Tag Archives: main-street

Lloyd Hughes Carleton Place Grocer

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Lloyd Hughes Carleton Place Grocer

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Dec 1980, Mon  •  Page 3

 

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The first storey storefronts of this building have been modified from the original glass windows for easier viewing of merchandise–hence the different colours of brick. 127-131 Bridge Street has housed a number of different businesses including pharmacies, clothing stores, grocery stores, and poolrooms.

The Hughes family bought the pharmacy from Dr. Preston in 1905.

W. J. Hughes Rexall Drug store was located on the corner and Thomas Lloyd Hughes born in 1897 along with his brother Harold until they each decided to run a smaller store at the opposite  ends of town. Lloy’s store was on Moffatt Street and Harold on Lake Ave West. For 50 years they were in groceries together and then the store was sold to Thomas’s nephew and for 12 years Thomas drove a butcher wagon. There was a dark room at the rear of the store where Mr. Hughes tested your eyes for glasses. You could buy a roll of film #116 for a Brownie Box camera for 25 cents and for $1.25 he would send it away to be developed.

The folks in Carleton Place will always remember the Rexall Drug annual 1 cent sale and every local household stocked up on cough medicine, cough drops, peroxide and all sorts of liniment. Some of the clerks that worked there were: Olive Dick, Ruby Voyce, and John Briscoe and Wilbert Robertson.

Harvey Asselstine attended the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1929. In 1944, he
returned to Carleton Place and bought the drugstore at the corner of Bridge and
Franklin, from W.J. Hughes who operated it for 38 years. Betty Findlay and Mary Cook both worked at Assestine’s Pharmacy.  In the rear of Asselstine’s drug store the CPR Telegraph operated during the 1950s. Asselstine expanded his drug store and bought out Hughes Grocery. In 2006 the Athen’s Corners Restaurant  was located there.

Taber and McCrae operated a Men’s and Boy’s clothing store within Struther’s Block, which later became a pool hall  (next door) operated by Mel Barclay. Charlie Giroux, who only had one arm took over the pool hall then Ab Dowseth from Smiths Falls operated it for a short time but when McCann and Porter gained ownership they moved the pool hall to the old Bank of Commerce.

Jeremy Stinson— That corner was, for much of my childhood, the home of the Blossom Shop. Back before the one way street.

 

 

 

So Where Was that Sign? MacGregor’s Body Shop — Hughes Grocery — Asselstine and Shwerdtfeger’s

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Colliding Into the IGA — Carleton Place

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Colliding Into the IGA — Carleton Place

 

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In January of 1969 two cars were badly damaged and part of the IGA storefront was damaged. The IGA store suffered considerable damage as one of the vehicles ploughed into the storefront but thankfully was stopped by a steel window post.

The car of D. L. Linton was parked on the west side of Bridge Street just north of Albert. He was pulling away from the curb when his car was struck almost centre by another car also proceeding south and driven by Gerald Stearns.

Force of the collision carried the McLinton car sideways and it went into the centre window of the IGA store. Both vehicles were very badly damaged. Mr. McLinton was taken to the  hospital by the Alan R. Barker ambulance and treated for minor injuries.

Beside the large plate glass window in the IGA, damage included destruction of a section of concrete shelf inside the window, part of a concrete slab shelving and exterior brickwork from ground level to the window.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

The Old Grocery Counter –Calvin Moore

Did You Know Who was Cooking in Back of Lancaster’s Grocery Store? Dr. Howard I Presume! – Part 3

Memories and Thoughts of the Grocery Store

Dishing up the Memories of The Devlins

Glory Days of Carleton Place–Mike Kean

Memories of Ruth Ferguson

Where’s the Beef in Carleton Place?

Name That Carleton Place Butcher? FOUND!!!

Memories of Argue’s Food Market?

The Days of the Loosey Cigarette, Slinky and Mailing a Letter

In Memory of Mickey Pickup– Carleton Place Dominion Store

The Writing on the Wall Disappeared but the Memories Don’t

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series–Volume 16– Newman’s Hall

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series–Volume 16– Newman’s Hall

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241 Bridge Street Carleton Place Ontario

 

Newman’s Hall was built of stone for Almon Shepphard Newman merchant then of
South Crosby Township Leeds County. It was considered the best-fitted store of its
day there being 144 drawers all hand made. Dry goods, groceries, and liquors were
handled. It has served a very wide variety of public and private uses including
school, town hall, theatre and concert hall, Canadian General Electric mica-splitting
factory,  and brewers warehouse store. In 1881, Newman’s Hall was sold by mortgage to
a Montreal merchant who sold it in 1884 to Robert McDiarmid Carleton Place
merchant.

 

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This woman (and tractor) are posing in front of the stone building at the corner of Bridge and William Streets – once the Opera House, a mica factory, and later, Brewer’s Retail. McCarten House at 233 Bridge Street is visible to the right. —Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

During the 1870s, municipal offices moved to Newman Hall because the Old Town
Hall located on Edmund Street was contending with increased school attendance.
The 1873 Assessment shows that A.S. Newman owned the property valued at $1300.
In 1875 the Assessment Rolls shows that Newman continued to own the property
which was now valued at $3500. In 1878, the Assessment Rolls show the property
being listed as a school and store worth $2000. With property listed on the same lot
with a burned building valued at $500. In 1879, the Assessment Rolls show that the
burned building continues to be valued at $500 while the structure at the corner of
Bridge and William Street is valued at $1500.

In 1884, J. Robert McDiarmid purchased the property. James McDiarmid reopened Newman’s Hall as a 500 seat public concert hall and later became a shooting gallery. It was reported in the local paper that the shooting gallery was of great concern on the ground floor of the building. No other word was issued but I can just imagine what was flying out of those windows. It is not clear when the Civitan Club purchased Newman’s Hall but they sold it to Gary Munro in 1983 and it then became Munro’s Archery.

In the 1880’s  one of the many Uncle Tom’s Cabin theatre troupe toured through Carleton Place on a regular basis even thought there were constant bad reviews. The first place it played was Newman’s Hall. Here is a tidbit about Newman’s Hall: after the Carleton Place High School moved from Hurd’s Hall; it found it way to Newman’s Hall. There it became the temporary quarters for a High and a Public School class. The second floor was also used as a school classroom for the entrance class the year the “new” High School was opened on Lake Ave West. Marg Whyte remembers a friend telling her that they marched from the classroom to the opening in the pouring rain.

Newman’s Hall was also occupied by the Brewers’ Retail Store on Townline. Clicker Peden was the manager of the Beer Store that opened there along with Jack Ryan and Aubrey Nesbitt as employees. This was also the locale of the first armed robbery of any business in Carleton Place in years. Beer store employee Aubrey Nesbitt had seen two tall men walking on William Street just before 9 am when he came to work. At 10 am Jack Ryan opened the store doors for business and returned to the rear to help Nesbitt and Wallie McKittrick stock the refrigerator with beer. Read more here: The Big Beer Store Heist in Carleton Place . The  Lions Club took over the building and held their meetings and weekly Bingo games there.

Newman’s Hall- Advertisement

New Public Hall opened by Mr. Robert McDiarmid.  One of the best in this part of the country.  Auditorium rearranged to accommodate 500 people.  The stage scenery, painted by Sosman & Landis, Chicago, provides four scenes, the ‘woods’, ‘parlor’, ‘kitchen’, and ‘street’.  The drop curtain presents a view of placid waters, rugged mountain rocks and ancient castle.

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Jill Seymour–1971 the Civitan let a bunch of us 12-15 year olds use the hall for Friday night dances. They weren’t a big deal. Usually about 25 – 30 kids showed up. Someone from the Civitan sold soda and chips. There was never a problem with alcohol or fights. It was great fun!

Jim Gordon–I believe that Bill Prime was also somehow involved with the Brewers Retail during that era.

236 Bridge Street Frame House and Knowlton Grocery Store

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The Frame House next to Sibbet’s/Campbells–

The Chartrand family occupied the frame house. George, John,  and Theresa were three of the family. It was at one time the home of Ray and Emily Moffatt and Willard and Ruby Aitken

Knowlton’s Grocery Store

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Photo 1978

In the early 20s the Barnes Family opened a store in what most people today know as McDonald Sports on Bridge Street almost across from the old  dairy.  It was purchased by Hillard McDaniel and his wife Eleanor who remodelled it with living quarters upstairs. Morna, Doris and Oliver Barnes later moved to George Street and then Clarence Emmerson’s family ran the grocery store. Jack, Ethel and Neil lived on the second floor and later moved to Smiths Falls. After that Mrs. Edith Knowlton continued the grocery business for a number of years. I would like to have her recorded here online.

What do we know about Edith Knowlton from Carleton Place?

1.She bought an illuminated sign and used to advertise community things

2. She understood her customers wanted

3.You could still run a tab at her store

4.You could order your groceries by telephone

5. You could drop in and have a chat and she served fresh coffee and had treats for all her customers at Christmas

6. Her husband ran a farm near Elgin

7. She had a daughter Janet

8. One wall of her store had happy face wallpaper

So what can you add? Please leave comments or email me at sav_77@yahoo.com

 

KNOWLTON, Edith W. (nee Crichton) In hospital, Carleton Place, Ontario, on Tuesday, March 16th, 2004, from earth to eternal rest with God in heaven. Loved wife of the late Charles Knowlton. Loved and remembered by her children, Janet and Allan; her brothers, George and Joe; a gazillion family members and relatives, friends and acquaintances, and last but not least Kaylie-Pup. After cremation, an informal time of visitation and service to remember her will be held at the ALAN R. BARKER FUNERAL HOME 19 McArthur Ave., Carleton Place on Tuesday, March 23rd, 2004 from 1 p.m. with service in the chapel at 2:30 p.m. with the Reverend David Mullin officiating. Edith’s ashes will be interred with her late husband in the family plot. Donations may be made to Carleton Place/Beckwith Community Support. “Come to Me all who are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” Matthew 11:28

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

 

relatedreading

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 14

Mitchell & Cram — History of The Summit Store 1898-1902 –Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 15

Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

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Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

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Margaret Ann Cornell posted the information about this photo from Public Archives when we posted it on the LCGS.
‘The three men in the picture are my grandfather Alden Affleck, Frank Mitchell and my dad Murray Affleck”. Day after the fire June 16, 1959.
authorsnote)
On June 18th of 1959 the fire inspectors conceded that the cause of the fire in Lanark Village on the 15th of June of that same year might be never known. A few days later a family by family survey by the Ontario government was determining the losses of the 3.5 hour fire.

Aid for the stricken village was pouring in by the 18th of June 1959 and the Lanark disaster relief fund had reached $11,152.00. Workers were continuing to clear up the mess left by the fire and families were staying at the local Odd Fellows Hall. There were tales from people who had lost everything, but all were confident that all would turn out well. The Canadian Red Cross had set up in the hall and nobody knew exactly where the food was coming in to feed these folks, but it kept pouring in since the night of the fire.

The photos below were taken by Ileen Sheard and submitted by Candas Price.

“The following is what my mom has written on the back of each photo: All photo’s taken June 16/59; day after the fire. My mom and dad and my two sisters lost everything and mom was pregnant with me at the time”.

Thank you Candas for sharing photos with all of us- we are documenting history because of these photos.

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“Down Main street at Drysdale’s Store”-June 16/59; day after the fire–All photos below were taken by Ileen Sheard and submitted by Candas Price

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“Miller’s Store 5¢ + 10¢ where fire stopped”–June 16/59; day after the fire

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“Sargeant Apartments, Eric Hornell’s Store-June 16/59; day after the fire

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Lanark Village Town Hall Before-Postcard

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Lanark Town hall After the fire–June 16/59; day after the fire

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Lanark Town hall (side view) after the fire-June 16/59; day after the fire

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“Eric Hornell’s Store up to Mrs. Maude McCurdy’s–Hornell’s, Sam Rathwell’s”

June 16/59; day after the fire

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“Dowdall’s Sash & Door, and Trails” –where the fire started.–June 16/59; day after the fire

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“Down by Kelly Sargeant Apartments- up to the Sash & Door” –June 16/59; day after the fire

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“Sargeant Apartments & our car”–June 16/59; day after the fire

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“Street up by Strang’s Drug Store”–June 16/59; day after the fire

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“Taken from Marion Stewart’s to Strang’s Drug Store”–June 16/59; day after the fire

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

16 Jun 1959, Tue  •  Page 7

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More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

June 17 1959– The Day After the Fire in Lanark Village

The Former Businesses of Carleton Place –Notes Part 2– Historical Newspaper Clippings

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The Former Businesses of Carleton Place –Notes Part 2–  Historical Newspaper Clippings

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I have been cutting archived newspaper articles for over 2 years. I will be adding from time to time new ones as I go through them.

 - Mr. Wm. WlHoughby has closed his briek-yard...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Oct 1898, Fri,  Page 5

 

 - MrTGeo. E. Leslie has placed aeetv-llne...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Dec 1898, Tue,  Page 2

 

 - An Important transaction took place the other...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Jul 1898, Thu,  Page 6

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Wed, Jun 1, 1898 – Page 2

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Wed, May 4, 1898 – Page 7

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Thu, Jun 9, 1898 – Page 2

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada-Thu, Dec 8, 1898 – Page 7

 - ' Mr. Root. Sibbltt ! Is opening an agency for...

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Fri, Dec 16, 1898 – Page 6

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Fri, Sep 27, 1895 – Page 5

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Sat, Sep 14, 1895 – Page 7

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Fri, Oct 7, 1898 – Page 3

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Thu, Oct 6, 1898 – Page 7

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Jul 26, 1898 – Page 8

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Apr 19, 1898 – Page 5

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Sep 13, 1898 – Page 6

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Sat, Apr 9, 1898 – Page 3

 

 

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Wed, Sep 7, 1898 – Page 8

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Wed, May 4, 1898 – Page 7

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Thu, Dec 8, 1898 – Page 7

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Dec 19, 1905 – Page 11

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaSat, Jan 21, 1905 – Page 15

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Fri, Jun 14, 1907 – Page 10

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, May 17, 1904 – Page 9

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Fri, Feb 12, 1904 – Page 5

 - Mr Harry Bond haa ettabllahed i ahoe-dreaaing...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  16 May 1904, Mon,  Page 7

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Mon, May 7, 1906 – Page 6

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Sat, Nov 7, 1903 – Page 6

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Wed, Jun 8, 1898 – Page 6

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Mon, Nov 29, 1897 – Page 2

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Aug 8, 1899 – Page 2

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Aug 8, 1899 – Page 2

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Aug 8, 1899 – Page 2

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Mon, Dec 31, 1894 – Page 3

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Thu, Apr 5, 1894 – Page 5

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Wed, Dec 6, 1893 – Page 7

The Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada
Fri, Jun 14, 1907 – Page 10
 - nicely. 1 j ' Mitchel Bros, have opened a...

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Aug 1899, Tue,  Page 2

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

The Former Businesses of Carleton Place — Notes Part 1- Historical Clippings

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Comments Comments Comments–Documenting History

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

 

Dr. Johnson Downing and Ferril I Presume? Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12 a

Clippings of Robbie Probert the Candlestick Maker

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Clippings of Robbie Probert the Candlestick Maker

 

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Ted LeMaistre Mayor of CP- Ginny Huether-Harry Probert and Rob Probert- Opening of their store across from the town hall.

 

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Saw your posting about Rob Probert and thought I would send you this picture of his Mom and Dad, Harry and Dorothy Probert and Bill’s Mom, Winn Flint.-Carole Flint

Ray Paquette--Harry Probert, Robbie’s father, was an interesting man in his own right. Following the death of the Avro Arrow in 1959, Harry, whose job “evaporated” in the fall out from that decision, moved to Carleton Place. Many an evening was spent in the Olympia with Weldon Armour explaining to us the impact that the loss of A.V. Roe Limited had on the technical and scientific community in Canada. The “brain drain” that followed ensured that John Kennedy’s challenge to reach the moon “…before the end of the decade was achieved…”

 

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Comments

Janice Tennant Campbell– His store and Remembrance Gift Shop were the two best places to buy a gift.

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston– Loved Robbie’s store!!

Livia Haasper– Absolutely. Loved the store. Too many of the nice stores gone. I’ve seen them come and go.

Lynne Johnson– They made beeswax candles. The ladies in town got employment from the Probert’s rolling the candles.

Jeremy Stinson– I remember when my grandfather did his ‘book tour’, the Carleton Place stop was at Proberts.

Ray Paquette– Robbie began his candle making at a young age, possibly around 12, at his home at the corner of McCrostie and Joseph Streets. When his small cottage industry took off, he moved downtown to the former Patterson Furniture Store at the bridge..

Joann Voyce I have an original honeycomb wax candle on a carved wooden Maple leaf which was made by Harry Probert back in the 1960’s

Wendy LeBlanc Loved that store! However, when cleaning out closets recently, I came across one of Rob’s lovely reversible wrap skirts that I bought a couple of decades ago. It is marked OSFA – One Size Fits All. I want my money back, Rob!

 

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The Municipal Heritage Committee of Carleton Place was pleased to present the first in a series of historical plaques describing local heritage buildings to Angelo Seccaspina, owner of Greystones, the former Mississippi Hotel building. Pictured left to right are Bernard deFrancesco, Chair, Robert Probert, Councilor Representative,
Jennifer Irwin, Manager of the Carleton Place & Beckwith Heritage Museum and Angelo Seccaspina– 2013

 

 - Robbie Probert, The Candlestick Maker, has some...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 May 1980, Thu,  Valley Edition,  Page 44

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

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215 Bridge Street Carleton Place

This building is not the original one that housed the grocery store of
Bowland and McRostie. Since its construction, it has only had minor upgrades and
alterations over the years.

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo

The grocery store of Bowland and McRostie was located at 215 Bridge Street.

Fred P. McRostie employed Olive Robertson who lived on Charles Street to be his clerk. His son Meredith worked at the store when he was home from College and Gordon H. Bennett was the butcher.

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McRostie’s store– Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Anne Turner emailed the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum with the following:

My grandmother kept a daily diary all of her married life, which I have, so my information is “from the horse’s mouth” so to speak. My grandfather (Fred McRostie) went into business with Bowland in 1909 & later became the sole owner.

Fred died Sep’t 29, 1934, but my father (Peter Meredith McRostie) who had returned from attending Queen’s University in 1931 & joined the store kept it going until its sale to a Mr. Fisher in February 1939. The building was not torn down then as she mentions him painting & renovating. ( That was Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum info)

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The next one is a calendar from my grandfathers store, although he had died by then and my father had taken it over. Joan Halpenny photo

I remember as a child seeing my grandfather’s name across the side of the building whenever I came to town and that would have been in the 1950’s so I believe the original building was still standing at that time, although I have no pictures to support this. However, there is no mention in my grandmother’s diaries which run to 1948 of it having been torn down.

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo

There was a pool room located upstairs operated by Charles Walford. The local branch of
the Legion took over the building for a time and rented the upstairs. When the new
Legion was built on George the building was torn down. I also remember the building as selling ice cream in the summer.

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photo shows John and Milton Dezell at their Supertest service station sometime in the 1920s. This station was located on Bridge Street, at the corner of Bell. The accompanying sketch of the site is from a 1926 fire insurance map and clearly shows the overhang and supports. The pink (brick construction) building to its right was the McRostie Grocery store. Next to it, is 205 Bridge Street, commonly known as “the doctor’s house”.

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo

John Dezell operated the Supertest Service Station. In 1939, the Supertest Service Station came under the management of Charles Black and George Carson. In 1950, Cameron Smithson leased the service station. In 1957, Charles Costello gained ownership. In 2006,
215 Bridge Street still is the site of an auto repair garage.

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The corner lot was the Supertest Service Station run by John Dezell and his son Forest. Later Chas. Black was the proprietor. Llew Lloyd said– Good timing . When it was the Super Test garage Bernie Costello played the piano for the Saturday afternoon crowd 

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198 and 200 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Circa 1860

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Photo: Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The Sinclair stores (198 Bridge Street is now a vacant lot and 200 Bridge Street was
The Looking Glass). The building that remains standing is of a wood frame
construction as was the other building. At one time, Robert Crampton owned the
building closest to the water and he ran it as a general store and a post office. Then
it was owned by a Hollingsworth and was a grocery store. It was also Bennett’s
Butcher shop.

385756_350635001660067_1511835524_n.jpgThis photo shows the interior of Sinclair Brothers Tailor Shop. That’s Herb Sinclair Junior to the left, ready to serve you. This store was located on the west side of Bridge Street, the second frame building north of the bridge. It has since been demolished.-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Then in 1924 it was bought by William Sinclair and was a dry goods
and ladies store operated by him and his brother Bill . It stayed as that until the 1950s.  It was also the Sinclair family residence for some time. His wife Helen Virtue with the help of Marjorie Connors Robertson, Isabel Cleland Allan, Marguerite Chapel Louks, Lois Brebner Bennett and Mrs. Frankie.

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photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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It was sold in the 1950s. The building next to it (200 Bridge) was the tailor shop owned by Colin Sinclair. He was a professional tailor and made men’s suits all from his own patterns. Both his sons and grandson were also professional tailors. At one time, they made the police uniforms for the entire town. The apartment above the store was occupied by Mrs. Herb Bennett and sons Donald and John. Later John and Elizabeth Knox Splane. 200 Bridge Street later became , Goofy’s, The Looking Glass etc.

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Around 1884, James E. Bennett decided being in business for himself would offer much more reward than looking after someone else’s cattle.  And so the first Bennett’s Meat Market opened its doors.  The store was located where Goofy’s Ice Cream parlor now stands.  The spot was considered a prime location.  Here some of the main businesses of the day were neighbors and a steady stream of people passed the shop each day.

He hired Charlie Devlin to help out and the two of them did all the work…and it was all done by hand in those days.  One side of the shop held a large plank anchored just down from the ceiling.  Huge meat hooks held beef quarters, where the lady of the house could come, look over the selection and make her choice.  Hand saws prepared the meat, because electricity was yet to come to Carleton Place.

A two wheel cart, hauled by horse, carried a box with a lid on the back, and a step for the driver; from the cart, deliveries were made all over town.

Summers of Carleton Place Past — Memories of Gooffy’s?

Scoon Scott’s Legacy– Good to See You!

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie — Lolly’s Tea Room

In Memory of Barbara Lanthier

Lost Buildings–Sinclair Brothers Tailor Shop

Through the Looking Glass

204-206 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

204-206 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

204 Bridge Street has a long history as being primarily a barbershop. Before it
became a barbershop this is where William Taylor operated his hardware store
before moving to the building at the corner of Bridge and Mill that was occupied by
McArthur. This frame building was a barbershop operated by Hughie Devlin. At the
same time that Devlin was a barber Harry Robertson was a cabinet builder at this
location as well. Some of the barbers included Claude McDaniel, Jack and Earl
McPherson, W. Sadler and then Jock Mailey. Around the mid 1940s or the early
1950s is when Jock Mailey and George Lemaistre hung their shingle out as barbers at
204 Bridge Street until George went to work for the CPR. Later Merrill Griffith purchased the building and turned it into apartments. In 2005 it was boarded up.

208-210 Bridge Street Carleton Place

Bellamy’s

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208-210 Bridge Street Carleton Place–1870 circa

In or around the 1920’s Wilfred Bellamy operated a confectionery store and later a
restaurant at this location. In 1937, there is an advertisement in the Carleton Place
Herald for Bellamy’s Ice Cream. Wilf and his wife Eva (Carr) were in business for a long time and had a nickelodeon, which was similar to a jukebox and the best
toffee around.  Over the years they employed Viola McKimm, Ruby Voyce, Annie Morris and Leslie Paul.  The Bellamy’s lived on Townline East, but had no family. In 1958 Bellamy’s sold it to  a Mr. A. Jones.  It was opened as a spaghetti diner. In an advertisement in the Carleton Place Canadian from 1971 the name of the restaurant is John’s and in 1975 saw the name change to the Bonanza Pizzia/Restaurant. Hence now location to Bonanza Kids?

Stephen Giles I remember going to the Bell office with my Mother to meet Joan Whalen after her shift. Then we would go to Bellamy’s restaurant where Joan’s mother Vi McKim worked. Best coconut cream pie in the Ottawa Valley!

Jeremy Stinson The ‘Color Your World’ building, I remember being Bonanza Pizzeria when I was little. That was before the building was fixed up and painted. My parents had a large Dodge van and you could drive through to Water street through the old car lot next to it. The building was covered in grey and black shingle siding.

