Tag Archives: letter

A. R. G Peden Town Clerk – Adin Daigle

Standard
A. R. G Peden Town Clerk – Adin Daigle
From the Collection of Adin Daigle— It cost 7.00 to rent the upper hall in 1911 for the District Dairy Meeting

An excellent account from Kevin at the Cosgrove real Estate Company– PLEASE click here..

Rarely does a property cross our paths that excites us as much as our latest listing – 19 Allan Street. This stately riverfront Victorian three-story home is overflowing with charm and character that you just don’t get in a new build: built-in linen/china cabinet, 9-foot ceilings in main living areas, wainscoting, a dreamy second floor balcony, picturesque front porch, and even original pocket doors (yes! Pocket doors!). But this 1912 red brick beauty offers more than just old-world charm, it’s been meticulously cared for and lovingly updated throughout the years by the current owners.  The formal dining room has been where Sunday dinner has been served for an increasingly growing family over the last two decades.  

This home is more than just a beautiful property – it’s an integral piece of Carleton Place history. Edmond Morphy, one of the first European settlers to inhabit this area, built his first log cabin on this site in approximately 1820 for his wife and eight children. (It’s worth noting that Carleton Place is located on unceded Algonquin First Nation territory).Some of you may know that Carleton Place was originally named Morphy’s Falls after the Morphy family. The town’s name was later changed to what we know it to be today, in honour of a famous square in Glasgow. When the current structure, 19 Allan Street, was constructed in 1912, the Morphy family log cabin was torn down. The industrious Peden family lived in this large Victorian home, and many of the original features remain today. Historical records show that Adam Robert Graham Peden (1849-1931) made ginger beer in the basement. To this day, there is a pipe that goes a quarter the way to the river from the basement, and back then water was drawn by a hand pump. The current owners discovered some the original glass bottles which are marked “ARG Peden”, and more Peden bottles are currently on display at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum (276 Edmund Street in Carleton Place if you’d like to see them in person!).  Adam R.G. Peden owned a soft drink bottling plant at 150-152 Bridge Street, which is the modern-day location of Capital Optical Eyewear.

Read more here..click

1912-

A town landmark adjoining the home of A. R. G. Peden on Allan Street was removed when the ruins of the large log house of Edmond Morphy, a first settler at Carleton Place, were torn down.  It was said to have been built about 1820.

Municipal Affairs, 1887

The incorporation of Carleton Place as a village took place in October, 1870, with a population of 1,226. We now have about a thousand more people than most towns in the Dominion had when they designated themselves as towns by acts of incorporation. Our civic affairs are entrusted to a reeve, deputy reeve and three councillors. These at present are Reeve William Pattie (building contractor) Deputy Reeve, William Kelly, (retired hotel keeper), and Councillors James Warren (blacksmith), Alex Steele, (tinsmith and stove merchant) and Abner Nichols (planing mill owner). The clerk of the Council is A. R. G. Peden.

The following gentlemen comprise the School Board : Robert Bell, chairman, Rev. Duncan McDonald (of St. Andrew’s Church), Abner Nichols, William Taylor, (hardware dealer), Peter Cram (retired tanner), S. S. Merrick, (grain dealer), A. R. G. Peden (grocer), J. Dougherty, Colin Sinclair, (merchant tailor), David Findlay (stove foundry owner), and D. Breckenridge (superintendent, Gillies woollen mill).

A. R. G. Peden – 1849/1935
Police Magistrate and Town Clerk for over 40 years.
Both photos from Rootsweb
1914

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Dec 1931, Thu  •  Page 12

From the Collection of Adin Daigle
From the Collection of Adin Daigle

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Mar 1928, Sat  •  Page 3
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 May 1987, Mon  •  Page 7

The Peden Family- Genealogy– Peden Saunders Sadler

Documenting Archibald Peden — Carleton Place

Was the Devil in Peden’s Store? When Matches First Came to Carleton Place

Recollections of the Peden Store

The Sad Tale of Alexander Gillies and Peter Peden

Letter from Davis House to Scotts in Pakenham- Adin Daigle Collection– Where Was Davis House?

Standard
Letter from Davis House to Scotts in Pakenham- Adin Daigle Collection– Where Was Davis House?
Adin Daigle Collection letter 1890

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Jun 1889, Sat  •  Page 2

Some of the people who figured prominently in the business life of the community in the 1870s: Andrew Matthew, general merchant and issues of marriage licenses; F. H. Davis, proprietor of the Almonte House; 

ALMONTE Ontario The Belmont Hotel Corner Cover 1909–Mr. Eccles prop;

1909

The doors of Hotel Amonte formerly the Davis House have been thrown open to the public, and it seems likely to (ill a serious want that has existed in Almonte for some time. Beginning at the upper floor the building has been renovated, papered and painted and decorated, and when the work on the ground floor is completed, Almonte will be possessed of a hotel that can stand up alongside of any other in the Ottawa Valley. Sanitary drainage and water service will be installed and everything made comfortable tor the guests–

The Lanark Era

Lanark, Ontario, Canada16 Apr 1919, Wed  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
12 Dec 1895, Thu  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1896, Fri  •  Page 2
CLIPPED FROM
The Star-Chronicle
Merrickville, Ontario, Canada
03 Jun 1909, Thu  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Mar 1919, Sat  •  Page 10
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Sat, Dec 11, 1909 · Page 17

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
29 Apr 1914, Wed  •  Page 4
Come on down for surgery — one day only 1886 Almonte Gazette
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1909, Wed  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1898, Fri  •  Page 6
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Apr 1914, Tue  •  Page 13

More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

 When the Circus Shut the Town Down

Before Rooney’s Pool House There Was.

The ‘Deer-Cow hybrid’ of Carleton Place Entertains the Councillors of Almonte — ORR Genealogy

You Need to be Heroic to Live in Lanark — A Letter from 1907

Standard
You Need to be Heroic to Live in Lanark — A Letter from 1907

The Lanark Era

Lanark, Ontario, Canada30 Jan 1907, Wed  •  Page 1

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Dissecting a Letter to the Editor — Isabel Aitken Ranney and Auld Kirk

Clippings and a Letter from Sadie Coleman –Robert Keith Duffett Coleman

Forgotten Letters – William Findlay- Almonte Memories –The Buchanan Scrapbook

Letter to the Editor– Chief Dougherty Does not Have the Best Firetruck!

1907 POSTCARD – VILLAGE OF LANARK. This postcard is from my personal collection of Perth and area scenes. It depicts the Village of Lanark looking northward on George Street. Caldwell’s Store and residence on the left with Caldwell’s Mill back left. To the right on the corner partially hidden is the Clyde Hotel. The postcard was sent to Miss Amy Caldwell of Caldwell Mills from Alice Quinn. The card reads. “Lanark, April 11, 07. My dear friend: I should have written before now but failed. How are you getting along and Alex also? From your former teacher Alice Quinn”. On the front it reads, “Clyde Forks can’t come up with this – eh

From Allan Ferguson to John Ferguson– Lanark to Montague–1850— thanks to Grant McFarlane and Melanie Johnston Mason

Standard
From Allan Ferguson to John Ferguson– Lanark to Montague–1850— thanks to  Grant McFarlane and  Melanie Johnston Mason

Thanks to Melanie Johnston Mason for sending and please note that Grant McFarlane in Lanark is the owner for credit purposes

The letter writer Alan, was writing about his father Thomas’ death which occured in 1846.The letter writer Allan also had a brother named Thomas and  this brother had a son named Alexander……And Alexander had a son named Allen. I am not related to the Ferguson’s but I have studied that lot, lot 26E, Concession III Dalhousie – and those are my findings thus far without delving into the genealogy of the family.

Info provided by: Melanie Mason – 

Dear Brother and Sister:

I received yours on the 17th of March. I was down in Lanark when I received you letter and on the way home, I was taken suddenly bad with pain in the stomach and bowels and in that state it was tight times with me to get the home of Hugh Hunter on the night of the 17th and on the 18th we found it prudent to send for Dr. Murray for we was afraid it was inflammation but on his arrival he dispelled that doubt for he said it was a windy colic and I am getting better. Mother and Mary is in some measure of health when I parted with them on the 19th, for Mother has been with Mary since the death of our Father and for a considerable time before it. Thomas came home from the shanty on the 17th of said month and he has not been very well since for I expect that it is the cold he has caught. You wanted to know if Thomas was at home the time of the storm. No. He was at the shanty, likewise you want to know all the particulars concerning the death of our Father.

He was at Hunters all the time of his illness. He, for 2 days after he arrived at Hugh’s, his throat swelled but the swelling fell immediately after and on the Wednesday before he died he was considerably better for he was reading at Chambers Journal more than the half of the day but on the day following he was much worse for he complained of stitches in his chest and body and on Friday he was still getting weaker and Friday night Hugh left home and came up to inform us that he was making worse and on Saturday morning Hugh and I left home to go down but to our great surprise when we arrived he was gone; a lifeless corpse so there was no person there but mother and Mary and the 2 children when he died., on the night of Friday after Hugh left home, he began to think that death was approaching but had no idea that it was so nigh at hand for he was quite and considerably composed. He would not lie in the bunk nor bed but to have his made at the fire. It was between 12 and 1 o’clock when Mother lay down to take little repose for she was tired out. Mary lay down with the children for they were both badly at the time and she spoke several to her Father but he give all at the times a sharp answer and Mother rose after Mary had spoken to him but he had drawn his last breath and this was about 2 o’clock in the morning and we removed his corpse home on the 1st of March and he was interred on the 2nd on the third line of Lanark beside his son James. We received a letter from Aunt Love on the 28th of February. John Love is in very poor health, likewise Aunt Taylor and there are some more particulars concerning Uncle Williams’ death and widow but I have not time at present to write them down. I wrote a letter——–this time a good way on to Mysena to (Jane) Telling her what has happened likewise I sent one to George (Sheare) and one to John Love and I was going to write to Uncle Nathanial but you informed me that you was going to write to him which will save me the trouble. I now commence to inform you that our Father died without making any will and you will be heir according to law; so I want an immediate settlement for Mr. D that is in Quebec, the creditors are pushing me pretty hard for it but I will keep them at bay till I get things settled so I only hope you will consider the matter and come up and we will make a definite settlement so I add no more at present so I remain your Brother until Death.   Alan Ferguson.

At bottom of letter written with different pen and ink and maybe by a different person, Allan Ferguson of Dalhousie 1850, John Ferguson, Thomas Ferguson, James Ferguson, Sarah Ferguson, Mary Ferguson, Jane Ferguson.

The original letter is in the possession of  Grant Davis McFarlane R.R. #1, Lanark, Ontario.

Mary is in the 1851 Census, age 70, living with her daughter Mary Ann and son-in-law Hugh Hunter. In 1861 she is back on her original homestead, living with her son Allan who has inherited the farm. The homestead has returned to forest and only a small excavation remains to show where the original house stood. Flowers and rhubarb still grow in the overgrown clearing. The St. James Ferguson Cemetery is located in the churchyard of the abandoned St. James Church on Concession Line 2 in Dalhousie.

Gloria Currie13 hours

Thanks, also to Amelia Jean ( Ferguson ) Allen, who transcribed the original letter, and to Lila McFarlane, who brought the original letter to her attention. This letter describes the death of Thomas Ferguson, who arrived ( from Scotland )with his wife, Mary Barr, and their children in 1821. It should be noted that the cemetery beside St. James Church is actually called the Ferguson Cemetery and the cemetery at the original Ferguson Homestead is the Thomas Ferguson Cemetery.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 Dec 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

So Where was this Bridge? Melanie Johnston Mason Photos Ferguson Family

The Heirlooms- Ferguson Violin

Letters from Lanark–Thomas Ferguson and Mary Barr

The Story of Wild Bob Ferguson of Dalhousie Township

Alan Ferguson and Minni Maude McGonegal — Clyde Forks

A Lost Letter — Reverend Canon Thomas Leech and Mary Empey Leech

Standard
A Lost Letter — Reverend Canon Thomas Leech and Mary Empey Leech

According to Ancestry.ca Mary Rombough Empey Leech married Rev. Thomas Leech on Tuesday June 25,1901 in Lanark, Ontario. This letter that I rescued was mailed from Carleton Place, Ontario on February 23, 1896, so they were not married yet.

Mary was born in 1862, so she was 39 years of age and he was 38 years of age when they married. They had one child Mary Adelaide (middle name named after her Grandmother) Leech and she was born June 19, 1902. On Jun 1921 •  she lived in Loughboro Township, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada, single and lived with the family in the family with Kingston. Their daughter Mary Adelaide LEECH was born on June 19, 1902, in Leeds, Ontario, her father, Thomas, was 39, and her mother, Mary, was 40. She died in 1996 at the age of 94.

This letter written from Mary Empey Leech to Thomas Leech from Mary was addressed to Reverend Leech in Bathurst Ontario–stamped Carleton Place on the front and Bancroft on the back. It begins:

Carleton Place February 23, 1896

My dearest love,

There is only J. the wee lad and myself here today. Father and Mother are both in Ottawa. We hope the change may do them both much good- Too many remark how much dear old father has failed this winter- I feel quite downhearted some nights as I come in from work and find him so miserable. However, if he gets along through Spring he may feel smart and stronger in the summer. This winter has been very trying to so many people.

How have you managed dear to get through the deep snow this month? Are you glad the Archbishop has made his visit? Helps your mission. Am sorry the Brotherhoods will not be with you sooner. I suppose however that he is coming and begin duty in his new field at easter. How have you and Mrs. Mallet settled in? I drove home (horse) part of the way this morning for a chat with your father and Ettie. Your mother stayed in town as it was lucky it was a mild day.

Say? dear home– You follow in a “careless rut” with writing to the home-folks- perhaps you have written within the last fortnight- have not heard any complaints since two weeks ago.

Maggie and Hattie attend church very regularly. Edith and ? are not so regular- they attend all the funerals though. I was joking with Hattie about W. the other day. She is very comfortable and I think very happy. This is Lent so I must abstain dear for sending you too long a letter. Will send you a copy of the “Passion of Jesus” which we are having here during this Lenten season. You may give it to Mrs. Sargeant. Perhaps she could get it up for Passion Week. We are not taking the “Story of the Crosses” on last page on as it would be long all taken together at one service. Think you will like it. once more dear love adieu. Yours as ever.

“Marie”

Thanks for sending the writing paper send another soins ( in care of her) Thank you

I would like to know how high the “snow mountains” are there. Cannot bear ours. ( snow drifts)

Rev Thomas Leech

BIRTH1863
DEATH1951 (aged 87–88)
BURIALSaint James CemeteryCarleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada  Show Map
MEMORIAL ID197173302 · View Source
Mary R. Empey Leech
BIRTH
1862
DEATH
1946 (aged 83–84)
BURIAL
Saint James Cemetery
Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada  Show Map
MEMORIAL ID
197173303 · View Source
Mary Rombough Leech (Empey)
Also Known As:“Leach”
Birthdate:June 26, 1862
Birthplace:Osnabruck Centre, Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry United Counties, Ontario, Canada
Death:1946 (83-84)
Place of Burial:Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Immediate Family:Daughter of Hamilton Nevis Empey and Adelaide M Empey
Wife of Thomas Leech, Reverend
Mother of Mary Adelaide Leech
Sister of Jean Graham HunterBessy Empey and Adelaide Empey
Mary R. Empey Leech
CEMETERY:St. James Anglican Church, Carleton Place
BURIAL PLACE:Lanark Ontario Canada
NOTES:Leech Rev. Thomas Leech M.A. Canon 1863 – 1951 His Beloved Wife Mary R. Empey 1862 – 1946 Beloved Parents Of Mary Adelaide New Every Morning Is The Love
Name:Mary Rombough Leech
[Mary Rombough Empey] 
Gender:Female
Race:Scottish (Scotish)
Age:85
Birth Date:26 Jun 1861
Birth Place:Ontario
Death Date:19 Jul 1946
Death Place:9th Line, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:Hamilton N Empey
Mother:Adelaide Empey
Spouse:Canon T Leech
Certificate Number:027868

 -
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Aug 1946, Thu  •  Page 14

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image.png
Rev Canon Leech 1951 death

 -
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Sep 1973, Tue  •  Page 44

Text and Photos Donna Mcfarlane

Linda I remember as a very young girl visiting this gentleman at Xmas to deliver a Xmas tree from our farm.. he was born there and had tears in his eyes when he saw the tree….. i think this is the one you wrote about this ( yes I did LOLOL)—i may have been four at the time but because of the fact he said he was born beside the fireplace —-i remembered him is a photo of the house where he was born which was destroyed by fire sept 17 1954…..Lot 12 conc 9 Beckwith— House destroyed by fire Sept 17 1954. Picture was taken Xmas 1946–mom and dads first xmas there after moving from Lake Avenue in Carleton Place

Text and Photos Donna Mcfarlane

Donna was born when they lived on Lake avenue Jan 6 1945 and they moved Sept 1946 to the farm. Her Mom hated to leave the house in town and move to country with no hydro and no water inside.

The porch was on the lane side of the house and ran fun length of stone house then another porch alongside the summer kitchen and separator room ending at woodshed. The stones at right under porch of stone house then the frame summer kitchen then the woodshed.. behind the house and a wee bit back you will see the drive shed.. in the far rear is the barns

Bathurst in 1896

 -
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Aug 1896, Sat  •  Page 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

loggers-at-innisville-644x336

Innisville- loggers and mills

 

101186549_10157436255541886_5092219728441638912_n

New Addition to the Code Journals (actual letter to T.A. Code from Mrs W.J. Rothwell ( Mary)

Lanark R. R. 1

March 18 ( no year)

To: Mr. T. A. Code, Perth

Dear Mr. Code,

I was very pleased to have your letters in Sat. mail and deem it quite a prize to hold– the documents re: Ennis Estate. I shall draw your attention to one error contained. The *Ennis “Cresh” if there is any.

*(author’s note–Cresh-Historically, surnames evolved as a way to sort people into groups – by occupation, place of origin, clan affiliation, patronage, parentage, adoption, and even physical characteristics (like red hair)

Thank you, my husband W. J. is quite himself to-day. He remains in bed. In fact he had to as his cold affected the head and stomach. He expects to attend Mr. Morris’s funeral to-morrrow.

David was the only child of the first marriage. My mother, Eleanor, was the oldest of the second family.

In order: Eleanor, Sarah, Maggie, John, Esther, Rebecca.

I like your ideas of the family tree, and have been meandering about.

Truly yours,

Mary Rothwell

Mrs. W. J. Rothwell (William Joseph)

Lanark, R.R. 1

Mary E. (James) Rothwell obit- 1941 -

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jan 1941, Fri  •  Page 19

 

William Joseph Rothwell

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Death: December 03, 1940 (65)
Immediate Family: Son of John Rothwell and Eleanor Mary Warren
Husband of Mary Ethel James
Father of Eleanor Kathleen Dorothy Rothwell

 

Original letter typed up in 1929 by T. A. Code and sent to Andrew Haydon from the journal I purchased.-Perth, Ontario,1929. Noted history about Eleanor Ennis mother of Mary Rathwell who wrote the above letter and why she was interested in Ennis family history.

Perth, December 16,1929.

Ennis Genealogy

Coped from a letter from Arthur Foster of Chilliwack, B.C. dated September 29th 1929. to George Ennis of Balderson, Ontario.

James Ennis, senior was married in Ireland before coming to this country. Four children were the issue of this union viz.

Mrs. Charles Harvey, Mrs. john Chalmers, Mrs. James Cook and one son James Ennis Jr. also one son David died young.

The name of his first wife not related or known. His second wife was Caroline Buell who died at Ennisville/Innisville in the early eighties.

James Ennis, Jr. married Miss Jackson and one son David was the only issue. He was again married to Essie Jackson, a sister of his first wife, and the following family followed.

Eleanor- Mrs. Wm. James (Mary Rothwell’s Mother)

Sarah-Mrs. John James, Clayton

John-later of Port Huron

Esther- Mrs. T. A. Kidd Burritts Rapids

Death

Perth Courier, Feb 24 1925 Death
In Lanark twp, February 15, Eleanor Ennis, wife of William H James, aged 50 years, 2 14 days. Born in Innisville in 1845. Daughters are Mrs R Montgomery, Lanark; Mrs Thomas Hands, Drummond, Mrs Wm Rathwell, Lanark and Mrs Frank, Edmonton and Sadie, Gladys and Nellie at home. Son William also at home…to St George’s
Cem…brother John E, Sarnia; brother-in-law T A Kidd, Burritt’s Rapids (Carleton Place ‘Central Canadian’)

 

Mary Ethel James

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Death: January 15, 1941 (62)
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Immediate Family: Daughter of William Hill James and Eleanor Ennis
Wife of William Joseph Rothwell
Mother of Eleanor Kathleen Dorothy Rothwell

 

relatedreading

29216054_10155639791476886_1338412320258260992_n1

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

 

ephemera_800

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

A Letter to my Grandchildren April 14, 2020 — Linda Knight Seccaspina

Standard
A Letter to my Grandchildren April 14, 2020 — Linda Knight Seccaspina

 

90264593_10157191712056886_7816722495968378880_o (2)

 

During the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918-1919, I found many letters written how people felt. I decided to write one for posterity.

To my sweet angels,

The only thing I can remember similar to this at your age was living in “a polio world” in the 1950s. Birthday parties and friends were shunned less the “polio germ” lived within them or their homes. Today, you my Grandchildren are living in a different world, yet it feels like the same world. I wonder if you will remember it like I remember the years of polio. 

Each day your Grandmother wakes up during this pandemic confused as to what day it is, yet somehow, none of this is a dream. Empty silent streets affirm the daily unimaginable reality show that we are all living through.

I don’t think I have felt melancholy until today, and after reading through some Facebook posts I see others are feeling the same way. I have made a great effort to think positive, even though I worry if any traces of COVID-19 have wandered into this house. Some nights I pull the sheet over my head in case the virus mysteriously hangs in the air. What if it suddenly infiltrates me making me feel like someone pulled a corset too tight? What if I never see you again?  I keep forgetting I am one of those that are in the high risk group and I must be careful.

I lay my head down on top of my laptop genuinely tired. Sleep is lacking greatly at night combined with the wildest dreams I have ever had. Last night I was running an auction in some stairwell and all I could see was rows of faces sitting in old wooden Sunday School chairs on each level. Faces were glued to what I was saying– but were they listening? It reminded me of a story your Great Grandmother used to tell me.

In the 1940s a Tetanus vaccination was introduced in Canada and many parents didn’t want to have their children vaccinated. Your Great Grandmother told me that she had heard stories that a child in Dunham, Quebec had gotten the inoculation and “ended up on all fours”. There is no proof regarding that statement of hers – but I know she went down to the High School daily pleading in front of a group of seated teachers and school elders. For a month she begged them to spare her children from being vaccinated, but in the end both your Grandfather Arthur and your great Uncle Fred Jr. were inoculated.

After the inoculation Fred Jr. got sick and died 5 months later. Each day when the doctor would come down those orange stairs from the second floor he would tell  your Great Grandmother that he had no clue how to help her eldest child. In 1941 Frederick Alexander Knight died at the age of 19, and the only memory that was left of him was a photo of him on the wall beside the verandah door. I have no idea what happened to that photo, and the only proof that Fred Jr. was born, lived, and died in Cowansville, Quebec is on the family gravestone that sits in the Emmanuel United Church Cemetery on Main Street in Cowansville.

There were also the occasional bats that used to fly out of hidden corners in the dead of the night in the old house. The discovery that bats caused rabies in the 1950s had increased public fear. The radio and newspapers drove your Great Grandmother to full tilt. The very transient sighting of a bat caused her to scream to keep my head down. Apparently one had gotten caught in her hair once and she didn’t want anyone to catch rabies.

Of course just like now there were conspiracy stories galore and I began to think this was one of hers. In reality, bats are not interested in flying into your hair, but they may fly close to you in search of insects. Remember that if I ever tell you that story.

Great Grammy Knight would spray her floorboards in the 50s trying to keep away any bugs that might form disease in her home. I realize today that was DDT and wonder how that generation and myself lived so long.

A hundred years ago there was something called The Spanish Flu and all your ancestors lived through it. Some survived, and some did not. But unlike your ancestors a vaccine for COVID-19 will hopefully soon be developed. Maybe our social interaction will be delayed for a while and we will have to find other ways to be together without risk.

Please remember that Facebook and Instagram can never replace the human spirit and Facetime is no substitute for being in the same room with family and friends. So all we can do now is take one hour or one day at a time and get through it smiling. Why? Because your ancestors made it through and we will too. As your Great Grandmother Mary Louise Deller Knight used to tell me:

Don’t worry my birdie, just do what you’re told and keep to the rules and you will be fine.”

She is right we will be fine– this too shall pass. I promise.

Love from your Gammy who loves you so much.

 

Lanark County Santa Letters 1918

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

Linda and Christmas Cards– and the Lack off–This is Your Christmas Letter:)

Linda and the Lack of a Christmas Card–This is Your Christmas Letter 2017

A Letter from the Trenches from the Carleton Place Lads

Standard
A Letter from the Trenches from the Carleton Place Lads

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jun 1915, Fri  •  Page 7

 -

The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
11 May 1918, Sat  •  Page 13

 

 

historicalnotes

hoope

Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

WW1 broke out and within two weeks, the town’s first dozen volunteers under Captain William H. Hooper left Carleton Place. Major W. H. Hooper, husband of Mabel Hooper –home after four years’ service in the first world war including two years as a prisoner in Germany, was welcomed in a reception held outdoors.  Indoor meetings had been banned by reason of deaths from a world influenza epidemic.

Major W.H. Hooper was appointed Post Master in 1920 and served as Post Master until his retirement in 1950. During Hooper’s time if office many changes occurred.He had control of the clerk for the position of Telegraph operator until the telegraph service moved to its own building. The school children popped in daily to get warm on cold days and enjoy the steam heat. The caretaker lived on the upper floor and could be counted on to appear as soon as the children entered the building and order them out. Major Hooper was also a gruff individual and his family on the corner of Lake Ave and Bridge Street. READ more here..CLICK

 

 

 -

CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Mar 1916, Sat  •  Page 10

 

relatedreading

The House at 180 Henry Street Carleton Place – John Armour

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Photos of John Armour

The McNeely Family Saga– Part 3

The McNeely Family Saga– Part 1 and 2

Lucy Connelly Poaps Penpal

Standard
Lucy Connelly Poaps Penpal

71083176_10156755869026886_3986114922139353088_n.jpg

From Lucy Connelly Poaps scrapbook

 

71290074_10156755869021886_7120718862353432576_n

Lucy Connelly Poaps

relatedreading

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

 

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

Standard
Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

 

s-l1600.jpg

My Dear Miss F–:

The very delightful party of last month was one which will long be remembered by those present, and by none longer than myself. I hope you enjoyed it thoroughly. How exquisite a spectacle, that of the lovers of years ago once more assembling their friends as witnesses to the union of hearts which age has not withered nor the passing of time cooled toward each other. To me there was great significance in the ceremonies of the evening. For those who aspire towards such a union themselves there almost seemed to be a wish and a prophecy of like love and a similar history. To me they spoke words of encouragement and gave me hope. May I not take to myself that courage and that hope, and ask you to return a love which is as fond, and which will be as enduring as that is of our dear host and hostess. My dear Miss H —, I have longed to say this to you before. I have often nearly broken a silence, which in plain truth I need not have kept. I will do so now. I will at once assure you of my earnest love, and beg you to think of me with favor. You are to me dearer than all the world besides, and you always will be. Tell me that I may come to you and say it, and you will make me happier than words can express. This may seem too abrupt — but were I to write a million pages, they would but repeat that I love you and ask you to love me, Am I too bold in signing myself

Ever your most affectionate

 John—.

s-l1600.jpg

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte