Tag Archives: Laurie Yuill

Cora Munro Yuill — Arthur Yuill — For Glenda Mahoney with Love

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Cora Munro Yuill — Arthur Yuill  — For Glenda Mahoney with Love

My good friend Glenda Mahoney asked me to do a wee bit of research and there is nothing I love more.. This is for you Glenda with much love..

Cora Munro Yuill

The House

Lanark County Genealogical Society

April 21, 2020  · Anne Ouimet writes. When I was very young & we would be on our way to Clayton Lake for our vacation. Just a short way from turning down the last road in. I remember my Mom pointing out a house on the left telling us it was Miss Pretty’s house. I never met the lady but we knew we were close to reaching our destination. Would that be the area this family lived in? LCGS Corporate Secretary Rose Mary replies, Here is the house you mention, yes the family lived in this area. The original Evans/Pretty house is the clapboarded one. At one time it was painted yellow. The log house was moved there in the 1970s or 1980s. It was Cora (Munro) Yuill’s house and was moved from the 3rd? line of Ramsay. Maybe someone can assist us in confirming the concession.

Dawn JonesThe original house on the left in this photo was yellow at one time and the Log house was brought in. Heather Higgs and Wayne Pender I think. Rose Mary Sarsfield

Glenda MahoneyAlex do u know where there is a copy of the poem Grandma Yuill wrote about the old house being moved.

Alexandra Folkard
April 22, 2020  · 
This is another photo from the 50’s

Alexandra FolkardIt moved there in the 90’s and it moved from old perth Rd. I Remember going with my Grandma Eileen Boothby (Cora’s Daughter) to look inside the house after they built it back up 🙂

Heather HiggsHi, I lived there for over 20 years and raised my family there… It was my ex husband and I that bought the house in 1986 it was just the original house with board and batten, then we purchased and moved the log part in around 1990.

The wedding

from ancestry and Laurie Yuill marriage certificate 1931

LaurieYuillLaurieYuill originally shared this on 29 Apr 2017

Name:Cora Munro
Gender:Female
Age:26
Birth Year:abt 1905
Birth Place:Darlington Twp. Ontario
Marriage Date:18 Nov 1931
Marriage Place:Lanark, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:Robert Munro
Mother:Ida Munro
Spouse:Arthur Yuill
Name:Cora Manro[Munro]
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:Scotch (Scotish)
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Single
Age:15
Birth Year:abt 1906
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:42
Residence Street or Township:Darling
Residence City, Town or Village:Township of Darling
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Daughter
Father’s Name:Robert Manro
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Elizabeth Manro
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Presbyterian
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Municipality:Darling
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Darling (Township)
Sub-District Number:15
Enumerator:James Guthrie
District Description:Polling Division No. 2 – Comprising that part Of the township west of the Fifth concession line from lot 1 to lot 4, both inclusive and that part east of the fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, lot 27, both inclusive
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:27
Family Number:42
Household MembersAgeRelationshipRobert Manro51HeadElizabeth Manro46WifeEarl Manro21SonWilbert Manro11SonEva Manro23DaughterFlorence Manro18DaughterCora Manro15Daughter

Facts


1905(AGE)Select fact

Birth

17 Aug 1905 • Darlington Twp. Ontario

1 Source

193126Select fact

Marriage

13 Nov 1931 • Middleville Manse,

Arthur Yuill

(1897–1963)

193126Select fact

Marriage

18 Nov 1931 • Lanark, Lanark, Ontario, Canada

Arthur Yuill

(1897–1963)1 Source

193428

Birth of daughter Blanche Yuill(1934–2012)

26 Feb 1934

193731

Birth of daughter Alma Yuill(1937–2003)

31 Jul 1937

194035

Birth of daughter Eileen M. Yuill(1940–2017)

31 Oct 1940

194539

Birth of daughter Della Yuill(1945–2012)

18 Feb 1945

196357

Death of husband Arthur Yuill(1897–1963)

06 May 1963

199590Select factView

Death

18 Oct 1995

LaurieYuillLaurieYuill originally shared this on 07 Sep 2017–Cora Yuill & Blake Mahoney at his Christening, 1983
sherren193sherren193 originally shared this on 23 Nov 2018

The Yuill family
Connie Jackson
My grandfather was raised by Robina and William. It was his mother Agnes wishes before she died when he was an infant. Grandpa ended up staying on at the farm at his Uncle Bills request. My Grandma said there was always family coming to visit on the weekends and Robina would want the dining room
Judy Arnott
These are my great great grandparents. Allie Yuill was my mother’s grandfather. His mother Robina was my dad’s great great aunt.scrubbed til it shone, good china out and chandelier lit to serve a tasty meal

Clayton Ontario History
April 28, 2018  · 




Robert Munro and Ida Watchorn married 1895. Parents of Eva (Mrs. James Fulton, Admaston), Earl Munro, Almonte, Florence (Mrs. J. H. Watt, Union Hall), Cora (Mrs. Arthur Yuill, Darling) and Wilbert Munro, Hall’s Mills. Grandparents and great grandparents and likely gg grandparents of many!




Conversations with Agatha Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook

Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28
The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill
Clippings of Mrs. Joseph Yuill – Margaret Yuill
Ralph and Iris Yuill
The Hart Children of Lanark — Laurie Yuill

Notes on Alexander and Joseph Yuill
Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter
Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

Turning Back to the Clock Agnes “Aggie” Yuill– The Buchanan Scrapbook

Archie Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

What do the IDA and Hallmark Have in Common? by Glenda Mahoney

Drummond Cemetery Photos by Glenda Mahoney

The Mahoney Legacy Ends–Masonry Runs in the Blood

The Oldest Cemetery in Drummond

Faeries on the Malloch Farm

A Time Capsule on the Malloch Farm

The Malloch Barn and Other Things

Remembering Haying in Lanark County- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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Remembering Haying in Lanark County- The Buchanan Scrapbooks
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..
From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill
From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

Related reading

Remembering and Documenting The Loose Hay Loader

Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28

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Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28
Water Yuill-from Aggie Yuill’s photo book from Laurie Yuill
Water Yuill-from Aggie Yuill’s photo book from Laurie Yuill
Water Yuill-from Aggie Yuill’s photo book from Laurie Yuill

Water Yuill-from Aggie Yuill’s photo book from Laurie Yuill
Name:Walter Mather Yuill
Gender:Male
Age:27
Birth Date:abt 1901
Birth Place:Lanark, Ontario
Death Date:27 May 1928
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Cause of Death:Heart Failure
Greenwood Cemetery
Lanark Highlands, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
May 1928
Water Yuill-from Aggie Yuill’s photo book from Laurie Yuill
Water Yuill-from Aggie Yuill’s photo book from Laurie Yuill
Water Yuill-from Aggie Yuill’s photo book from Laurie Yuill

Walter Mather Yuill

BIRTH1900
DEATH1928 (aged 27–28)
BURIALGreenwood CemeteryLanark Highlands, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID168976117 · View Source

Family Members

Parents

Siblings

The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill

Clippings of Mrs. Joseph Yuill – Margaret Yuill

Ralph and Iris Yuill

Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter

Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

  1. Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Lanark 1962 Centennial Photos

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Lanark 1962 Centennial Photos

 

img.jpeg

 

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 07 Aug 1962, Tue - the 200- the on of Mac- the thriogTweek-long...

 

 

 

Image may contain: 1 person, standing and outdoorImage may contain: one or more people and people standing1-32A (1).jpg1-31C (2).jpgAll photos from Elaine Playfair’s album thanks to Lanark and Middleville Historian Laurie Yuill.

 

  1. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.relatedreading

    Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

    1. Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

       Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

    The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill

    HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1

    HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 

     

    HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

    Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

    HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Ken Manson– 1986 Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds –Side 1B — Bill Croft and Farm Machinery

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Ken Manson– 1986 Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds –Side 1B — Bill Croft and Farm Machinery

middlevillemainstreet1900

 

Thanks to Laurie Yuill for transcribing it.

14993525_10153942922221835_4288975307913722447_n.jpg

Ken Manson, Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds, Side 1 B


Ken Manson: Well, Mrs. Mather, she got away, eh?
Jimmie Dodds: Yeah….run around the barnyard there and run out to the maple.
Ken Manson: Yeah, she sure was. Going like lightning. This would be Mrs. Johnny Mather. I was over and got a, took a picture of Agnes Yuill this morning, I don’t have a picture of her. So went over and took a picture of Aggie.

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I was starting too…you remember Harry Somerville?
Ken Manson: Yeah.
Jimmie Dodds: You’ve heard of Milton Langstaff, have you?
Ken Manson: I remember seeing Bill Langstaff, oh yes.
Jimmie Dodds: He was brought up with Bill Langstaff.
Ken Manson: Oh, you say Milton Langstaff?
Jimmie Dodds: Milton Langstaff. They lived at the, at that time, they lived at the Liddle place….
Ken Manson: Oh I see, yes, aha
Jimmie Dodds: This fella, I think it was the first day of school, the teacher after…sent us out to play at the woodshed. And this Langstaff fella, first thing he did, he climbed up the woodshed and got a piece of a broken plate and just threw it and cut McIntyre across the forehead here. And of course he howled and the teacher come out….wrapped him up the
best…could and sent him home with one of his sisters. He didn’t come back that
summer.
Ken Manson: Yeah.
Jimmie Dodds: Course, he was young enough , he was barely…it was a long way to come.

Ken Manson: Thank you very kindly. That’s nice.

Ken Manson: See there’s a method to my madness. Now I’ve got your hand writing.
Helen Powers: Why, what’s that for?
Ken Manson: Well, I like this type of thing.
Helen Powers: Oh, you do. You judge people by their hand writing. Is that it.
Ken Manson: Well, not really, no.

Ken Manson: Oh, beautiful. Thank you. Yes, well that’s nice. Very good. Oh, you’re baking bread.
Helen Powers: ….
Ken Manson: That’s right, yeah.
Jimmie Dodds: Well, you lived up in…..
Ken Manson: Yeah, uh huh.
Jimmie Dodds: Well then you moved to Ramsay?
Ken Manson: No, I was born in Ramsay.
Jimmie Dodds: Oh, I was thinking…
Ken Manson: And then we moved up here.
Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, oh yeah, that was the way…..
Ken Manson: Yeah, I was born in Ramsay.
Jimmie Dodds: Remember Harold James, he started working at…..he started to work for your father in Ramsay.

Ken Manson: Yeah, I remember him being there.

Jimmie Dodds: ….he was awful rough on them.
Ken Manson: Oh yes. Yes, he was hard on them boys.
Jimmie Dodds: …..can’t blame them too much, but.
Ken Manson: No. No. And you know he was , a, I often heard Dad say that he was a very nice lad around the place.

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I guess so. Yes Harold was…..
Ken Manson: Yeah. Well, if I shut this off and get a picture of you, there’s a supper over at Hopetown and I haven’t done my walk today yet, so I’m going to walk to Hopetown for supper.

Helen Powers: Are you?
Ken Manson: Yeah.
Helen Powers: And home again?
Ken Manson: No, no I’ll just walk the one way. Helen Dodds has just got a story she wants to tell me here. Go ahead Helen.

Helen Powers: You shouldn’t put the name in it. Oh I totally forgot.
Ken Manson: Oh, yes, certainly. Oh, we gotta have it. Sure.
Helen Powers: That wouldn’t be fair for her.
Ken Manson: Oh, well, she’ll never know, I won’t tell her.
Helen Powers: Well, you went and put my name on there. I’m not going to.
Ken Manson: Sure.
Helen Powers: No, I’m not going to.
Ken Manson: We’ve gotta have that.
Helen Powers: Not on that. I can tell you some time, but I’m not going to….


Ken Manson: Ok, you can tell me. This is where the tape…..see Jim and Helen on February 22 nd .Beautiful clear day, and I just notice today that Veryl has had her ears pierced. She said she got… And this is 1986. So I haven’t done my walk today, as of yet. So there’s a supper in Hopetown tonight, and I guess I’ll walk to Hopetown and we’ll have supper there. Well, since I’ve been on this thing, we’ve had another person pass away on this street. That’s Bill Croft, and I think it was about June the 10 th ’86 that he died. Bill was 84. He was an awful man to talk. Loved to talk to you if you could listen to him, and he looked after the museum up here quite well. But a good man to meet people because
he had all the time in the world to talk to them. He lived in a big square house next to
the cheese factory here. (2011 Concession Road 6) This has been a Croft property for
many, many years I guess. He had a, there was other buildings put up here.

Veryl Manson: Arthur Croft was his father.
Ken Manson: Arthur Croft was his father and there was a doctor Croft that doctored here when Dad was a young lad because I remember Dad saying about coming down here to get a tooth pulled, and he just latched onto it and pulled it out. That was all there was to it. There was no freezing or no nothing.

We had just got back from a vacation to Keremeos in the Okanagan Valley. We left on June the 7 th and we went to see John Marshal on our way out at Summerberry, and we picked Kelli (King, daughter to Shirley (Manson) and Bill King, granddaughter to Ken & Veryl) up at the Regina Airport. And she went out to Murray’s with us. And we were up to Kamloops and round to see Carmen and Rena and we were in that country for four days I guess. And then we came back to Marshal’s.

We stayed there two nights and one day, and then we headed home, because I wanted to
get home and have a pretty good rest before I had to go back to work again. So this is
July the 1 st , and it’s a beautiful sunny day. We’ve had a lot of rain here, hail, some wind
storms tearing chunks out of barns. And the farmers are having a problem with their
hay, and they’re talking about rain again tomorrow. 

Some people that we have missedspeaking about here is Luella Foster died. August the 4 th , 1983. She was Luella Bowes. She was Wilbert Foster’s wife. Wilbert Foster is a first cousin to Veryl. Also another first cousin of Veryl’s, George Foster of Kemptville, he died March the 21 st 1986. Also Bill Croft has passed away in June 1986. And John Lashley has passed away in January 1987. And Eldon Ireton, he just passed away yesterday, January the 14 th ’87. He lived on an arm on the 11 th line of Lanark Township, in near Floating Bridge at Taylor Lake. Eldon Ireton was 79 and John Lashley was 68. And Bill Croft was 84. And Veryl’s uncle Melvin Whiting died in August, he was 82. That would be August ’86. He was a brother to Veryl’s mother. They lived at Burritts Rapids.


This is January the 5 th 1986 a very mildday. We have had quite a bit of snow and had some colder weather, not terrible severe, but it’s sure a nice day today. This is January the 13 th 1988. We’ve had a very cold night here. It was twenty-two below here this morning. Thought I’d better catch up on the deaths again. Addie Somerville (nee Munro, born August 19, 1914 – died December 25, 1987, wife to Matthew Ernest Somerville. They lived South West at 438 Wolfgrove Road, just outside of Middleville) has died and she was 74 I think. This would be Matt Somerville’s wife and there is more on the tape, it has broke and we are recording this off of the other tape, so I guess I’ll turn it onto the other side.

This tape that I am recording this off of, it broke, the end broke on it, and I fixed it up and got it rewound again. So this was a ninety minute tape, so we will have parts of this on two tapes here.


We left, we came through to Kenora and we thought maybe we would find a motel
somewhere just beyond Kenora, but we never found a motel. So, we kept coming and
right now we’re, I guess about, six miles out of Winnipeg. And we found a place here at
Deacons Corners. They call it Deacons Corners, Winnipeg, that’s their address, so we’re
not very far out of the city. And we have came from Long Lac this morning to this
Deacons Corners here at Winnipeg. So, tomorrow morning we’re going to, I think
maybe go to Austin Manitoba and see that museum again. And then there’s a place
called Manson in Manitoba just near the border of Saskatchewan. We’re going to go up
there and see if there’s anything in there of interest. We’re out here at the car this
morning at Deacons Corners. The wind is blowing out of the south. It’s going to be a
nice day, I think, and we can see the sign over here that says 101 Winnipeg bypass and
Brandon exit two kilometers. Not far from Portage la Prairie there was a guy threshing
wheat out of the swaw. They were also working the ground up then and sowing the
wheat again. They had a lot of them just planting their wheat now, this seems to have
been wet here. This is Monday the 9 th of June ’86. The speed limit along this number
one highway is one hundred kilometers. We’re at Austin, Manitoba again here now and
when we drive in here I have counted fourteen steamers sitting here. There’s a
Fairbanks Morse, ten horsepower engine here with one enormous flywheel on one side
and a big gear wheel on the other side where a crank can be attached to it. There’s no
pulley on it. There seems to use it with an arm on it to push and pull something.
There’s a Rustin gas engine here, quite a large engine, but it don’t say what horse
power. And there’s a wagon sitting with engines over here, it says engines restored by J.
A. Gibson, Elm Creek. And there’s an engine here they call Manitoba Engines Limited,
nine horsepower. Here’s another one here, big old bugger, Rustin Lincoln Engines.
Here’s another one here, Rustin Lincoln Engine number 44448 with governors on it like
a steam engine, one flywheel, it has a pulley on it, and the pulley is driven by a gear, like
a corner gear. This is Lincoln…it says. Here’s a tractor they call Flour City and it is huge.
It’s a four cylinder, it’s a homely looking rig, and I can just put my hand on the top of the
hind wheel. Has a big square tank at the front of it for cooling. There’s another one
here, it’s a Hart Parr. It’s a huge machine too. It’s ah, they look more like the size of a
steamer. The hind wheels on this Hart Parr would be three feet wide. Here we have a
case ten twenty horsepower, a model 1919 donated by C. G. Hunter, Sidney, Manitoba,
and it is a cross mount.

I thought that Raymond Blackburn’s (Raymond lives north of Middleville at 2087 Galbraith Road. Austin Manson, and nephew of Ken’s, son of Herman and Ethel Manson now owns Raymond’s Case tractor) looked awful, but this is just terrible. It’s the worst looking thing you ever looked at. They say that it is a tractor, it has one wheel on the front, it has an arrow up front to tell you which way the front wheel is turned because you can’t see the front wheel. It looks more like a corn binder.

It has one great big wide wheel on the right hand side driven by a gear and the other
wheel on the other side just appears to be sort of an idler. You drive from the right
hand side and you sit on a seat here. What a hell of a looking rig! There must be 500
tractors here, some of them awful well fixed up. Here’s a wee lad here they call The
General. Has one wheel on the front like a car wheel. Rock Islands, Hart Parrs, Cock
Shuts, Farmalls, you name it, it’s here. Here is one here, a 55 horsepower L A M Z, Lamz
Bulldog, restored by T. Klucky and sons, Stonewall, Manitoba. This has rubber tires, it is
a big old bugger, it’s a strange looking machine. Has a smoke stack on the front of it
similar to some of the old…but this is on rubber and always has been and they’re big,
they’re very big tires. Here’s one, says Townsend Oil Tractor. Has a front end, looks just
like a steamer with a stack on it. It’s a twin cylinder up top like similar to Len McKay’s
Eagle. Here’s another thing, by the golly, it says it’s a Gray. It’s a cross mount motor on
it, it’s a Minneapolis Moline white drive drum tractor, and the drum, is like it’s all one
big wheel , it’s covered. The drum must be at least four feet wide and that is the wheel
with prongs, spikes in the wheel. Here’s another they call the Huber Manufacturing
Company, Marion, Ohio. This is also a cross mount tractor, a four cylinder. Here is the
biggest McCormick-Deering tractor I think I’ve ever seen on rubber. It’s a six cylinder for
an old lad. There’s a Sawyer-Massey tractor. There’s another old bugger, I haven’t
found a name on it yet. It’s a one cylinder. It’s a Case opposed, tall 24 horsepower, a
model 1910, donated by William I., donated by W. L. Longstaff. Here’s the Advance-
Rumely, guaranteed to burn successfully, all grades of kerosene, under all conditions, at
all loads up to its rated engine horse power. This is a good looking machine here, it runs
good I guess. A big old bugger, lots of big old lads here. They got roofs on them, like a
train coming down the track. Here’s another one they call The Pioneer. Thirty sixty,
1904 model. It is huge. When I stand along beside the hind wheel, I’m ten inches from
reaching the top of the wheel. Here is another monstrous machine. The hind wheels, I
guess, would be, oh, over three feet wide. Manufactured by Marshal Sons And
Company Limited. Engineers, Gainsborough, England, and it is an awful tremendous
looking rig. It’s got a smoke stack on it, like, somebody was making syrup. It looks to
me as if it is a three cylinder diesel with governors on it like a steam engine. There’s no
seat on the back. You have to be standing up and running around all over this cab to see
what’s in front of you I guess. They’ve got a place fenced in here with all types of
tractors. There’s some old steamers, there must by 200 old pieces here waiting to be
repaired. Here’s a Titan , a big old brute of a tractor. It looks like a four cylinder. It has
a cab on it as well. A lot of these big old lads have cabs on them. Here’s another
Rumely, oil cooled tractor, it is a big son of a gun. There’s one shed here has twelve
enormous very big oil cooled Rumely tractors, Titans and so on. We’re going to go over
into this grain elevator now. Homesteaders Village it says. Yeah, this is an old elevator
they brought in from some place I guess, and it’s all here.

The wagon is sitting here with the blocks behind the wheels. The way it was elevated up for to run the grain out that went down into the hopper. And there’s a set of beam scales here that you weigh the load on. The crank at the other end at the front wheel, opposite the front wheel , you turn that and the platform that the wagon is sitting on goes up on the front end so the grain runs out and down into this hopper here. There’s a little fanning mill here, it’s called the Emerson…oat separator. Manufactured by Hart Emerson Company Limited, Winnipeg, Canada. Oh yeah, this is his office here. The Brown-Duvel moisture tester, quite the looking thing. There’s a Fairbanks-Morse engine in here that’s used for power for the elevator. And it looks to be an eight horse maybe. It’s not so terrible big, but I think it would be about an eight horse, I doubt if it’s a ten. It looks about an eight horse.

I can’t find the number on it here anywhere. There’s a very old, old HAM set here. It
looks like a code, like you can send a code message, but it says here on this piece of
paper “Hello, Welcome to Austin Threshing Man’s Reunion. This radio station is being
operated by radio amateurs or HAM’s and is used to inform other HAM’s in the world
about the activities in the events of Austin. Thank you for stopping in.” Boy, what a
crude looking outfit, it looks like one of those outfits that the CPR sent their messages
on.


I guess we’ll go up to the old train station now and have a little peek in there. They have
tracks laid from the station to the elevator, with a caboose sitting here. Canadian
National Railways. Public Notice, The freight, passenger and express tariffs of this
company are open to public inspection and may be seen upon application to the agent.
Northern Pacific Railway Station, built in 1893 at Baldur, Manitoba. Moved to the
museum in 1975. In 1923 the Northern Pacific and other…the Canadian National
Railway. They have caged in here, this is an amateur radio station VE4 MTR operated
from the Manitoba Agricultural Museum during the Manitoba Threshing Reunion,
making contact with other amateur radio operators throughout the world. A few
license plates here, a ’71 license plate number VE4XN Sunny Manitoba. A thousand
lakes, no, a hundred thousand lakes. They have their old hand cart here and so on that
was used on the railroad, a good display. This is in the old caboose here, “Passengers
Are Prohibited From Standing On Platform While Train Is In Motion”. It’s an old wooden
lad, boy oh boy. It’s sure getting worn too. They got some building here, shoe and
harness repair, a gristmill with the equipment, some equipment in it here….village
exhibits they call this. We’re coming up to the blacksmith’s shop. Stuff in here just
about similar to Upper Canada Village. Another barn here, Livery Feed and Sale, a horse
harness here, stalls, lantern, fork,. We’re at the general store here, a real nice setup
here. They’ve got everything , a general store for sure. All your canned goods that
came in cans. Blue Ribbon Tea, Nabob Tea, Delicious Melrose Tea, Markle Tea and Bee,
that’s cut tobacco. Old clocks, there’s scales, dishes, butter spoons, crocks, lanterns,
pails, a stove.

Veryl Manson: June the 4 th ’86, Elizabeth Moffat, Carleton Place, Ontario and Hilda Edwards, Navan, Ontario, and I guess the rest are from Manitoba.

Ken Manson: This is in the guest book that you sign when you’re here. They got a building here, McKinnon and McKinnon Barristers Solicitors. There’s a big stone here with a……. (end of side 1)

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

Ken Manson– Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds, Side 1 -“Did you ever hear the story about the fellow who was shot up Bob Pretty’s there”?

Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Ken Manson– Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds, Side 1 -“Did you ever hear the story about the fellow who was shot up Bob Pretty’s there”?

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Ken Manson– Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds, Side 1 -“Did you ever hear the story about the fellow who was shot up Bob Pretty’s there”?

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Thanks to Laurie Yuill for transcribing it.

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Ken Manson, Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds, Side 1

Ken Manson: This is January the 5th, 1986, a very, very mild day. 39 degrees Fahrenheit, quite windy and balmy.  The snow is melting and the roads are wet. Lyle (Manson, Ken’s oldest son, born June 18, 1952 – died May 25, 1994) was away fishing this morning on Dalhousie Lake.  They got one small pickerel. Lyle and Dale Bowes have built a fishing hut, insulated and all, I haven’t  seen it yet, but they’ve been getting a few pretty good pickerel, four pounders, and they taste real good at this time of the year out of the cold water.  He has some time off now, He works for Tomlinson crushing and gravel, driving a Euclid. And they have shut down for some time during the winter and colder weather.  So this gives him an opportunity to get at the fishing which he sure likes.

We had a two week deer hunting season this past fall. Not too many people were too happy about it, but it didn’t prove out too bad I guess, on the deer herd because it was very, very wet weather.  I seen quite a few dear, but I didn’t see my buck. So I guess I got my share last year. Kevin (Manson, Ken’s youngest son, born February 16, 1957), he got a dandy buck, fourteen pointer.  And Bill (King, Ken’s son-in-law, born November 20, 1944 – died May 15, 2017), he got one, and Daryl (King, Ken’s Grandson and Bill’s son, born December 19, 1969), so they had some pretty good luck this year even though it was wet weather.  And Laurie (Manson, Ken’s  middle son, born June 25, 1954), he hasn’t had any luck for a good many years, the last one, he shot, was at the Whipple Tree Runway, in back of Mickie Penman’s old place.  But this year he shot two of them, and he was hunting up with his father-in-law, Joe Lalonde’s gang. They got three, Willie shot one, and Keith, he had a bow and arrow license and he got one with the bow, a doe, the week before hunting season.

But there sure is a lot of deer trailing around through the snow here not too far out of the village. I stopped yesterday and showed Veryl (Manson, nee Foster, Ken’s wife, born August 5, 1925) a trail that goes down over the hill heading down to Addie Somerville’s (nee Munro, born August 19, 1914 – died December 25, 1987, wife to Matthew Ernest Somerville.  They lived South West at 438 Wolfgrove Road, just outside of Middleville) house.  They apparently are coming up and feeding at night in the fields I guess, over in John Borrowman’s.  There has been quite a number killed with cars, and boy, they sure make a wreck of some of these cars when they get hit with a deer like that.  Alice McKay down here, she hit one, one morning down at Maggie Baird’s (1046 Herron Mill’s Road) place there, or the old place there where Karl Thompson used to live.  This street here has experienced a couple of deaths this winter and fall. On the fourth of October, Bower Cameron passed away in his sleep in bed, Audrey (Cameron, nee Wert, Bower’s daughter-in-law.  They lived at 2055 Concession Road 6 in Middleville) found him there in the morning.  He was 83. And then I was coming home from my walk on a Saturday, December 28th, (1985) when I came in sight of the house here, I could see an ambulance, at Harry Mitchell’s (2052 Concession Road 6, in Middleville).  And they loaded Harry up and took him to the Hospital in Perth, but he died there about 8:00 that evening.  And we think he was in his 82nd year.

I have been taking my holidays in the last three weeks of June for the last few years and have enjoyed the company of these two men  at that time and boy, we are sure going to miss them. Because they were always out yacking and talking away to you. So, the only ones left now on this street is Agnes Yuill, and Archie Yuill and Margaret (Agnes, born April 3, 1895 – died August 31, 1992, and Archie, born February 10, 1902 – died October 16, 1990, were sister and brother.  Margaret nee McIntyre, born February 15, 1904 – died February 1, 1993, was Archie’s wife. They lived at 2048 Concession Road 6, in Middleville) and Mrs. Harry Mitchell (Ethel nee Barr) and Bill Croft (born 1902 – died 1986) I guess will be the oldest ones now.  Jimmie Dodds in the other end of the town is still living and he is 91.  Willie Creighton is in the Hospital right now recovering real well from a bypass heart operation.  He has had a problem now with his heart for a couple of years anyway. So he’s got in and had his operation and is doing real well.  Daryl King has turned 16 of lately and got his driver’s license the first test, so he is keeping the loose change gathered up now very well.  It costs money to drive these cars now with our no lead gas 54.7 a litre, that is.

Hi, I want to come in and have a chat with yous and take your picture…  Yes, sure…. Just because I’m interested in people that are older than I am, and their stories. I have a tape recorder here to I want… Oh Yes

Helen Powers: This fellow came to us.

Ken Manson: Oh really…. Oh, somebody just dropped it… Oh yes, yes.

Helen Powers: Oh dear, I remember I got something….

Ken Manson: Have you, good for you.  Well I just wanted to, I’m up here to talk to Jimmie Dodds (born December 8, 1894 – died April 29, 1990) and his sister Helen (Jacklin, wife of deceased John M. Jacklin, and wife of ? Powers.  She was born 1901 – died 2000).  This thing recording our voices here.  And, oh, you’re having a birthday again Jimmie.

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I had one in December

Ken Manson: December

Jimmie Dodds: December 8th, I was 91 years of age.

Ken Manson: Isn’t that great.  And you have good health too.

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I guess, I’m not able to do any hard work though.

Ken Manson: Well no, you’re not going to the bush at all.

Jimmie Dodds: No, no, I couldn’t, I did years ago.

Ken Manson: Yes, you’ve done lots of bush work.  How old would Harold be if he was living now? (Harold Dodds, Jimmie’s brother)

Jimmie Dodds: He was a little less than two years older than me.

Ken Manson: Oh, he was?

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, his birthday is in March.  Yeah, he was about 18 or 19 months older than me.  Something like that.

Ken Manson: And can I ask how old you are Helen?

Helen Powers: 84

Ken Manson: You’re 84. So, you’re a year younger than my mother.

Helen Powers: What year was she born?

Ken Manson: She was born in 1900.

Helen Powers: Mrs. Harry Stead and I were born in 1901.

Ken Manson: Oh, really?  So, the farm that you came from Jimmie, was that your father  and mother lived there all their life?

Jimmie Dodds: Well, my father was born over there, I think.  Yes, I think most of his family, brothers and sisters were born there.

Ken Manson: What was his name?  I’ve forgotten now.

Jimmie Dodds: My father was Jim Dodds too.

Ken Manson: Oh, it was Jimmie Dodds?

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah

Ken Manson: And what about your Great Grandfather

Jimmie Dodds: Well, ah, his father?

Ken Manson: Yeah

Jimmie Dodds: Well, his father’s name was Crawford and his son’s that you know about, Crawford Dodds.

Ken Manson: Yeah

Jimmie Dodds: He lived on the farm there up until 1900.  And we come up and …..

Ken Manson: Is that where you were born?

Jimmie Dodds: Harold and I and Jennie were born there and Helen was born of course… Helen and the younger girls were born over there.

Ken Manson: Oh, and yous came up from Tom Whelan’s old place?

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, Tom Whelan’s, at that time there were two places…. near the river and the other where Tom Whelan’s lived.  I think there had been a, did you ever hear a song about a Whelan’s that drowned in the Mississippi?

Ken Manson: No

Jimmie Dodds: You usually hear that song sung.  Jim Whelan was drowned in the Mississippi.

Ken Manson: Oh, and somebody made a song about it.

Jimmie Dodds: They made a song.  I remember I was at Calabogie at the dams there and …. good singers sang these old songs at night, and that was one of the songs.  Harold and I, we knew about the … we come from where father and I lived.

Ken Manson: Well, I was just interested… where did you go to school?

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I gone over to the school in Middleville

Ken Manson: Oh, you did.

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah.  Harold went one year to, there was an older school down below Lanark on the road t…

Ken Manson: Knowles’

Jimmie Dodds: Knowles’, yeah, maybe you know where it is.  Maybe there’s an old building there yet. Where Mac Knowles lived.

Ken Manson: Well, I’ve been wanting to get up here and have a wee chat with you because I thought likely you’d have some stories of bygone days.

Jimmie Dodds: Did you ever hear the story about the fellow who was shot up Bob Pretty’s there….

Ken Manson: No

Jimmie Dodds: There’s an old man that, I forget the old man that lived there.  I forget what his name was, but…

Helen Powers: Not Jack Virgin?

Jimmie Dodds: No, no, no, the man that lived up at Pretty’s there long ago, that’s way over a hundred years ago, I don’t think….but this man, he, a girl went out to Hopetown and…there was a young fellow over near Hornes Lake, he walked home with this girl.  Well apparently the old man was mad about that and he shot…I don’t know, he didn’t shoot the fellow, not that night, no, but he threatened him pretty bad, and the fellow got up a gang and came back again at night. And the old man got out his gun and you know, they were breaking into his house.  And of course he had to…and he shot the young man, well he didn’t die just there. They carried him out to where Lloyd Pretty lives there and he died there. He was a young man over by Horns Lake there. And that was the story, and of course in those days they didn’t do anything about this man murdering a fellow…defend his own house.

Ken Manson: Well, now, isn’t that, I’ve never heard that before.  Now that is interesting.

Jimmie Dodds: Well Lloyd Stewart, he knew about it…his father wasn’t supposed to go over, he took down an upstairs window and went with the gang.  Anyway, that young fellow, he took sick and died. I think they carried him home, he lived a little while. But I know……

Ken Manson: Yes.  Well, they’d likely have a little trial among themselves.

Jimmie Dodds: Well, you’d think so.

Ken Manson: Well, isn’t that something.  And another thing I was talking about one day, somebody asked me was, was this road always here?  Was that a forced road always there, Jimmie, do you remember?

Jimmie Dodds: Well now, I can’t tell you about that.

Ken Manson: Or did you have to go down to the Seventh Line corner and go up the Seventh Line to go to Harold’s?  

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I think there’s always been a road because….

Ken Manson: Yeah, I suppose eh.  And you worked on, you and Harold worked on the hydro dam, was it?

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, I worked there on the…

Ken Manson: Would that be right at Calabogie?

Jimmie Dodds: Well, just a little down below where the power….

Ken Manson: What year would that be, Jimmie, would you have any idea?

Jimmie Dodds: I think it was, the 1st World War was at an end because….

Ken Manson: That’d be 1914’s.

Jimmie Dodds: Somewhere, yeah, somewhere in the teens.  Oh, I tell you, I was about sixteen or seventeen.  Not long before there was a band of soldiers that marched down from Calabogie and camped at Middleville overnight.  Maybe you’ve heard of the time the soldiers camped in the fairgrounds here.

Ken Manson: Yes

Jimmie Dodds: That was in the 1st World War, in 1917 or there abouts.

Ken Manson: Didn’t they put one in jail that time.

Jimmie Dodds: There was some story, yes….

Ken Manson: And they put this guy in jail.

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, he spent one night there and they had to march down the back road….

Ken Manson: How are you getting the winter in, pretty good?

Jimmie Dodds: Oh yeah.

Ken Manson: You’ve missed the flu?

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, so far.  Although, I wouldn’t like to go to the bush and do anything.

Ken Manson: Do you still go down to the store once in a while?

Jimmie Dodds: Oh, I go down to the store every morning.

Ken Manson: Every morning?

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah

Ken Manson: Gosh, that’s great.

Jimmie Dodds: Of course, this morning there was no mail.

Ken Manson: No.

Jimmie Dodds: Oh I miss Harry Mitchell and Bower Cameron.  They were always around.

Ken Manson: Oh, by gosh yeah.  That’s for sure.

Jimmie Dodds: We got to know the Mitchell’s when Harold bought that place up there….

Ken Manson: How many years was Harold Reeve?

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I don’t, I couldn’t say off hand.  Oh, I imagine two or three anyway.

Ken Manson: Yes.

Jimmie Dodds: Well I don’t,….

Helen Powers: Harold died in ’70.  Just before Pioneer Days

Jimmie Dodds: He was getting ready to….

Ken Manson: By gosh, that’s right.

Jimmie Dodds: He came down a week before.  He was unloading stuff and brought it down here a few days before.

Ken Manson: Your memory’s better than mine.

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, and he told me something, he said you’ve got some old stuff over at the farm you could bring over too.  Look at the picture of him and Lorne Stewart around here just a few days before the fair.

Ken Manson: Oh yes.

Helen Powers: …..trauma, that if she lives through it in July, she’ll be 102…Uncle John Dodds and Aunt Tenee, they used to live with Grandpa, they’re twins…..I have it somewhere.

Ken Manson: No, that’s fine Helen.  By golly.

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I can remember her father’s mother there….1900 but…I knew a lady, I heard her talking in Gallic tongue.  There was an old….minister come to Middleville. He was an Irishman. He had her reading out of her own bible in Gallic.  And then…..

Helen Dodds: I remember Mary…saying one time she was down at…when she heard somebody shouting up….

Ken Manson: Yeah, you’re doing good Jimmie.  You just look the same every year.  You never change a bit.

Jimmie Dodds: I would have liked to go out and gather sap in the deep snow.

Ken Manson: Oh golly, you’d better forget about that.  Well the snow’s not that deep this winter.

Jimmie Dodds: No, it’s not, it’s not really deep, no.

Ken Manson: No, but there’ll be a bit of a crust on it now, I guess.

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, I guess.

Ken Manson: With that ice we had.  Did you make syrup when you were at, over on…

Jimmie Dodds: We had about 75 trees there…..we used to make enough to do ourselves, you know….and Wilfred had a big bush, Wilfred had a really big bush too.  One time Wilfred took a, one of those…

Ken Manson: When did you get your first car Jimmie?

Jimmie Dodds: Well, I can’t remember the year, but it was about a 1910 Chev ah Ford, Model T Ford.

Ken Manson: Yes.

Jimmie Dodds: So I drove it for twenty years, then I guess later on I gotta say I had a Chev.

Ken Manson: Yes.

Jimmie Dodds: I didn’t drive very much I guess.  I drove, I don’t know…then Helen had a car…I quit driving.

Ken Manson: Oh yeah, right.  Well sir Donnie’s got quite a setup thee for making syrup now.

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah, it’s good, yeah.

Ken Manson: You’ve been up there to have a look at it?

Jimmie Dodds: Oh I’ve been, oh yeah…..

Ken Manson: It’s pretty complete.

Jimmie Dodds: Yeah.  Well, I worked with Harold for quite a few years in the bush there.  I boiled most of the time.

Ken Manson: Oh yes.

Helen Powers: There’s that…picture at 100 years of age.  Isn’t she beautiful there.

Ken Manson: Gosh, she sure is.  And this is when she was a hundred?

Helen Powers: Yeah, it says on the back. July the 11th, 83….

Ken Manson: She’s a young looking woman there, isn’t she?

Helen Powers: And this is when she was in ’85, that’s last year, a year ago, last summer.  And this was taken there to.

Ken Manson: At the same time.

Helen Powers: But that’s her only child, Frank…And this is the class reunion we had two years ago.  28th of April, we had it two years ago.  We’re all there but Eva…She was upstairs talking to a teacher or somebody.

Ken Manson: Oh yeah, and who took those pictures?  They done a good job.

Helen Powers: Well, that was off my wee camera, but it was enlarged.

Ken Manson: Oh yeah, that’s good…..

Helen Powers: I’m sorry Eva’s not there.  The teacher and Eva are upstairs talking.  That’s at the school. Albert’s there.

Ken Manson: Albert?

Helen Powers: Yeah we made sure that, we made it early on account that he was suffering…

Ken Manson: Yeah, right.  Now this was your school class.

Helen Powers: Yes.  Eva was the only one out of the room.

Ken Manson: This guy?

Helen Powers: Harold Moyer.

Ken Manson: Harold Moyer.

Helen Powers: He’s the first cousin of Bill’s.

Ken Manson: He’s the first cousin of Bill….I seen him with Bill last summer…Who’s this?  I can’t see who this is.

Helen Powers: Tina…

Ken Manson: Oh, that’s Tina…I should maybe write that name down on the back before I forget.

Helen Powers: And these are the pictures of Johnny’s son.  Ryan.

Ken Manson: Oh yes….Golly that’s good.

 

Stay tuned for side 2

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

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Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

 

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Thanks to Middleville historian Laurie Yuill I have saved a few of the many photos he has from the photo book of Aggie Yuill from Middleville. Thanks Laurie!!

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte
 

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  1. Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

     Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1

 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 

 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

From the Buchanan Scrapbook

The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill

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The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill

Play while viewing photos

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All Photos from Aggie Yuill’s photo album and shared by Middleville historian Laurie Yuill

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and the cutest one of all shot in 1937 below

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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Edward Welsh – William Lee’s Sawmill

 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

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HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

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Archie Yuill at Rankin’s Yard — Middleville- Photo Laurie Yuill

 

LAND PURCHASED    

In 1883 another attempt to purchase land and erect a building was made when Alex Lawson agreed to sell 2½ acres for $250, the Society to pay all costs of conveyancing and fencing and was willing to allow said sum to remain as a lien on the land upon payment of common interest which was afterwards interpreted as 7 percent, and this offer was accepted and the necessary documents executed.  Arch Affleck was engaged to prepare a plan of a building and tenders were advertised for and two received, Daniel Watt, $487, and A.M. Blackburn $440, the latter being accepted and the building erected. When the crowd first filled the galler parts, it was feared that the joists might give way as at Almonte, and next year these were properly strengthened and have since stood the strain.    In 1885 a board fence was constructed along the front which was quite an undertaking as formerly a zigzag rail fence had been there and the panels had been filled with loose stones, and as these had to be got rid of a trench 3 feet wide had to be dug deep enough to place all these stones below the level of the surrounding surface.  C.G. Jackson undertook to do all work of building this board fence 6½ feet high for $50, the Society to supply all material and a part of the remaining fence was built in each of the three following years.

 

ENGAGED BRASS BAND

In this year and several years thereafter the services of a brass band was engaged for the Fair.  In 1886 a two-day show was held and a few years after the members were required to have all their commodities in the Hall on the first day of the show, but it was found unsuitable as the smallness of the prizes offered did not compensate the competitors for their trouble and the Society reverted back to a one-day show.  In 1887 the first festival held in the community was held in the grounds by the Ladies of the Congregational Church. In 1888 Mrs. Arch Manson, Mrs. John Somerville, and Mrs. Scantilion were called in to assist in revising the Ladies’ department of the Prize List. In 1891 prizes were first given for the now popular breed of Holstein cattle and Shropshire sheep, also for flowers.  A trotting match from Hugh Rodger’s gate to the gate of the grounds, on time, was keenly contested at the Fair this year. I think the winner was J.N. Dobbie’s Little Vic. In 1893 the Secretary’s salary was increased to $36 and the Hall was leased to C.G. Jackson for a skating rink, the interior arrangements were removed and the younger people of the community enjoyed an excellent winter’s sport, not withstanding the limited area.

FIRST LADY DIRECTORS  

In 1897, the first Lady Directors were appointed, Misses Maggie Gemmill, Maggie A. Croft, and Jean W. Affleck, being the appointees.  In 1899 a baseball match between the Jovial Sports of Ramsey and Lanark was the special attraction at the fair that year, the winners receiving a prize of $10 and the losers $5.   In 1900 Mr. Andrew Baird having died after his election for this year Mr. Thomas Young who had for many years served as Director and Vice President, and who firmly declined previously the office of president was prevailed upon to accept the office in Mr. Baird’s place.  The admission fee was raised to 15 cents for adults in this year, and the Lady Directors were Mrs. D.G. Dobbie, Maggie A. Rankin, and Maggie Gemmill. In 1902 the extension to the Hall was built at a cost of about $400 the Society paying $250 and the Sons of Temperance $150, in return for which they were granted the free use of the hall for 15 years as a lodge room.  In 1906 Societies came under new regulations and each one was required to select a corporate name, and fix its headquarters. The following motion proposed by Albert Affleck and Arch Nairn, “that this Society shall be named the Lanark Township Agricultural Society, and that the headquarters of the same shall be at the incorporated village of Middleville in the said Township” was adopted and forwarded to the Department of Toronto.    In 1907 the admission fee was raised to 25 cents for adults and 10 cents for children, which prices still remain.

 

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Archie Yuill- Photo- Laurie Yuill

DINING HALL ERECTED  

In 1909 $200 was paid on the mortgage indebtedness and the Dining Hall erected at a cost of about $235.Expert Judges were employed this year for the first time on horses and cattle.    In 1910 the mortgage debt was paid in full, and the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair to the great gratification of the little folks. In 1912 the Poultry House was erected at a cost of $150.  On February 13th, a Livestock Judging Competition lasting two days was held by the Society under the direction of Messrs Emmerson and Dawson, the Agricultural representatives at Perth. The Secretary-Treasurer’s salary was raised to $75 in this year.  The Society became affiliated with the Association of Exhibitions and Fairs, and George S. McIlraith was appointed as a delegate to attend the Convention. A grant of $10 was made to the Rural School Fair.
   

In 1914 10 Horse Stalls were erected costing about $125, and a well was dug in 1915 at a cost of $105.   The fair of 1917 turned out like those of 1920 and 1921, to be appointed for a very rainy day, but was carried through, the admission fees only amounting to $48.50, but the weather insurance $172 paid by the Government partly made up the loss.  The 1919 Fair was the only one year your Secretary has been unable to attend, being detained by sickness. Misses Agnes E. Affleck and Mabel Reid, however filled the position to the satisfaction of all on that occasion. In 1920, Mrs. Arthur Tennant, one of the most promising young men of the Society and for a number of years a Director, suggested that the Society should purchase a clover huller for the use of the locality but when he made further inquiry the cost deemed too great.

COMMUNITY GROUNDS

In 1921 the Directors generously granted the use of the grounds for the year as a Community Ground free of all charge.  Several attempts have been made to enlarge the grounds but always without success.

 

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Archie Yuill and Jean– Middleville– Photo– Laurie Yuill

 

PRESIDENTS AND SECRETARIES

The men who have filled the executive offices of President and Secretary-Treasurer since the formation were the following:

Presidents: John M.G. Hall, from May 11th 1851 till January 1854;

Alexander Stewart, from January 1854 till January 1870;

Edmond Anderson, from January 1872 till resignation January 1884;

Robert Lawson Jr., from January 1885 till resignation January 1889;

Andrew Baird, from January 1889 till death 1900;

Thomas Young, from March 1900 till resignation January 1908;

Wm. B. Affleck, from January 1908 till resignation January 1915

Crawford Dodds, from January 1915 till January 1916;

Alex McKay, from January 1916 till present.

Secretary-Treasurers: Mr. James Young served as Secretary Treasurer form the very inception of the Society till he was forced to resign by failing health in 1870 and he must have enjoyed the unlimited confidence of his fellow members for his books were so well kept that no audit was made till the year 1865.It gave me pleasure in conning over the records and financial statements, while he filled this office to observe the neatness and accuracy for the entire term, and I must confess that when I came to the first years of my own work I felt somewhat ashamed of my work in comparison.  However, I improved a little be experience. Mr. Young’s salary ranged from nothing for the first two years, 15 shillings 0 pence for 1853 and gradually increased until near the end of his term when he was paid $25 per year. Mr. James Stewart, merchant succeeded for the next two years but in 1872 he moved to Renfrew and your humble servant was then appointed and has been your Secretary since that time till the present excepting the term between March 24, 1917 till January 18, when Albert E. Affleck filled the position.

 

 

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Arch and Cecil Threshing Beans– Middleville- Photo Laurie Yuill

 

GREAT GOOD ACCOMPLISHED

It would give me great pleasure were I able to convey to you an accurate conception of the good accomplished by this Society during all these passing years, but that is beyond mortal ken, yet I am confident that results have been much greater that any of us can conjecture.  A Society that held the allegiance of men like George Blair, James Young, Thomas Kelso, J.W. Anderson, James Matthie, Daniel Wilson, and many others as long as they were residents of the locality, and of men like Sylvanus Gemmill, William Stead, Peter Reid, the Affleck’s, Somerville’s, Dodds’, McIlraith’s, and many others whose descendants of the 2nd and 3rd generation are still loyal members surely worthy of respect and support is I am Confident that a great deal of the trouble in this world arises not so much from natural depravity, but as a result of misunderstanding each other, and in our Society we have a common meeting ground where regardless of creed, Presbyterian, Baptist, Congregationalists, Methodists, Anglicans, and Roman Catholics, all of whom are represented on the membership list (which is at present 63 for the present year) may come together in kindly competition, or as in the present occasion in social.I sincerely trust that this may not be the last of these gatherings but that they may become of yearly occurrence. I wish to thank you all for your kind tolerance for listening so patiently to this rambling sketch.

 


Signed Arch Rankin

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1

 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 

 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

  1. Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

     Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

 

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

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HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

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All photos- Laurie Yuill

LANARK VILLAGE BROKE AWAY    

In 1862 the people of Lanark Village whether from a feeling of their growing importance, or because they were not receiving their full share in the expenditure of the Township revenues because incorporated as a separate Municipality taking in a number of good farms and the Municipal Government of the Township was then located at Middleville.  

At the Fair in this year it was ordered that the Judges be provided with a free dinner, and prizes for that year were $101.55. At the Annual Meeting in 1864 money was transmitted to Mr. Shanks in Britain to procure clover seed from the old land. In this year the membership fees amounted to $139. No show was held this year but $262.30 was paid for the purchase of a number of purchased sheep, purchased at the Provincial Exhibition by William Stead, who seems to have the authority on all matters pertaining to livestock no doubt owing to the knowledge gained in his youth as a farmer on his native heath in Yorkshire and also the experience gained in the land of his adoption.

Mr. Stead was one of the first to take an interest in the Society and I am pleased that his grandsons are still evincing that same interest. At the Annual Meeting in 1865 it was resolved that all future meetings of Directors exclude the interference of other members with their business and Auditors were first appointed who were Wm. Robertson and Peter McLaren II.

 

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All photos- Laurie Yuill

TRANSFERRED TO MIDDLEVILLE

Partly owing to the Incorporation of the Village of Lanark there arose a feeling that the management of Township Society should be transferred to the Township and located at Middleville and it was felt that the place of holding the Annual Meeting gave a decided advantage to that section, and there began a struggle to obtain that advantage.  At the Annual Meeting in 1866, a motion by James Affleck and Peter Reid that the next Annual Meeting be held at Middleville was carried. At the March meeting a motion by Robert Fleming and James Reid that the next exhibition be held at Lanark was followed by an announcement that the next exhibition be held at Middleville, and the original motion was declared carried by a vote of 26 to 12.

Nothing daunted, the Middleville people set to work to secure a larger membership in their favour and at the Annual Meeting in 1867 held there, the following Directors were chosen: John Affleck, Peter Reid, Robert Stead, Peter Barr, and Wm. Robertson, the place of next Annual Meeting was fixed for Middleville, quarterly meetings to be held alternately, beginning at Lanark and the exhibition to be held at Lanark Village.

 

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All photos- Laurie Yuill

In 1867 or 1868 it was agreed that next Annual Meeting be held at Lanark and quarterly meetings alternately. Evidently at this time there had been a movement to do away with grants to township agricultural societies for at the first quarterly meeting in March the following motion appears: moved by George Blair seconded by James Young that a memorial be forthwith brought up and forwarded to the Provincial Secretary at the earliest opportunity for continuing township societies.

At the Annual Meeting in 1869 the following extract shows how some of the members were caught napping. “From the reading of the new agricultural bill it was made evident that all members who had not paid their membership subscription for the ensuing year prior to 1st January of such ensuing year shall but have the right of voting at the election ofoffice-bearers,” consequently the few who had paid had the whole right of appointing office-bearers.  The place of the next Annual Meeting was settled by the following vote for Lanark 12, for Middleville.

 

JAMES YOUNG RESIGNS

In 1870 the Secretary, James Young, tendered his resignation as Secretary-Treasurer, and was succeeded by James Stewart and a contest for the presidency resulted in a vote for 17 for Edmond Anderson and 12 for Alex Stewart. At the meeting in March the Secretary-Treasurer was directed to accept American silver at 5 percent discount and to take steps to have all American silver on had exchanged into current funds.

In 1871 Peter McLaren and James McIlquham were sent to Markham to purchase two purebred Shorthorn sires, but this venture did not turn out very satisfactorily.   At the 1872 meeting James Stewart who had disposed of his business and was leaving for Renfrew, tendered his resignation and your present Secretary, a raw inexperienced youth of 23 years was chosen to be his successor.  Fortunately for me I had an excellent body of men on the Directorate, who kindly overlooked the many blunders that I made in that first year’s experience. These were Edmond Anderson, the President, whose memory I revere as an upright intelligent and public spirited citizen, giving his time and his talents for many years to the service of the Society without any thought of personal gain, as he seldom required any seed and scarcely even competed for prizes.  

The above remarks also apply to several of the other Directors and members. When we contrast his ideals and a conduct with present day ones, when one invites a friend to become a member of the Society, and is met with the reply: “There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”, is one to blame if he concludes that the normal fibre of humanity is degenerating? The other office-bearers for that year were James Campbell Vice President, James Affleck, Peter Reid, George Affleck, James Watt Jr., James Matthie, Arch Campbell Sr., Robert Fleming, John McIlraith, and Thomas Francis.  

In this, all the animals in possession of the Society were ordered to be sold and hereafter all the meetings of the Society were held at Middleville, which then became the permanent headquarters of the Society and a special meeting was held on February 8th, 1873, to consider the purchase of land for the Society’s use. About 50 members were present but no definite action was taken as none of the farmers adjoining the village were willing to part with their lands so the Society had to continue in the old way for some time longer.

 

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All photos- Laurie Yuill

 

CHARGING ADMISSION FEE

Up until 1875, all exhibitions had been free to all comers, but in that year a motion was adopted to charge an admission fee of 10 cents and appointed Wm. B. Affleck and John McEathren as door keepers, as tickets were not use at that time.  In 1877 the Prize List was first printed in pamphlet form, heretofore, being printed on a sheet form. The old rule holding members as such until they notified the Secretary of their wish to withdraw was repealed in this year. In 1878 the Farmer’s Advocate was first introduced as one of the periodicals to be furnished by the Society, and still retains its popularity among the members. In this year another attempt was made to secure land but without results. Heretofore the Secretary-Treasurer was elected by the members at the Annual Meeting and had a vote onthe Directorate, but a change in the Agricultural Act required that the appointment be made by the newly appointed Board of Directors and depriving the Secretary of a vote unless he had been chosen as a Director,which still prevails.  

1879 must have been the low water mark in the price of seeds, common clover selling 6½ cents, late clover 7 cents, timothy 4 cents and corn 1 cent. In 1881 100 bushels of White Russian wheat and 50 bushels of Lost Nation wheat were imported, which had a beneficial effect on the wheat crop for several years.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

  1. Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

     Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