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Tammy Marion  – I’m not 100% but I think it was where the Bonanza Restaurant/Pizza place use to be on main st ( Bridge.St) and it was called the Carleton before it became the Bonanza. That’s what I think anyways

I stopped at a restaurant in the town of Carleton Place. The restaurant was called Bellamy’s. It was on the main street. Bridge Street. It was in there that Phil all of a sudden decided to throw his lemon meringue pie all over the place — on the table, on our faces, on the floor, on the next table, on the wall and even over — read the rest tomorrow– read more here.. A Story About Bellamys and Lemon Pie

The Empty Parking Lot

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Photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Joan Stoddart mentioned something two days ago. The Remembrance Shop did indeed have three locations. The first Remembrance Shop opened in 1950 located between Sinclair’s and Bellamy’s on Bridge Street. An important owner of The Remembrance Shop was Edith Bowers who bought it from Elizabeth then Mrs Lowry. It did start in the front part of the white building by Bellamy’s.

From the picture it looked like quite a grand hotel, but sadly it closed and remained vacant for years. The Drader family moved to Carleton Place around 1932 where Simeon worked as a carpenter. In 1953 he purchased the old Rathwell hotel which by then was in  very bad way and falling apart. Willington McGonegal had a second hand store next to Bellamy’s.

Drader renovated the building and constructed nine apartments in the building that was known as the Drader Block. In 1954 Simeon and Mary Drader celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. The Rathwell Hotel was demolished in 1956 and Simeon Draper also died in 1956.

Tammy Marion There use to be a building next to the old Bonanza Pizzeria – Color your World in this photo, before it became just a parking lot as it is today..Can’t remember if it was a garage,car sales lot or what it was at the time, but there was a building there. I remember it burning down in 1978 as I lived next store that year in the old Maynard Furniture building ( I refer to it as that) ( where the MP Scott Reid’s office is today) and the firemen/police were knocking on everyone’s door in the building to get everyone out – just in case the fire spread..

Tammy Marion Well the building that burned down in 1978,could have been 79 too- didn’t look anything as grand as that picture Linda lol..and it wasn’t so close to the road either. It was set back in more if I recall correctly because I remember seeing cars parked infront of it when I walked by… The address to my apartment was 226 Bridge St. ( middle door) apt faced the main st. Maynards Furniture Store and front was to the right of that door when facing the building – High St end. That’s why I referred to it as the Maynard Furniture building.Bought a television from them in 1980,81.. Now I’m going to rack my brains trying to remember what it was that burned down back then.Pretty sure Paul Dulmages garage was in operation then – which was right across the road of that now empty parking lot. He had a Rottweiler pup named Thumper or someone that worked there did. Funny-I can remember that but not what burned.

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Photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–This building used to be in the empty parking lot next to Scott Reid’s office on Bridge Street. St. John’s Masonic Lodge formed in 1843- This building was built in 1911 at 55 Bridge Street. The Ancient Order of United Workmen might have been in the former beer store building on Bridge St.–read-The Ancient Order of United Workmen-Death Benefits etc.

At the same time the next building which was frame and was known as the Oddfellows Hall was also destroyed. It had a long entrance hall which opened up into two large rooms. The first room had two or three pool tables and the second room had a fairly smooth floor which was rented out to different organizations for meetings and dances. The second floor of this building was the Lodge rooms of the local Oddfellows and Rebecca Lodge.

 - All these buildings . bear the unmistakable...

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Ray Paquette– The memory I have of Bennett’s at High and Bridge was the September morning walking to CPHS the day the 1955 Chevrolet was unveiled. What made this new car launch memorable was the the significant body style change from the previous models. It heralded a new era in design and became the talk of car enthusiasts. That was the time when all automotive producers unveiled the next year’s models in September.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 May 1946, Fri,  Page 2

 - Mr. John Rathwell, brother of Mr. James E....

                               

The Bennett Butcher Shop- Corner of Bell and Bridge Street

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James E. Bennett’s butcher shop in Carleton Place with Charlie Devlin–Photo Thanks to Deborah Devlin-Adams

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Photos by Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The Bennett Butcher Shop- Corner of Bell and Bridge Street

Bennet

James E. Bennett – 1860/1927

Mayor of Carleton Place – 1904-1906 – Grocers and Butcher, est. 1883.

I’ve written quite a few pieces about Bennett’s Butcher store along with stories about Ruth Ferguson and Danny when he was in charge of the premises. There are not too many folks that don’t know about Bennett’s Butcher shop, and if you don’t then read on for the history. The butcher shop had an apartment on the 2nd floor and a huge metal teapot hanging out at the 2nd level of the corner of the building. At the start of Old Home Week it was painted green and if you ask anyone today, no one knows where the darn thing went to. The business was first operated by J.E. Bennett who was also the mayor of the town from 1904-1906. Later his son, Austin C. Bennett and his son, William operated the butcher and grocery business. Over the years the staff included: Shirley Robilliard, Dorothy Cooke, James Taffy Williams, George Folkard, Bernie O’Meara, Ruth Ferguson, Isabel Wylie, and Jerry Tinsley. Austin Bennett, his wife and his son Bill lived upstairs for some years, but later on moved to the corner of Townline and Thomas Street. Bill, and his wife Lois (Tweedmark) resided on Flora Street. You can check out my links below or better yet read Mary Cook’s story that was in the 1987 Carleton Place Canadian.

James E. Bennett: Early Carleton Place Butcher–From Heritage Carleton Place

By Mary Cook

The Carleton Place Canadian, 1987

    James E. Bennett had no way of knowing that the small butcher shop he opened in the late 1800’s would see four generations of Bennett’s in the business before the final chapter closed on one of the best known butcher shops in the Ottawa Valley.

Old photographs show a wiry, golden haired man of moderate stature.  He was born in Ferguson’s Falls in 1860, and came to Carleton Place as a child of 9, supposedly to take over his father’s blacksmith shop when he was old enough.  The shop was located in the empty lot between the Valleytown apartments and the first stone house going west on High Street, which is now a private parking lot.

But young James had no intention of becoming a blacksmith.  In an era when it was expected a son would follow in his father’s footsteps, young Bennett went off to be a herdsman for a well known businessman G. Arthur Burgess.

Around 1884, James E. Bennett decided being in business for himself would offer much more reward than looking after someone else’s cattle.  And so the first Bennett’s Meat Market opened its doors.  The store was located where Goofy’s Ice Cream parlor now stands.  The spot was considered a prime location.  Here some of the main businesses of the day were neighbors and a steady stream of people passed the shop each day.

He hired Charlie Devlin to help out and the two of them did all the work…and it was all done by hand in those days.  One side of the shop held a large plank anchored just down from the ceiling.  Huge meat hooks held beef quarters, where the lady of the house could come, look over the selection and make her choice.  Hand saws prepared the meat, because electricity was yet to come to Carleton Place.

A two wheel cart, hauled by horse, carried a box with a lid on the back, and a step for the driver; from the cart, deliveries were made all over town.

James E. Bennett soon outgrew the small shop next to the bridge.   An  opportunity came up to move across and down the street, and the young businessman jumped at the chance.  He took his three sons, Harry, Gordon and Austin, “Onnie” into the business with him.  It was a location that was to see almost 70 years of continuous business by the next two generations of Bennett’s.

The store was a massive stone structure (unchanged today) that stood on the corner of Bridge and Bell Street.  It was distinguished by a huge tea pot that hung from the corner of the store between the first and second storeys.  The pot advertised Salada Tea, and one day in the 20’s when the town was celebrating Old Home Week, Ted and Jack Voyce climbed a ladder and painted the massive tea pot red commemorating the event.  No one knows where the tea pot is today.

In the very early days, before Bennett’s built their first abattoir, the shop had to close down in the afternoons so that the butchers could travel the countryside buying their meat.  They would arrive at the farms, strike a deal, slaughter what they had bought, and head back to town.  The first abattoir was on the 7th line of Ramsay near the old lead mines, and almost back to back with the Anglican Cemetery.

