Tag Archives: lavant

So What Happened to James Reid — Lavant

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So What Happened to James Reid — Lavant

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
25 May 1904, Wed  •  Page 1

This was a public ad place in the Lanark Era in 1904. Public domain—–Read the last entry in the classfied ad– “PUBLIC WARNING” —James Reid was about 17 at this time, and if you look at the family; it was certainly a huge family and things must have been tough as it was for most children in these eras. I can’t figure out the age of consent, but his father was from the old country and he probably had his own ideas, like other parents from the old country.

Children and youth were important contributors to the family economy. Most children learned by working alongside adults. Children’s work, both paid and unpaid, was crucial to their own and to their families’ well-being and survival.

Trying to track James down I found out that he stayed in the Lavant area and had a farm. Eight years later after this ad was placed in the Lanark Era, he married Margaret Closs who was seven years younger than he and had six children. Looks he fared out well.

1900 James Victor Reid age 13
1900
Ontario- Photo– Donald Campbell

James Reid in the 1891 Census of Canada

Name:James Reid
Gender:Male
Marital Status:Single
Age:4
Birth Year:abt 1887
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Lavant, Lanark North, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Son
Religion:Free Church
French Canadian:No
Father’s Name:Robert Reid
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Jessy Reid
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgeRelationshipRobert Reid45HeadJessy Reid38WifeEmma Reid16DaughterJohn Reid14SonRobert Reid12SonWilliam Reid9SonMaggie Reid6DaughterJames Reid4SonJessy Reid2DaughterAgness ReidDaughte

James Victor REID

1887–1973

BIRTH 9 MAR 1887 • Lavant,Lanark,Ontario

DEATH 6 DEC 1973 • Perth,Ontario

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Sep 1938, Sat  •  Page 24

So What Happened to Miss Eva Reid of Renfrew?

What Happened to the Riddell/ Montgomery Doors? Three years later…  Sherri Iona (Lashley)

What Happened to Earl Hyde France ?

Survivors of the 1906 Fire– Mr. William Edward Scott Tom Comba — What Happened to Them?

What Happened to Lottie Blair of Clayton and Grace Cram of Glen Isle?

So What Happened to Miss Winnifred Knight Dunlop Gemmill’s Taxidermy Heads?

What Happened to Harold McLean?

What Happened to Basil Flynn’s Ducks.. ahh Geese?

What Happened to the Towels in the Soap Box?

The Flower Station School— The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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The Flower Station School— The Buchanan Scrapbooks

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

Lavant Township consists mostly of swamps. It was slow in populating and in 1842 the population was only 40 people.
Flower Station:
Was a postal station in the 1880s. Gilbert White was the postmaster and also general merchant.
Lavant:
Is a village in the southern portion of Lavant Township. In the Historical Atlas for Lanark County, it is marked Lavant PO.
Clyde Forks:
In the Historical Atlas for Lanark County, there is Ochil PO which was near Clyde Forks.

Clippings of the K & P Railroad Kick and Push –Buchanan Scrapbooks

Logging Down the Line From Snow Road to Lavant to Carleton Place to Appleton to Galetta

S.S. #3 Lavant Clyde Forks

The History of S.S.#3 Lavant Clyde Forks

Alan Ferguson and Minni Maude McGonegal — Clyde Forks

Archie Guthrie’s Notes on Lanark Mines Hall’s Mills and Cheese 1993

Caldwell’s Roller Mills and Sawmill Burnt to the Ground –$30,000 Damage

Clydesville General Store

Thurlow and Lavant Clippings

The Lavant Station Fire 1939

Alan Ferguson and Minni Maude McGonegal — Clyde Forks

We’ll Never See a Woman Again Like That-Irene Crosbie

From the Files of The Canadian — Who is This? Where is This?

What’s In a Name? Lanark County 101– Or What’s What in 1934

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What’s In a Name? Lanark County 101– Or What’s What in 1934

Lanark was a provincial riding in Ontario, Canada, that was created for the 1934 election. In 1987 there was a minor redistribution and the riding was renamed to Lanark-Renfrew. It was abolished prior to the 1999 election. It was merged into the riding of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke.

In 1933, in an austerity measure to mark the depression times, the province passed an update to the Representation Act that reduced the number of seats in the legislature from 112 to 90. The riding of Lanark was created from parts of Lanark North and Lanark South and consisted of the townships of Beckwith, Bathurst, Burgess North, Dalhousie, Darling, Drummond, Elmsley North, Lanark, Lavant, Montague, Pakenham, Ramsay, Sherbrooke North and Sherbrooke South. It also included the towns of Almonte, Carleton Place, Perth, and Smith’s Falls and the village of Lanark

1934-

W H A T ’S in a Name? Sometimes very little. Scores of townships in On- ” tario are called after old-time members of the Provincial Legislature big frogs in the little political puddles of their day—whose names mean nothing to this generation. Sir John Graves Simcoe, first Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada, gave his own name to one of our counties. Lady Simcoe claimed a share in the work; and to this day three of the townships in that county bear the names of her pet spaniel puppies, Tiny, Tay and Flos. •

 But often in the place names of a community there are suggestions of its ” early history and the origin of its pioneers. The Highlanders who settled Glengarry county have left proof of their love for the old land in the names we find there—Lochiel, Dunvegan, Lochinvar, Dalkeith, Athol, Glen Roy and a dozen others. The Highland emigrant never forgot. 

Lowlanders who came to our own country in 1811-1822 for- or fail to renew in Canada the names of shires and streams and towns which they had known a t home. Lanark, county, township and village,—the Tay, the Clyde, Kilmarnock, Clyde Forks, Glen Tay, the Scotch Line, all remind us of the districts in Scotland from which thousands of our first settlers came. But now our townships, for the most part, preserve the names of the great or near-great men then concerned, in their colonial government or their friends. 

BURGESS, probably from the Bishop of Salisbury, school-mate and friend of Prime Minister Addington (Did you know that North Burgess is now part of Tay Valley?) read- McLaren’s Phosphate Mine — BurgessWood Housing– Anglo Canadian Phosphate Company

ELMSLEY, after Hon. John Elmsley, second Chief Justice of Upper Canada;  Read-A Town Called Barbodies–Port Elmsley 101

BECKWITH and MONTAGUE after Commander J. Beckwith and Admiral Sir George Montague who were friends and guests of Earl Dalhousie Quebec during his term as Governor; – Read-The Beckwith McGregors or readThe Barren Lands of Montague?

DARLING, after Col. H. C. Darling, Military Secretary to Lord Dalhousie for whom he made an inspection and report regarding the Perth and Rideau settlements in 1822. By the way, many years ago I was told by one of the ‘oldest inhabitants’ that this township was named in honour of Grace Darling, the heroic lighthouse girl who, alone in her frail skiff, rescued nine sailors from the wrecked schooner, “Forfarshire” in the storm swept North Sea. Every school reader fifty years ago contained the story of that braV’e deed. One would like to : believe that the township owed its name to her; but she was only eight years old when the survey and naming were completed, and the more commonplace explanation must be accepted.  Read-People are Afraid to Work– Jennie Majaury- Darling Township

DRUMMOND—Sir Gordon Drummond was born a t Quebec .where his father was paymaster of the military forces. Sir Gordon entered the army and served with distinction in Holland, Minorca, Egypt and Gibraltar before coming back to Canada in 1813 to take a gallant part in the war against the United States Read-Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

SHERBROOKE—Sir John Cope Sherbrooke followed Drummond as Governor. Perhaps in Quebec he might have worked out some peaceful solution of the troubles and conflicts, even then becoming acute, between the French Canadians, and the British minority there. But the shuffling policy of the British Colonies office convinced him that the task was hard, and his failing health hastened his resignation.  Read-What’s Happening at Christie Lake June 23, 1899

LAVANT—Sherbrooke was succeeded as Governor by the Duke of Richmond. Richmond Village, the Goodwood river (commonly known as the “Jock”) and the townships of Fitzroy, March and Torbolton in Carleton county get their names from the Duke’s family or estates, and our township of Lavant recalls a village near the Goodwood racetrack on the Duke’s estate in Sussex, England. Read-The Lavant Station Fire 1939

Driving between Ottawa and Franktown one passes a cairn on the roadside in memory of the tragic death there of Charles Lennox, fourth Duke of Richmond. 

