Tag Archives: Masonic-lodge

Preserving History- The Masonic Lodge Signatures

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Preserving History- The Masonic Lodge Signatures

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Note: this is not the Carleton Place Canadian signatures– these are the ones at the back door of the Masonic Lodge on Albert Street. Thanks to Paul Todd

You might see what seems duplicate photos in this series, maybe they are — but I wanted each and every signature to be seen. Why? Paul Todd saved these signatures from being painted over as he felt this was an important part of the Lodge history– local history.

Did you know we have signatures on the walls of the Carleton Place Town Hall? Then there are the signatures from those that worked at the Carleton Place Canadian building on Bridge Street. I have written about names etched in the pews at St. James Anglican Church. Etched signatures in bricks of the Leslie girls in the back of the the Leslie/ Comba building on Bridge Street. History is everywhere if you look closely.

The importance of preserving history makes up a big part of what we have today at present and what will still happen in the future. This is the reason why I document history, why Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum does what she does. – so that children, at a young age or any age, could be aware of what has transpired ages ago and how it affected our society, culture, people, and life today.

Since I was 14, no matter where I lived, local history was number one for me. It’s all about the future remembering the past. Imagine future generations with no recollection of where they came from.  Thank you to all of you that donate photos and memories. None of us can do this without you. What great work for us all  to preserve now what may be impossible to find in just a few years.

 

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Author’s Notes –Linda Knight Seccaspina, is the granddaughter of Frederick J Knight (middle gentleman) and daughter of Arthur J Knight of the Cowansville, Quebec Masonic Lodge. She has been fascinated with the Masonic Lodge for as long as she can remember. Her Grandfather and Father always said “it was a secret”— and she had to take it at that. Not that she likes it.

 

Signature Readings

The Lanark County Quilt and its Families

Do You Know What I Found?

Before and After at The Carleton Place Canadian

The CPHS Autograph Book –Christena Rygiel

If You Squint Really Hard Can you see a Yeti?

 

LODGE READINGS

Secret Handshakes, Glimpses of Velvet and Big Chairs –Part 1

How Religion Came to Richmond and the First Masonic Funeral

The Mystery of the Masonic Rock – Pakenham

Things You Didn’t Know About the Stella Lodge

Carleton Place Masonic Lodge Mystery

An Unpleasant Ride? Masonic Lodge– St. John’s No. 63

The Miracles of Potton Springs

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

 

 

 

Tales From the Lodge – Bryan Reingold

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Tales From the Lodge – Bryan Reingold

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Bryan Reingold  He was known as A.F. Rodger (Albert Foster Rodger)

 

Memories of the Masonic Lodge- Bryan Reingold

My late uncle, Albert Foster Rodger, from my mother’s side was a *33 degree Mason in Toronto. Not only a lawyer by trade, he was appointed as the Senior Master of the Supreme Court of Ontario until his retirement. He was not only involved with the Masons but was equally involved with the Boy Scouts. 

When I would visit him and my aunt in Toronto, the two of us would sit for hours in his study, sipping on fine single malt scotch and talk until the wee hours of the night. He and my mother shared amazing similarities in their personalities. When he would be in Ottawa at his office (he had an office in many Ontario jurisdictions), I always cried when he’d head back to Toronto because it was like saying goodbye to my mother again who had already passed away. His passing was the hardest one I ever had to attend. 

I remember my Uncle wanting me to become a Mason, but because of their oath of secrecy he couldn’t divulge the details of what was in the oath of becoming a Mason, and subsequently I chose not to pursue it. 

I also happen to have my late Uncle’s graduation picture from Osgoode Hall in 1943.  Though he was in private practice for a while, he eventually became the city solicitor for Hamilton, Ontario and from there was appointed as Senior Master. One of the most understanding, loving, and compassionate man I ever had the pleasure to know. I loved him dearly as my Uncle and miss him. 

Bryan Reingold

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Name
Albert Foster Rodger
Birth
19 Oct 1917
Death
06 May 2002

historicalnotes

 

*In the United States, members of the Scottish Rite can be elected to receive the 33° by the Supreme Council. It is conferred on members who have made major contributions to society or to Masonry in general

 

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Author’s Notes –Linda Knight Seccaspina, is the granddaughter of Frederick J Knight (middle gentleman) and daughter of Arthur J Knight of the Cowansville, Quebec Masonic Lodge. She has been fascinated with the Masonic Lodge for as long as she can remember. Her Grandfather and Father always said “it was a secret”— and she had to take it at that. Not that she likes it.

 

Secret Handshakes, Glimpses of Velvet and Big Chairs –Part 1

How Religion Came to Richmond and the First Masonic Funeral

The Mystery of the Masonic Rock – Pakenham

 

Carleton Place Masonic Lodge Mystery

An Unpleasant Ride? Masonic Lodge– St. John’s No. 63

The Miracles of Potton Springs

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My Uncle and Aunt’s gravestone at the York Cemetery in Toronto. You can see the Mason insignia by his name.

 

 

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Masonic Lodge Dinner thanks to Joyce Tennant April 1978 Canadian

Secret Handshakes, Glimpses of Velvet and Big Chairs –Part 1

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Secret Handshakes, Glimpses of Velvet and Big Chairs –Part 1

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Secret handshakes and the glimpses of velvet and big chairs— and then there the blue aprons that my Father and Grandfather carried around in something that looked like a violin case. Those are the memories of the Masonic Lodge I still hold at the age of 69. Last week I was interviewed by Tara Gesner for the Carleton Place Almonte Gazette. One question was:

If you could know the truth behind any one secret or mystery, what would it be?

SECCASPINA: I want to know what really goes on with the Freemasons/Masons. It has driven me nuts for years. My dad and grandfather were Grand Masters and I would always ask what the organization was all about. They told me it was a secret, and no matter who I still ask today, it still seems to be a secret.

So today, Paul Todd graciously agreed to show me around St. John’s No. 63 in Carleton Place. I am going to do a few posts about my visit, but I can tell you there is no hocus pocus or magic like a film I saw about the a Free Mason Grandfather on Hallmark. These fraternal groups, no matter what you read or think, is based on community. Most join at the recommendation of somebody close to them. I am sure my Grandfather joined because he liked the charitable side of membership, and then some choose to join as they need the sense of fellowship like my Father did.

While members are discouraged from discussing politics or religion, belief in a higher power has been, historically, a requisite to join. The Worshipful Master is like the lead actor, and the best way to explain it is that it’s like a play, which everyone has a part in. There are things you have to learn – you have questions you have to learn answers to to rise up in the lodge, but might I mention that I heard no skulduggery or anything weird.

So my questions were today:

Why do you wear aprons?

Freemasons wear aprons, because of the supposed evolution of freemasonry from the stonemasons.

What about the Rebekahs?

The Rebekahs that my Grandmother belonged to are part of the Oddfellows –wrong group.

What about that all-seeing eye, in the pyramid in the Blue Bible my Dad used to have?

“That is the ritual” — the time-honored way to learn Masonic ritual is by listening to it during lodge meetings and studying to memorize it.

 

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Bridge Street Carleton Place 1910- Photo from St. John’s No. 63

Then I asked about the story when the Granite Chapter of Royal Arch Masons in Carleton Place was consumed by fire in 1910 and the Masonic Temple was rebuilt in 1911. Any Royal Arch Mason will recognize the significance of the keystone in a Royal Arch ritual.

The fire had been discovered at the rear of the building at the corner of Bridge and Albert Streets in the heart of the town.  This building was occupied by Cameron Brothers and W. Singleton & Son and there is considerable doubt as to which side of the premises the fire originated.  However, it is generally believed that the fire started from a box stove at the back of the meat shop. The fire of 1910 rushed down Albert Street and caught on the brick building occupied upstairs by the Freemason lodge and downstairs by the Salvation Army.

From this building it leapt to nearby buildings and then caught on the steeple of the Zion Church.  The firemen worked valiantly to save the edifice but their efforts were futile for the stream would not reach the blaze.  The flames soon enveloped the whole church and then huge arms of fire were stretched out for more prey.

One Saturday morning a few years ago, during a cleanup of a back storage closet, in one filthy cardboard box, was found a marble keystone that was scorched and cracked, with chunks missing from its top. Nobody alive today realized that we had this object. It turned out that it was the keystone from the Chapter, that had gone through the fire a century ago.

Today, we have the keystone on display during appropriate parts of the ritual and use it as a tool in our Masonic education. It is sometimes used it to discuss the story of the symbolic Masonic bird, the Phoenix, that is consumed by fire, rises again from its own ashes. That keystone lost in the fire is no longer in Carleton Place and must reside in one of the Ottawa Lodges archives.

With files from the
Grand Lodge Library of Canada

 

 

Carleton Place Masonic Lodge Mystery

An Unpleasant Ride? Masonic Lodge– St. John’s No. 63

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brockville Lodge at Carleton Place in front of the town hall 1929

The Mystery of the Masonic Rock – Pakenham

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The Mystery of the Masonic Rock – Pakenham

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It began with this clipping I found clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 27 Sep 1895, Fri, Page 5.

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Once again Brent Eades came to the rescue and found this on Google Books-thank you Brent!

Brent was inclined to think it was a hoax — “there was a lot of that going on in the 19th century, people digging up things they’d planted themselves in fields, for various reasons”.

So I began the hunt and found this article..

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Then this from The Builder Magazine–November 1929 – Volume XV – Number 11

THIRTY- SEVEN years ago an alleged discovery was made of an inscription,
apparently of Masonic significance, near Almonte, a town about forty miles
southwest of Ottawa. It is necessary to make the statement guardedly, because, as
has so often happened in like cases, no adequate steps were taken at the time to
authenticate the find. In spite of having followed up every line of inquiry that
seemed likely to promise further information on the subject, one must confess that
the results have been very meagre and very unsatisfying.


The first, and most obvious approach was to the local lodge, Mississippi No. 147.
The secretary wrote me saying that he had no information on the subject, but
would pass my letter on to the- Master of the lodge, W. Bro. R.A. Jamieson, who
as it happened was also Town Clerk, and very much interested in the history of the
locality. Not hearing anything further, after an interval of some months I wrote to
him direct. He replied that it was the first he had heard of my inquiry. He said that
he had heard vague rumors of the discovery of the inscription, but had no definite
information on the subject whatever. He added that he had no means of
prosecuting an inquiry along the most natural lines, as the files of the local
newspaper had been removed.


The following July I met him at the meeting of the Grand Lodge of Canada (for
Ontario), and obtained some further information. The files of the local newspaper,
the Almonte Gazette, were in the hands of the Hon. Andrew Haydon (no relative of
mine, by the way, so far as I know) and through him I obtained the first real light
on the subject. He was preparing a history of Lanark County, in which Pakenham
Township is situated, and very kindly looked up the original account that appeared
in the Almonte Gazette. I might add that I had previously written to the
Department of National Archives at Ottawa, in the hope that they might have a file
of the Gazette there, but was informed that if there had ever been one it had been
destroyed with many other documents in the destruction of the Parliament
Buildings by fire some years ago.


As soon as the date of the discovery was fixed I made a search through the files of
the Canadian Freemason and the Canadian Craftsman, but found no more than a
single paragraph in the former journal. This quoted a dispatch from London,
Ontario, which without giving any details, scoffed at the “discovery” as a hoax.



Since then I have had some further correspondence with Bro. Jamieson, whose
inquiries have resulted in very little further information. He, however, did elicit
from a son of Bro. Forsythe, the first Mason to examine the stone, that he
remembered a man coming to the farm when he was a boy, to cut out the portion
bearing the inscription. All those who were mentioned as having examined the
stone in the account in the Almonte Gazette, are now dead with the exception of R. Wor.
Bro. Dr. McIntosh. To this brother I also wrote and was informed by him that, so
far as he knew, the proposal to cut out the inscribed portion of the stone was
carried out, though he had no knowledge of what became of it.

Bro. Jamieson wrote to me more recently to say that he was going to have the
minutes of the lodge searched in order to see if any mention was made of the
discovery, or of the proposal to cut out the inscription, and if this was one, how the
relic was disposed of. However, nothing rather has come to hand, and though I
have written Bro. Jamieson twice since, no further word from him has reached me.

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The date of the issue from the Almonte Gazette containing original report which was May 27, 1892. This account is here reproduced.

 A MASONIC MYSTERY–Almonte Gazette  May 27, 1892.


An alleged relic of 1604 discovered in Pakenham Township – How it was found –
What it looks like – Speculation as to its author unknown.


Considerable interest has been created in Masonic circles in this district by the
discovery of a peculiar inscription on a rock situated on a mound in an out-of-the-
way place on Mrs. Joseph Dickson’s farm in Upper Pakenham. The discovery was
accidentally made by Mrs. Dickson’s son over a year ago. He told Mr. John
Forsythe, his neighbor, of what he had seen. The latter thought there was nothing
of importance in the affair, and paid little attention to it until a few weeks ago, when, during a search for his cattle, his attention was drawn to a polished rock with
Masonic emblems carved on its surface.

Mr. Forsythe, being an enthusiastic member of the Craft, made a careful examination of the stone, and, finding it to possess unusual interest for members of the fraternity, he communicated the result of his investigations to his brethren in Almonte and Pakenham and invited them out to inspect it for themselves. The invitation was accepted, and a short time ago Messrs. R. Pollock, J. M. Munro, A. J. McAdam and W. P. McEwen, of Almonte, and Dr. McIntosh, Major O’Neil and R. Moore, of Pakenham, enjoyed the
hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Forsythe, and during the afternoon paid a visit to the
spot containing the mysterious inscription. They found a rock with a polished
surface six or seven feet in length, and a couple of feet in depth, bearing an
inscription that, judged by its appearance, had been placed there by an unknown
hand at a very early period, as the action of the elements in the intervening period,
clearly demonstrated. The writer, believing that Gazette readers would be
interested, took an impression of the inscription, of which the following is a copy,
but greatly reduced in size:

Screenshot 2018-06-05 at 15Illustration Almonte Gazette May 1892 of the inscription on the Pakenham rock.


How such an inscription came to be carved in such a place is a mystery. If it was
cut in the stone in the year 1604 – nearly three centuries ago – as the figures would
seem to indicate, it looks as if some follower of Champlain (who passed through
this section about the year 1603) had done the work;  but of course is mere
speculation. We understand that Mr. Forsythe intends sawing out the interesting
relic, and it will form the nucleus of a museum in connection with his lodge –
Mississippi No. 147, A. F. and A. M., G.R.C., Almonte. Some Almonte craftsmen
have submitted specimens of the polished stone to a prominent geologist, with the
object of gaining information as to the effects of the elements on it through the
lapse of time, and every effort will be made to unravel the mystery surrounding the
affair.

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At MissIssippi Lodge #147 GRC.–2015

The description leaves much to be desired. The writer says he “took an impression
of the inscription,” by which is probably to be understood a rubbing. The
description of the stone as “polished” is very vague, and while the dimensions
given probably refer to the stone itself, grammatically they refer to the polished
surface. It remains doubtful whether this surface was natural, or artificial. This
makes a good deal or difference, for inscriptions cut on natural surfaces, unless
very deep and on a very large scale, very rapidly become indistinct. The photograph of the *Nova Scotia Stone reproduced in THE BUILDER, vol. x, p. 295,  shows such indistinctness very conclusively.