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Musem– July 10, 2014 -“Butcher” Bill Bennett, who passed away last Sunday at the age of 88. Bill was a local icon – working in his family’s butcher shop, playing hockey for the Red Wings, and involved in many local organizations like the 100 Club, Curling Club and St. James Anglican Church
Today we remember “Butcher” Bill Bennett, who passed away last Sunday at the age of 88. Bill was a local icon – working in his family’s butcher shop, playing hockey for the Red Wings, and involved in many local organizations like the 100 Club, Curling Club and St. James Anglican Church. Rest in Peace Bill – we won’t forget you!

In the winter time, the store also closed in the afternoon, but then it was time to haul ice from the Mississippi River.  The shop had an ice box, and two ice houses held the year’s supply.  Each day, ice had to be hauled into the shop to fill the ice box.  The Bennett’s didn’t have that problem in the winter.  The butcher shop was so cold the meat froze overnight, and stayed frozen all day.

All the Bennett’s, right from that first James E. who started the business in the 1800’s possessed a wonderful sense of humor.  James’ grandson Bill, remembers a woman coming into the store for a quarter’s worth of cooked ham.  It was a blistering hot day.  Bill’s grandfather James looked her square in the eye and said, “Hell, lady I wouldn’t open the fridge door for a quarter on a day like this.”  Apparently, the ice would melt as quick as you would look at it, and Bill says if his father was going to open the ice box door, it was going to be worth his while.

James E. Bennett built three houses in the Flora Street area.  One of them is occupied by his grandson Bill and his wife Lois.  Behind the house were stables where up to five horses were housed.  They were used as delivery horses for the meat market, and they knew the routes as well as the men who drove them.  One old horse, the story goes was so familiar with the routine of the business that when Findlay’s Foundry whistle blew at 12 noon, the horse headed for Flora Street with or without the driver.  “You better be on that cart when the whistle went, or the horse went home without you”, was the saying of the day.  In the morning a delivery man went door to door picking up order for meat.  There were no telephones, and this was the way the business ran.  The lady ordered from the delivery man, he rushed back to the store, filled the order and rushed back out to deliver it so she could cook it for the noon meal.

Ledgers of the day reflected the simple way of life and how business was carried on.  Some entries carried only the first name of the customer, or it might simply state the last name and beside it how much was owed.  It could read “Bells…12 cents”.  The amounts were small, and when the account was paid, there was no receipt given.  A simple pencil line through the entry showed the debt was cleared.

There was co-operation between the shops too.  Sometimes a ‘debtor’ would leave a shop in a huff…invariably it was over a bill.  Bill says, “someone would rush over to the other butcher shops and say Mrs. So and So left us and she owes .40 cents.

Well, he’d send the message back…’she won’t get a cent of credit from us until she pays the .40 cents.’  That’s how business was done in those days.”

As stated in a previous story, much business was carried on in a reciprocal manner.  Bennett’s had agreements with at least two other merchants in town.  Cameron’s blacksmith kept their horse shod, and Bennetts supplied their meat.

Once a month a tally was made to settle the difference.  The same system worked with Nichols Mill.  The mill supplied all the lumber Bennett’s needed, and the meat market filled the Nichols meat needs.  Once a year, the two businesses would have a reckoning.  The tallies were usually just a few dollars apart.  They’d say, just forget it.

Wipe the slate clean and let’s start over again, Bill Says.  After James died, his three sons took over the business.  By the time the second world war broke out, Onnie was on his own as everyone who worked for him joined up, leaving no staff to run the store.  Young Bill was taken out of school in Grade 11.  He was to remain working alongside his father for more than 40 years.

Bill remembers the store he did chores in when he was just a little boy, long before he knew he would eventually be taken into the business.  “There were meat counters all along the back.  The floors were covered with sawdust.  Barrels of pickles, herring and sauerkraut lined the walls, and we built a little booth for Dorothy Malloch.  She was our cashier, and when you got your meat from the counter you took up a little slip of paper and paid Dorothy.  Later Isobel Wylie and Ruth Ferguson joined the staff.  A big stove sat in the centre of the floor, and boy did it got cold at night.  And in the daytime, when the fire died down, we’d throw in a roll of wrapping paper if we ran out of wood.  It was cheaper than wood, too.  It didn’t give off much heat, but it kept burning all day long.”

The first electricity the store had was purchased from Art Burgess who built a small power plant east of the present Medical Centre on Lake Avenue.  Burgess sold power to several industries and businesses before the town was hooked up to outside power.  For the first time Bennett’s were to have electric refrigerators.  It was perhaps the biggest improvement ever seen in the business.

As a young boy Bill always had a pony to the envy of all his friends.  “But Dad had an ulterior motive in buying me a pony and cart.  It was his way of initiating me into the business at an early age, because while everyone else was out playing, I was expected to use the pony and cart to deliver meat,” he says.

The business grew during the war.  But the workload of looking after the rationing books was enormous.  That job had to be done when the store was closed and the place was quiet.  There was never enough butter and bacon to go around, and it was a “first come, first served system.”

Prices went up during the 40’s.  They were a far cry from what they were in the early days of James E. Bennett, according to early ledgers.  Two pounds of beef sold for .14 cents; two and a half pounds of steak for .23 cents, and pork chops and sausages for .12 cents a pound.

As the seventies came to a close, the Bennett’s Meat Market was approaching almost 100 years of continuous operation.  Onnie was ready to call it quits.  And so was Bill.  The business was sold in 1978 ending an era unmatched by any other retail business in the town’s history.

James E. Bennett had established a reputation for honesty and service early in the game.  It was carried on for three generations.  The businessman left his mark politically as well.  Like almost every other merchant he took his turn in municipal politics, holding the office of mayor from 1904-06.  He set a pattern for what he expected the business to be…a service industry that met the needs of the town honestly.  He probably expected his sons, grandchildren, and great grandchildren to carry on as long as they were able to do so, and in the same fashion.  Had he lived, he would not have been disappointed.

Today, the old stone building still serves as a meat market, as Danny Joly continues to meet the same high standards set by that original butcher more than 100 years ago.  James E. Bennett would be pleased.

Note: Since the printing or this article in 1987, unfortunately the meat market closed that was located in the old Bennett’s Meat Market. The building at the corner of Bridge and bell Street now houses the Hing Wah Restauant.

Glory Days of Carleton Place–Mike Kean

Memories of Ruth Ferguson

As the World Turns in Carleton Place — Soap and Ground Beef

Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

Where’s the Beef in Carleton Place?

Name That Carleton Place Butcher? FOUND!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

relatedreading

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Comments Comments Comments–Documenting History

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

Dr. Johnson Downing and Ferril I Presume? Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12 a

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

The Former Businesses of Carleton Place — Notes Part 1- Historical Clippings

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The Former Businesses of Carleton Place — Notes Part 1- Historical Clippings

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I have been cutting archived newspaper articles for over 2 years. I will be adding from time to time new ones as I go through them.

 - At last a barber has opened up In tha enop...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jun 1900, Mon,  Page 6

 - i Mr. Andrew Keilson ' is enlarging,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  26 Jul 1898, Tue,  Page 8

 - t j , , ' club. Miss Miller, of Bridge street,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Aug 1901, Tue,  Page 2

 

 - The drain hi front of Mr. Matth1es barber shop...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Jun 1899, Fri,  Page 4

 - .. Carleton Place (Special to The Journal.) '...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Oct 1899, Fri,  Page 4

 

 - Mr. E. A. Leech has purchased the business...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Apr 1910, Mon,  Page 5

 

 - Adjoatmant of oialma arising from Wedneaday...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Feb 1906, Mon,  Page 5

 

 

 - Dr. T. R. Paterson is fitting up his dental...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jun 1898, Sat,  Page 9

 

 - Th nubile "maLrket" aotutp fc-avliw fc-avliw...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Aug 1905, Mon,  Page 3

 

 - Lanark Mr. George B. Moore has Just placed In,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Dec 1906, Fri,  Page 12

 

 - ! A couple of boys, supposed to have nrst...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Aug 1899, Tue,  Page 3

 

 - Mr. and Mrs. W.I J. Hughes have gone to Boston...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Sep 1910, Tue,  Page 12

 

 - MILKING MACHINE and 6-can 6-can 6-can milk...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jul 1946, Thu,  Page 20

 - Miss Christine GJertrum. ' from Flesherton, Is...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Feb 1899, Fri,  Page 6

 - scarce. , Mr. Keyes, burnt out yesterday, wHi...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Dec 1897, Tue,  Page 6

 

 - . Mr. R. G. Zabalan wUl shortly remove remove...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  10 Feb 1898, Thu,  Page 4

 

 - Mr. Richard Zabalan Is selling out his stock in...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Feb 1900, Tue,  Page 7

 

 - Mr.lUanirs has named his Lake Park cottage...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Aug 1899, Sat,  Page 8

 

 - Mrs. Ei. A. McGregor has removed her restaurant...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Oct 1898, Tue,  Page 2

 

 - You Lee, one of our Chinese laundry-men....