The story has been often published with varying details. But the account written by his son, Lord William Pitt Lennox, has not, I think, been reproduced in recent years. It may be of interest to read his own words:

That a far cry from the glitter and glamour of his vice-regal courts at Dublin and Quebec, from his sumptuous entertainments at Goodwood, from the gorgeous ball at Brussels where the Richmonds entertained Wellington and his officers on the eve of Quatre Bras and Waterloo, to this poor crazed Charles Lennox, running madly through a Canadian swamp, and dying at last on a pallet of straw in a back-woods cow byre. “He was born in a barn, and he has died in a barn” said the gossips, when the news reached England. Which was true. Read-The Haunted Canoe from the Jock River

Immigration/ settlers stories

Ramsay W.I. Tweedsmuir History Book 1—SOME EARLY RAMSAY HISTORY

Plans For the Lanark County Townships, 1827, with Names Names Names

How Did Settlers Make Their Lime?

Mothell Parish familes that are in the 1816-1822 1816 – 1824 Beckwith Settlers Names

The Old Settlers Weren’t so Old After All

Dear Lanark Era –Lanark Society Settlers Letter

Ramsay Settlers 101

Beckwith –Settlers — Sir Robert the Bruce— and Migrating Turtles

Come to Canada– the Weather is Fine — Immigration Links

Lanark Settlement Emigrants Leave Scotland

Sheppard’s Falls — Shipman’s Falls — Shipman’s Mills –Waterford — Ramsayville Victoriaville and Almonte — Senator Haydon

ROCKIN’ Cholera On the Trek to the New World — Part 4

Rock the Boat! Lanark County or Bust! Part 1

It Wasn’t the Sloop John B — Do’s and Don’t in an Immigrant Ship -Part 2

Riders on the Storm– Journey to Lanark County — Part 3

Logging Down the Line From Snow Road to Lavant to Carleton Place to Appleton to Galetta

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Logging Down the Line From Snow Road to Lavant to Carleton Place to Appleton to Galetta

It has seldom been our privilege to present a more comprehensive word picture of the everyday life of a lumberjack and river driver on the Upper Ottawa a half century ago, than that which comes to us today from the pen of Mr. James Annable of Carleton Place. Born on the banks of the Mississippi at Carleton Place, in the days when lumbering on that important tributary of the Ottawa was at its height, Mr. Annable at an early age threw in his lot with the bronzed giants of the forest and river. His experiences during that first season are not only interesting but highly informative.

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 Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. The old pike Hole

appleton tom edwards photo

Down by the Old Pike Hole–The Island Bridges of Carleton Place- Before and After

The Devil, a Regatta, the Enterprise and a Gale

A Logging Camp Story — Beaver Stew

Just Another Day in Logging

  1. Six Women in Town but Lots of Logging
  2. Loggers– Arborists– Then and Now in Lanark County
  3. You Don’t Waltz With Timber on a Windy Day
  4. Smoking Toking Along to the Log Driver’s Waltz 
  5. Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys
  6. Your Mississippi River, Ontario Fact of the Day

S.S. #3 Lavant Clyde Forks

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S.S. #3 Lavant Clyde Forks

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

The History of S.S.#3 Lavant Clyde Forks

Alan Ferguson and Minni Maude McGonegal — Clyde Forks

Archie Guthrie’s Notes on Lanark Mines Hall’s Mills and Cheese 1993

Caldwell’s Roller Mills and Sawmill Burnt to the Ground –$30,000 Damage

Clydesville General Store

S.S. #2 Lavant Robertson’s Lake

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S.S. #2 Lavant Robertson’s Lake

 

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ESCAPE FROM LIMBURG
Lance Corporal Robert Rollo Paul
(1888-1962)
In the cold darkness shortly before dawn on Thursday November 15, 1918, after an 11-
day 200-kilometer cross-country odyssey, Lance-Corporal Robert Paul, crawling on all fours, within meters of a German border guard, slipped across the Dutch frontier and regained his freedom after 18 months as a Prisoner of War. During the First World War approximately 3,300 Canadian soldiers were taken prisoner on the Western Front. Many attempted to escape but Robert Paul was one of only about 200 men tough and wily enough to succeed-– read more here.. CLICK

 

 

relatedreading

S.S #1 Lavant Thurlow

The Lavant Station Fire 1939

Book of Annual Reports SS#6 Darling California

S.S #1 Lavant Thurlow

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S.S #1 Lavant Thurlow

 

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Image may contain: textThe school closed in February 1970 and the children were bussed to Maple Grove Central School in Lanark.

From the files Doris Blackburn/ Karen Blackburn Chenier

 

Joann Voyce
My Grandfather John.G.Voyce attended this school in 1885, approximately, along with his sisters and step brothers and step sisters My family visited the building 10 years ago. It was, at that time, a Community Hall where we were well received and fed. A couple of original Voyce family school books, from that school, were donated to their library by our family. The original mortgage apparently was held by Hugh Natchbull Thurlow who was a step father to my grandfather and the log cabin where they lived was the Thurlow farm next to the school

 

 

relatedreading

 

S.S. #5 White School White Community Hall

  1. Halls Mills School– Earl Munro –1968

  2. A Pakenham School Story from Ingram Scott

  3. The Things I did in School?—Tribute to Corey Sample

  4. The Blizzard of 1888– Three Heroic Teachers

    221 Facebook Shares!! Memories of Almonte update– Don Andrews and Mrs. Scholar

    Lanark East Teachers’ Institute 1930 Names Names Names

    The Trouble With Trying to be Normal– The Ottawa Normal School

    Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

    “Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

    The Forgotten Clayton School House

    Be True to Your School–SS #15 Drummond

    Schools Out for the Summer in the County

    School Salaries of 1918

    Home Economic Winners Lanark County Names Names Names– Drummond Centre

    Lanark County Public School Results 1916 Names Names Names

    Scotch Corners Union S.S. #10 School Fire

    School’s Out at S.S. No. 14 in Carleton Place

    The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

    The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

The Lavant Station Fire 1939

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The Lavant Station Fire 1939

 

 - LAVANT STATION VILLAGE BLAZE COSTS $50,000 20...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 19 Jun 1939, Mon,
  3. Page 1

 

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Joe Brousse with the Lavant Mail about 1910- House is believed to be that of Manson Kellar- Photo- H. Brousse

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Alan Ferguson and Minni Maude McGonegal — Clyde Forks

We’ll Never See a Woman Again Like That-Irene Crosbie

From the Files of The Canadian — Who is This? Where is This?

from the buchanan scrapbook

The Bush Fires of Darling Township

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The Bush Fires of Darling Township

 

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October 1897

The bush fires were everywhere in the year 1897 due to a period of dry weather. I read lots of accounts of numerous fires in the Ottawa Valley as well as on the Quebec side. It was truly a perilous year.

 

October 1897

Bush fires have been raging in Darling for nearly two weeks and are doing considerable damage. The fire started on the south side of the river on the boundary line between Lavant and Darling. It originated from a haymaker’s fire which was supposed to have been quenched but was smouldering underground.

It has already extended over an area of six square miles, destroying four hundred acres of wooded land belonging to the Merchants Bank, Perth, and the timber limits of Messrs. J. & J. Herron and T. B. Caldwell. Mr. Larocque, who lives on that side of the river, has lost one stack of hay and Mr. J. A. McFarlane has had great fears of his, though he has so far been able to save it.

On the north side of the river Messrs. J. & J. Herron’s lots on the boundary line have been completely destroyed. Mr. John Stewart, of Waba, who lost his shanties and equipment some time ago by incendiary fires, has been, further victimized by the destruction  of the best of his limits lying along  the boundary line by ares of a similar j origin.

Our informant was an eyewitness of the struggle which *Mr. Thos. Elliott had to save his property  on Thursday last. His premises were completely surrounded by fire and it was only by the most careful watching that the fire was kept under control. Fire was first noticed in a pile of corn husks about forty feet from the house. Immediately after this was extinguished fire was noticed right at the door of the barn. Hardly was the second blaze subdued before fire was again noticed beneath a sloop a few feet from the barn.

While fighting the fires a spark alighted on *Mrs. Elliott’s shoulder and before she was aware of it, it had burned a large hole through her clothing. Mr. Jno. Caldwell, of Darling, had much difficulty in saving the building on his lower lot and despite the best efforts of those fighting the fires three stacks of his hay were consumed. Four or five hundred acres of land belonging to Mr. Jno. Murray, jr., were swept over by the fire and on Friday night four or five acres of the line fence between Messrs. W . C. Craig and P. Foy were destroyed.

On Sunday fire broke out near Boyle’s bridge and was spreading rapidly. The heavy rain, however, should check the progress of the fire and bring relief to the anxiety of those whose property was threatened

 

historicalnotes

*005220-76 Thomas ELLIOT, wid, 28, Perth, Darling, s/o Thomas and Rose ELLIOT, married Ellen Elmiyra MOFFAT, 23, Lanark, Darling, d/o John and Jane MOFFAT, witn: William McKINLEY of Lanark, 14 April 1876 in Lanark

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Oct 1897, Tue,  Page 7

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Oct 1897, Tue,  Page 7

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

The Fires of 1897

Smiths Falls Fire-Coghlan & Moag

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Plans For the Lanark County Townships, 1827, with Names Names Names

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Plans For the Lanark County Townships, 1827, with Names Names Names

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Perth Courier, Sept. 22, 1933

Plan of Lanark Village and other Townships, 1827, with names

 

(Donated to the Perth Museum by T. Arthur Rogers of Perth)  This plan, dated Surveyor General’s Office, Toronto, June, (year illegible), and is signed by John Macaulay, Surveyor General.  The names of the east and west (approximate) streets were Argyle, Prince, George, York and Canning while Hillier, Clarence, and Owen ran at right angles to these.  Most of the lots had the names of the owner written thereon and the dates on which the patents had been issued.  James Mair was at that time the largest property owner with 14 lots in his name while William Mair was down for one.  These were all dated July and August, 1845.

John Hall, Esq., had five lots (1843-44-45); J.R. Gemmell, one, 1844; Jas. McLaren, one 1845 and the Baptist Society with two lots (date illegible).  The Caldwells do not appear to have yet arrived on the scene but in 1830(?) Boyd Caldwell and Co. founded the woolen mill which was the principal support of the village during the succeeding half century.

Set of Maps or Plans of the Townships of Lanark County, with the exception of Dalhousie, Ramsay, Beckwith and North Sherbrooke which are missing.  Like the plan of Lanark Village, the names of the then owners and dates on which they had been granted are inscribed on the occupied lands.  Some mention of these names may be of interest to descendents of these pioneers many of whom are living on the original locations.  For this purpose each township will be taken in its turn.

 

 

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www.bytown.net… Map of Drummond Township, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada, in 1879

Drummond

On the first concession we find the names of such well known pioneers as Dr. Thom, A. Fraser, J.T. and R.(?) James, Nathaniel and William Stedman, J. Hand and James Bell.  On the 2nd Concession (the part within the town of Perth)—Col. Taylor, Capt. Marshall, Greenly, Harris, Malloch, and Haggart and going eastward C.H. Sache, Henry J.T.&R, William StedmanR.(?) or N.(?) James and Thomas Hands (1855)  On Concession 3—R. Greenel, B. Glen, James and W. Morris, Sutton Frisell, J. McPhail, John Tatlock (1851), T. Doyle, Michael and John Foy (1853).  On Concession 4 Thomas Poole, J. Richmond, J. King (view the 1830(?) grant of the east half of Lot 12 in the museum), W. Morris, Hon. R. Matheson, T.M. Radenhurst.  On Concession 5 Martin Doyle (1853(?)), G. Richmond, Charles Devlin.  On Concession 6, D. Macnee, D. Campbell, P. Campbell, T. Bothwell, W. Thompson, and James Codd (Code).  On Concession 7, D. Campbell, F. McIntyre, T. Whyte, P. Campbell (Beech Groove Lot 6, birth place of Archibald Campbell, Sr., and now owned by the Carr-Thompson family), McGarry, W. Shaw, J.&D. McLaren.  Concession 8, J. Balderson (of Balderson’s Corners), T.&J. Richardson, W. Fraser, T.&W. Stedman, W., M.J. & G. Gould, J. McLenaghan, and P. Sinclair.  Concession 9(?) (paper shows “IV” must be misprint) J. McIntyre, C. Campbell, J&W. Tullis, P. McIntyre, P. McTavish, (initial illegible) and N. McLanaghan, D. & J. Robertson.  Concession 10(?) J. Campbell, J. Cuthbertson, W. & J. McIlquham.  Concession 11 J. McIlquham, R. Matheson, Esq. (1846?)  Concession 12 L. Drysdale (1845?), Hon. Malcolm Cameron (East(?) Lot 9, Concession 12 and west ½(?) Lot 13, all dated 1845 and north of the Mississippi River)

 

 

 

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RootsWeb – Ancestry.com Bathurst Twp.

 

Bathurst Township

Concession 1(?) (West to East along the Scotch Line) Robert Boarnes(?), Anthony Katz, John & William Ritchie, James and John Bryce, Thomas McLean, S.(?) Wilson, heir of George Wilson, A. & James Fraser, Alexander Dodds, Jas. Boarnes(?), T. Cuddie, Francis Allan, William Old, t. Consitt, John Adams, Jas. Allan.

Captain Adams owned Lot 21 (1847) and west ½ of Lot 20 on Concession (number not listed) while Thomas Manion was on Lot 17, Concession 3(?)

  1. Cameron, Esq., had the west ½ of Lot 13,Concession 5; John Doran had been granted Lot 1 on Concession 3(?) (at the west end of Bennett’s Lake) on July 4, 18?7) (Transcriber’s note, the third digit in the last date was illegible). W.A. Playfair owned lots 22 and 23 on Concession 12(?) and John P. Playfair got Lot 21, Concession 12 in 18?? (last two numbers illegible)./

Christies Lake was then called Myers Lake and its outlet to the Tay River.

 

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Perth Historical Society

North Elmsley

The fourth concession south of Rideau Lake were still vacant.  J. McVeity was located on the north shore of Rideau Lake on Oct. 8, 1846.  Patrick King, ditto in the same year.  Thomas Dudgeon, ditto, 1850 and J. Beveridge the next year.  William Croskery and Rev. M. Harris each had a half lot on Lot 27, Concession 9 north of Otty Lake.  This place is inscribed “Surveyor General’s Office Kingston Jan. 11, 1844.  True copy, signed Thomas Parks

 

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www.bytown.net–Map of North Burgess Township, Ontario, Canada, in 1879

 

North Burgess

Prior to the “Irish Invasion” George McCullen(?) McCulloch(?) secured 87 acres at the west end of Otty Lake in 1845.  Alexander Cameron got the east half of Lot 5 Concession (number illegible) and the south portion of the west half of the same lot in 1849 and George Palmer obtained Lot 10, Concession (illegible) in 18??(illegible).  John Holliday, Sr., was down for the Clergy Lot 3(?) in the 9th (?) Concession.  Between 1850(?) and 1859(?) the following Irish settlers arrived on the scene coming largely from the counties of Down and Armagh:  Messrs. James O’Connor, Pat Booker(?), Sam Chaffey, Pat Kelly, T. Donnelly, James Deacon, Thomas and William Ryan, Felix Bennett, Francis O’Hare, John Doran, Jas. Lappen, Bernard Farrell, Bernard Byrnes, Peter Power, Pat O’Neill, John Farry(?)Parry(?), Patrick McParland, Michael McNamee, M. Byrnes, Jas. Byrnes, John McVeigh.  Black Lake was then called Salmon Lake and its outlet was the Salmon River.  Hon. R. Matheson owned lots at both Otty and Rideau Lakes.  Dr. James Wilson held the east (?) half of Lot 2, Concession 2(?)3(?) (west side of Otty Lake), John Oatway had lot 23(?) 22(?) Concession 10 (1852(?)1862(?) and T.B. and William Scott secured land on the Upper Scotch Line in 18??(illegible).  However, about half the township was still open for settlement.

 

 

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RootsWeb – Ancestry.com—-South Sherbrooke Twp.

South Sherbrooke

Hon. William Morris and Dr. Wilson owned Lots 18, 19, 20, on Concession 2(?) on the north shore of Myers (now Christies) Lake—the location of the Christie Lake Iron Mine.  And these two Perthites likewise held hundreds of acres of adjacent ground—probably to protect possible extensions of their iron deposits.  There were many Corry (or Korry), Deacon, and Elliott holders and Hon. R. Matheson, John Playfair, William Lees, and Thomas Brooke had sundry lots.

 

 

 

Lanark Township

Its principle feature is the River Clyde which intersects its western part from north to south.  Such names as James Mair (1845), G. Watt, John Close, Robert Robertson, Patrick McNaughton, Robert Craig, Jas. Rankin, Neil McCallum, Alexander Stewart, Alexander Yuill (1858(?)) and J.W. Anderson indicates its Scottish character.

Pakenham Township

About the middle of the last century the Dickson family appears to have been the largest land owners here.  Samuel Dickson is credited with 850 acres or more while Andrew Dickson (the third sheriff of the District of Bathurst) held 650 acres and Robert James and William Dickson some more.  The Hilliard and Combs(?) farms were also extensive holders as were James Wylie, William Wylie, Hon. William Morris, and James and Alexander Snedden (1858 and 1853).

Lavant Township

With the exception of the large holders probably in connection with lumbering operations of Boyd and Alexander Caldwell, William McKey and John Gillies, this township appears to have been practically unsettled during the 1850’s.

 

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Darling Township

Like Lavant, this area seems to have been given up to lumbering operations, sundry lots being held by Messrs. James Gillies, and Peter McLaren (1856), Alexander Caldwell (1855), Robert Haley (1846(?)), C. Henry Bell (1856(?)) and M. Cameron.

 

 

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www.bytown.net Map of Montague Township, Ontario, Canada, in 1879

Montague

Mostly vacant but Patrick Gilhuly had Lot 27, Concession 7 (1841) and J.G. Malloch owned part of Lot 27, Concession 3(?) (1856)

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Just a Field of Stones Now? “The Old Perth Burying Ground” Now on Ontario Abandoned Places?

The Old Settlers Weren’t so Old After All

Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell

Dear Lanark Era –Lanark Society Settlers Letter

Ramsay Settlers 101

Beckwith –Settlers — Sir Robert the Bruce— and Migrating Turtles

EARLY SETTLEMENT OF DALHOUSIE-Tina Penman, Middleville, Ont.

Lanark County 101 — It Began with Rocks, Trees, and Swamps

What Was Smiths Falls Perth and Port Elmsley like to Joseph and Jane Weekes?

Rock the Boat! Lanark County or Bust! Part 1

It Wasn’t the Sloop John B — Do’s and Don’t in an Immigrant Ship -Part 2

Riders on the Storm– Journey to Lanark County — Part 3

ROCKIN’ Cholera On the Trek to the New World — Part 4

Rolling down the Rapids –Journey to Lanark Part 5