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The crux of the inscription is naturally the date. The square and compass, in
unusual position it is true, the hand, the trowel and perhaps even the eye, may
probably be accepted as having been quite clear. The design below the trowel
looks as if intended to represent a wall of rubble Masonry, either in course of
erection, or else an unfinished part of the “inscription.” Perhaps both. But the date
is naturally very difficult to accept; and if the cutting was done on a natural
surface, it is well within possibility that the second figure was 8, of which part had
been less deeply cut owing to irregularity of the surface, and had thus been
obliterated by weathering. The date 1804 might not be too early for a pioneer
settlement in the vicinity; the ostensible date, however, seems to present such
grave difficulties as to be incredible.


The whole history of this “discovery” is a striking instance of the ignorance and
carelessness with which possible evidences of Masonic antiquity are treated. The
project of cutting out the stone was unfortunate to say the least. Better to have left
it to the weather than to have removed and lost it. On the other hand those who
condemned it off hand as a hoax or imposition were equally to blame; for that was
only to be decided by examination. If only such things could be carefully described
and impartially judged at the time of discovery, so that if genuine they might be
preserved, and if not that the fact might be authentically established! Unfortunately
most of the Craft “care for none of these things,” and it is much easier to come to a
snap decision without information than it is to investigate. So some will believe
and some will reject, according to their individual disposition, while the student
can only regret that opportunities for examination were so carelessly neglected and
ignored.

Pakenham_ON

authorsnote)

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Other difficulties to be solved lie in the fact that the first known white man to
travel the Mississippi River, which is joined by the Indian River quite near the
Dickson farm, was Etienne Brule in 1610, not 1603 as stated above. 

As to the suggestion that the figure 6 was really an 8, 1 find on examining
Robertson’s “History of Freemasonry in Canada”, that there was no record of any
lodge in the vicinity of Almonte during the era of our Provincial Grand Lodges of
Upper Canada. He gives, however, details of a lodge that met at Richmond, in
Carleton County, under a warrant dated 1821, which place was a village on the
Goodwood River, some twenty miles southwest of Ottawa, in the Rideau Military
Settlement…

historicalnotes

*In Nova Scotia, articles have been written about the Masonic Stone discovered on the shores of Annapolis Basin in 1827, marked with a Square and Compasses and the date 1606. The Stone may have marked the grave of an operative mason who came to the Habitation with DeMonte and Champlain, but it cannot be accepted as proof that there was organized Freemasonry in Nova Scotia before 1738. R. V. Harris, Freemasonry in Canada before 1750; Hon. William Ross, Freemasonry in Nova Scotia, Halifax 1910, The Stone no longer exists. For its final disappearance, see the magazine, Freemason, Toronto. March-April 1963.


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1862 Potton Springs, Quebec– Date of some engravings on the protruding stone above springs. Included are several names and free masonic symbols. From–The Miracles of Potton Springs

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Owl’s Head, Quebec--The Golden Rule Lodge of Stanstead holds a ceremony every year at the top of Owl’s Head. Near the top of Owl’s Head is a natural chamber, accessible on foot, through an opening between rocks. Members and guests of Golden Rule Lodge No 5 of Stanstead of the Masonic Order meet here annually on the summer solstice. This chamber was inaugurated by Henry J. Martin, GM, on September l0, 1857. Acclaimed to be the only natural open air lodge that is known to exist, Masons from the world over have visited here. The Masonic emblem of a square and compass with the letter ‘G’ in
the centre is inscribed on one wall. A double headed eagle, of symbolic meaning to Masons, is depicted on the chamber’s eastern face.

Owl’s Head, Quebec

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Author’s Notes –Linda Knight Seccaspina, is the granddaughter of Frederick J Knight and daughter of Arthur J Knight past grand masters of the Cowansville, Quebec Masonic Lodge. She has been fascinated with the Masonic Lodge for as long as she can remember. Her Grandfather and Father always said “it was a secret”— and she had to take it at that. Not that she likes it.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

Carleton Place Masonic Lodge Mystery

An Unpleasant Ride? Masonic Lodge– St. John’s No. 63

The Miracles of Potton Springs

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

Carleton Place Masonic Lodge Mystery

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Carleton Place Masonic Lodge Mystery

Mystery

 

Image result for keystone in Royal Arch ritual

 

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I have told the story before of how the Granite Chapter of Royal Arch Masons in Carleton Place was consumed by fire in 1910 and the Masonic Temple was rebuilt in 1911. Any Royal Arch Mason will recognize the significance of the keystone in Royal Arch ritual. 

The fire had been discovered at the rear of the building at the corner of Bridge and Albert Streets in the heart of the town.  This building was occupied by Cameron Brothers and W. Singleton & Son and there is considerable doubt as to which side of the premises the fire originated.  However, it is generally believed that the fire started from a box stove at the back of the meat shop. The fire of 1910 rushed down Albert Street and caught on the brick building occupied upstairs by the Freemason lodge and downstairs by the Salvation Army.

From this building it leapt to near by buildings and then caught on the steeple of the Zion Church.  The firemen worked valiantly to save the edifice but their efforts were futile for the stream would not reach the blaze.  The flames soon enveloped the whole church and then huge arms of fire were stretched out for more prey.

img.jpgThe Lost Photos & Words- Carleton Place Fire 1910

One Saturday morning a few years ago, during a cleanup of a back storage closet, in one filthy cardboard box, was found a marble keystone that was scorched and cracked, with chunks missing from its top. Nobody alive today realized that we had this object. It turned out that it was the keystone from the Chapter, that had gone through the fire a century ago.

Today, we have the keystone on display during appropriate parts of the ritual and use it as a tool in our Masonic education. It is sometimes used it to discuss the story of the symbolic Masonic bird, the Phoenix, that is consumed by fire, rises again from its own ashes.

With files from the
Grand Lodge Library of Canada

 

 

 - In a lively junior hockey match at the park...

 

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Glenda Mahoney submitted this photo

 

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Llew Lloyd Photo courtesy of Reid McIntyre Ingleside On .
Jennifer Fenwick Irwin Four individuals are identified in this photo: the small boy at front is Ross Davies, who became the editor of the Carleton Place Canadian. Clarence Doucette is the young man with light cap looking towards the camera at center. Agnes Healey is to the left of the wooden triangular structure, wearing white and a big straw hat. The older gentleman sitting in the buggy at bottom left with his back to us is a “Mr. Arthurs.” The occasion was the laying of the cornerstone of the present Masonic Temple building at 55 Bridge Street- Linda says — you can see the Moose on the other side of the street

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Nov 1895, Fri,  Page 7

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

  relatedreading

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Feb 1906, Mon,  Page 5

Fire

The Lost Photos & Words- Carleton Place Fire 1910

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!- Volume 1- Part 2

The Hysteria and Overbooking of Hayley’s Comet 1910

 

Carleton Place Masonic Lodge

An Unpleasant Ride? Masonic Lodge– St. John’s No. 63

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An Unpleasant Ride? Masonic Lodge– St. John’s No. 63,

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Photo-Masonic Lodge, St. John’s No. 63, located at 55 Bridge Street.
This newspaper clipping from 1979 shows the building in the 1920s-The LCBO moved into the building in 1945, paying a monthly rent of $45!-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Carleton Place  March 21 1890 Almonte Gazette

John Ross Robertson, of Deputy Grand Master of the Lodge of Canada, A .F. & A.M ., W . Bro. Toronto,  visited Carleton Place Carleton Place and delivered a carefully prepared address on “‘Craft Masonry in Canada. St. John’s Lodge-room was comfortably filled on the occasion, there being a full turn-out of the members of that lodge, as well as a large number of visiting brethren. Among the latter were a dozen enthusiastic Almonters, who were amply repaid for their unpleasant drive (there was a spring snowstorm) by hearing an address of rare interest.

The distinguished lecturer gave a condensed history of the order in, Canada for the
past century, interspersed with anecdotes, and read extracts from some of the minute-books of bygone days to show how lodge business was transacted in the pioneer period in this country.

 

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John Ross Robertson


Some amusing incidents connected with the *craft during the Upper Canada rebellion in 1837-38 were related. The audience was delighted with the lecture, and at its close Rev. Bro. Jarvis moved, and W . Bro.Munro seconded, a hearty vote of thanks to the D. G. M.. which was carried unanimously. R. W. Bro. Robertson and the visiting members of the fraternity were afterwards entertained at a banquet in the elegant dining-room of Bro. Mcllquham’s hotel (Mississippi Hotel), where a fine spread Was prepared, and to which, it is scarcely necessary to say, full justice was done.

historicalnotes

 

*Debates within Upper Canada on the nature of the relationship of the provincial Grand Lodge and the English Grand Lodge paralleled political discussions on the colony’s constitution. Those Freemasons who immigrated from the United States favoured an independent Provincial Grand Lodge.  Charles Duncombe was a Freemason, serving as first master of the Mount Moriah lodge at Westminster. In 1836, in a move that presaged the Rebellion, he set up a Grand Lodge independent from the British lodges and became its first Grand Master.[1]

  • Duncombe’s Grand Lodge was short-lived, but he soon helped found another during the Patriot War that followed the Rebellion: the Hunters’ Lodge. The Hunters’ Lodge was patterned on Freemasonry.His last known Masonic activity was to establish a Masonic lodge in Sacramento in 1852.

Blaine Cornell added: Possibly Mark Rubin was actually Mark Rubino one of the Rubino brothers who owned the large brick building still standing at the NW corner of Beckwtih and Mill and imported fruit and vegetables from the USA during the 50’s,60’s and early 70’s

 

The Passing of Odd Fellows —- Tales From the IV

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This story is a piece of fiction I wrote about the house on Lake Ave East a few years ago. I found it yesterday and thought I would share.  Fictional story from the collection of Linda’s Dark and Dreadful Tales– and photos by Linda Seccaspina — THIS IS NOT A TRUE STORY

                             

Smiley glanced at the morning sun that was slowly being covered by passing clouds. Time was fleeting and he must pass on his special gift before it was too late. A knock on the door interrupted his train of thought, and slowly he walked towards the front door in his size 12 furry slippers. He knew who was on the other side without even looking. Young Ethan had been visiting him for weeks in preparation. Ethan flashed a grin upon seeing Smiley and said,

“Are we ready?”

Smiley roared at the top of his voice,

“I don’t know who you are Sir, but this is my house, and that is my doorstep you are standing in”
Ethan laughed and then grew silent as Smiley fondly placed his bluish hand upon his head. Their friendship had bloomed for years ever since Ethan had asked his father what he did each week at the Masonic Lodge on Bridge Street. The boy had been mesmerized by the eye and the pyramid in the Mason Bible that graced his Dad’s night table since he was 4. After many requests for information his father had said quite firmly,

“Mysteries, like the Masonic rites,  our parents and elders have sworn not to reveal to the uninitiated, which includes all children.”
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Ethan always followed his father when he went to his meetings hoping to find out some little thing that would give him some insight. One night he met old Smiley standing by the Roxy Theatre who said he might be able to offer some clues. Smiley, in turn, thought that the boy was perfect for his project.

The relationship grew into a kindred friendship and the weeks were filled with stories,magic and penny candy. Life would become what it was supposed to be thought Smiley. No aches, pains, and his mind would soon be clear as day.  Ethan was ready on the other hand to trade his life for the secrets of the Lodge.

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The appointed day came without much fanfare. The day was gloomy, but it would do. They climbed to the roof of the Lake Avenue East house to a small landing. There Smiley placed the tiny piano stool smack dab in the middle. As soon as Ethan sat down Smiley rotated the chair quickly until it whirled.


“Please release me!” Smiley screamed to the overhead skies.

Lightening began to rain on the small roof, but each bolt seemed to miss their target. Finally, what looked like a lightening bolt grabbed the stool by its legs creating a loud bang. When the smoke cleared there still sat Ethan—but was it really him?

The Carleton Place Canadian reported a mysterious object fell from the sky November 21, 1953 into a busy airline corridor along the St. Lawrence. Imaginations reported the object left a white trail as it plummeted to the ground. Immediately it generated fear that something bigger was coming and Lanark County police looked into whether a small plane had crashed, but found nothing.

Mark Rubin was among those who witnessed the object when it fell between Sayville, New York and Perth.
“It had this little curlicue tail at the top and was coming straight down at a 90-degree angle,” Rubin said to the media.

Police said they planned to send investigators to talk to Rubin and look at the photos he took. To this day they have not, and believe the object might have had more mysterious origins.

No one will ever know what fell from the sky that day, but whatever did gave new life to someone. Was it Smiley or Ethan that survived?  Had anyone been reported missing? One thing is for certain, whatever happened had to remain a secret, as a secret between two is a secret, but a secret between three is everybody’s secret. After all– “What we do for ourselves dies with us–what we do for others remains and is immortal”— *Albert Pike.

Historical Note 
*Albert Pike (December 29, 1809 – April 2, 1891) was an attorney, soldier, writer, and Freemason. Albert Pike is one of the only Confederate military officers or figures honored with a statue in Washington, D.C., another being Robert E. Lee

Mysteries at the Carleton Place Masonic Lodge

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St. John’s No. 63 Masonic Lodge

Address: 55 Bridge Street Carleton Place, Ontario

Built in 1913 – Architect: unknown

On November 25th, 1842, a group met at Manny Nolan’s tavern to petition for dispensation. The first installation of officers occurred January 20th, 1843 after formal granting in December of 1842. The present lodge building was constructed in 1913 after the first hall was destroyed by fire in the great fire of 1910 in Carleton Place.

St. John’s Lodge met at the Carleton House, 4 Bridge Street) from 1843 to 1858. The building no longer exists. From 1858 to 1865, the Masons called Hurd’s Hall home (on Bell Street), and from 1865 to 1870 it was 250 Bridge St. – which later became the town’s fire hall.

For the next 17 years (1870 to 1887), meetings were held at “Dr. Cornell’s Hall” – at the corner of Bridge and William Streets. The inaugural meeting in the new building took place on Dec. 13, 1911, and a ceremony of dedication – by M.W. Grand Master Aubrey White – was held on Feb. 9, 1912.

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When I was a young girl I was mesmerized with my father’s blue Masonic Lodge apron. I don’t know how many times I asked him what the “all seeing eye” meant in his Masonic Bible. More mystery shrouded my mind when my Grandmother left for her Rebecca Lodge meetings in her white dress. When my Grandfather became a Grand Master of the Cowansville, Quebec branch people shook his hands congratulating him and I just sat there and shook my head.

I asked once, okay, maybe I asked 50 times, but I was always told the same thing. Anything to do with the Masonic Lodge was a secret that they could not share with me. When my Grandfather and Father died, the local Masons came in their dress ‘uniforms’ and closed the door and had some sort of ceremony over their caskets. I still had no idea after all those years. I stopped one of my former classmates who was now part of the local Masonic Lodge and asked him point blank if the Masonic Lodge was about taking over the world. He laughed and said,

“Linda, if you stop and ask yourself logical questions the answer is very clear There are no major secrets in masonry. How can we be trying to take over the world when we have such a hard time organizing a fundraiser?”

Sigh— I still don’t know and never will, and each time I walk by the Masonic Hall in Carleton Place I wonder how these people can keep a secret for so long. Keeping secrets isn’t my specialty, and I think they can smell that from a mile away:)

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This is a undated vintage picture of the back of Central Garage with the late Frank Robertson and late Ken Robertson of Carleton Place as children. The photo would have been taken in the late 1920’s. A view of the Masonic Lodge on can been seen in the background.

 

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