Tag Archives: McAdams

Clippings and History of Mill and Bridge Street Almonte

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Clippings and History of Mill and Bridge Street Almonte

almonte.com

Photo thanks to Brent Eades of Almonte.com

On the corner of Bridge and Mill Street once sat The People’s Store and the McAdams store– read-McAdams Store Almonte— It burned down and became The Orpheum, then the O’Brien and nowThe Hub. read-Mary Delaney Caught Stealing at The People’s Store

There was a fire in 1911 and that whole corner burned down as it began in the back of People’s store

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1911, Tue  •  Page 1
Thanks to Brent Eades

Almonte and district suffered no great damage as a result of Saturday’s wind of hurricane proportions. The O’Brien Theatre was the only casualty and about one quarter of its roof was torn off.There was also some damage to the ventilators in the building. The matinee was cancelled but Mr. H. R. Davey was able to make temporary repairs and the night show was held as usual — May 1950 Almonte Gazette

may 1960 almonte gazette

Almonte and district suffered no great damage as a result of Saturday’s wind of hurricane proportions. The O’Brien Theatre was the only casualty and about one quarter of its roof was torn off. There was also some damage to the ventilators in the building. The matinee was cancelled but Mr. H. R. Davey was able to make temporary repairs and the night show was held as usual. 

Motoring was most unpleasant and in some sections telephone poles were torn down. The fire brigade responded to four fires on Saturday, three of which were in less than an hour. One was a chimney fire at the home of Mr. James Waddell in New England. Another was a grass fire at the end of Ann St.; the next was at the residence of Mr. Archie Levitan where leaves caught fire in some unexplained way and the fourth was at the home of Mr. Edgar Lowry, corner of Country and Church Streets. This one started from a fire that had been set out several days before and the embers were fanned into life by the high wind.

May 1950

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 21

May 1930 Almonte Gazette

Everything is just about ready for the reopening of the Orpheum Theatre here and the first official showing will be on Monday afternoon and evening next, June 30th. The first picture to be shown will be the First National beautiful, all technicolor, musical comedy story “Sally,” which both on the stage and through the sound screen has proven very popular and entertaining. The management have made a special effort to secure a positive atmosphere with courtesy and pleasure and a sucessful production for presentation.

Mr.  Bruck is general manager and an excellent picture has been procured for the opening day. The new theatre is one of the best in the Ottawa Valley and no doubt will be a great drawing card for Almonte. 

The picture “Sally” will be shown on both Monday and Tuesday of next week, and will be followed by dramatic and musical attractions that will amuse and entertain the large audiences which it is expected  to patronize the new theatre. The program also of the management is to show only features of a high standard which will be superior in quality and of a calibre that will insure a successful entertainment. The advertising pages of the Gazette will from time to time announce the various sound pictures that have been booked for showing here. The new O’Brien Theatre is a commercial enterprise, but it is more. 

This new theatre in Almonte is a testimony to the man whose name ‘it bears; expense has not entered into the construction and equipping of the O’Brien Theatre; only the best in each of the various lines necessary to the building and equipping of the O’­ Brien Theatre was allowed into the architects’ specifications. The result is that Almonte now has a beautiful Movitone and Vitaplione motion picture building, very modern in design, acoustically perfect, and absolutely fireproof. 

The new O’Brien. Theatre is a distinct asset to the town. In addition, the furnishings and the equipment are of the most advanced and approved designs that the world’s markets had to offer, and everything has been laid out to ensure public approval. The old Orpheum Theatre has been entirely remodelled and built; the canopy over the main entrance and the immense electrical sign present an imposing and attractive appearance; there are three entrance doors from Main street into the lobby. In addition there are two exit doors which open on to Bridge street, and these two exits will enable the theatre to be emptied at any time very rapidly. The main theatre building is of brick and concrete and the floors are covered with fresh cement which is a sound deadener. A very modern ventilation system has been installed so as to provide for the free circulation of fresh air continuously. Entering the theatre one goes from the lobby to the main part of the house. The lighting effects in the lobby are modernistic. Particularly artistic photo frame and mirrors decorate both the lobby and foyer. 

These lend a very attractive appearance to this section of the entrance. Going from the lobby one enters the main part of the theatre, with its wide aisles and beautiful, comfortable, upholstered opera chairs, with leather air cushions and upholstered backs finished in wine color. 

Indirect lighting of the aisles is a very up-to-date touch which will no doubt be appreciated by the patrons coming in during the performance. On the stage is a large Vocalite sound   screen equipped with an automatic screen modifier, also electrically operated and controlled. This screen and modifier is one of the new real WS features of the Q’Brien Theatre. The stage back of the Vocalite sound screen has been draped with heavy and artistically finished velour hangings, and the scenic effect will compare with any of the theatres in the larger cities of Canada and the United States. 

The owners of the O’Brien Theatre gave a great deal of time and attention to the question of sound equipment, and after investigating many different styles and makes of machines decided to install the high class Northern Electric sound equipment for both Movitone and Vitaphone in addition to new Simplex projection machines. This newest sound equipment will enable the proper presentation of the bigger and best of the talkies and where feasible the screen will give life size reproduction. 

The main contract for the construction of the new O’Brien Theatre was awarded on a tender basis to M. Sullivan & Son, Arnprior. The architects were Messrs. Richards and Abra of Ottawa, and local firms whose work has assisted in the completion of this fine new building were: Taylor Bros., The proscenium curtains, valances, draperies, carpels and furniture for the O ’Brien Theatre here, and also those in Renfrew, Arnprior and Pembroke, were made and installed by A. J. Frieman, Ottawa. 

Broadloom Axminster carpets, reversible gold French velours, black silk velours and figure silk damasks, all richly trimmed, together with highest grade available. The main contract for the construction of the new O’Brien Theatre was awarded on a tender basis to M. Sullivan & Son, Arnprior. The architects , were Messrs. Richards and Abra of Ottawa, and local firms whose work has assisted in the completion of this fine new building were: Taylor Bros., The proscenium curtains, valances, draperies, carpels and furniture for the O ’Brien Theatre here, and also those in Renfrew, Arnprior and Pembroke, were made and installed by A. J. Frieman, Ottawa. 

photo almonte.com

The theatre was owned and operated by Ottawa Valley Amusements, owned by Renfrew entrepreneur M. J. O’Brien. The Renfrew Theatre was part of a chain that included theatres in Arnprior (now once again associated with Renfrew), and Pembroke, Almonte and Carleton Place.

Marilyn Miller 1929 in Sally which was playing at the O’ Brien

Source: North Lanark Regional Museum
When the Rosamond Hospital in Almonte quickly filled on the night of the accident, the O’Brien Theatre opened their doors rather reluctantly.  When confronted, the owner of the theatre protested opening his doors, claiming he didn’t have any authorization. Nevertheless the doors were removed, and used as stretches for the dead and wounded.
Converted into a temporary hospital and morgue, it is unclear whether the theatre had re-opened by December 31 as advertised in the Almonte Gazette.

Photo Allan Stanley— read-Lottie Barr’s Chips Almonte –Thanks to Allan Stanley

Almonte1925 Gazette

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Dec 1942, Mon  •  Page 12

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 24
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 24
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Aug 1969, Tue  •  Page 37
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Feb 1957, Sat  •  Page 3

Thanks to Brent Eaded

Our pushing young merchants, Messrs. Riddell & McAdam,
have purchased the •People’s Store• property from Mrs. J.T~
Brown, and will shortly remove to their new stand. The price
paid was $5,550. At the sale on Saturday afternoon .Mr. Wm.
Curry, blacksmith, bought the Cowie pump factory and the
residence adjoining, paying therefor.$950. Sept 1890 Almonte Gazette–https://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/…/mary-delaney…/

Related reading….

Almonte at Night — 1946

Lottie Barr’s Chips Almonte –Thanks to Allan Stanley

Seeds of Love–Almonte Cinema – Then and Now

Les Portes Tournantes Film Almonte 1987

The People’s Store McAdams Building Fire 1911

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The People’s Store McAdams Building Fire 1911

Corner Bridge and Mill Street now the Hub

Almonte, May 18, 1911

One of the most disastrous fire In the history of the town broke out in the early hours of this morning in the business block and before it was gotten under control had entailed a loss estimated at nearly $76,000, only partly covered by insurance. The conflagration is a most serious, one for the town s the portion destroyed is right in the centre of the business section. In about an hour after the fire broke out the large block of half a dozen buildings which fell a prey to the flames had been consumed with practically all of their contents. Carleton Place sent its engine on a special train but the fire was under control when it arrived. The principal buildings destroyed are those of A. J. McAdam, Sirs. J. S. Patterson, Mrs. D. H. Davis, these three being of brick; W. McMunn, H. Conn and J. Francis, the latter being frame; T. R. White’s coat shed with a large stock of coal; W. N. Acton’s lumber storehouse, well filled with dressed lumber, and L. James’ ash house.

The fire when first discovered was well advanced and had apparently broken out in the rear of the People’s Store attire. By the time the fire company was on the scene and the engine In action the flames had spread to ths frame structure at the rear of the Mock. All the upper part of Mr. W. J’cMunn’s building, formerly the old Music hall and now used as a storehouse for buggies and machinery, was a mass of flames.

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To show what a narrow escape Mr.  Robertson’s store had from destruction during the big blaze, one only has to look at the eave of the roof, which is burned and charred- in several places. The terrific heat from across the street was the cause and only a thorough drenching kept the building from falling prey to the flames. The attention of the firemen was devoted principally to preventing the fire from spreading to the adjoining blocks. The substantial store building of Mr. F. W. Robertson was instrumental in shutting off the advance of the lire down Mill street, although the edge of the roof was on fire repeatedly. The chief danger was that the fire might cross High street to the lavls house, a large three-storey frame building, as the wind was blowing in that direction, but there was little wind and this enabled the firemen to get a chance to fight it. The pressure on some of the lines of hose was poor and the water could not be ithrown to the top of the Davis house. It was. however, saved by a party of volunteers under Mr. L. W. Shipman and Mr. Avery, a teacher. The roof had become ignited from embers and Mr. Shipman succeeded after some delay in getting a hand pump to work on the roof. Mr. Avery also made his way along the roof in a daring manner and applied water to the fast in creasing blaze. The daring work ot the two men undoubtedly saved the hotel.

The saving of the Davis house also prevented the destruction of a large part of the town which would certainly have been destroyed if it had gone. There was a hard struggle to prevent the fire from crossing to the Davis house sheds, when Acton’s lumber shed was on fire, the heat being so intense that It almost drove the firemen out of range. Carleton Place generously sent their fire engine down on a special train but the fire was under control before it arrived and was detrained. The loss will be well up near the $100.000 mark, as there were three large brick buildings. A. J. McAdams building shows the most loss ( People’s Store)

The brick wall of the McAdam building on Bridge street is still standing, but owing to its dangerous condition the street has been fenced off. Monday evening about six o’clock, during the high wind, a portion of the upper part was blown off. The wall will probably be taken down to the second story, and the lower portion rebuilt. The walls at the back of the McAdam and Patterson buildings are also standing, but the rest of the burned area is nearly all levelled to the ground.

McAdams occupied the first flat of his building as a general store and lost his complete stock. The second flat was occupied by the Misses Beaton as a dressmaking shop and partly by McAdams’ stock of carpets. etc. The third story was occupied by the Citizens’ band. Mrs. J. Patterson’s shop was occupied by J. H. Proctor, harness maker, and Messrs. Rooney and Hogan barbers, on the first flat, the Bell Telephone central and Mrs. Patterson’s residence in the second flat, and the upper flat was the hall of the Sons of Temperance.

The lower flat of Mrs. Davis’ building was occupied by T. Hogan’s pool room and tobacco shop and the Union Express office and the second flat by Mrs. Davis as her residence. George Robertson, occupied the barber shop at the rear of the Peoples’ store, near which the fire originated There is a fair amount of Insurance on some of the goods but the loss will still be heavy.

1911 Almonte Gazette May

Some of the losses in detail, with amount of Insurance, are: Mrs. J. S. Patterson, loss on buildings $4,000; occupants, J. H. Proctor, harness, loss $2,000: Rooney and Hogan, barbers, $500; telephone central office, loss $4,000. Mrs. D. H. Davis, loss on buildings, $250, on furniture $1,000; occupants of stores under her dwelling, Thos. Hopkins. tobacco and pool, $2,000;

Dominion Express company office, $500. A. J. McAdams, drygoods and general store, loss on building, $7,000; on stock $30,000; other occupants of McAdam block, the Misses Beaton, milliners and dressmakers, $500; Citizens’ band loss on instruments, $500; Geo. Robinson, barber shop, $500. Wm. McMunn block, lose on buildings. $2,000; on stock of flour, feed and implements, $3,000. M. Unger, vacant dwelling and shop, loss $1,500. John France, frame dwelling, loss on building and contents, $1,000. T. R. White, coal sheds, loss on building $1,000; on contents $1,000. W. N. Acton, dressed lumber and office, loss on building and contents, $3,000. Mrs. E. Greig. loss on furniture in McMunn block. $1,000. The burned section is bounded by Mill, Bridge and High streets and the C. P. R. tracks. Chester Avery, the young school teacher who was in instrumental in saving the Davis house and thus checking the fire was slightly injured.

May 1911 Ottawa Citizen

Related reading

Mary Delaney Caught Stealing at The People’s Store

McAdams Store Almonte

Robertsons Keepsake Building Memories and Comments

McAdams Store Almonte

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McAdams Store Almonte

 

 

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From the collection of Bruce Sadler/Lorraine Nephin McAdams store- Almonte

*May 6 1892-Wonder where those loafers were when the fire started? On Tuesday last the People’s Store brick block had a narrow escape from being damaged by fire. The chimney leading from Mrs. Greig’s kitchen stove runs up the wall between her residence and Riddell & McAdam’s store. Tuesday noon the chimney took fire, and through an imperfectly protected pipe hole in R. & M’s. the flame was communicated to a curtain stretched across it.

 

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Credit-North Lanark Regional Museum, Almonte Gazette

Almonte Gazette Clipping: Advertisement for Caldwell’s Tweeds at A.J. Adam’s Store, Almonte
7 January 1898–Almonte, Town of Mississippi Mills, Ontario, Canada

The Teskey family continued operating the Mississippi Woollen Mills in Appleton right up to about 1899 when the mill was sold to Mr. Thomas Boyd Caldwell of Lanark (Boyd Caldwell & Co.). The Caldwell family were originally lumber barons in Lanark Village and during the late 19th century had entered the woollen industry. Appleton’s woollen mill added to the Caldwell’s business of mills in Lanark Village and later Perth.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte