Tag Archives: Maple Leaf dairy

Langtry’s Dairy Carleton Place Larry Clark

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Langtry’s Dairy Carleton Place Larry Clark
All Photo’s are from Larry Clark
Looking for something else in my garage, found this. I would have tried to place them in the Langtry blog but would have had to do it one at a time, so sending to you to do with as 
you will.
Maple Leaf Dairy -249 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Joann Voyce added When this picture was taken this was Langtry’s Dairy/ The building to the right was the Beer Store— Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Historical Museum

Nancy Hudson– First met Fred when he used to delivery milk to our home in Innisville. He was a really nice man. Remeber when the dairy was first Langtry’s and later Rintouls. read-Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Angie Ballantyne–My grandparents Naomi Loton and Gordon Langtry used to run that dairy and lived upstairs. I have an old milk bottle!

What did you Buy at The Dairy?

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

What did you Buy at The Dairy?

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Angie BallantyneMy grandparents Naomi Loton and Gordon Langtry used to run that dairy and lived upstairs. I have an old milk bottle! 😊

The question was: Go back in time.. What are you going to buy at the Dairy today on Bridge Street?

Kevin St JeanI believe paul dulmages dog shopped there

Jo-Anne Drader NelsonWas the dog a black lab ? I remember seeing him all over town when I was young. He just went wherever he wanted. Very nice dog.

Terry LathamCould have been Duke he used to wander all over town. Stop in for a visit at some places. All I had to do is stop and ask if he wanted a drive home and he would jump in my truck if he did. Or just walk away if not.

Cathy DulmageHe stopped there every day for a treat from Mr Veenstra. Also he stopped at the bottom of Argyle St to drink from the stream every day and many other places

Paul HodginsI remember Duke in the water going after orange balls that sank but he would dive down and get them every time Amazing dog Duke was ❤🐕

Gail Sheen-MacDonaldMilkshake for my bother, sister and me, an ice cream cone for my mom and a quart of buttermilk (uggh!) for my dad.

Brian Giffin5 cent ice cream cone after church

Sandy HudsonIce cream

Leslie Garagan.25 would get me a big bag of mixed candies.

Bj LayComic books, video games, !!! Thanks Fred!!!

Janine McDonald AzzouzCandy on route to the movie at the Town Hall.

Lorraine NephinMilkshake.

Kathy DevlinA bag of penny candy or maybe be a popsicle

Mark Pyegrade 7 Carambeck,walk down and buy sweet tarts…

Linda; from Gord CrossMore Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy–Ray Paquette2 hours
A lot of your younger followers would probably be unable to identify the people pictured on the steps, I can only name three: Ray Morrell, Isobel (Nesbit) Bryce and Joann (Waugh) Cullen….

Jo-Anne Drader NelsonIn line on a Friday night to buy a bag of mixed candy. Fred must of had a lot of patience. Every kid picking out each candy. 4 mojos ,2 blue whales etc …. Lol

Ruth Anne SchnuppDefinately an ice cream cone !

Toby RandellGrowing up, as soon as you walked in on the right was a wall of penny candies. That was the go to, but a close second would have been an ice cream cone.

Toby RandellTotally forgot the giant freezies.

Bill ConallThree-scoop ice cream cone. Fifteen cents

Shannon ToshIce cream cones

Norma JacksonTiger tail ice cream

Sonya SpurwayIce cream !!!!

Sandi Shaw

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Ted HurdisPenny candy and ice cream

Donna Griersonmilkshake

Brianna Ryan1 cent candies😍

Kate HurdisCandy, marbles and pogs

Cathy PatersonPop candy ice cream

Amanda WaterfieldRenting videos games is what I remember doing

Mel StanzelI had a milkshake after finshing my paper route . milk shake made by the eldest Nesbitt girl

Tom MontreuilOrange sherbet cone and milk shake cups for drinking whiskey

nna LeMaistreChocolate milkshake 25 cents

Phil HallahanThose maple toffee cones

Jane ChurchillPenny candy and chocolate milkshakes; picking up smokes and Coca Cola for my mom when I was only about 5 or six years old 🙂

Karen Frances RintoulJane Churchill I remember going and getting Velveeta mac & cheese and the popcorn you shake on top of the stove and then going to your place. I don’t even know how old I was.

Kimberly Townend-WillettsI loved the smell, I can still remember it even though I was 2 years old.

Heather DormanFuzzy peaches from the 5cent candies because I’m a high roller 😂I once tried to buy candies with my moms silver dollar and he called my mom 😅

Yvonne RobillardOmg, moved here 1983 but visited from 1980,didn’t recognize the dairy, but did get ice cream there from fred veenstra!

Phyllis BensonIce cream cone

Joanna LucianoPre-scoop tools; remember the cylindrical shaped ice cream portion set in the cone??

Jeff RobertsonVideo games. Bigfoot candies and always shooting the shit with the owners!

Bonnie AdamsI could always get a Saturday Citizen there on Sunday

Angela BigrasIce cream

Sandra DakersYou’d be surprised what a big bag of candy you could get for 10 cents

Beth NolanMy grandparents lived o Heriotte Street..my grandfather and I went to the Dairy after supper and got ice cream cones for each of us, for my grandmother and Uncle Allan….I use to run down to buy milk if my grandmother needed some…..then I’d go to Millers stable on the back street to see the horses

Carly DrummondWe used to rent Super Nintendo games from here & get their cheap candies!

Adam DowdallI would buy marbles there

Keith DrummondI grew up living a block away from the Dairy since I was 2 (1965). I don’t recall seeing all of you there 😃 but Fred was the only owner I knew of. Twenty five cents did go a long way back then.

Keith Drummond hey neighbour, I saw you there and at my house many times!! 😉Jane Churchill

Dave WhiteIce Cream

Danielle TreffA banana and chocolate popsicle, and an N64 game for the weekend

Larry DelargeIce cream

Wesley ParsonsFlavored toothpicks and 10cent chocolate popsicles

Rebecca ChampagneAs a child I would go here countless amount of times. I remember buying Garbage Pail Kids cards. They all came with a stick of gum. I would also rent Nintendo games there as well.

Pam McCauleyCandy

Elizabeth SmithGiant licorices. One time, my friends and I convinced Fred to sell us a full bag of the penny candy. 800 gummy bears

Kaylea White100 sweetish berries

Thelma SavardIce cream you would go with a bowl and it would be filled up for supper dessert can you imagine now going with a bowl?

Marjorie GawThelma Savard awesome

Megan KerryCandy on the way to swim practice

Alana FlintMaple Walnut Ice Cream and Salt ‘n Vinegar Chips for dipping in the ice cream!

Cody Smithson$1.00 pepperoni stick and a $1.00 can of pizza pringles. Fred never charged me tax and would always have a fresh news paper for me to take back to my grandfather.

Lyann LockhartAny candies that were 2 for 1cent and 3 for 1 cent. Mojos , green leaves , gum balls and caramels but they were 2 cents.

Allison VaughanDidn’t go there often but recall getting candies there

Laurie Stearns-SmithA little brown bag filled with as many candies as a quarter would get me. It was surprising how much you could buy.

Bill LemayMy dad smoked Buckingham cigarette s choke a horse

Amanda KatFill a paper bag with 5 cent candies 

Bill BrownHot summer days as a kid – ice cream – candy

Andrea McCoyGood stuff. 15 cents bought enough

So what has happened to the Dairy?

Zoe Whitney-HandI used to buy .25 cent candies and milk for my parents, it was recently renovated into two newer apartments on the bottom where the store was and the original two up top

Related stories

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

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More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy
Linda; from Gord Cross


Merrill Fisher, a good friend then and now, sent me these pictures of the dairy.
Can anyone name all those on the steps of the dairy in 1955?
Joann Voyce

Isabel Nesbitt Bryce, Joann Waugh Elva Ford Ray Morrell possibly a Giffin

Julia Waugh GuthrieJoann Voyce , just seen this picture and noticed Aunt JoAnn right away. I love these pictures
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Carol KwissaYes my aunt Joanne Waugh -Cullen on Isobel’s left shoulder and I also recognized Elva Ford

Susan Thompsonthe woman on the left hand side looks like my aunt Maryanna Giles Dunlop
Sylvia GilesYes Maryanna Giles-Dunlop front row left and her friend Isobel Bryce next to
Her!!!
Sherri IonaLook at the sign above the door! Smoking advertisements were so prevalent.

Larry ClarkI knew the 2 guys in the doorway (not the one holding the cone) Dave Splane comes to mind for the one on the left but probably not right!

Anne CramptonBubba look how beautiful your mom was.

1967– 6 cents of whipping cream–October 15, 2020 · Wendy LeBlanc

I have so many memories of ‘The Dairy’ as we kids of the 1950s called it; it was around the corner from our home on James Street and we either shopped there or at least walked by it every day. The following are some random memories as they come to me:When Dad first came home from WWII, he didn’t go immediately to the promised job at Findlay’s Foundry, but worked delivering milk for the dairy for some months. Our milk was delivered daily from The Dairy, but occasionally Mum would send us over to buy a quart of milk; I clearly remember carrying the empty glass bottle with 2 dimes and a penny in it to buy the milk, which at that time was not homogenized. Mum either poured the cream off the top for another use or vigourously shook it to give us wonderfully rich whole milk.On Sundays following attending Church at Memorial Park United, we stopped off at The Dairy to buy a brick of Neapolitan ice cream, our staple dessert on Sunday noon. Very occasionally, we would walk over to The Dairy with a bowl and come home with it full of scoops of dipped ice cream for a special treat (we had only an icebox, so couldn’t store ice cream).In the 1960s, my sister Kathryn worked at The Dairy and brother Wayne and I expected extra large ice cream cones from her, and I am sure she gave them to us in fear – not of losing her job, but of us. Peggy Mace and I stopped at The Dairy almost daily on our way back to school after lunch to buy penny candy; Mrs. Saunders was working there and was very patient with us as we carefully and slowly selected our treats. While we were there, a well-dressed man (I think I know who it was but hesitate to say as I am not certain – but definitely a town business man) came into The Dairy every day and drank down a glass of Alka Seltzer; now that must have been some kind of a lunch he went home to! Our childhood neighbourhood territory was small, but our lives were enriched with businesses like The Dairy and the people who owned and worked there.Dale Costello Great memories, and stories of Maple Leaf Dairy. We were big time in CP with two dairies. Many a chocolate shake hand made by Ray Morrels mom. My Uncle, Lorne Aitken delivered bottled milk, and I helped on Saturdays– You can get Wendy’s book at the Carleton Place museum

Ruth Anne SchnuppI remember they had the biggest cones for 10 cents !

Kathy DevlinI remember taking empty pop bottles in to cash out for a bag of penny candy, pixie stix, licorice , mojos, green leaves

Jim McKittrickGreat summer jobs for 3 years 1 in the dairy and 2 summers delivering milk for Bill R ( 1965 66 and 67 )

Sherri IonaNana would send us off with a 25 cents . . . . Popsicles, ice cream, milkshakes. . . . What memories!

R.D. LackeyAmazing place as kids loved going there rent games 5cent candy’s a place like this need to come back

Carol McDonaldI worked after school and weekends and some summer days when Mrs Saunders would take holidays for Bill and Ethel Rintoul and babysat their kids some evenings. Buttermilk was served by the glass , big ice cream cones were served to a line up of people especially on Sundays and many milkshakes all different flavours, penny candy, very busy most days!

Jan McCarten SansomDoug B. McCarten ..I remember ice cream cones and milkshakes, and especially time spent with my best friend Katherine Langtry, watching cartoons Saturday mornings in their home upstairs .. wonderful memories !

Doug B. McCartenJan McCarten Sansom in addition to all that I remember a Sealtest sign with feet LOL

John ArmourI got my milkshakes everyday (even through winter). Mrs. Nephin made the best ones.

Sandy FredetteDon’t know when it was originally built, but do know it’s being renovated now… my grandson is helping out on the project.

Jane CarnegieWent there daily on my way back to school for penny candy…would ho back after school with pop bottles to cash in for chips and more candy!

Derek Bowker

I remember walking home and stopping in for penny candies! Got BUSTED shoplifting when I was just a little kid! Parents got called and I had to go back and apologize! Life lesson!!!Renting Nintendo machines and games for the weekend! That place was LEGENDARY!!!

Meghan PookThe Dairy! We’d sneak off of Carambeck’s yard during lunch and buy 5¢ candies. I remember the heavy fridge door made of wood with latch style handle. That’s where the small cartons of chocolate milk were. The older gentleman who worked there usually reminded me of a cross between Mr. Dress-Up & Mr. Rogers in appearance but always struck me as stern. Probably b/c he was dealing with a gaggle of random school kids streaming through buying less then $1 worth of product. I loved the miniature brown paper bags we used for the candy. I loved the way the bell sounded when you entered. I loved the way it smelled in there – like dust and tobacco and something sweet. Good times.

Meghan PookThe Dairy! We’d sneak off of Carambeck’s yard during lunch and buy 5¢ candies. I remember the heavy fridge door made of wood with latch style handle. That’s where the small cartons of chocolate milk were. The older gentleman who worked there usually reminded me of a cross between Mr. Dress-Up & Mr. Rogers in appearance but always struck me as stern. Probably b/c he was dealing with a gaggle of random school kids streaming through buying less then $1 worth of product. I loved the miniature brown paper bags we used for the candy. I loved the way the bell sounded when you entered. I loved the way it smelled in there – like dust and tobacco and something sweet. Good times.

Brian Giffin5 cent ice cream after church

Related reading…

The Duff Dairy Diphtheria Scare

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

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What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

 

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

Maple Leaf Dairy -249 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Joann Voyce added When this picture was taken this was Langtry’s Dairy/ The building to the right was the Beer Store

 

Jayne Graham Best ice cream cones..

Dawn Jones Fred Veenstra. Such a nice man. Always so helpful.

Angie MacDonald Cromlich Fred was a nice fella. I looked very forward to stopping by, whether it be with mom, my grandma, or running over from my aunt and uncle’s house that was across the street – I would walk in with a couple quarters and walk out with a bag full of penny candies. He was also open Christmas Day. Our family tradition was sharing scratch tickets….. The adults would have us kids running back and forth to buy more scratch tickets with our “winnings”. Ron MacDonald

Jo-Anne Drader Nelson On a Friday night all the kids in town would be on a mission. It was movie night at the Townhall. First stop was The Dairy. Kids would be lined out the door. We would all take turns choosing our penny candies from behind the counter. Fred would put them in small paper bags. You could get a lot of candy for a few cents back then.

Sandy Hudson Had many an ice cream from there!

Beth Sweeney I worked at the Maple Leaf Dairy when I was a very young teen (50 cents/hr) scooping icecream, making milkshakes. I don’t consume either of these to this day. Too exhausting selling so many for so long! Fun times tho! Bill Rintoul was the owner way back then. He kept alot of us neighbourhood kids employed over the years. Good memories.

Rick Redmond I remember a couple of the girls that worked there. From scooping ice cream, over time, their right arms got very strong, and they could beat a lot of guys at arm wrestling.

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Mary Jane Lancaster When I was about 6 I was sent to the Dairy for my Mom’s smokes but mom forgot to give me my 10 cents for mixed up candy.
I took a chocolate bar.
When I left Fred called my Mom and told her what I did.
I ate the chocolate bar quickly on the way home.
When I got in the house Mom looked at me and marched me right back to the store
Fred met us at the door with a mop.
I mopped the whole store. When I was finished Fred said “there we are even “
I learned my lesson .
You have to earn
Your chocolates.
I never took anything without paying since☺
Thanks Fred!

 

Debbie Lynch My son took a couples if tomatoes out of a garden I made him take his money over to pay for it….don’t think he took anything that didn’t belong to him

Toby Randell Likely was there everyday from the age of 6 to 14. Penny candies, ice cream, video game rentals, movie rentals. Fred was a great guy!

Sarah Russo We would visit my grandma every Friday night and on the way we’d stop at The dairy to buy a bag of chips and a drink to take with us. I looked forward to it each time ☺️ Fred was always so friendly 😄

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Paul Bergsma I used to live down William St. RIP Fred. What a cool place to go to rent Nintendo games and grab a Coke out of the old fridge.

Gail Grabe I worked there for 2 summers in High School scooping ice cream, on the weekends people would be lined up out the door. A nickel for one scoop and a dime for two. Frank McCutcheon was the owner and I was paid $.35/hr. Farmers would bring in milk cans, it was pasteurized and bottled in the facility on the side.

 

Wendy LeBlanc I have so many memories of ‘The Dairy’ as we kids of the 1950s called it; it was around the corner from our home on James Street and we either shopped there or at least walked by it every day. The following are some random memories as they come to me:

When Dad first came home from WWII, he didn’t go immediately to the promised job at Findlay’s Foundry, but worked delivering milk for the dairy for some months. Our milk was delivered daily from The Dairy, but occasionally Mum would send us over to buy a quart of milk; I clearly remember carrying the empty glass bottle with 2 dimes and a penny in it to buy the milk, which at that time was not homogenized. Mum either poured the cream off the top for another use or vigourously shook it to give us wonderfully rich whole milk.

On Sundays following attending Church at Memorial Park United, we stopped off at The Dairy to buy a brick of Neapolitan ice cream, our staple dessert on Sunday noon. Very occasionally, we would walk over to The Dairy with a bowl and come home with it full of scoops of dipped ice cream for a special treat (we had only an icebox, so couldn’t store ice cream).

In the 1960s, my sister Kathryn worked at The Dairy and brother Wayne and I expected extra large ice cream cones from her, and I am sure she gave them to us in fear – not of losing her job, but of us. Peggy Mace and I stopped at The Dairy almost daily on our way back to school after lunch to buy penny candy; Mrs. Saunders was working there and was very patient with us as we carefully and slowly selected our treats. While we were there, a well-dressed man (I think I know who it was but hesitate to say as I am not certain – but definitely a town business man) came into The Dairy every day and drank down a glass of Alka Seltzer; now that must have been some kind of a lunch he went home to! Our childhood neighbourhood territory was small, but our lives were enriched with businesses like The Dairy and the people who owned and worked there.

Dale Costello Great memories, and stories of Maple Leaf Dairy. We were big time in CP with two dairies. Many a chocolate shake hand made by Ray Morrels mom. My Uncle, Lorne Aitken delivered bottled milk, and I helped on Saturdays.

 

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Sandra Dakers An awesome place for penny candy!

Cathy Paterson We used to go there as kids

Dale Costello Choices. Dairy on one corner, and the beer store on the other.

Pam McCauley A regular ‘go to’ place for my family – for years and years and years

Patti Antle Schopp Worked there for a year.

Karen Lloyd We had tokens that were left in the top of the bottles, for payment, no money was used, Rintouls owned it as I remember .

Julie Aldham I worked there…. Scooping ice cream

Sherri Iona My Nana would send us down to get milk and give us a quarter to get candy, a drink or popsicle. I remember the fake candy cigarettes! Plus I remember have shakes and the floats.

Bill Brunton Ice Cream Cones and those Candies. I also remember getting sent down to the Dairy from where we Lived on Moffatt Street for Smokes. That was a big part of that side of Town for a long time.

Sherri Iona Ah yes ice cream. I remember having first creamsicle flavour there!

Bill Brunton Licorice and those little red cinnamon things. It would be cool to see a picture of the inside of that place around 1975. Bubble gum newspaper’s and magazines. It was a cool store.

Jim GordonOne of my fondest memories of the Dairy was in the summer with the upstairs windows open ( where the Langtrys lived) listening to Ralph playing the piano. Also to Ray Paqette, yes, Wayne did deliver for them, and back then he wasn’t “ wandering Wayne

 

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Ray Paquette Didn’t Wandering Wayne deliver milk for the Langtrys when they owned the dairy?

Joan Stoddart He might have worked there but he helped my dad deliever for the Carleton Place Dairy in the 50’s


Norma Jackson I loved their tiger tail ice cream cones, liquorice and orange

 

Kimberly Townend-willetts I used to love those, some people think I’m strange when I describe that icecream, doesn’t sound appealing to them at all….lol

 

Glenda Mahoney My Dad always bought his on line lottery fron Fred. Fred faithfully ran my Dad’s numbers every Wednesday and Saturday. About 2 months after my Dad passed I went into the dairy and Fred asked me about my Dad’s tickets. We had completely forgotten about it. Fred was still running the tickets waiting to hear from us. Between free tickets and little cash wins i think it was $24 I owed him. That was customer service.

 

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Photo from Google Image-Inside Ottawa Valley

 

Bernie Johnston Edwards I remember when one of the first game consoles (Nintendo Super I think) had a popular game come out around Christmas. Zelda I think was the name of it. Couldn’t find it anywhere in Ottawa. My friend’s son wanted one for Christmas. I walked into the Dairy and sure enough Fred had some. Made that young lads Christmas.

Hazel Stewart-Huneault Popsicles.. 5 cents
Believe it was the Rintouls back then or maybe the Veenstras.

Elizabeth Edwards My dad would take us and we would get giant licorice pieces for 25 cents each.
My friends and I once bought 800 gummy bears from him for 8 dollars so we could play *chubby bunny.
He sold “spice girl bubble gum” and when I was buying a couple pieces, he let me have the cardboard case. I thought he was the coolest.!

authorsnote)

TOP DEFINITION
Chubby Bunny
A game. Here’s how to play

1. Stuff some Marshmallows in your mouth.
2. Try to say “Chubby Bunny”

3. Repeat until you can not pronounce Chubby Bunny coherently.
Chubby Bunny


Jessica Racey Going in and taking forever to decide on what penny candies I wanted.

Katie Weaver loved going in there on a friday night after school and renting our VHS for the weekend and getting penny candies.

Barbara Plunkett Maple. Leaf. Diary. Was. A. Wonderful. Store


Wendy Healey Loved stopping at the Dairy for an ice cream when we took a trip into town. I remember the cement steps were so worn they had a curve in them. As soon as the door opened you were greeted with all sorts of candies on display. A treat for all kids back then.

Brian White the best milk shakes in town

Patricia M Mason Leduc 100% agreed

Donna Marie Cleary My first job was at the Maple Leaf Dairy in the early 80s.

Janice White Yep always loved going there for there penny candies. They used to deliver milk to the gate at my grandmas and went to pick it up for her and take it to her

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

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Belle the horse driven by “CCB’ for the Maple Leaf Dairy- 1948-1951

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All photos from  the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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c,

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Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

Chilling out with Chef Ben White — Easy Gluten Free Dairy Free Rocky Road “Ice Ice Baby” Ice Cream

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

 

 

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

Maple Leaf Dairy -249 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Joann Voyce added When this picture was taken this was Langtry’s Dairy/ The building to the right was the Beer Store

One day it seemed Fred Veenstra was there and the next day he wasn’t. To tell you the truth I began to drive over to the Maple Leaf Dairy one hot summer day in the early 80s when my hair stuck to my head as I just didn’t want to be seen at Mac’s Milk on my side of the river. Stupid idea? Maybe- but then I would have never met Fred.

As the sound of the television blasted in the background and people came in and out I found out a lot about Frank over the years. I never knew how old he was, but he told me stories about being born in the Netherlands and how the family moved to High Street in 1963. When his father developed heart problems he, like myself felt, responsible for his family. Both of us had to grow up pretty fast because of family issues.

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Photo from Google Image-Inside Ottawa Valley

Throughout the years that I frequented the Maple Leaf Dairy, the chips began to be a little past their expiry date, and some things developed a film of dust over them, but that didn’t matter as you went there for Fred. Fred told me he had bought the building from Bill Rintoul in 1970 and at one point he had six drivers delivering through the area- even as far as Bells Corners and Stittsville. But, as we both discussed, sometimes you need to make changes in your business and Mike McNeely took over the delivery business in the 1980s, but Fred kept the store.

The Maple Leaf Dairy was open from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. each day, and no matter what time you went in Fred was standing behind the cash with a smile. I could never understand why he never married as he was a good looking man and always had a kind word and a smile. Sometimes he would hand out a dollar or two to those who needed it, and sometimes he would wave his hand in the air telling someone to pay him when they could. A more humbler generous man you could not find anywhere in the town of Carleton Place.

Sometimes he would laugh at my incessant playing of the lottery- but that was just between me and him. The day I heard of his death from liver cancer I cried- and after that I stayed on my side of the river to play my lotto. I knew how hard it was to run a business and thought Fred had deserved a whole lot better. But, even though I did not get to say goodbye to Fred I knew it was not forever, and it was definitely not the end. It simply meant that I would miss him until we meet again.

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Photo -Lot of 6 Vintage Dairy Tokens Carleton Place, Ontario RARE Maple Leaf milk-EBay

historicalnotes

Fred Veenstra

Fred Veenstra

(Died December 30, 2010)- Barker Funeral Home
Peacefully in hospital, Carleton Place, Ontario on Thursday, December 30, 2010.

Loved and devoted brother of Nellie Jansen (Keimpe), Corrie Ballard (Del), Tina Pos (Hans), the late Jan, Shirley Archer (Bill), the late John (Linda), Margaret Sabourin (Gerry), Marcell (Lena) and the late Rose McKenzie (Skip). Special uncle to many nieces and nephews.

Friends may call at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, 19 McArthur Avenue, Carleton Place on Monday, January 3, 2011 from 7 to 9 p.m. and on Tuesday from 12 noon until time of funeral service in the chapel at 1 p.m.

Interment at Pinecrest Cemetery, Ottawa.

In lieu of flowers donations to the Carleton Place Hospital Foundation would be appreciated.

Nancy Hudson– First met Fred when he used to delivery milk to our home in Innisville. He was a really nice man. Remeber when the dairy was first Langtry’s and later Rintouls.

Sherri Iona– I remember walking from my grandparents’ house at Bridge and Townline to the dairy as a child. It was one of the few places we were allowed to go. Penny candy, maybe a pop, definitely ice cream or a Popsicle on a hot day. And then there were milkshakes and floats. Sometimes Nana would want us to pick up something at Mrs Knowlton’s across the street. I don’t remember who worked at the dairy but I do remember being in school with I think Marcel Veenstra and they lived just up the street from us on High Street . . . It might have been at the old monastery, which became a nursing home of kinds. I remember my brothers playing hockey on the outdoor rink with the Brothers.

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston– We used to go here a lot in the 70’s but as a kid we used the dairy on Moore Street – remember Fred very well. The building to right I remember being the Beer Store when i was a kid. It was also the Knights of Columbus hall sometime after that.

Keith Drummond-Fred was a big part of our childhood. We lived a block away at 277 Bridge Street until I was about 12 (1975). My younger brother and I would get our weekly allowance of 25 cents and we would race to the dairy to see Fred and by candy and pop. Back in the days when the parents didn’t have to be in hot pursuit after their children, in fact they didn’t want to see us till the street lights came on. I moved away in the early 80’s but would come back once in awhile and there would be Fred behind the counter at the Dairy. I met Fred when I was 7 yrs old, last time I was home was in 2004 and there was Fred, behind the counter. 25 cents went a little further in those days, but Fred would always throw in a little extra.

Wendy LeBlanc I have so many memories of ‘The Dairy’ as we kids of the 1950s called it; it was around the corner from our home on James Street and we either shopped there or at least walked by it every day. The following are some random memories as they come to me:
When Dad first came home from WWII, he didn’t go immediately to the promised job at Findlay’s Foundry, but worked delivering milk for the dairy for some months. Our milk was delivered daily from The Dairy, but occasionally Mum would send us over to buy a quart of milk; I clearly remember carrying the empty glass bottle with 2 dimes and a penny in it to buy the milk, which at that time was not homogenized. Mum either poured the cream off the top for another use or vigourously shook it to give us wonderfully rich whole milk.
On Sundays following attending Church at Memorial Park United, we stopped off at The Dairy to buy a brick of Neapolitan ice cream, our staple dessert on Sunday noon. Very occasionally, we would walk over to The Dairy with a bowl and come home with it full of scoops of dipped ice cream for a special treat (we had only an icebox, so couldn’t store ice cream).
In the 1960s, my sister Kathryn worked at The Dairy and brother Wayne and I expected extra large ice cream cones from her, and I am sure she gave them to us in fear – not of losing her job, but of us. Peggy Mace and I stopped at The Dairy almost daily on our way back to school after lunch to buy penny candy; Mrs. Saunders was working there and was very patient with us as we carefully and slowly selected our treats. While we were there, a well-dressed man (I think I know who it was but hesitate to say as I am not certain – but definitely a town business man) came into The Dairy every day and drank down a glass of Alka Seltzer; now that must have been some kind of a lunch he went home to! Our childhood neighbourhood territory was small, but our lives were enriched with businesses like The Dairy and the people who owned and worked there.
Dale Costello Great memories, and stories of Maple Leaf Dairy. We were big time in CP with two dairies. Many a chocolate shake hand made by Ray Morrels mom. My Uncle, Lorne Aitken delivered bottled milk, and I helped on Saturdays