Tag Archives: matheson house

How Many People Read About Lanark County in 2016? Top Stories?

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Let’s Check Out What Happened in 2016!

So in the middle of 2016 I expanded my writing to include all of Lanark County on the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page. Here are the 2016’s year end results as of December 30 10:33 am–

In 2016 we had over 722,102 views and 590,692 visits from 131 countries who read about Lanark County (and now Quebec Eastern Townships) history.

Facebook brought in the most hits, next it was various search engines I use and then Twitter coming in second and third respectively. The top countries reading our local stories are:  Canada, United States, United Kingdom, Turks & Caicos Islands, Germany and Australia– and Mexico coming up strong this year.

Here is the deal- I can’t do this alone– no one can–it is only through sharing stories and commenting that we make history come alive! So thank you for helping get the word out about Lanark County. Now let’s keep spreading the word– we can do this!

The top 15 Stories of the Year

The Sad Remains of Law & Orders– Destroyed last Night

Was it Just a Matter of Time? The Old Barracks

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Local Man’s Dad Was Leader of The Stopwatch Gang

The Witch of Plum Hollow – Carleton Place Grandmother

Chesswood of Carleton Place –THE MENU

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

Did You Know About the Crotch Lake Disaster?

The Rooftop Christmas Tree in Carleton Place (2016)

Going Once- Going Twice- Carleton Place Sold to the Highest Bidder?

Aerial Images of the Old Cold War Barracks Fire-Carole and Bill Flint

The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

Patterson’s Restaurant Perth

What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

Can Anyone in Carleton Place Hear Me?

 

Happy New Year and Thanks for reading!!  It is only through sharing stories and commenting that we make history come alive!

Linda Seccaspina

Related Reading:

How Many People Read the Tales of Carleton Place? Top Stories? 2015

There She Is–The Scarf Queens of Carleton Place 2016

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

 

I Can Dream About You —Early Hotels of Perth

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From Perth Remembered–The St. George Hotel

Perth Courier, March 19, 1964

Early Hotels of Perth

The year 1896 was a good period for the hotel industry in Perth. Five recorded hotels flourished within the town boasting a grand total of 165 rooms, five bars, and two more establishments than presently service the needs of the traveling public in 1964.

According to 19th century observers, Perth had a high caliber of service and had an excellent reputation as a fine hotel town. One such observer was the old Perth Expositor which noted how strangers “always judge a town by its hotels” and then carried the impression of hospitality and service to the far reaches of the land.

The hotel business of 1898 was a vast improvement over the rude taverns and inns of early days. Several of the hotels survived the turn of the century and can be readily seen in today’s busy commercial trade. The only hotel still bearing the same name and remaining in the same location is the Revere House at Wilson and Foster.

The hotels of Perth began just prior to the Boer War, and were five: Barrie’s Hotel, Hicks House, Allen House, Revere House and Queen’s Hotel. They were all located in the business section of down town Perth and catered to a through trade from road, stage and traveling salesmen. Since 1900 the road trade has shifted west to Highway 7 where an assortment of motels enjoy a lucrative business from an almost entirely auto trade.

The St. George Hotel had a direct relationship to the economic and social development of Perth. Constructed in 1830 by John Doran, a native of Wexford, Ireland and one of the earliest settlers of Perth, this Georgian-style structure was constructed as a private home. However, by 1832, the building had been converted to a hotel by William Cross, a Perth Innkeeper, who advertised in the Bathurst Courier that he had moved to a “Commodious Stone House” and would supply his guests with “choice liquors of all kinds” and a larder stocked “in the good old English styleIn 1896 the oldest hotel was Barrie’s operated by Thomas Barrie. It had thirty rooms and a well stocked bar. A resort of the surrounding farming community, the hotel enjoyed a heavy seasonal business. Mr. Barrie was hailed as a “jolly good natured fellow” with a “pleasant greeting” for all.

 

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The Hicks House, now the Perth Hotel, was hailed as the “leading commercial hotel” in eastern Ontario, sporting a bar, billiard room, free bus rides and a variety of fare on the table. The proprietor was John Wilson, noted for his catering and disciplining of the “hotel attaches”.

The Queen’s occupied thirty rooms, a bar, a billiard room and stables across from what is now Girdwoods Store on Foster Street. Owned by Frank A. Lambert, father of Edward Lambert, present day proprietor of the Imperial Hotel on Wilson, the Queen’s closed its quarters in 1918 after purchasing Barrie’s from James P. Hogan who succeeded Mr. Barrie as operator. Queen’s and Barrie’s are thus the modern day Imperial Hotel operated by Ed Lambert who took over from his father in 1934.

In 1896 Revere House was a 25 room establishment run by W.J. Flett who is described as one of the best hotel men in the valley. He enjoyed a popular local trace.

Largest hotel in Perth, now closed to business, was a fifty room spread called the Allan House, situated to the west of the town hall in a block now occupied by Chaplin and Code and the Coin Wash. Andrew Robinson the proprietor, was famous for his “uniform courtesy and kindness” and the free bus rides to the train and stages. Mr. Robinson purchased the Allan House from I.C. Grant after ten years as an employee of the Hicks House.

Needless to say, the hotels of Perth had close connections with Crystal Sprine Brewery and McLellan’s Distillery, two enterprises which made Perth famous from Nova Scotia to British Columbia.

READ THE PERTH COURRIER AT ARCHIVES LANARK

 

RELATED READING

Ever Wanted to Time Travel? Here is Your Chance!

What Happened When the Paper Boy Never got Paid in Perth…..

The Sad Tale of Unwed Mothers of Days Gone By — Perth through the Ages Tour

Would You Duel Anything For Love?

The Citroen’s of Perth, Ontario –Photo Essay

Did You Know About the House of Industry?

Chatter and Blather about Miss Jessop and Miss Matheson