Tag Archives: mary cook

Did you Know the History of the Carleton Place Arena Christmas Tree? — and other stories…

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Did you Know the History of the Carleton Place Arena Christmas Tree? — and other stories…

Photo Linda Seccaspina

“We have six to eight major Christmas events at the arena — from the town’s annual Appreciation Night to the Bowes Brothers’ holiday show,” Bob White said. “So many people get to enjoy the tree.”

The large tree, which stays up until after the new year, still has a Cook’s of Carleton Place tag attached. It will not be removed.

Read the rest of the story by Tara Gesner here… CLICK

Photo- Tara Gesner

Noreen Tyers

December 5 at 8:47 PM  · 

Cutting a Christmas Tree at the House of Old at R. R. # 4

You know when you are a city folk and you decide to move to the county, and it’s your first Christmas at the House of Old.  You know all it takes is a dusting of snow that glistens in the dark when the moon shines.  One can not imagine what thoughts goes through your mind, it’s the Christmas Season

It does not matter that the house is not new and fancy, maybe you don’t have the latest in household items.  What matters is the beauty and the serenity of the place.  If you take the time to look at your surroundings you are in awe of what the night brings.  I found I could see stars I never did in the city before.  The old Owl was sitting on the corner of the Barn that had seen better days, but this was a distant project to protect.  The Hoot from the Owl just completed the setting and life was good, he was just acknowledging our presence, he approved.

You know, I might want to call myself a bit of a romantic, but life was good, my family was with me, everyone enjoying a walk after dinner.  A discussion was happening with some very excited voices of the kids, what their first Christmas in the Country what was going to be like.  They were all excited about venturing to the Sugar Bush to cut down a fresh tree from the land where they lived. 

They were happy with the first snowfall, and our dog had been taken off his lead to walk with us at his leisure, he had to be tied as he did love to chase the neighbour’s  cattle and that was a, No, No.   You never think of the retraining of your pet, to country ways but there is, after all sort of beasts, he was not used to like porcupines, who demonstrates displeasure should he get to close.  While being tied, he was so used to the deer coming to the apple trees he did not seem to bother with them. I do have to admit the kids, maybe thought some of the deer were Santa’s Reindeer.  Every once and awhile they would speak to our dog Bow and say, don’t hurt the babies, and he never did chase them or did he harm them in any way.  He would watch as they cleaned up the falls on the ground and enjoy every morsel.  Was it magic maybe they were some of Santa’s reindeer.

From the first snowfall, the idea of Christmas was sure to generate conversation on Christmas and what it was going to be like in the countryside.  To keep our two children on track and focussed, we decided that the tree that would be cut, would have nothing but handmade decorations.  There will be a couple of exceptions and that was the old antique ornaments of my grandparents and parents tree, and they just always went on, you know one of those traditions.  In order to keep the children busy we decided that we would get them started making the Christmas Ornaments for our tree.

Well the decoration workshop got busy, and we planned what would go on the tree.  Some coloured construction paper was bought, adults cut with the scissors and the kids made the chains and glued.   An old bushel basket was placed in the Summer Kitchen to put the ornaments as they finished.  We strung popcorn and cranberries for garlands. The bits and pieces of skeins of wool was gathered to make some hanging little dolls, both boys and girls.

We had decided that we would invite the extended family for Christmas Dinner, Oh dear our Dream of an Old Fashioned Country Christmas had got slightly out of hand.  The last head count was about fourteen adults and OMG kids, about eleven of them, yes we had a place to hold that many bodies as we would be eating in the Summer Kitchen which was a big room. 

The heating for the Summer Kitchen was a big old Findlay Wood Stove, six plates and a warming closet with Lion Heads adorning the corners and a water reservoir attached to the stove. As we heated with wood in the house we did have a good supply and it was just outside in the wood shed.  No Worry, my husband always called me the wood sorcerer, as the wood furnace was my chore to keep it burning, it went out when he tried to tend it.

The food was good, everybody was bringing something, an old fashioned Pot Luck, and I did not have to do the desert–someone else had volunteered, I had Christmas Cake we made  for a treat.  We had enough Potatoes, Carrots and other things from the Garden, including summer savoury and parsley. I had made some Meat Pies (Tourtieres) and Sausage Rolls, using my Mom’s recipe, we had enough to feed an army.

As we were having a fresh tree it would be put up a week before Christmas, the Summer Kitchen was cool and that was good for the tree.  Come Saturday, the kids were out of bed at the Crack of Dawn, and were ready to go, breakfast was needed so that did slow down the pressing duty.  To watch the expressions on their face it was worth a thousand pictures.  We found a tree and it was a beauty, the only thing was it was big.  Father cut another piece off the bottom when we brought it in, and soon it was in the old pail with some water to keep it fresh, with the cut off branches used for some greenery to decorate.  The only problem was keeping the kids from decorating, right away, they just could not understand the tree needing to find its place and the branches fall into place. They did not need a lesson in a tree being frozen being outside, too much information for the situation.

It was a good thing school was still in session for a couple of days, as this put off the decorating process for another few days.  When the anticipation was at its highest peak and holding off decorating could not be extended  any longer, so the tree trimming started.  Now being as they had never decorated a tree from the start, it was hard to restrain them while Dad was placing the lights on the tree.  One could tell that this process was definitely holding them back and they were all ready to start.   

 “Is it time yet Dad, can we put some decorations on yet, please Dad”.  

 It was a parent decision to let them go ahead and we would rearrange later. Homemade star for the top, crochet decorations over Candy Canes, Some Pine Cone Elves, and the chains and the garlands are a few of the Creations that adorned our tree, and the treat  the fresh smell of evergreens.  It was a good idea to not bring out the tinsel, as the placement would have been clumpy and not one string at a time. Restraint is great in some situations and I have to admit that the tree cutting, homemade decorations, and all the elements, just did fulfill the dream of a Country Christmas in a country setting, and what a delight that we made the decision to come.

By the way the meal was delicious and the family did enjoy their experience of a Christmas in the Country.  A trip to the Sugar Bush for some, while dishes were being done was also a highlight.  The next Christmas we had our own home raised Turkeys, the taste superb, after all they were fed fresh corn and apples from the farm, along with their meal.  Each family received a turkey as part of their Christmas Gift.  Have not tasted a good wholesome turkey since leaving the House of Old.

 From the pen of Noreen, Dec 2020

Click here

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada23 Dec 1974, Mon  •  Page 2

also read-The Landmark Pine Tree in Watson’s Corners– Gloria Currie

The Christmas Tree Farm Carleton Place

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada08 Jul 2017, Sat  •  Page 38

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada11 Dec 1984, Tue  •  Page 3

My 365 Tree

To be honest we had stopped decorating the interior of the house in a big way after the fire in 1995. Two years ago, I sucked my heart in and decorated every single room for the Carleton Place Hospital Foundation Christmas House Tour. Not everyone was behind my decision, but I had to make this effort in his memory.  I knew that the house would never again display his talents and love for the season, and wanted to do it as a tribute for his love of Christmas.

After the fire we all remembered the ravaged Christmas tree that stood in a corner, so instead, he put up a giant tree in the TV room in 1995 and bought music boxes.  That tree has stood there 365 days a year since December 1996 and will never ever come down. Read-In Memory of The Man Who Loved Christmas

People of Carleton Place– Louise Roy — 1988 –Mary Cook

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People of Carleton Place– Louise Roy — 1988 –Mary Cook
PLEASE CLICK ON THE PHOTO to make it bigger

People of Carleton Place — John Flett

People of Carleton Place– John Porter Prospect Carleton Place

The Curious World of Bill Bagg — The Gillies Blacksmith Shop

“2,000 people on the streets”–Dr. Finlay McEwen of Carleton Place

Carleton Place 1845– Dwellings and People

I am Woman — Hear Me Roar? Linda Knight Seccaspina

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Robert McDonaldRobert McDonald Photography–From the Mississippi Mudds – Aladdin Jr production on February 18, 2017–Phototaken on the mezzanine of the town hall.

I am Woman — Hear Me Roar? Linda Knight Seccaspina

In 1911 Sir Wilfrid Laurier came to speak in the grand hall of the small hamlet of Carleton Place situated in Lanark County, Ontario. This was an important event for those voting in Carleton Place and the local women worked for days preparing the hall and the luncheon. Some women wondered if they could also hear the words of Sir Wilfrid Laurier and were soon told that they would be allowed to sit on the upper floor as long as they remained quiet.

For women today this notion seems incredible, but you have to remember that in 1911 artist Emily Carr abandoned her love of painting in British Columbia because Canadian critics and buyers were not ready for her work. A woman could not use the term ‘martial abuse’ in 1911 and would be condemned to life imprisonment for any harm done to her husband, even if she was not at fault.

In 1974 iconic Ottawa Valley writer Mary Cook wrote that there was one area in which Lanark County was completely backward and that was in electing or appointment of women to municipal or community office. Have times changed since 1974 when Mary wrote that article in the Ottawa Citizen?  I was curious, and when the North Lanark Age Friendly group asked me to write an article about the subject I had an inkling of the answer I was going to get.

I asked a few female politicians if they felt they were treated less by men and all of them answered yes. Yet, no one really wanted to give me their names for exactly the same reason Mary Cook received in 1974. Anyone she queried asked her that they remain anonymous so it would not jeopardize their chances of ever becoming appointed to a committee or being elected to public office.

The documented fact is that women are still underrepresented in politics. When I ran for office as a councillor a few years ago; I was asked by some if I should not consider my age or my health. Honestly, I would rather drop dead representing my community than sit on a chair and watch reruns of The Crown. The fact that I am in my senior years doesn’t make me any less effective, nor am I too delicate to lead. Once baby boomers, we are now aging in a society that celebrates beauty and youthfulness and our opinions sometimes become invisible.

In the early 1960s I was passionate, not by politics, but by the incredible social change led by the youth movement.  I told my father that anyone over the age of 30 should be sent out to farms. I really drank the Kool Aid blaming the older generation for the VietNam war and the condition the world was in. In 1981, I turned 30 and the first thing my father asked me was: “When are you leaving for the farm?”

By then I realized that being a woman in the current world was going to be more difficult. Trying to get a job and being discriminated against for wearing avant garde fashion and my strong opinions were my worries now. In my grandmother’s case in 1981, they were still being treated like 1911 and had to listen to a speech by the Bishop from the confines of the church kitchen after organizing complete events.

We as women, and as senior women, are still invisible to some and when we stand up for something we are not acting “like your mother” or having “a hot flash”. After speaking with these women in politics this week I realize we still have issues with female authority, and women are still the most underused resource. While it is no longer the mentality of 1911 I understood these women’s concerned comments of continuing gender bias despite their great performances.

In 1974 one civic minded female from Carleton Place summed up the situation this way to writer Mary Cook. “Women have a lot to offer, but for some reason men are terribly afraid they might lose some of their prestige if they open their doors to women in public office”. Why do women still have more to prove than men when it comes to politics and other issues?

It doesn’t matter where you live–women belong in all places where decisions are being made. As Shirley Chisolm once said: “If they don’t give you a seat at the table, bring your own folding chair”.

Lady Aberdeen and Lady Taylor
Lady Aberdeen (at right), first president and founder of the National Council of Women of Canada with Lady Taylor (at left), her successor as president, Ottawa, Ontario.
(Mrs. John H. Acheson. Library and Archives Canada, PA-057319)

How many women have been in Carleton Place government? Only 7 since 1901 when Dr. Preston became the first mayor (before that there were reeves)

Linda Seccaspina

Theresa Fritz

Wendy LeBlanc (mayor)

Linda Schmidt

Melba Baker (mayor)

Barbara Walsh

Trudie Dickie

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Vandalism 1974 in Carleton Place

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31 Jan 1974-

Vandalism is probably no worse or no better in Carleton Place than in any other Ontario town with a population of 5000 many of whom are barely into their teen years. It is this age group, according to police, which is causing most of the town’s vandalism. Town officials have singled out four areas that are especially prone to vandalism. The headache for town foreman Keith Macintosh, besides the street signs, is the problem of marking fire hydrants fur easy identification in high snowbanks. As fast as fluorescent markers are put up. they are stolen. “‘We spend hours searching out hydrants wich have lost their signs and replacing them.” Mr. Macintosh said. Me thinks the heaviness of the markers rule out blaming of children.”

Apart from the cost in man-hours, there is a real danger to the community . The community centre has long been a favourite target for vandals however, past chairman Dave Kirkpatrick said he thinks the situation has improved over last year. Rest room walls have had to be painted several times to block out obscenities, and he revealed the girls washroom received much more abuse than docs the boys. “The only thing which will cover the magic marker writing is paint” he said.

Another favourite community centre target has been the outside furnace grating which so far this year has been replaced three times. The post office has always held special attraction for vandals, and this year the department of public works reached the end of its patience, and is now in the process of installing heavy institutional type link fence around all grass areas. Since the post office was built 10 years ago vandals have torn off the metal letters from the building, ripped out cement benches, tied a horse to a newly-planted tree, buried a car up to its axles in fresh turf, littered the grass with broken bottles and garbage, dismantled a brick mill, and used the lawns to walk dogs.

A post office employee said the department of public works had no alternative but to fence in the grass areas in an effort to cut down on the property abuse. In the meantime, town police continue to try to catch the culprits, but few charges have been laid. One policeman said “We always seem to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.” However Mayor Eldon Henderson said town vandalism has to stop. He is going to insist on more rigid control of town Bylaws as loitering is concerned, and he is going to ask that town police concentrate their patrolling in the trouble spots of the town. That theory doesn’t always work. Several weeks ago three youths attacked the police cruiser while it was parked in front of the police station, tore the signal dome from the roof, and ripped out both headlights. They were caught but the action proves that vandals aren’t choosy in Carleton Place when they are seeking out a target.

Celebrating Christmas in July — Mary Cook Archives — LeMaistre

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Celebrating Christmas in July  — Mary Cook Archives — LeMaistre

The only -thing missing was the snow. Christmas lights hung from the trees, The picnic tables were dressed with Christmas tablecloths, and the full-size Christmas tree in the cottage was decorated with candy canes and gifts.

The idea of celebrating Christmas in July came to the LeMaistre family when they were right in the midst of the festivities last December. Someone said it was a shame that when the family had so much fun at the regular celebration Christmas it couldn’t be repeated in the summer.

The family that is always ready for a party could see no reason why Christmas could not be celebrated twice a year, and no sooner were the decorations taken off the tree last winter, than the family began planning for the Christmas-in-July party.

The LeMaistres have what is commonly called in the Valley “a large connection,” and on Saturday night almost 50 people turned up at the Mississippi Lake cottage of Ted and Elizabeth LeMaistre. Instead of sleighrides and snowball fights, the guests swam and sat under the trees to get out of the hot sun.

But inside the cottage, turkey, shortbread and all the Christmas trappings usually prepared for Dec. 25 were brought out. And after the feast, gifts were handed out. Then came Christmas carols. Would they do it again? You bet they would, said Elizabeth. But they have to get Dec. 25 out of the way first.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Jul 1981, Tue  •  Page 3

Mary Cook Archives

Mary and Walter Swinwood — Mary Cook News Archives 1981

The Evolution of the Women’s Institute — Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Bob Sadler’s Boat Rides –Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Carleton Place Ladies Auxiliary — Chamber of Commerce 1987– Mary Cook Archives

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Mary Cook Archives —Philip Mailey — January 25 1983

Carleton Place a place for Mad Scientists! Mary Cook News Archives 1983

Mary Cook Archives — Rifle Ranges and Nursery Schools — September 1980

Mary Cook News Archives — The Wool Industry 1982

The Moldowans —- Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Clippings of Cheryl Coker — Mary Cook News Archives

Donald Lowry …. Mary Cook News Archives

1976 Agricultural Tour — Mary Cook News Archives

The Dear Abby of Lanark County -Mary Cook Clippings

“Who is to say the street won’t be overrun with irate husbands ready to fill people full of lead?” Clippings of Mary Cook

Blue Grass Textiles Speedo- Mary Cook Clippings

Missing the Post Office — Mary Cook Clippings

Max Movshovitz Carleton Place Merchant — Mary Cook Clippings

Charlie Menzies — Talkin About Pickerel — Mary Cook Archives

Howard McNeely Mary Cook Clippings

Carleton Place Arena 1981 — Mary Cook

Carleton Place Arena 1981 — Mary Cook

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Carleton Place Arena 1981 — Mary Cook

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jan 1981, Mon  •  Page 4

Mary Cook Archives

Mary and Walter Swinwood — Mary Cook News Archives 1981

The Evolution of the Women’s Institute — Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Bob Sadler’s Boat Rides –Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Carleton Place Ladies Auxiliary — Chamber of Commerce 1987– Mary Cook Archives

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Mary Cook Archives —Philip Mailey — January 25 1983

Carleton Place a place for Mad Scientists! Mary Cook News Archives 1983

Mary Cook Archives — Rifle Ranges and Nursery Schools — September 1980

Mary Cook News Archives — The Wool Industry 1982

The Moldowans —- Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Clippings of Cheryl Coker — Mary Cook News Archives

Donald Lowry …. Mary Cook News Archives

1976 Agricultural Tour — Mary Cook News Archives

The Dear Abby of Lanark County -Mary Cook Clippings

“Who is to say the street won’t be overrun with irate husbands ready to fill people full of lead?” Clippings of Mary Cook

Blue Grass Textiles Speedo- Mary Cook Clippings

Missing the Post Office — Mary Cook Clippings

 

Max Movshovitz Carleton Place Merchant — Mary Cook Clippings

 

Charlie Menzies — Talkin About Pickerel — Mary Cook Archives

Howard McNeely Mary Cook Clippings

Charlie Menzies — Talkin About Pickerel — Mary Cook Archives

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Charlie Menzies — Talkin About Pickerel — Mary Cook Archives

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Apr 1979, Mon  •  Page 5

 

Memories of the Pickerel Run Innisville

More Pictures of the Innisville Pickerel Run

The Angling Adventures of John and Leonard McNeely

 

Mary Cook Archives

Mary and Walter Swinwood — Mary Cook News Archives 1981

The Evolution of the Women’s Institute — Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Bob Sadler’s Boat Rides –Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Carleton Place Ladies Auxiliary — Chamber of Commerce 1987– Mary Cook Archives

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Mary Cook Archives —Philip Mailey — January 25 1983

Carleton Place a place for Mad Scientists! Mary Cook News Archives 1983

Mary Cook Archives — Rifle Ranges and Nursery Schools — September 1980

Mary Cook News Archives — The Wool Industry 1982

The Moldowans —- Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Clippings of Cheryl Coker — Mary Cook News Archives

Donald Lowry …. Mary Cook News Archives

1976 Agricultural Tour — Mary Cook News Archives

The Dear Abby of Lanark County -Mary Cook Clippings

“Who is to say the street won’t be overrun with irate husbands ready to fill people full of lead?” Clippings of Mary Cook

Blue Grass Textiles Speedo- Mary Cook Clippings

Missing the Post Office — Mary Cook Clippings

 

Max Movshovitz Carleton Place Merchant — Mary Cook Clippings

Max Movshovitz Carleton Place Merchant — Mary Cook Clippings

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Max Movshovitz  Carleton Place Merchant — Mary Cook Clippings

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Oct 1976, Thu  •  Page 2

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Nov 1966, Sat  •  Page 23

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Jun 1949, Mon  •  Page 8

Magical Movshovitz Moments

 

Mary Cook Archives

Mary and Walter Swinwood — Mary Cook News Archives 1981

The Evolution of the Women’s Institute — Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Bob Sadler’s Boat Rides –Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Carleton Place Ladies Auxiliary — Chamber of Commerce 1987– Mary Cook Archives

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Mary Cook Archives —Philip Mailey — January 25 1983

Carleton Place a place for Mad Scientists! Mary Cook News Archives 1983

Mary Cook Archives — Rifle Ranges and Nursery Schools — September 1980

Mary Cook News Archives — The Wool Industry 1982

The Moldowans —- Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Clippings of Cheryl Coker — Mary Cook News Archives

Donald Lowry …. Mary Cook News Archives

1976 Agricultural Tour — Mary Cook News Archives

The Dear Abby of Lanark County -Mary Cook Clippings

“Who is to say the street won’t be overrun with irate husbands ready to fill people full of lead?” Clippings of Mary Cook

Blue Grass Textiles Speedo- Mary Cook Clippings

Missing the Post Office — Mary Cook Clippings

Missing the Post Office — Mary Cook Clippings

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Missing the Post Office — Mary Cook Clippings

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By Mary Cook Citizen special correspondent

Home mail delivery here doesn’t appeal to everybody. Now that the system has been established more than nine months, most people, according to a post office spokesman, now accept it and are pleased with the added service. However, a few diehards like Maurice Price, who has a personal objection to door-to-door delivery, would be just as happy with the old system. In fact, Price, a professional engineer, refused to go along with the change and rents a private post box. “I find it most puzzling that an institution which continues to lose money would venture into an operation which costs more money.

“It also annoys me that by refusing door delivery, I am in fact saving the post office money, and yet they charge me for the ‘privilege’ of renting a box … it doesn’t make any sense.” The most common argument against home delivery comes from older residents who miss the social contact the daily walk for the mail afforded them. Ray Moffatt said his morning trip down Bridge Street was the “highlight of my day.”

“There was always someone to sit with on the benches outside . . . and the obituaries were always placed inside the post office and we all went in every day to check on them. Now, if I go downtown, it’s for a cup of coffee.”

John Belisle said it was one of the worst things that ever happened to the town. “I really miss visiting with my old friends … I still come downtown every day, but I rarely meet any of the old post office gang.” Many people, however, are pleased with home delivery. Mrs. William Hanham, whose husband is a physician said: “At least now I get my mail … my husband often forget to bring it home from the office.”

Older people who are confined to their homes feel the same way, and young working couples are pleased that their mail is at their homes when they come home at night. Peter Montean, assistant postmaster, said that out of 1947 points of call, only 75 families retained boxes at the main office. These figures, he said, would indicate the door-to-door delivery was generally well received. However, the post office has not been without its own transition problems. Many local mail users often put only the name and the word “town’ on their envelopes, omitting street and postal code, so that all of this type of mail requires hand sorting and the marking on of the postal code. After a notice from the post office, the situation is gradually improving.

Many businesses say that the traffic past their stores has decreased because of home delivery, and they feel the demise of the daily trip to the post office has affected their cash registers … but they all agree it (home delivery) is here to stay. As one old timer put it, “Sure I miss the trips to the post office every day, but now my morning friends are the people on the soap operas.”

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jul 1977, Tue  •  Page 4

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

You’ve Got Mail — The First Post Offices of Lanark County

As Time Goes By — The Old Post Office Clock

The Story Behind the Clock – Dack’s Jewellers

The Appleton Mail Man Who Always Got Things Straightened Away

Take a Letter Maria– Carleton Place Post Office

As Time Goes By — The Old Post Office Clock

My Baby, Just-a Wrote Me a Letter– The Carleton Place Post Office

 

The Ghost of the Post Office Clock

Notations and History about the Old Post Office

The Mystery of the Almonte Post Office Clock –Five Minutes Fast and other Things….

Crime and Punishment? –Tales from the Almonte Post Office

Michael Dunn remembers Ron Caron

 

Mary Cook Archives

Mary and Walter Swinwood — Mary Cook News Archives 1981

The Evolution of the Women’s Institute — Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Bob Sadler’s Boat Rides –Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Carleton Place Ladies Auxiliary — Chamber of Commerce 1987– Mary Cook Archives

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Mary Cook Archives —Philip Mailey — January 25 1983

Carleton Place a place for Mad Scientists! Mary Cook News Archives 1983

Mary Cook Archives — Rifle Ranges and Nursery Schools — September 1980

Mary Cook News Archives — The Wool Industry 1982

The Moldowans —- Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Clippings of Cheryl Coker — Mary Cook News Archives

Donald Lowry …. Mary Cook News Archives

1976 Agricultural Tour — Mary Cook News Archives

The Dear Abby of Lanark County -Mary Cook Clippings

“Who is to say the street won’t be overrun with irate husbands ready to fill people full of lead?” Clippings of Mary Cook

 

The Dear Abby of Lanark County -Mary Cook Clippings

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The Dear Abby of Lanark County -Mary Cook Clippings

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jun 1980, Sat  •  Page 73

 

Mary Cook Archives

Mary and Walter Swinwood — Mary Cook News Archives 1981

The Evolution of the Women’s Institute — Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Bob Sadler’s Boat Rides –Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Carleton Place Ladies Auxiliary — Chamber of Commerce 1987– Mary Cook Archives

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Mary Cook Archives —Philip Mailey — January 25 1983

Carleton Place a place for Mad Scientists! Mary Cook News Archives 1983

Mary Cook Archives — Rifle Ranges and Nursery Schools — September 1980

Mary Cook News Archives — The Wool Industry 1982

The Moldowans —- Mary Cook News Archives 1982

Clippings of Cheryl Coker — Mary Cook News Archives

Donald Lowry …. Mary Cook News Archives

1976 Agricultural Tour — Mary Cook News Archives