday.. The petition link is in the blog please sign it.. we have to dot our i’s and cross our t’s.

Save the tree Sign the Petition

Re: The McArthur Island Tree– Should it Stay or Should it Go?

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Tuesday night Council December 4th meeting agenda

COMMUNICATION 129008
Received from Joanna Bowes, Manager of Development Services
Addressed to Planning and Protection Committee
Date October 13, 2017
Topic DP3-04-2017, 150 Mill Street, McArthur Island
SUMMARY

CLICK HERE

 

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Monday December 4th– Photo by Steve Yaver– Looks much like Mr. Bill and i hope the tree doesn’t end up like him 😦

 

historicalnotes

 

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The Tale of “Hackaberry Found” in Carleton Place

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Dream a Little Dream About the Hemlock Tree

 

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So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

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The McCarten House of Carleton Place–Ginko Tree

 

The tree stays

Carleton Place’s official tree avoids axe

 

 

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So Can I Pillage the Land Freely in my town?

 

 

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Oingo Boingo! Bobolink Birds Bothered- Concerns-Carleton Place Citizens #2

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When Were Some of the Trees Planted in Riverside Park?

 

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Lost Lanark Legacy Fruit Trees– Need Help!

 

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The Faeries of McArthur Island- Dedicated to the Bagg Children

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Whatever Happened to the Lanark County Greening Apple?

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Are we in Neverland? Concerns from Carleton Place Citizens #1

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The McArthur Island Tree– Should it Stay or Should it Go?

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The McArthur Island Tree– Should it Stay or Should it Go?

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I vowed to never write a piece about local government after my heart attacks as I take my town way too personally because I care. So I haven’t–I have shared media reports, and left it at that. If folks want to look badly and not worry about what kind of legacy they are going to leave when they end their town political career so be it. But yesterday after I saw posts from Allan and Emily Stanzel about the possible removal of the 120 year-old Hackberry tree on McArthur Island in Carleton Place I got angry.

In 1952 there was one lone Hackberry tree left in Ottawa near Brewer Park and the George Dunbar bridge. It had a white picket fence around it, and a sign that said “Do Not Destroy”.  The late mayor of Ottawa, Charlotte Whitton, whose cousins were from Carleton Place, insisted these trees be protected.

 

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If you didn’t know, Carleton Place’s official tree is the Hackberry Tree, and our park of trees on Mill Street is the largest grouping of Hackberry trees in Eastern Ontario. They are native to the area and are thought to have been brought here by the indigenous peoples for their medicinal qualities. The Hackberry tree was once protected, but it’s okay now, and only the Dwarf Hackberry tree is still protected here in Ontario.

 

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The town plaque indicates how rare these trees are in this part of Ontario, but now there  might be plans to cut down one of the biggest and oldest specimens in the area. I would say he is the “Grandfather tree” of the area. Even if the developer replaces it with a young new Hackberry tree, is this good enough? Should we just lay down and give up if they plan to cut this big, beautiful 120+ year-old tree down to make room for a traffic circle/sidewalk?

 

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On  May  17,  2013, Justice  Moore of  the  Ontario  Superior  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that  trees  whose  trunks  grow  across property  lines  are  the  common  property  of  both  owners.  Neither  owner  can  injure  or  destroy  a  shared  tree  in Ontario without  the  consent  of  the  other. A tree on a property line in Ontario is jointly owned by both property owners based on a ruling by Justice J. Patrick Moore on May, 17 2013 in the Ontario Court of Appeal.

The Ontario Superior Court verdict in May 2013, which went unnoticed by most anyone not involved in Hartley v. Scharper,  created some of the most stringent and detailed law on tree preservation in Canada. Cutting down a shared tree or chopping at wayward branches without a neighbour’s approval could now be a criminal act, punishable under the provincial Forestry Act.

Someone said the tree is on private property, but if you look closely at the photo those trunk roots go way under the road which I think is owned by the town. Correct me if I am wrong. So, if the town owns the road, we have in essence two owners/neighbours of that particular tree.

 

The tree stays

 

This tree in the photo above is at St. James Gate and was protected by the Carleton Place council in 2013. Just remember that owing to a 6-1 vote by Carleton Place council, a request from Shaiin Charania, owner of St. James Gate Irish Pub & Restaurant, to remove a tree within the boundary of his establishment’s outdoor patio was rejected. – Tara Gesner/METROLAND

 

You know in the end none of us are getting out alive, so we need to stop treating this town as an afterthought. Everyone enjoy our restaurants, shop at our local stores, walk in the sunshine on our trails. Always say the truth of what you are carrying in your heart like the hidden treasure it is– as there is absolutely no time for anything else.

The history of Carleton Place is important to its identity. Hopefully, the developers can figure out a way to accommodate both. If we lose sight of that, what have we got? If you don’t like how things are, say something, do something, as the tree can’t. They have no voice–we do.

Only when the last tree has been cut down, the last fish been caught, and the last stream poisoned, will we realize we cannot eat money.” –― Cree Indian Prophecy 

Credit to Emily Nicole Stanzel for raising the issue and starting the Petition!!

Save the tree Sign the Petition

 

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Tuesday night Council December 4th meeting agenda

COMMUNICATION 129008
Received from Joanna Bowes, Manager of Development Services
Addressed to Planning and Protection Committee
Date October 13, 2017
Topic DP3-04-2017, 150 Mill Street, McArthur Island
SUMMARY

CLICK HERE

comments

Jennifer Fenwick Irwin —From my understanding, the developer is working on ways to avoiding this with the urban forest Committee -the Planning Department has no legislation that would prevent its removal. It is not a species at risk. However it must be replaced with another Hackberry Tree.

 

Ronald Y–This magnificent tree should be cherished and protected. Development should preserve, not destroy, our distinctive, established, fragile natural heritage – not destroy it and lose what makes our community special. Development should respect and work around this precious tree and others like it, not eliminate it for the sake of conformity, convenience, and a quick buck.

Allan Stanzel– Great article Linda hopefully they will re design around the tree. A good spin could be put on this for marketing the McArthur re design. Also not sure of the exact property lines with regards to the high water mark of the river. I understand that X number of feet from a river or lake is not owned. Again not sure of distance.

 

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Doug B. McCarten–This grouping of 5 Hackberry trees still survive in our old side yard….I can’t believe how healthy and how tall they have grown! This group was always in our yard and I suspect that they would be at least as old as our house which is in the same age group as the one you are trying to save!! The simple answer is to route the road around the tree and protect the tree!! It can and should be done! The McCarten House of Carleton Place–Ginko Tree

historicalnotes

 

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The Tale of “Hackaberry Found” in Carleton Place

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Dream a Little Dream About the Hemlock Tree

 

stones.jpg

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

wendyaa

The McCarten House of Carleton Place–Ginko Tree

 

The tree stays

Carleton Place’s official tree avoids axe

 

 

sumatra-deforestation-120124.jpg

So Can I Pillage the Land Freely in my town?

 

 

collagebobo.jpg

Oingo Boingo! Bobolink Birds Bothered- Concerns-Carleton Place Citizens #2

13934657_10154185547396886_831357997563192707_n.jpg

When Were Some of the Trees Planted in Riverside Park?

 

22861637_280969865727445_7816585754526758975_o.jpg

Lost Lanark Legacy Fruit Trees– Need Help!

 

21462251_10155222421456886_1250942448661698097_n.jpg

The Faeries of McArthur Island- Dedicated to the Bagg Children

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Whatever Happened to the Lanark County Greening Apple?

collagelost trees.jpg

Are we in Neverland? Concerns from Carleton Place Citizens #1

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The Faeries of McArthur Island- Dedicated to the Bagg Children

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The Faeries of  McArthur Island- Dedicated to the Bagg Children

 

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Photo Linda Seccaspina

 

Louise and her Grandmother were in their sitting room gazing at the rushing river outside wondering what they were going to eat for dinner. They silently worried what would become of them, as the cupboard was as bare as Old Mother Hubbard’s. Louise told her Grandmother that she would fill up the kettle and make her some tea. In the meantime she would make a wish that the faeries might come and bring them something to eat.

“Make the tea” her Grandmother said, “but do not depend on the faeries to help you as there is no such thing as faeries”. Louise was positive there was such a thing as faeries, but she dared not argue with her Grandmother, and took her pail and went into the woods on the other side of the Mississippi River. As she dropped her pail into the well  she heard a voice after she drew up the water.

“Drop it again and see what happens” said the fairy sitting on the side of the well. Louise smiled at the tiny figure, but told her she did not need anymore water.

“But you do need bread,” replied the fairy who insisted she drop the pail into the well once more.

Lousie did as she was told, and when she brought up the pail there was a large loaf of bread and a piece of cheese in the bucket. She thanked the fairy and told her that she knew the faeries would help her. She ran across the bridge, back to the house, and set the table. Louise told her Grandmother that the faeries in the McArthur Island woods helped her but, the Grandmother still did not believe her even when she brought home a strip of bacon and more bread the next morning from the well in the woods.

 

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The next morning the landlord told them that they must leave as he could not afford to have renters that did not pay and Louise and her Grandmother went to sit next to the well on the island. The Grandmother told Louise that if her faeries were real they would give them a comfortable home to live in. Like magic a small cottage appeared and the fairy told Louise that surely the Grandmother must believe in them now.

The Grandmother nodded her head and agreed that no one should ever give up on faeries as she had done. Always remember that through faeries a child’s imagination is stimulated, and sometimes good deeds will come from it if you really believe.

I wrote this small fictional tale because of something Kelly Bagg told me at her father’s wake. She told me how her late father Bill Bagg used to tell his children that there were faeries in the woods of McArthur Island. Sometimes in the afternoon, or after dinner, he would take his children over to the island so they could look for faeries.

Faeries are invisible and inaudible like angels, but their magic sparkles in nature. Bill Bagg remembered the words of Robert Louis Stevenson that:  “every child must remember laying his head in the grass staring into the infinitesimal forest and watch it grow populous with faeries”.

Now each time I drive over the back bridge I remember Kelly’s tale and I stop and look for faeries. So to whomever develops this land in the future I beg you, please leave room in the woods so the faeries can dance.
And so they linked their hands and danced
Round in circles and in rows
And so the journey of the night descends
When all the shades are gone

 

 

 

 

Stories about Bill Bagg

 

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The Curious World of Bill Bagg –The Deer Heads

The Man that Brought “Canada” Back to Carleton Place – Bill Bagg

Come on, Let’s Go Down in the River –Photo Memories

One of Us– Memories of Bill Bagg

Before and After with Bill Bagg and the Mississippi Gorge

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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What do you Know about the Prince of Wales Cairn?

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What do you Know about the Prince of Wales Cairn?

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 22 Jul 1974, Mon, First Edition, Page 2

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First we lost a few skids of stone from the Findlay house on High Street that were supposed to be saved. Later I found out that the missing stone is sitting on McArthur Island along with the stone from Central School and Prince of Wales. (some of the school’s stone was used as fill to fill up the river channel next to the Gilles building down by the back bridges)

No one is aware that this cairn existed except a few, but the article above from the Ottawa Journal says it does. Saturday I drove around and around the block and saw nothing but this concrete slab. It looked like something was once in there?

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David Robertson seems to remember a cairn but not at this location as pictured but down the street straight off the side of the building. “I seem to remember someone telling me the cement base pictured was a location of a water well with pump — I could be wrong”.

Bill Brunton thinks it was located right across the street from Barbara Couch’s old house and David  thinks he is right. Bill also mentioned that he thinks the cairn was once hit by a car?

Anyone?

Today I went back and think this is the location just on top of the wee hill as you can see the stone buried in the ground, or what is left of it.

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Cairns of Carleton Place

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Findlay Memorial Cairn-High Street

This is the Findlay Memorial Cairn, located on the site of the first foundry on High Street. It gets missed, tucked away on the north side of High Street in a tiny little park with a shuffleboard court! All that remains is an empty field and a cairn of a once great company. The Findlay Cairn on High Street–The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

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The Willis Cairn in Riverside Park-photo sent to me by Jennifer Fenwick Irwin-The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

In Riverside Park there lies a little-known site which is of some interest in the town’s history.  It is found at the extreme end of the town’s park, near Lake Avenue and close to the Mississippi River.  This was a burial ground, where members of one of the first families of settlers of the town were laid in a now unmarked graveyard. The late Alex John Duff, Beckwith farmer, that he recalled this burial ground in his youth in the 1880s as being at that time a little cemetery about 15 or 20 feet square, a gravestone in which bore the name Catin Willis.

Discovery of this site in 1946 was reported at a Carleton Place Parks Commission meeting, at which the suggestion was made that the area should be marked as a historical site by erection of a cairn. Later the remains were exhumed and moved to the United Church cemetery. – Whatcha’ Talkin Bout Willis? — This Old House in Carleton Place

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The Morphy Cram on Emily Street

The Cairn above placed on the property now owned by The Bell Telephone Company, which was the original burying site for the Morphy Family, first settlers of this area. In 1819 Edmond Morphy, his wife Barbara Miller and their eight children, the first residents on the site of Carleton Place, emigrated to Upper Canada from Ireland and settled here.–Read more The Statue of Liberty of Carleton Place

MORE Cairn photos at the very end

So About that Ballygiblin Sign…. Fourteen Years Later!

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.–

relatedreading

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

Before and After with Bill Bagg and the Mississippi Gorge

Realizing How High the Mississippi River once Roared

Take Me Where the Mississippi River Once Flowed– The Hidden Mill River

Channeling John Gillies

The River Dance of the McArthur Mill in Carleton Place

The Writing on the Wall Disappeared but the Memories Don’t

Maybe We Should Film Oak Island in Carleton Place? The Day the Money Disappeared

So About that Ballygiblin Sign…. Fourteen Years Later!

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Thanks to Glenda Mahoney— Jim Mahoney– Valerie and Gary Nichols Jim Tye Reverend McDowell Cairn at Zion Memorial Church 1991

Did You Know? An Island was Once Not an Island

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Photo by Carleton Place’s sky pilots Bill and Carole Flint

Did you know that McArthur Island or Kenden Island (Kenden Industries)  was once not an island? The main river flows past the location while a man-made channel, once used to divert water to the former McArthur Mill complex actually created the island in the 19th Century. Water flow of the Mississippi River was also changed for the Bates and Innes Mill.

 

See more Carleton Place Sky Pilots photos here

 

Other Carleton Place Mysteries

Take Me Where the Mississippi River Once Flowed– The Hidden Mill River

Before and After with Bill Bagg and the Mississippi Gorge

The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

The Mystery Ruins of Carleton Place- Photos by Adam Dowdall

The Mystery Ruins and the Floating Sidewalk Near the McNeely Bridge

The Hidden Hideaway On Glen Isle

 

 

The River Dance of the McArthur Mill in Carleton Place