Tag Archives: letters

You Need to be Heroic to Live in Lanark — A Letter from 1907

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You Need to be Heroic to Live in Lanark — A Letter from 1907

The Lanark Era

Lanark, Ontario, Canada30 Jan 1907, Wed  •  Page 1

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Dissecting a Letter to the Editor — Isabel Aitken Ranney and Auld Kirk

Clippings and a Letter from Sadie Coleman –Robert Keith Duffett Coleman

Forgotten Letters – William Findlay- Almonte Memories –The Buchanan Scrapbook

Letter to the Editor– Chief Dougherty Does not Have the Best Firetruck!

1907 POSTCARD – VILLAGE OF LANARK. This postcard is from my personal collection of Perth and area scenes. It depicts the Village of Lanark looking northward on George Street. Caldwell’s Store and residence on the left with Caldwell’s Mill back left. To the right on the corner partially hidden is the Clyde Hotel. The postcard was sent to Miss Amy Caldwell of Caldwell Mills from Alice Quinn. The card reads. “Lanark, April 11, 07. My dear friend: I should have written before now but failed. How are you getting along and Alex also? From your former teacher Alice Quinn”. On the front it reads, “Clyde Forks can’t come up with this – eh

Forgotten Letters – William Findlay- Almonte Memories –The Buchanan Scrapbook

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Forgotten Letters – William Findlay- Almonte Memories –The Buchanan Scrapbook

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

For Young’s Foundry read- Mr. Young and Mr. Bond- Almonte History 1870s

For Rosamond Memorial Hospital read-Becoming a Nurse — Rosamond Memorial Hospital

For the coverd rink read- The Almonte Skating Rink on “The Island”

For Doc Metcalfe read- The Doctors of Almonte … In the First Half of the Century – Archibald Albert Metcalfe

For the dignitary dropped in the drink–What Happened When Agustin Barrios Gomez Came to Town?

This Findlay Family photograph 1916 depicts William Findlay (Bill’s grandfather and son of the Findlay Foundry founder, David Findlay) along with his wife and four children.
Seated in the front is Mr. William Findlay, his wife, Mrs Annie Shaw Cram Findlay, and their youngest daughter, Rosamund. Standing behind them are their three oldest children, William Fraser (Bill’s father), David Douglas, and Dorothy.
This photograph was taken in 1916, the day before David Douglas left for the war. Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
From Stuart McIntosh–During the Great Depression mother worked for the Findlay family of Carleton Place.

Howard John Rattray — Memories of WW 2

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Howard John Rattray — Memories of WW 2
Picture of my mom and dad . My dad met my mom in England as she was serving in the woman’s Air Force . They married and my mom came to Canada after the war as a war bride Photo Roger Rattray

90 Day Fiance and Mail Order and War Brides

The centre item is a telegram to my Grandma letting her know he arrived in Europe OK and of course send some cigarettes :)- Roger Rattray

Hi Linda : I found this in the my dads old scrapbook and thought it was a good time to send it just prior to Remembrance Day . I found my dad in both articles as he served with the RCAF in England . Roger Rattray

Sandra Rattray My husband ‘s father, Howard Rattray, and his father, John Rattray and their predecessors, owned part of Indians’ Landing. The story that was passed down was that the Indians used to trade their furs in there (at the former Patterson’s Furniture Store and Funeral Home or embalming room) This was common knowledge to many of the older locals-The Little Door by the River

Other reading-A Beckwith Will and James and Eliza Rattray

Who Remembers Pen Pals?

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Who Remembers Pen Pals?

In 1971 a six-year pen pal relationship came to an end this week when the participants, a 19-year-old English girl and a 19-year-old Smiths Falls boy met face to face. Linda Murrish of St. Ives in Cornwall, England, picked the name of Darwin Boles from an international pen pal grouping six years ago. 

They have been writing ever since. Linda, who was told by her mother that Canadians ate nothing “but hamburgers and drank Pepsi” flew into Toronto International Airport and was visiting with the Boles family in Smiths Falls. Linda felt “right at home” with the Boles; thinks Ottawa is “fantastic;” has a slight problem understanding our currency and may just stay on in Canada. Her tour of Ottawa included a visit to Carleton University where Darwin is a third year student in sociology.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Oct 1989, Tue  •  Page 18
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1946, Sat  •  Page 24
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Nov 1940, Sat  •  Page 20

Linda (Darnell) Susan (Hayward) Knight always hated her name, because in class there were at least three girls with the very same name. So, much to her Dad’s opposition, she decided to change the spelling of her name to Lynda. After all, if she was going to be a famous fashion designer, her name had to be slightly cool or have an edgy spelling. She was so enamored of the way her name looked now that she began sending away for free stuff. Every day after school she would walk across the street, march in to the Post Office, and open up the family’s mail box. Her father would not touch the mail addressed to Lynda because he thought she was being ridiculous. Most days, the box was full of the many free travel brochures she had requested; all addressed to someone named Lynda not Linda. She decided that once she got out of school, she would travel the world designing for the rich and famous, so she really needed this incoming travel information. Lynda entered contests daily by the loads, all with her newly made up name. She won a pen on the Canadian TV show, “Razzle Dazzle,” hosted by Alan Hamel and a talking turtle named Howard. She loved Howard and he read her winning story aloud on the air, and then carefully spelled out her name as L y n d a.

Linda Knight Seccaspina

Lucy Connelly Poaps Penpal

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters — Part 28–I Didn’t Swindle Money from the Wampole & Co W.H. Brick

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters — Part 28–I Didn’t Swindle Money from the Wampole & Co W.H. Brick

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“Thou Shall Not Bear False Witness Against Thy Neighbour”

Written by Wampole employee W.H. Brick

On the Code Felt and Knitting Company Limited Stationary

Written in Toronto, March 14, 1907

Copy of Circulation Letter to the Citizens of Perth

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In all honesty I could write a Canadian mini series about this 5 page faded letter that was found in an envelope in my Thomas Code Journals. Neatly typed probably by Code’s secretary in defiance with what the Perth newspaper and its citizens were waging against Mr. Brick. A lot of it is fading and it is extremely repetitive, so I typed out the highlights with a hint of sarcasm. I could not help myself. Apologies

Toronto, March 14, 1907

When one disappears out of the blue one day, and money is missing from the great Wampole Medicine Company, one should not write that they have feelings of mingled surprise and interest 9 months later. So instead of letting the local Perth papers complain about you — you feel a 5 page letter of “Truth” is needed to stop the ‘fake news”.

The good people of Perth should know that I, Mr. W.H. Brick will no longer tolerate this behaviour and it will only be discussed in a court of law. No more ‘he said she said”!  “I shall take you all to court.”  Famous last words.

Please note my friends that one Mr. Danner never suffered injury at my hand and had always been the gracious recipient of the hospitality of my home. Now, however, he takes the advantage of “the psychological moment” by never losing an opportunity to condemn me in either public or private. 

Among the false statements Mr. Danner has circulated is the fact that I had robbed Wampole from day one! He was simply jealous that Mr. Wampole and Mr. Campbell respected me more and they failed to notice his remarkable worth. I believe that Danner also said that after my death I would need to answer for the insanity and subsequent death of Henry. K. Wampole. I, W.H. Brick was not responsible for Mr. Wampole’s or anyone’s death.

Then there is also a Mr. Maher who had the audacity to intrude into Hick’s Boarding House unannounced while my wife was seriously ill. He ranted that her dearest husband, me, was going to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. He is nothing but  a dumb brute! There is also nothing to the truth that over $3,000 was short from a Toronto baseball club when I was treasurer. The gall of the Toronto papers sending copies to the newspapers of Perth! Ladies and gentleman, no other individual has entered a community with more desire to help than I did when I took up residence in Perth.

Suddenly a crash came and I went away as per an arrangement with the late Henry R. Wampole. After that fateful day an event that no man was ever more unjustly or atrociously maligned than myself. Since I have returned to Toronto I have been gathering evidence to clear up the words these gossipers are spreading through the town of Perth.

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Photo-Perth Remembered–

First- I did not leave Perth borrowing or attempting to borrow 50 dollars 100 dollars or a million dollars.

Second–I did not leave town without paying my honest debts, except my board bill at Hick’s House. But, I did pay it later, or did I? ( By the way W.H. Hicks left his wife at the boarding house when he left without paying the bills)

Third— That I did not dabble in stocks, place horse race bets or run with women. I also did not lose lots of money on poker games but I did lose a small stake with friends in a private game.

Fourth— That I did not deceive or fool the people of Perth

Fifth — that I did not speak badly or gossip about the people of Perth

Sixth— That I never took advantage or fooled any citizen or firm in Perth

To the Perth physician who told my wife she had no idea how she had put up with me so long– I wish to say we are living happily ever without his advice. 

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The Hicks House later the Perth Hotel– Perth Remembered

To the boarders at Hick’s Boarding House that gossip incessantly about me– I know they dare not say this to my face. To the editorial comments by a local barrister of Perth I saw “Pshaw!”

To those that have defended me in Perth it leaves me room to return even though I have a crushed and bleeding heart.

Scrapbook Clippings of Wampole

 

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Thomas Alfred Code Journal

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

 

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
30 Oct 1918, Wed  •  Page 5

Handwritten Notes from 1821- Erin McEwen

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Handwritten Notes from 1821- Erin McEwen

 

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Erin McEwen–here is the direct “translation” of the handwritten notes from 1821. I apologise for the grammar, etc., but this is a true copy:

Author’s Note- Hannah Stedworthy could also be Hannah Stidworthy in various translations.

 

In June 1821, a party of stalwart young Scotch men and women assembled at the Stedworthy Home in Dornock Scotland to make arrangement for their sailing to Canada – a new country just opening up.

 

Among the group was a young married couple, William McEwen and his wife who before her marriage was Hannah Stedworthy. This young couple, having all the comforts of life in their own home were advised by their parents not to risk the hardships and trials which lay before them; but with great courage and ambition, they bid adieu to friends home and their country and set sail in June for their new land.

 

The voyage was long and rough, it taking many months at sea (5 months), and it took days to make the trip on land. They landed in Brockville and made the trip to Perth in a covered wagon drawn by oxen. After getting all information as to the blazed trails, they struck off themselves leaving the rest of their party to go where they desired. They strapped their belongings on their back consisting of an ax, a tea set, a lock and key to lock a shanty when they would build one, a treasured Bible which they always read while resting, soda salt-flour and a griddle to cook the scones.

 

The way through the bush was a blazed one with many swells and bogs on their pathway but they plodded on for many miles, digging up the soil here and there to examine it. Finally, they came to a creek and spring with a nice rise of trees leading up from it. This soil looked good around the roots of the trees and they decided to build a wigwam there. They intended to build a shanty at once; but they were expecting the stork to visit them soon. They at once set to work and cut poles and covered them with brush. While they were busy at work building their wigwam (which was in an adjacent field to the present McEwen home), they heard the sound of an ax at a distance. The two set out in the direction of the sound to fine one Sandy McLean and his wife making a scow under a basswood tree on the 7th line.

 

Rejoicing to have found these friends who to had come from Scotland near them, and the women only too glad to be able to help one so young who needed a friend for on that cold November night, a male child was born in the wigwam. The first white male child born in Ramsay Township. They called him William after his father. Soon after, they build a shanty on the hill by cutting down trees and piling them up and burning them.

 

They tore up the soil around the trees with a drag two poles pointed with wooden teeth dragging the ground, sowed seed by hand which they carried on their backs from Perth, reaped it with a sickle, catching a cluster in one hand and cutting it with the other. Thrashed it will a flail, cleaned it in the wind with a hand sieve and carried it back to Perth on their backs to have it stone into ground flour and then brought back to make scones and bread. They planted hops and trained them to run op poles, picked blossoms off and boiled them and used the boiling water on flour, salt and grated potatoes to make yeast. They used a pumpkin cut in two and scooped out for a basin. They used flambos, a piece of twisted cotton or string layered on a pewter spoon, the spoon filled with tallow. It was then stuck into a crevice in the wigwam (and later the shanty), for a light. They had no matches. They used flint. They would strike the flint on a piece of steel or pocket knife, a park from the flint would light the punk. The rotten core in maple gathered for this purpose.

 

When the surveyors came from Perth to survey the lines, McLean’s had build their shanty directly on the 7th line so McEwen’s had to build another shanty nearer to the 7th line where three more sons and 1 daughter were born. The father died, leaving the mother and son William on the farm. The others went to Western Ontario

 

 

The Saga of a James Street Home— Christina McEwen Muirhead

What Was it Like Living in Beckwith 1800s? Christina McEwen Muirhead

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Killed by Zulus — Duncan and James Box

Was a Boldt Castle Boathouse Once in our Midst? See the Home of the Daphne!

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?

The Continuing Saga of Christena McEwen Muirhead—The McLaren Mill

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

“2,000 people on the streets”–Dr. Finlay McEwen of Carleton Place

The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued

The McEwen McEwan Fire 1949

The Spirit of the 7th Line

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The Gnarled Beckwith Oak

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

Lucy Connelly Poaps Penpal

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Lucy Connelly Poaps Penpal

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From Lucy Connelly Poaps scrapbook

 

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Lucy Connelly Poaps

relatedreading

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

 

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

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Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

 

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My Dear Miss F–:

The very delightful party of last month was one which will long be remembered by those present, and by none longer than myself. I hope you enjoyed it thoroughly. How exquisite a spectacle, that of the lovers of years ago once more assembling their friends as witnesses to the union of hearts which age has not withered nor the passing of time cooled toward each other. To me there was great significance in the ceremonies of the evening. For those who aspire towards such a union themselves there almost seemed to be a wish and a prophecy of like love and a similar history. To me they spoke words of encouragement and gave me hope. May I not take to myself that courage and that hope, and ask you to return a love which is as fond, and which will be as enduring as that is of our dear host and hostess. My dear Miss H —, I have longed to say this to you before. I have often nearly broken a silence, which in plain truth I need not have kept. I will do so now. I will at once assure you of my earnest love, and beg you to think of me with favor. You are to me dearer than all the world besides, and you always will be. Tell me that I may come to you and say it, and you will make me happier than words can express. This may seem too abrupt — but were I to write a million pages, they would but repeat that I love you and ask you to love me, Am I too bold in signing myself

Ever your most affectionate

 John—.

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

 

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Author’s Note—Since *Nathaniel McLenaghan was a customs collector in Perth beginning in 1897 and Edward the 7th was on the throne from 1901-1910 so this letter was written in the 1897-1910 time frame.

Apology

Nathaniel McLenaghan, Esquire. Collector of Customs and of Inland Revenue for His Majesty, Edward the 7th, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the British Dominion beyond the Seas, Kings and Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India, and to all these presents may come, we sent greeting.

Dear Mr. McLenaghan,

We, the undersigned, who live, move and have our being (doing as little real work as possible) in and around the County Buildings in the Town of Perth feel that we have done you a grave injustice by circulating foul slanders calculated to injure you, not only in your official capacity, but also your private associations, if such were possible.

We doubly regret our actions as well know your reputation in the community will not stand much trifling with and we hasten to make redress. We plead in mitigation of our offence the fact that we have become so accustomed to stating what is not the fact, that it is most difficult for us to tell the truth excepting when a lie will not suit  our purpose, and we trust that this apology will, with the hereinafter mentioned compensation, be accepted by you as a full and ample settlement of the whole matter and a peace offering from us.

We may say that as far as our information goes, you did not steal any wood from the Inspector of Public Schools, Francis L. Mitchell, to wit, and we base this conclusion on two grounds, either of which we deem good and sufficient.

Firstly: Mr. Mitchell had no wood to steal, that is, we believe all the wood he has been known to have since he moved to the Rideau, has been gathered by him at night from the premises adjacent to his cottage and we understand that at such times you were in company with, and like him, make your own provision for the next day. As a consequence, in our opinion, you would not be at all likely to take such a long chance on being caught, as would necessarily result from an attempt to take any of Michell’s plunder.

Secondly: We think you would be much more likely to steal the money from Michell and buy the wood. As against this last conclusion however, is the fact that Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales. For these several reasons, we are able to completely exonerate you from having either directly, or indirectly, unless perchance you may have done so in your sleep, ever harboured a single thought which would tend to deprive your friend and neighbour of a single chip of his wood pile.

In order to fully recompense you for the injury done to your reputation and to show how fully we desire to save you from financial loss by reason of our wrong-doing, we will pay you the sum of One Cent in equal quarterly instalments of One Farthing.

Believe us,

Your most humble and obedient servants,

Wm. P. McEwen

John Code

W.H. Grant

John Lee

 

 

historicalnotes

*Nathaniel McLenaghan (November 11, 1841 – September 26, 1912) was an Ontario merchant and political figure. He represented Lanark South in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1890 to 1893 as a Conservative member.

He was born in Drummond Township, Canada West in 1841, the son of Irish immigrants, and educated in Perth. He taught school for several years before becoming involved in exporting cattle. McLenaghan served on the town council for Perth. He was named deputy customs collector at Perth in 1893 and customs collector in 1897.

He died at Perth in 1912

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times,
  2. 27 Nov 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 4

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

 

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Innisville circa 1890s

My Dear Son,

I told Mary when she was going away to speak to you for a little money. She must have forgotten. David Ennis has gotten the line fence made and I have to pay half of it, and Mr. Ireton and his man are at this one at home today and both needed very much to be done.

Very affectionately yours,

Mother

Excuse- mail is waiting

(I assume the mailman was waiting for her note while she wrote it)

 

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Innisville, December 14, 1892

My Dear Son,

I am sure you will think it very strange that I now wrote to thank you for your kind present. I now write and thank you very much indeed as they are beautiful and we needed them so much as we did not get any in the fall.

I often pray God to bless you and prosper you for you have always been good and kind to your Mother, and not alone to me but to all the rest as well: your *brothers and sisters. I suppose I need not expect you out at Xmas as I hear through the line that Jennie (Thomas Alfred’s wife) is not coming home until after the New Year. They will likely want you to go down to Ottawa.

Emily was up to her grandfather’s funeral also Uncle Abe and Tom and Eddie and now hear Thomas. I would like if you could come out at Xmas and I will not give up yet and I will be looking for you.

I am greatly troubled with rheumatism in my shoulder, my hand shakes and I can hardly write. I hope you will excuse my writing.

From Mother (Elizabeth Hicks Code-she died 3 years later)

 

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Family Records as taken from the Family Bible (more later)

William Code and Elizabeth Hicks married 27th February 1849 by Reverend Mr. Harris at Perth, Ontario. William Code, died at Innisville 21st October 1868. Elizabeth Hicks, wife of William Code died at Innisville 23rd October 1895.

Births

John Code born 22nd January 1850

Margaret Code born 1st February 1852

Thomas Alfred Code born 9th June 1854

Mary Elizabeth Code born 20th October 1858

Robert George Code born 20th October 1858

William Abraham Code born 27th February 1861

James Richard Code born 17th January 1864

historicalnotes

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Funeral Invitation that is also in the journal I have- Leslie Clan

Shore Brae to St. Clement’s Churchyard Aberdeen, Scotland

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville