Tag Archives: lowry

Symington Farm Equipment — Lowry Symington History

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Symington Farm Equipment — Lowry Symington History
Feb 11 1971

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Nov 1968, Fri  •  Page 18

Lowry History

The Lowry Barn on Highway 29

Second Lieut. H. A. Powell, to Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Lowry, of Pakenham — Steam in WW1

Donald Lowry 1976

Joe Baye — Donna Sweeney Lowry

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Things About Bill Lowry 1998

The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

Memories and Poetry of George Lowry

Symington

Symington and Family — Odds and Ends Lanark County

Sadler Farm Part 2 Jaan Kolk Nancy Anderson and Lorraine Nephin

Cold Storage Plant in Almonte- Meat Locker Trivia

He Almost Became a Dead Skunk in the Middle of the 12th Line

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
14 Sep 1898, Wed  •  Page 4

The Lowry Barn on Highway 29

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The Lowry Barn on Highway 29

Crystal Stanton asked a question .

Yesterday at 7:04 PM  · Looking for some history information. Biked from Almonte to Carleton Place along the railway. Anyone have information about the farmhouse with the barn roof that says “Jesus died for our sins”. I feel like there is a powerful story there…..

Maryanne Ryan

You should see what the other side says. YE MUST BE BORN AGAIN. I do have to say every time I drive bye, I praise God and Thank Jesus.

Christine AnnHeidi Parsons Lowry I would love to hear the history as well. I have wondered for 30 years. It definitely is a huge piece of home

Jocelyn Penley Wright— I went to school with Heather and Glenn Lowry who grew up on the farm. Heather told me the story but it’s been so long ago I’ve forgotten. I was in Grade 7 with her. David Scott was our teacher.

Kim MelansonI’d be curious to know as well. I was always told a few different stories growing up.

Heidi Parsons LowryThis is Neil Lowry, my wife is Heidi Parsons Lowry(the one posting)I am a proud nephew of the land owners of the property. To the best of my knowledge it was painted to show their strength in the faith in Christian values and God‘s word.I have reached out to my cousins who grew up there to add more insight and possibly story.Glenn LowryHeather Lowry-Hoogeveen💛

Julie Phillips-BowdenHeidi Parsons Lowry I would also love to know the story behind the sayings on the barn–it makes me think everytime I drive by—

Joy NoelI’ve always noticed these words, wondered about the owners and the story. I guessed it was a reminder to live a Christian life. 🙏🏻

Diane Larocque NoonanAs an 80-yr-old local, I remember that being there on the roof when I was very young…but I see you have had feedback from the Lowry family, who owned the property then and may well do today!

Heidi Parsons LowryMy husband says it has held up really well over 41 years, it was painted in 1980 and never touched up

Paul LeBlanc

Heidi Parsons Lowry I moved to Almonte, 14 at time and I recall it being painted. Was the green steel roof put on before before the literature was painted

Heidi Parsons LowryPaul LeBlanc I only married into the family in 2007, I called it the Jesus barn. Once I knew the devotion and kindness of my family, I feel very blessed to know them. Their contribution to the community is unmatched in my humble opinion.💛

Wendy Lowry

Paul LeBlanc hi Paul! Hope you are well. The roof was green steel and then the white letters were painted on. I recall my father saying that he was told that the white would fade very quickly because of the dark colour underneath. My mother does not remember hearing that though.

Paul LeBlanc

Wendy Lowry hi Wendy, great hearing from you, I’m doing great, hoping you as well. Thank you for the clarification and history on the barn roof. To be honest, I knew Lowrys owned the farm, but did not know it was your family 😉. Thanks for the history lesson

Allison Kerry MacKinnonHeidi Parsons Lowry, my husband said that Mr. Lowry once told him it was “miracle” paint

Christine AnnAllison Kerry MacKinnon that’s amazing! It certainly is miracle paint. Still looks awesome

Lantern Hill Farm

The Lowrys are very strong Christians and not afraid of shouting it from the roof tops!!No pun intended.

Wendy Lowry

Crystal Stanton thank you for bringing up this subject. My father David Lowry was the owner of the barn and paid to have those words painted on the roof. Sadly he has since passed away but those words have remained as was mentioned since 1980 and it has never been repainted or touched up.My father said that God had given him a vision of how painting the scripture on that roof would reach many, many people as at that time it would be seen if you were driving past, were in a plane flying over or on a train.He was a Christian man and an evangelist of sorts. In that he wanted to share the gospel (the good news) of God with everyone. Basically he wanted everyone to know that God loves them. Loves them enough that Jesus died on the cross for them. Jesus died to pay the cost of all of our sins and he wants us to be with him forever.The words painted on that barn were not meant to be a threat but to tell of the gift that God offers and wants for all of us.He would be pleased to know that the vision God gave him all those years ago still stands true today just like the word of God.

Julie-Ann MortonWendy Lowry thank you for sharing. God bless you as your godly heritage has blessed many throughout the years. No one this side of heaven will know the impact that barn has had on people

Tina BrianI remember as a kid driving past this on our trips up this way. I thought oh wow so nice that they keep it freshened up…. amazing that it’s never been touched up

Maureen EsserysHi before we emigrated to Canada we came on vacation many many times. When we saw that roof we knew we were going to land shortly. My son was 9 years old and used to say not long now mum xxx

2021

Almonte’s agricultural community remembers farming, community leader Allan Lowry

NEWS FEB 23, 2021 BY ASHLEY KULP  CARLETON PLACE ALMONTE CANADIAN GAZETTE

Allan Lowry

The Lanark County agricultural community is mourning the loss of Allan Lowry, who passed away Feb. 14 at the age of 67. – Lowry family photo

A kind and humble man with a passion for agriculture is how the Mississippi Mills community is remembering Allan Lowry.

The lifelong farmer passed away at age 67 on Feb. 14. In recognition of the community leader, flags at the Mississippi Mills administration office were lowered to half-mast Feb. 16.

Agriculture was in Allan’s blood, having grown up on Penlow Farms, the family’s 100-acre dairy operation just outside of Almonte. It was established by his parents, Dorothy (Penman) and Bert Lowry.

“Our dad did well in school and was involved in 4-H and Junior Farmers’ (Association of Ontario) in his youth,” noted daughter Christa and current Mayor of Mississippi Mills, as she spoke about her father at his Feb. 20 celebration of life at Almonte United Church. “He was at a 4-H event where he and our mom met, in fact.”

He married Donna (Sweeney) in 1974, and in 1978 began expanding their family with children, Christa, Julie, Brad (Lindsay Cavanagh) and Leanna. That same year, he and Donna became partners in Penlow Farms and helped add a cash crop operation to the farm.

“Our dad was devoted to Penlow Farms, building internationally recognized Holstein bloodlines, developing successful cash crop operations, expanding the farm acreage and constantly seeking new and progressive technologies, science or management techniques to improve,” Christa said.

Donna and Allan took over the farm in 1994, with the help of their children. Today, Brad and wife Lindsay are poised as the next generation to oversee it.

Almonte’s agricultural community remembers farming, community leader Allan Lowry

NEWS FEB 23, 2021 BY ASHLEY KULP  CARLETON PLACE ALMONTE CANADIAN GAZETTE

Allan Lowry

The Lanark County agricultural community is mourning the loss of Allan Lowry, who passed away Feb. 14 at the age of 67. – Lowry family photo

Penlow Farms earned a Master Breeder shield at the Holstein Canada convention in Manitoba in 2012.

A kind and humble man with a passion for agriculture is how the Mississippi Mills community is remembering Allan Lowry.

The lifelong farmer passed away at age 67 on Feb. 14. In recognition of the community leader, flags at the Mississippi Mills administration office were lowered to half-mast Feb. 16.

Agriculture was in Allan’s blood, having grown up on Penlow Farms, the family’s 100-acre dairy operation just outside of Almonte. It was established by his parents, Dorothy (Penman) and Bert Lowry.

“Our dad did well in school and was involved in 4-H and Junior Farmers’ (Association of Ontario) in his youth,” noted daughter Christa and current Mayor of Mississippi Mills, as she spoke about her father at his Feb. 20 celebration of life at Almonte United Church. “He was at a 4-H event where he and our mom met, in fact.”

He married Donna (Sweeney) in 1974, and in 1978 began expanding their family with children, Christa, Julie, Brad (Lindsay Cavanagh) and Leanna. That same year, he and Donna became partners in Penlow Farms and helped add a cash crop operation to the farm.

“Our dad was devoted to Penlow Farms, building internationally recognized Holstein bloodlines, developing successful cash crop operations, expanding the farm acreage and constantly seeking new and progressive technologies, science or management techniques to improve,” Christa said.

Donna and Allan took over the farm in 1994, with the help of their children. Today, Brad and wife Lindsay are poised as the next generation to oversee it.

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Pictured, back row, from left: Brad, Christa, Leanna and Julie. Middle row: Donna and Allan Lowry. Front row: Dorothy and Bert Lowry. – Lowry family photo

She looked back fondly on a 2012 family trip to Brandon, Man. where Penlow Farms was recognized with a Master Breeder shield at the Holstein Canada convention.

“What a true testament to the breeding program our dad encouraged, balancing production and type,” Christa said.

A new barn with a state-of-the-art robotic milker, one of the area’s first, was added in 2015.

Allan served on countless boards and committees, including Lanark Mutual Insurance, Auld Kirk Cemetery, Mississippi Mills’ economic development and agricultural committees, to name a few. He also invested a great deal of time as a member of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, Ontario Soil and Crops Association and Lanark Holstein Club.

He was known for his practicality, sharp mind, big heart and graciousness. Those are attributes his lifelong friend Merv Hilliard, says fit him to a T.

“He always said you have to love what you do or you shouldn’t do it,” he said. “He was always willing to talk to new people and he made new friendships wherever he went. He was very involved in a lot of organizations and he thrived in it.”

