Tag Archives: logger

The Postcard Courtship of Emma Buffam and Dugald New – Episode 3

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The Postcard Courtship of Emma Buffam and Dugald New – Episode 3

Dugald James New lived and worked as a labourer for a period of time in Almonte, and from what I can tell he moved on to working with the Moore logging camp in the Ottawa region. ( thanks to Jaan Kolk) He was in love with Emma Buffam who lived in Appleton and them moved to Carleton Place and her nickname to everyone was ‘Kid”. I have also found postcards from other logging locations so I will do a few postcards each day so we can put their romance together. They dated by postcards for almost 4 years.

Postcards from Dugald James New to Emma Buffam in Carleton Place ( there are about 60 of them- and will put up two a day) thanks –thanks to Cathy & Terry Machin-

May 5,1910

Hello Kid,

Got a card from Ernie and he thought you were a dandy. When I go home to see you, you will be out. Say Kid, wish you were here you would have a lot to do as we have a lot to do. Did you hear anything about the wedding? Brice came home just before I left and didn’t have time to talk to him. Well this is ‘all the lies’ I can think of. Answer soon!!

Dugald

May 9 1910

Well Kid I got that letter you said you sent last week so I thought and would save you asking the Boogieman about it. Well kid, it rained this afternoon and getting ready to see the explosion in Hull.(Quebec) so I don’t have much time. Besides a lot of running around I have to do. Well kid I suppose you are having a good time, but answer soon, if not sooner. DUG

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October 19, 1910, Ottawa ( postmarked Ottawa CPR MC)

Well kid,

We had to work tonight, and I did not have a chance to get up. I may be up tomorrow night if nothing happens. We are having one heck of a swell time I don’t think. I worked from twelve o’clock last night until seven this morning. Well kid, be good.

Dug

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August 16, 1910 ( postmarked Train Number G)

Well kid,

Here we are having a lovely time working all day and part of the night. I saw Annie B this morning and was talking to her. I have not been in the water yet ( logging) and have no notion to go in. He has not asked me to go in yet. I think I will be here for a day or two.

Well kid, be good. Soon

Dug..

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Do you want to chum with me???

April 10, 1912 Caledonia Springs

Well, kid

We came down today, and it is certainly a nice place to drop off at as we mot certainly can’t get home until midnight on the freight train. We aew all now in the prime of health. If nothing happens I may drive down to the house on Sunday around 2 or 2:30 if it is good weather. Well kid, don’t write again until I see you, because I don’t know what kind of place this is and we never come back. I will close remaining your friend

Dug

January 3, 1911 Point Fortune

We got here okay and I think I will go out on the job tomorrow. Hope it won’t get that hard on me. But never mind, things may pick up for me. Mr Demers did not come out with us as his son Duncan came off the train we were on. I wrote a car from Rigaud to you. Answer soon if not sooner. I also don’tknow what happened to Tom. He was on the train when we left Carleton Place and that is the last we seen of him. Would you see if he is at home and answer right back?

Dugald

This is where DUGALD NEW lived when he wrote Emma Buffam from Ottawa-4 Avon Lane New Edinburgh— Notice how small it was. They had homes for mill workers and they had homes for logging labourers too.-
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 May 1910, Mon  •  Page 1
In the past, Pointe-Fortune was inhabited or visited by Amerindians, coureurs de bois, fishermen, log drivers, cellars, vacationers and farmers. 
The national road also passed through the village. 
But, the 1960s transformed Pointe-Fortune forever. 
With 
the construction of the Carillon hydroelectric dam in the early 1960s and 
the arrival of Highway 40 , Pointe-Fortune has become a small, isolated and quiet hamlet where the emphasis is on nature conservation, environmental protection, sustainable development and the recreation and tourism aspect.
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Mar 1911, Mon  •  Page 10

Name:Dugald James New
Age:23
Birth Year:abt 1890
Birth Place:Carleton Place, Ontario
Marriage Date:5 Nov 1913
Marriage Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:James H New
Mother:Francis S Flynn New
Spouse:Emma Elizabeth Buffam

Name:Emma New
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:English
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Married
Age:30
Birth Year:abt 1891
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:12
Residence Street or Township:Park Ave
Residence City, Town or Village:Town of Carleton Place
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Wife
Spouse’s Name:Dugald New
Father Birth Place:England
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Presbyterian
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Occupation:Housewife
Municipality:Carleton Place
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Carleton Place (Town)
Sub-District Number:50
Enumerator:T Franklyn Nolan
District Description:Polling Division No. 5 – Comprising that part of the town south of the 12th concession line and east of Rochester street and Franktown Road
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:41
Family Number:12
Household MembersAgeRelationshipDugald New31HeadEmma New30WifeMabel Hurcomb26LodgerLillian New2Daughter

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Mar 1942, Tue  •  Page 16
Name:Dugald New
Gender:Male
Racial or Tribal Origin:English
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Married
Age:31
Birth Year:abt 1890
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:12
Residence Street or Township:Park Ave
Residence City, Town or Village:Town of Carleton Place
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Head
Spouse’s Name:Emma New
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Presbyterian
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Months at School:90-91
Occupation:Laborer
Employment Type:2 Wage Earner
Nature of Work:?? B
Income:1200
Out of Work?:No
Duration of Unemployment:09
Duration of Unemployment (Illness):9
Municipality:Carleton Place
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Carleton Place (Town)
Sub-District Number:50
Home Owned or Rented:Owned
Monthly Rental:BB
Class of House:Single House
Materials of Construction:Wood
Number of Rooms:6
Enumerator:T Franklyn Nolan
District Description:Polling Division No. 5 – Comprising that part of the town south of the 12th concession line and east of Rochester street and Franktown Road
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:40
Family Number:12
Household MembersAgeRelationshipDugald New31HeadEmma New30WifeMabel Hurcomb26LodgerLillian New2Daughter

cbcbcbc

Name:E Lillian Bassett
Birth Date:1919
Death Date:2010
Cemetery:United Cemeteries
Burial or Cremation Place:Beckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:N
Spouse:Gordon A Bassett
URL:https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/187497647/e-lillian-bassett
Name:E. Lillian Bassett
Gender:Female
Death Age:91
Birth Date:abt 1919
Death Date:3 Nov 2010
Obituary Date:6 Nov 2010
Spouse:Gordon
Child:GordRuthRodRon
Name:Mrs Lillian New
Gender:Female
Residence Date:1963
Residence Place:Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Electoral District:Danforth
Reference Number:M-5105




Early lumber companies were very simple operations requiring a lot of hard work and luck and a little capital for wages and supplies.Most timber was illegally cut off crown land.This account of the Moore brothers of Aylmer describes the typical first generation of pioneer lumber men.Their nephews and sons went on to live near Des Joachim’s and be successful lumberers along the Black,Dumoine and Upper Ottawa river,especially David Jr.”Job Sr and David Moore Sr were the sons of Dudley Moore who arrived in Wrightville in the early 1800s.Together they formed the first edition of the Moore Lumber Company shortly after Philemon Wright made his first voyage to Quebec City.In their first operations they each took an axe and two or three men with a yoke of oxen,one cow,one bag of Indian corn,one bag of flour,butter and a small quantity of meat and established a shanty on Lac Deschenes.They made a few cribs of timber,rafted them  (many cribs formed a raft with buoyant pine as the base and a few heavier oak and other hardwood on top) and took them to Quebec.By hard work and perseverance and modest growth ,year by year, they became very extensive lumberers.”(from an interview with an acquaintance of the brothers by Anson Gard) READ—The Last of the Wild Rivers






Photo from- thanks to Cathy & Terry Machin– Moore Lumber Co who Dugald New worked at as a cook and labourer.
Photo from- thanks to Cathy & Terry Machin– Moore Lumber Co.

Moore Logging Crew-Photo from- thanks to Cathy & Terry Machin– Moore Lumber Co.
Photo from- thanks to Cathy & Terry Machin– Moore Lumber Co. along with Brooks Lumber Co.who were a huge outfit out of the US and bought land parcels all through Canada to cut wood. Thanks Jaan Kolk

Stories of Big Joe Montferrand

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Stories of Big Joe Montferrand

Joe-Montferrand-738x1024

Big Joe was a logger and he plied his dangerous trade along the Ottawa Valley as he led the men who conveyed the long trains of logs down the swift rivers to the pulp mills of Montreal and beyond. He was a man of extraordinary strength and courage, attributes matched only by his civility and kindness. During his life he was called upon to teach a lesson to many a quarrelsome braggart or would-be-bully, but unlike the fictitious Paul Bunyan, Big Joe lived and his numerous descendants still reside in Quebec.

In January of 1925 Mr. Derby told a very personal story about Montferrand when he boarded in Aylmer with the Derby family. Mr. Derby Senior and Big Joe were friends and Derby said that the fabled stories of Big Joe Montferrand of being a quarrelsome lad was a myth– except when he was in action.

Joe was generally a good natured man, but when someone started anything he went into action. He instantly became a real wildman and it was said that his kick was deadly. In 1855 however Derby was in Quebec with Montferrand and they were lying off on a raft of wood off Cap Rouge near Quebec. At one point they both decided to get a wee shot of booze and a man asked if he was not indeed Big Joe Montferrand and that he was pleased to meet him.

The man expressed interest in him as the strongest man in the area and said he would like to see if this story was true by fighting him. Big Joe agreed and they both went off to the hotel yard ready to fight. Derby  thought it was best to stay in the bar at this point and have a couple of drinks as really he had no idea they were going to fight.

Before long Joe came in and told the barkeeper he had best come out and take care of what was now a dead man. According to the story the two of them had not been fighting long before the man began to  fight unfairly bunting his head. Joe warned him to fight fairly or he would kick, but the man refused to listen. So Joe did what he did best and that was to kick his opponent, and he kicked hard. One of Joe’s kicks went near the man’s heart and that was the end of the story, and his opponent dropped like a log.

Of course a huge fuss ensued and Joe was not arrested but was detained for a few days until he was able to go back to his logging crew. He had learned a lesson that day and never fought anyone else who challenged him.

Montferrand stood 6’4″ and was lithe and powerful, and one of his biographers, Andre de la Chevrotiere, described him as “prodigiously strong and at the same time generous, charitable, patriotic and with a love for hard work.” Anyway, big Joe was a famous fighting man, and some of his memorable battles took place right here.

He spent a lot of time in Hull and Ottawa between 1825 and 1850. One of his brawls became known in every shanty as “the battle of the beast with seven heads.” Montferrand was a ladies’ man, and he had a date with a fair creature who was coveted also by one of seven MacDonald brothers. The MacDonalds were an unruly lot four of them standing more than six feet, and they knew Joe – would be crossing the Footbridge at the Chaudiere from Hull to the Ottawa side. They decided to confront Joe in the middle of the bridge.

Joe pounded six of them senseless, and came to the youngest, and took mercy, and told him to go home to his mother. Joe continued on his way to keep his rendezvous with the lady fair. ‘ He was a bush foreman, and when the lads were taking off with civilization for the bush, it was Joe’s custom to stand them treats in a tavern, and it was said his generosity usually exceeded his purse.

One time, he was leading his gang into the woods for the winter when they came to The Tavern of the Pretty Widow.  Montferrand wanted to stand the treats but he was broke. He asked The Widow for credit, and she granted his wish, and so Joe decided to leave a calling card. From his “turkey” the bundle the men carried containing all their belongings he got out his “cork boots” (caulked boots), cleared a path, launched himself into the air and planted both feet on the ceiling, leaving his heel marks.

So was born “the legend of the cork boots,” and so many travellers stopped into The Widow’s place to see the marks of the feat that she was well repaid. He had one line of challenge: “No man on the Ottawa can stand up to Jos. Montferrand.” In those days when a “rough and tumble” or “a toute fain” meant using the head, feet, fists and even teeth’, nobody ever did.

Did you know?:- Far more often, though, the appellation ”Mrs.” indicated a widow’s tavern. As the only women to be licensed in their own right were widows. 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Nov 1935, Sat  •  Page 32

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