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Feb 1900, Wed,  [First Edition],  Page 8

 

 - a very pleasant Mr. Stewart Oliver ot Dr....

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Sep 1898, Wed,  Page 8

 

 - Mr. Wm. Jenkins haa placed a new bread van on...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Jun 1898, Sat,  Page 2

 

 - NOTICE TO CRtDITORS. Ia the matter oi CHARLES...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  15 Mar 1890, Sat,  Page 3

 

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Sat, Apr 23, 1887 – Page 4

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Thu, May 5, 1887 – Page 3

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Feb 1, 1887 – Page 3

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Jun 21, 1904 – Page 7

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Sat, May 20, 1899 – Page 6

 - Warren- Mr. llenree intends to remove anoruy...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Sep 1905, Fri,  Page 11

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Comments Comments Comments–Documenting History

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

 

Dr. Johnson Downing and Ferril I Presume? Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12 a

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

 

142 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

142 Bridge Street Carleton Place

The Queen’s is the oldest hotel that is still in operation in Carleton Place as a hotel and was originally built for Duncan McIntosh of Perth Ontario who was the father of Dr. Duncan H.McIntosh, of Carleton Place.

 

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

In 1882, Mrs. M.J. Chatterton bought the hotel and operated it as the Chatterton House. Peter P. Salter doubled the size and renamed it the Queen’s Hotel. In 1889, it was repurchased and run by Mrs. Chatterton and Ab. Salter. Later it was renovated and operated by Dan Miller.

 

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The cost was $1.50 per day with hot water and electric lights. There were 40 new rooms and a free bus to the train. In 1937, the roof on the Queen’s Hotel blew off because of high winds and sat in the middle of Bridge Street. Dan Miller sold the Queen’s to Lloyd Ionson from Cobourg. There were 50 rooms. Miller ran the hotel from 1920-51 intermittently.

Mary Whyte remembers one of her school friends Pauline O’Keefe whose father owned the hotel at the time. When Dan Miller bought it he had a taxi business on the premises and had some year round boarders and one of them she remembered was Jabe Coombs a  foreman at Findlay’s. Later Dan’s son William and his wife Marguerite (Griffith) operated the hotel and Geoff Laycock was the next owner.

 

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

According to the museum history Miller ran it for 4 years then he sold it to Mr. Chadwick. In 1927, Miller re-obtained and ran the hotel for another 3 years and then rented it to Mr. Martin 2 years. Lindsay Thurlow was the next to operate the hotel. Mr. Miller’s sister Mrs. William Taylor took the building and changed it into apartments. Mr. Miller returned to Carleton Place in 1948 and began modernizing the hotel and providing a dining room. He changed the apartments back to hotel rooms and built 13 garages at rear and 2 apartments over a section of the garage.

When Tom Sloan was the owner of the Queen’s hotel he had a sign out front that was really worth reading:

Good Sample Rooms-Centrally Located

Commercial Rates- One dollar and a half per day

This house has been renovated all through and is one of the coziest and most enjoyable in the Ottawa Valley

Hotel Rules for Visitors

Board- 50 cents a square foot- meals extra

The hotel is convenient to all cemeteries- hearses to hire 25 cents

Guests are requested not to speak to the dumb waiter

Guests are requested not to play any games more exciting that Old Maid after 7 pm so as not to disturb the night clerk’s slumber

If the room gets too warm open the window and see the fire escape.

In case of fire you will have a hard time finding the fire escape, there ain’t any.
If you’re fond of athletics and like good jumping, lift the mattress and see the bed spring

Married men without baggage are requested to leave their wives at the office for security
Don’t worry about paying your bills; the house is supported by its foundation.

Tammy Marion —There use to be a longish narrow building at the back of the Queens at the backside of the parking lot. It was still there in 1984-85. I was told years ago that it use to be a stable back in its day – for the people’s horses when they came by horse to the Queens. Don’t know if that was true or not – but took it as if it was. It had an upper level too. In 1984 or 85 there was an apartment on that upper level as I remember Audrey Wilson living there then.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 Apr 1899, Fri,  Page 6

 

The Queen’s most iconic boarder was Wandering Wayne Richards

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In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

Christmas in April – (Wandering) Wayne Richards

More than Words- Mural is Almost Finished!

 

 

Related Reading to the Queen’s Hotel

The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

Carleton Place Folk Art from the Queen’s Hotel –The Millers

Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel vs the Town of Carleton Place

People of Carleton Place, Ontario — Gail Sheen-MacDonald

Part 1- Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place- can be found here.

Part 2- Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place– can be found here.

Part 3- I Will Take Some Opium to Go Please —The “Drug Dispensary” at the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 4- Chatterton House Hotel Registrar- George Hurdis -1884

Part 5-What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 7-All the President’s Men — Backroom Dealings in Carleton Place?

Part 8- Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

Part 9-What Happens Behind The Queen’s Hotel Stays Behind the Queen’s Hotel

part 10-John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place

part 11-The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

part 12 –He Did What? Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

The Sultans of Swing at The Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Things That Disappear in Carleton Place — Elgin Street and The Queen’s Hotel Sign

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

 

151 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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151 Bridge Street Carleton Place

151 Bridge Street housed two stores but one side was vacant. R.D. Carmichael’s
grocery was located here. Carmichael’s was a long narrow store with a round wood stove in the back. There was a scale to weigh all bulk food and everything was put into small brown bags and tied with a string. It was mentioned in McDiarmid’s weekly column in the Canadian that a whole hank of bananas hung in the window and they became quite brown before they were all sold.

Mr. Carmichael employed his half sister Jessee McGregor, Alberta Whyte, Vera Cavers and Lorne Whyte was the delivery boy. Whyte used to call all the customers on Monday morning, took your order and delivered late that day or the very next morning. He repeated this on Thursday and Friday and the other side of the river was serviced on the between days. No money was exchanged between the delivery boy and the customer and every week you went in and either paid the bill or paid towards something towards the bill.

 

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Photo from the Canadian Files- from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

When the entrance way and the floor of his store got so worn it became a hazard Mr. C just moved all his groceries and carried on. After R.D. Carmichael’s relocated, R.A. Beamish had a store located here. The4 manager was Eddy Lavoie who married Jean Hamilton and he employed Daisy Peckett. Later the manager was Florabelle MacPherson. A fire occurred in the early part of the 1960s totally destroying the building. The current building was erected and has housed such businesses as Vicky’s Dress Shoppe, Esquire Dress Shoppe, the Bridge Hotel, The Bridgewater Inn, and now the Bridge Street Tavern. When the building burned one of the women’s clothing stores was in operation at this site. The owner had just purchased her new stock for the upcoming season. Of course we remember that it was the home of Ballygiblin’s Restaurant for many years.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Mar 1963, Fri,  Page 1

 

related reading

The Fire That Almost Wiped Out Part of Bridge Street

DILL we meet again! A Tip of the Glass to Ballygiblin’s

Derek Levesque – More than Words

Meet Chef Dusty Pettes from Ballygiblins

A Charming Woman is a Busy Woman – Sherry Duquette

It’s a Mad World! View from a Carleton Place Bench

 

150-152 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photos Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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150-152 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

G.C. Stackhouse a dentist ran the store as a book, stationary, and variety store.
Then the store was under the ownership of John Flett (1836-1900), then by A.C.
McLean from Perth to March 1889, then by M.C. Pewtress from Hamilton Ontario. In
the 1890s, it became a soft drinks bottling plant of Adam R.G. Peden son of William
Peden (1813-1879) Carleton Place general merchant. He was Town Clerk from
1877-1921. This street corner stone building has long been divided into a bakery
and barbershop through the years.
It has had numerous businesses in its premises. In 1871 James M. Scott ran a
stationary shop (Lovell’s Dominion Directory). In 1876 a dentist G.C. Stackhouse
was located in the building (Woodburn’s Central Canada Directory). Mr. Stackhouse
seems also to have been in the jewellery trade since the Carleton Place Herald of
1878 contains an advertisement announcing his withdrawal from the trade. The
Herald announced that on March 3 rd of 1880 that Mr. John Flett was buying out Mr.
Stackhouse.
Woodcock’s Bakery and Jerry’s Bakery also operated businesses at 150 Bridge Street.  Some of their employees beside their son Roy were Viola Shannon and Dot Foxton. The man who delivered their baked goods around town daily by horse and cart was Harvey Paul.. People looked forward to the Easter season as on Holy Thursday he went around town delivering Hot Cross buns at 25 cents a dozen.

Bill W’s sister Evelyn ran a hairdressing salon in the right hand corner and the other entrance to this building was rented by Howard Mc Neely who had his barbershop  from about 1929 to the 1970s until he purchased the George Doucett building. His helper was his brother Mel and then his brother Earl. When Howard moved his store it became The Clip Joint a hair salon run by the late Barbara Lanthier and Linda Horricks Tompson until Barb moved her salon past the bridge.

Next door at one time was Ad Valiquettes Hair Dressing and later Dr. J. A. McEwen had his office there.

 

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Dale Costello One of my favourite CP stores. Woodcocks Bakery. If you could buy the smell of fresh baked bread, you couldn’t afford it.

Joann Voyce Worked there in the summer and weekends. Started at age 14.

Doug B. McCarten Butterscotch cookies yummy my favourite!

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston I am sure every mother in town knew her kids wouldn’t move an inch if they got to watch that donut machine – we sure didn’t! I wonder what happened to that machine – whether it was saved or not???????????? – not to mention the rest of the stuff.

Ray Paquette I had the only paper route in town that made no money because my last delivery was to Woodcock’s where my proceeds were “eaten” up buying those jam filled scones!!

Joann Voyce When I worked there I learned all my great work ethics from Vi Shannon and Ethel Reese.. Two great ladies !

Jim Amy Kirkpatrick The best raisin buns and caramel cookies in the world!!!

Sherri Iona And fresh bread, when maple syrup came in

Sharron Ann Foote Donuts made in the window on Saturday mornings. 50 cents bought a dozen—allowance for the week well spent!!

Valerie Edwards Woodcock’s bakery in right corner , the best caramel cookies preferably with raisins

Llew Lloyd I remember they had a red haired baker . He was the ginger bread man. He baked cakes really fast .

Catherine Marvin Cream Puffs for 50 cents.

Penny Trafford I’m with you Cathy, Cream Puffs. My memory of them I swear I was still in a stroller, I bet they were only 10 cents! 😂

Peter Hawkins We always stopped there, on our way into town to visit my grandmother, to pick up a dozen raisin cookies.

Llew Lloyd The raisin cookies were a staple at 81 Bell . Hot cross buns at Easter were another family favourite . Remember the ladder on rails to store bread etc. on the upper shelves ?

Ted Hurdis When Wendy got pregnant for Brodie my mom went to Woodcocks and got her 4 huge cream puffs in a box.

Wendy LeBlanc- Mum did all our baking to save money but I somehow recall the delightful triangular-shaped super-flakey pastries filled with jam and sprinkled with coarse sugar. Ooh! I can still recall the taste as I write about them. I also remember cream puffs – Peggi Mace and I were students of Helen Gardiner in Grade 5 in Central School; we ran errands for her downtown nearly every day and once a week we would go to the bakery for her; she always treated us with a cream puff. I can’t think of Helen – a wonderful teacher – without thinking of cream puffs and visa versa!

 

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Related reading to the bakery

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

 

 

Related reading to the Aitkenhead family

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Photos of the Orange Parade Almonte 1963 — Name that Band?

How to Make a Vintage Apron- Aitkenhead Photo Collection

No Banker Left Behind – Bank of Montreal Almonte Photos

Down by the Mississippi River- Almonte Falls Photos 50s

Are These Memories Just for Ourselves? — The Family in a Box

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Vintage Carleton Place & Beckwith

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Photo just outside Movshovitz’s

From the Carleton Place Review Files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Carleton Place Ambulance team leading, Steven More, Tim McIntyre, Jason Watt… Thanks Jim McUsac! He said 1992-1993?-Remember the Hospital Bed Races of Carleton Place?

154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1885- Sumner Block

Valiquette’s hair dressing was in this building and later Dr. J.A. McEwen had his office
here. Max Movshovitz’s dry goods store was located in what was known as the
Sumner Building. Morbic Sumner operated a dry goods store also. The Sumner Building at 154-160 Bridge Street is on Lot 25, which is one of the larger lots on Bridge Street. In the 1960’s a large fire occurred and a parking lot took over where some of the businesses had been. So it is unclear based on land deeds if some of the businesses were located in the Sumner Building or at what is now the parking lot. Dr. Winters was a dentist and his
practice was taken over by Dr. Smith an MD. Two Stanzel sisters operated a
millinery.

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From the Carleton Place Review Files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

When Dr. J. A. McEwen had his office here the family lived on the corner of Franklin and Beckwith which had previously been a bank. ( see story-Cameron Ellis Building — What Happened to the Rest of it?)

When Mr. Movshovitz had their store in this building the family lived over the store with their son Isaac who was handicapped and their other children Abraham and Shirley. They were part of the Bridge Street business group for a very long time and two of their clerks were Mrs. Preston Shail (Laura Gorr) and Mrs. Earl Fleming (Emma Smith).

Next door was Godden’s Jewelry Store and then Jack Bennett opened an electric shop and
it was here that Stewart Cavers worked and learned the trade.  Later a Mr. Dunfield from Renfrew took over the shop and sometime later Mr. and Mrs. Earl Fleming turned it into living quarters.

 

Related reading

Magical Movshovitz Moments

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

 

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 10–

Standard

 

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The first storey storefronts of this building have been modified from the original glass windows for easier viewing of merchandise–hence the different colours of brick. 127-131 Bridge Street has housed a number of different businesses including pharmacies, clothing stores, grocery stores, and poolrooms.

The Hughes family bought the pharmacy from Dr. Preston in 1905.

W. J. Hughes Rexall Drug store was located on the corner and Thomas Lloyd Hughes born in 1897 along with his brother Harold until they each decided to run a smaller store at the opposite  ends of town. Lloy’s store was on Moffatt Street and Harold on Lake Ave West. For 50 years they were in groceries together and then the store was sold to Thomas’s nephew and for 12 years Thomas drove a butcher wagon. There was a dark room at the rear of the store where Mr. Hughes tested your eyes for glasses. You could buy a roll of film #116 for a Brownie Box camera for 25 cents and for $1.25 he would send it away to be developed.

The folks in Carleton Place will always remember the Rexall Drug annual 1 cent sale and every local household stocked up on cough medicine, cough drops, peroxide and all sorts of liniment. Some of the clerks that worked there were: Olive Dick, Ruby Voyce, and John Briscoe and Wilbert Robertson.

Harvey Asselstine attended the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1929. In 1944, he
returned to Carleton Place and bought the drugstore at the corner of Bridge and
Franklin, from W.J. Hughes who operated it for 38 years. Betty Findlay and Mary Cook both worked at Assestine’s Pharmacy.  In the rear of Asselstine’s drug store the CPR Telegraph operated during the 1950s. Asselstine expanded his drug store and bought out Hughes Grocery. In 2006 the Athen’s Corners Restaurant  was located there.

Taber and McCrae operated a Men’s and Boy’s clothing store within Struther’s Block, which later became a pool hall  (next door) operated by Mel Barclay. Charlie Giroux, who only had one arm took over the pool hall then Ab Dowseth from Smiths Falls operated it for a short time but when McCann and Porter gained ownership they moved the pool hall to the old Bank of Commerce.

Jeremy Stinson— That corner was, for much of my childhood, the home of the Blossom Shop. Back before the one way street.

Related Reading

Bridge Street V.E. Day Parade Photos- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Who was the “Drugstore Woman” in Asselstine’s Rexall?

 

133-137 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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All photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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133-137 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1885 1904

In 1903 there was a fire so the entire Bell Block had to be rebuilt. 133-137 Bridge Street originally owned by Mr. Andrew Bell. Without the adventurous capitalist Andrew Bell, Carleton Place would not have flourished the way it has. Bell bought the property from McGregor in 1885.

 

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The building belonged to Anne, Andrew’s wife until 1919 when she sold it to Stanzel. In
1898, Stuart’s or Stewart’s (confirm) drug store was situated in the Bell Block. W.J.
Muirhead had his hardware store in the Bell Block for a few years and returned to his
old stand when there was a fire in 1903. In 1906, Abraham and Aboud operated a
clothing store at this location. Percy Hardy had a music and photo shop in the Bell
Block that later became T. Eaton’s and Company.

Th doorway upstairs led up to Taber Business College on the third floor under the supervision of Charles J. Taber. Besides having students from Carleton Place there were many that arrived daily shortly sfter 9 am on the CPR local from the Ashton and Stittsville area. After C.J Taber retired his son Gordon took over

In 1917, Lewis and Frizell opened up shop in the Bell Block. In 1920, D.N. Frizell and Co. were the successors to Lewis and Frizell. Mr. Maguire operated his harness shop here and his site was eventually taken over by Mr. J. Craig who was a jeweller. By 1930, Mr. Craig left Carleton Place.

In 1936, Stanzel leased the building to Stedman and in 1960 Stedman bought
the building. Stedman’s operated at this location up until 1992 when the building
was sold to Cotter Canada Hardware and Variety. At 133 –Stedman’s Seltire Store or what was commonly referred to as the 15 cent store was located here. It employed about 4 girls and a boy to help with the heavy lifting. In 1936 Mr. Chittick was the manager and the staff included: Vera Edwards, Helen McGregor, Eileen Hart and Ethel Cable. Marg Whyte was one of the part tie gals and made 85 cents on a Saturday from 6 pm until closing which was about 10:30 Pm. It later became Stedman’s or V & G.

Next door was Eaton’s and their order office. Over the year it was staffed by 2 girls at a time and extras during the holiday rush. Florence McIntyre, Dot Peden, Leita Reid, Pat Bennett, Marjorie Crawford, Audrey Peden, Bertha Pye and Bessie Fee were some of the employees.

 

Related reading:

Who Was A. W. Bell of Carleton Place?

Stedman’s of Carleton Place 1950s

Stedman’s — Carleton Place Memories

Come Back to the Five and Dime Carleton Place–Robertson’s

The Taber Business College- Women in the 20s

Before and After — Photos of Carleton Place

 

139-141 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Ryan Hawkins posted this photo up on Instagram. Grahams.shoes
#tbt My grandfather (Bob Hawkins) on the left in front of Graham’s Shoes with the original owner Jimmy Graham in the fall of 1974–Be back Monday–

139-141 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Circa 1880 ca, 1904

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

A fire in 1903 required 139-141 Bridge Street to be rebuilt.  William Stanzel, originally of France, settled in Goulbourn and in 1874, William moved his shoe shop from Goulbourn to Carleton Place. William’s son Stephen learned the trade and Ross and Earl later owned Stanzel’s shoes. William’s daughters had a millinery shop on Bridge Street too.

139 Bridge Street was sold to Andrew Bell in 1885 and belonged to his wife Annie
until 1919 when she sold it to Stanzel. Stanzel started out in business in 1888. In 1917, Stanzel’s moved once more to its final location at 139 Bridge Street where Graham’s Shoes is now. There was a bad fire and one side of the building was entirely gutted. After the fire, Stanzel’s Shoes moved to 143, then moved to 101.

In 1929, James Moore and William Buse owned the business for four years. and called it The Boot & Shoe Store. Moore and Buse were former Findlay employees who wanted another occupation. Walter later went into the taxi business and in 1958, Stanzel’s Shoe Store was sold to James Graham. Graham worked at Allan Bros Shoes for 35 years and in 1971 Bob and Isobel Hawkins took over the business. Now their son Doug Hawkins runs it.

 

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141 Bridge Street originally part of the property owned by the McArthur family was
sold in 1885, to Mr. Pattie. Pattie and Andrew Bell built what was referred to as the
Opera Hall. In 1898, Pattie sold the building to James McDiarmid who owned 141
Bridge Street until 1926 when it was sold to  W.W. Taber and Ladies and Millinery were sold on the 2nd floor. Among his staff were Bertha Grant, Edith Machlen and Louise Playflair who all remained spinsters. It remained in the Taber name
until 1963.

 

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Wally Cook of Cook’s  retired after 37 years and in 1958, Cook went into business for himself. Wally managed the Walker’s store that was at the same location and there were other managers and Dutch Ryan was another popular man in the store. Over the years some of the clerks were: Violet Craig, Eileen Bunty Muff, Gladys McLaren, Gwen Cable, Helen McKittrick and Stewart McGregor was the delivery boy.

At the turn of the twentieth century when the Tabers owned the store and there was
a vault on the first floor. Due to a fire, the vault fell through the floor into the cellar
and the front of the vault was up against the wall. Wally’s wife, Mary was curious
about what was inside so on the last night that the store belonged to the couple, the
vault was opened and they found in the vault a small box inside with a piece of paper
with McDiarmid Block in large bold letters. Later The Remembrance Shop was in this location.

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Clipped from Manitoba Morning Free Press,  26 Jan 1904, Tue,  Page 4

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  30 Jan 1904, Sat,  Page 19

Related reading:

And Then There was Cook’s– and Most of All Mary Cook

Mary Cook’s Deportment Classes for Young Ladies in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Mod Fashion Show 1960’s

The “Chosen Friends” of Carleton Place –The Fire of 1904

Tales From the Maguire Block in Carleton Place

Do You Know What This Building Used to Look Like in Carleton Place?

Where Was Walker Stores in Carleton Place?

 

143-147 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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143-147 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1880 ca, 1904

 

Some of the earlier businesses in the Bell Block included Tucker’s Jewellers, T.
Steele’s shoe store, W. Philips Men’s Clothing Store, Mayhew, and Robert McDiarmid.
W.J. Muirhead’s hardware store also sold wallpaper and paint and Peter Dunlop was an employee and Ken Muirhead worked for his father before moving on to the RCMP.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Dec 1894, Mon,  Page 3

It was sold in 1932 to George W. Eades, who operated his hardware store at 143 Bridge Street up until his death in 1983 and then his estate took over ownership. In 1953, Eades remodelled his store front, and this was when the hardware store took over the smaller shop next door. George made improvements to the store and also employed Pete Dunlop, Gerald Haskins, Jim Griffith, Carman Lalonde and George’s daughter Helen was the bookkeeper.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 May 1951, Wed,  Page 47

 

The small store Eades took over had been a tailor shop and at one time a jewellery shop run by Mr. Craig. It had also been a tearoom where a lady would read your tea leaves for an extra 25 cents. The George Allan Shoe Store was known for its large green boot and their longest serving staff was James Graham who later opened his own shoe store. On the 2nd floor was the dental office of Dr. Ernie Walroth, a photography shop operated by Percy J. Hardy and later by Victor Goodwin as well as the office of Fred. J. Tighe who gave music lessons and later William Stephenson. Did you know the Walroths lived in the brick house at the corner of William Street and Baines that had a Hackaberry tree on the premises.

 

Eades Hardware of Carleton Place-Allen Wrenches Toilet Seats and Electric Heaters

The J. H Tucker Store Carleton Place

In Memory of Carman Lalonde — Grandfather, Father and Historian of Lanark County

 

149 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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149 Bridge Street Carleton Place– Circa 1880

 

In 1894, C.C. Allan Shoes conducted business at 149 Bridge Street. Mr. E. Farmer
bought the business in 1900 and sold it in 1910 to George Allan. Allan’s shoes store was one of the first Stedman’s stores in the Carleton Place area and it belonged to Charles Allan in 1890. Charles’s son George took over in 1900. There was a fire in either 1903 or 1904 so George bought Box’s shoe store at 149 Bridge Street in 1910. George sold the store to Maher in 1958. In or around 1969 Simpson Sears conducted business at 149 Bridge Street until about 1977. Nancy’s Impressions has been in business since 1983.

 

Related reading..

Past “Impressions” of Nancy Code Miller

Nancy Code Miller– A Chip Off the Old Block

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s

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