He last spoke with his friend on the morning he went into hospital, Feb. 13.

“I knew he wasn’t well, but he was looking forward to spring coming and to being able to get out and have a visit on the front porch,” he said. “There are friendships and then there are loyal friendships and I would put Allan in that category. He’ll be sadly missed.” Ashley Kulp click

Related reading

So What are the Mysterious “diamond cross” cut-outs seen on barns in Lanark County?

Donald Lowry 1976

Second Lieut. H. A. Powell, to Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Lowry, of Pakenham — Steam in WW1

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Things About Bill Lowry 1998

The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

Memories and Poetry of George Lowry

Fires of Lanark County 2002

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Fires of Lanark County 2002

I have not going to add anything else other than I found a complete record of the local barn fires of 2002– and just documenting it. Stories have been told already. Good or bad, it happened 19 years ago and it is history.

My family was also affected- my kids were going to all the fires the same as everyone else and they were filming them. Pretty soon gossip began to falsely spread that my sons had something to do with it and the OPP came and took their camera away and investigated. Of course they had nothing to do with it. But I will remember how vicious gossip got around the area for everyone, and how many folks were affected in one way or another. So all I am doing here is listing the properties.

“Be Impeccable With your Word. Speak with integrity. Say only what you mean. Avoid using the word to speak against yourself or to gossip about others. Use the power of your word in the direction of truth and love.”

Amen to that!!!

The Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, CanadaWed, Sep 18, 2002 · Page 31

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 2002, Wed  •  Page 31
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 2002, Wed  •  Page 31

The torching at the Lowry farm was the seventh and most deadly strike for the barn-burning ghost of Lanark County.

Standing in his hay field just down the road from home, Ed Lowry looked north and saw black smoke. A minute later his pager beeped, calling the volunteer firefighter to an address he knew well. He raced back in his pickup, but the flames, feasting on stacks of hay and straw, had spread too fast. He lost his barn and stable. Inside, 65 pigs and 15 calves burned alive.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 2002, Wed  •  Page 31
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 2002, Wed  •  Page 31
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 2002, Wed  •  Page 31

Donald Lowry 1976

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Donald Lowry 1976

Almonte farmer wins pork award By Mary Cook Citizen special correspondent

1976

Donald Lowry has been named one of Ontario’s top pork producers by the Ontario Pork Congress. The award, presented for the first time this year, was for continued and outstanding contribution to the pork industry. Mr. Lowry, of RR 3 Almonte, raises 2,000 pigs a year, selling 40 per cent for breeder stock and the remainder for consumer use.

His sales involve travelling about 60,000 miles each year. He buys new breeder stock mainly in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes, but this spring he bought seven top breeders in Ireland at a cost of $1,000. Most top herds in Canada are interrelated, he said, and new blood must be introduced to prevent weaknesses.

Taking the pigs to market has given the Lowrys some funny moments. On their way to Indiana with a truckload of pigs a sow gave birth to a litter of eight, which had to be transferred to a cardboard box on the front seat. Exhaustion forced a late-night stop at a motel “quite prestigious to say the least” and the box of piglets was quietly taken inside.

In the wee hours of the morning, they started to squeal for food and by the time the Lowrys were fully awake, eight tiny pigs were running all over the room, under the furniture, into the bathroom squealing constantly. When Mr. Lowry wondered why the occupants of rooms on either side of theirs hadn’t complained, Mrs. Lowry said, “Do you really think anyone is going to phone the office and say there’s a litter of pigs in the next room? The office would think they were crazy.”

Mr. Lowry’s most cherished award, apart from the plaque he just received, was a championship at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto. The top price he has got for a breeder is $3,000. Mr. Lowry is reasonably happy with today’s pork market. The producer is getting a very realistic price at 70 cents a pound dressed, he said, and prices went too high last summer.

“Prices must be good enough to encourage the producer, but reasonable enough to entice the consumer. I think we are at that stage now.” The -Lowrys are heavy pork consumers. Pork is a versatile meat and at present prices it offers good nutritional value, Mr. Lowry said. He said it probably would be another 10 years before the particular plaque is awarded again. Jack Durant of Chesterville was the only other Eastern Ontario producer to receive an award from the congress this year.

Pat Burns And the Black Pig– A Ghost Story?

Lanark County Pigs on the Wing

Run Pig Run–Shake it Off! Convictions of 1870

When Pigs Fly or Bacon Up is Hard to Do

Tuesday’s Top Lanark County Story- Pigs in Dalhousie Space?

Auctionering Without a License and Pigs on the Loose

“I Like My Chicken Fryin’ Size” said the Pig

Lobster John and Arnold the Pig in Carleton Place

Joe Baye — Donna Sweeney Lowry

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Things About Bill Lowry 1998

The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

Memories of George Lowry

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

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A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

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One sentence is missing from the top but this is all that is left so had to document it. from the McRae scrapbook.

 

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Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Update on The Manse in Beckwith