Tag Archives: larry clark

A Gift for a Teacher 1939 Larry Clark

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A Gift for a Teacher 1939 Larry Clark

I was going thru some of my junk and re-discovered this item. I just now realized that this is possibly a Christmas gift to a teacher. The interesting part is that while this is a not so interesting pattern, the manufacturer was of some importance and would have been fairly expensive to purchase. As you can see this would have been purchased shortly after the start of WWII and to that extent someone (the storeowner, purchaser) loved the bowl but not the fact that it was made in Germany and so obliterated that fact. I have googled both names but drew a blank. I haven’t heard of this practise or seen some such as this before. Perhaps it was a normal practise at the time. The mark is that of Reinhold & Schlegelmilch, Germany with the “Germany” portion covered up.

Larry Clark

Has anyone seen this before??

Thought you might like a better photo! I don’t know what he/she used to print on the plate but it is obviously permanent ink of some kind-no markers in those days?Larry

Reinhold Schlegelmilch was a porcelain manufacturer in SuhlGermany, founded in the 19th century. The factory mark was the initials “RS” in red encircled by a green wreath beneath a red five-pointed star. Reinhold Schlegelmilch had two sons, Arnold Schlegelmilch and Ehrhard Schlegelmilch.

Ehrhard Schlegelmilch operated the factory in Suhl, and during this period, most of the pieces exported to the United States bore the “RS Prussia” mark stamped in red. Arnold Schlegelmilch started a factory in Tillowitz, then Germany (now Tułowice), Poland. In 1910, the Tillowitz factory began using the “RS Germany” mark stamped in green. The Tillowitz factory kept producing porcelain through the Second World War. The company was taken over by the Polish state in 1946 and privatized in 1995 under the name Fabryka Porcelitu Tułowice SA. The production in 2011 concentrated on sanitary and building ceramics including tiles. These two operations produced the majority of their products for export beginning in 1892 until the beginning of World War I.

For almost 100 years, 1869 to 1956, Reinhold Schlegelmilch’s initials, RS, appeared in various marks on fine German porcelain. Probably today’s most desired pieces are those marked RS Prussia. Rare blanks with rare decorations, such as animals or portraits, of RS Prussia can bring $3,000-$8,000. More common floral pieces have routinely sold for $75-$350. Other sought after marks include RS Germany, RS Suhl, and RS Poland.

Due to it’s higher value, the RS Prussia mark has been forged and copied since the late 1960s . New RS Suhl appeared in the early 1990s, and now, in 1998, RS Germany and RS Poland are being reproduced. This article will review the new and forged RS marks and compare them to original markings. It will also look at other ways fakers attempt to enhance or imitate RS porcelain. Read more here click

Leslie China Hall Fire

Gwladys Williams Menzies– Celebrating a Local Girl who Made Good

Carleton Place High School Photo 1954-1955 Name those Students- Larry Clark

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Carleton Place High School Photo 1954-1955 Name those Students- Larry Clark

LindaThese photos are a scan of a picture I recently received from my sister Eleanore Eliopoulis. I put as many names to the individuals as I can remember but they are not all accurate due to the more than 60 years that have passed since that time. Some names that I think should be there are missing because I am not sure.. Faye Robertson, Beverly Emerson etc. I, of course, am not in the photo as  (for whatever reason) I always managed to avoid these photo sessions. I don’t see John Clifford, Sam Saunders, Wayne Ormrod-

BUT there must be some of us left from that era that would be able to add some names. I will eventually get the photo to Jennifer-if she is interested, and perhaps it can be restored somewhat. From time to time I will go back to the photo as some name or other pops up for no reason, ie. I struggled over “Pauline Burns”, whom I recognized but for the longest time, her name escaped me but when I opened the photo this morning-there it was. I hope I am right. There are many others that I knew but still struggling with the names.

Like us all Larry and thank you and Eleanore!

Ray Paquette said:

Because of the technology available at the time, the picture was taken twice: the left hand side and then the right. This provided an opportunity for the late Bill Hendry to appear in his assigned position on the left then to quickly speed to the right side and reappear standing and smiling impishly, appearing in the photo twice!!!

Langtry’s Dairy Carleton Place Larry Clark

D & L Slade Co.– Way of Housekeeping Larry Clark — A Tide Mill

Remembering an Accident 1966 Larry Clark

Ritchie Feed and Seed Part 3– The Egg Grading Station-Cecil Hicks — Larry Clark

Tales from Ritchie Feed and Seed — Larry Clark part 2

Tales From Ritchie’s Feed and Seed — Larry Clark — Story 1

Memories of Ritchie Feed and Seed Carleton Place

Home Boys and Family–Mallindine Family — Larry Clark

1963 Riverside Park — Stills from a 8 MM Movie Camera — Larry Clark

Dowdall’s Esso and Hank’s Tire- Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown and Larry Clark

More Photos of the Hazwill Pony Farm… Larry Clark — Wylies– 1962-1963

Photos of Carleton Place — Larry Clark— Findlay Memories

Memories of Larry Clark’s Photos- Bonds Horricks and Tombstones

Riverside Park Comments Larry Clark ‘The Dip’

Larry Clark Photos Documented 1963 Parade

Get me to the My Future Wife On Time — Larry Clark

I Was Axed — Memories of Larry Clark — Bell Street

1954 CPHS Graduation Pictures — Larry Clark

Cruisin Through the Dance Halls- From Carleton Place and Beyond!! Larry Clark

The Summer of 1956- Larry Clark

The Carleton Place Night Patrol: Aka Skin Dogging — Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Upper Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Memories of a Photo — The Forgotten Canadian Forestry Corps, Booze and a Mud Quagmire

Update to the Charles Lindbergh Story — Larry Clark

 Tales You Did Not Know About—Charles Lindbergh Landed in Carleton Place

Memories of Neighbourhood Kids — Larry Clark

Larry Clark Memories : Billings Bridge, Willow Trees and the Orange Lodge

Skating on Fraser’s Pond and Hobo Haven — Larry Clark

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Your Veribest Agent

A Personal Story — Caught in the Ice– Rocky Point- Larry Clark

Women of the Red Cross — Mary Slade –Larry Clark

Old Notebooks Larry Clark and I Once Had a Math Teacher like This!

Memories of Mulvey’s Candy Store and Joie Bond — Larry Clark

My Family – Larry Clark — Hilda Strike — Olympic Medallist

Finding Treasure — Larry Clark

The Girl Who Gave Birth to Rabbits — Magazines from the 50s Larry Clark

Langtry’s Dairy Carleton Place Larry Clark

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Langtry’s Dairy Carleton Place Larry Clark
All Photo’s are from Larry Clark
Looking for something else in my garage, found this. I would have tried to place them in the Langtry blog but would have had to do it one at a time, so sending to you to do with as 
you will.
Maple Leaf Dairy -249 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Joann Voyce added When this picture was taken this was Langtry’s Dairy/ The building to the right was the Beer Store— Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Historical Museum

Nancy Hudson– First met Fred when he used to delivery milk to our home in Innisville. He was a really nice man. Remeber when the dairy was first Langtry’s and later Rintouls. read-Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Angie Ballantyne–My grandparents Naomi Loton and Gordon Langtry used to run that dairy and lived upstairs. I have an old milk bottle!

What did you Buy at The Dairy?

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

D & L Slade Co.– Way of Housekeeping Larry Clark — A Tide Mill

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D & L Slade Co.– Way of Housekeeping Larry Clark — A Tide Mill

Larry Clark

In 1775 the mill provided a footnote to the American Revolution. One of the earliest naval engagements of the war took place near the mill, and its gates prevented the British from sailing up Mill Creek and coming within firing range of Chelsea.
Henry Slade had bought into the mill in 1827, and the innovation introduced in his time was the grinding of tobacco into snuff to supplement corn. As Henry’s children David, Levi and Charles took an interest in the business, they – especially David – wanted to let their new ideas and ambition increase the business.
For one year, Henry turned the mill over to the hard-working David, who increased the mill’s profits to $500 until the older generation stepped back in. But soon David took charge again, creating the D & L Slade Co. with brother Levi. It would for more than 100 years turn out spices for New England home and professional kitchens

 

HISTORY

Re: D&L Slade Company Boston, Massachusetts

By genealogy.com user September 30, 2000 at 07:43:06

Henry Slade (born 1791) purchased an old mill in Revere that was powered by tidewater.This mill has burned down TWICE, so the poor building that is falling to ruin currently is more modern than Henry’s mill.He used the mill to grind snuff, since he sold tobacco products.He turned over the use of part of the mill to two of his sons, Charles (born 1816) and David (born 1819), and they began to grind spice for wholesale grocers as Slade Spice Company.Charles eventually left the company and was replaced by his brother Levi (born in 1822)and D & L Slade was formed.When Levi died in 1884, the company incorporated, with David, Wilbur L. Slade (son of Levi), Herber L. Slade (son of Levi), and Henry Dillingham (son-in-law of David and husband of Anna Jeanette, David’s daughter, of course).They began to buy spice and sell it, and since they were sticklers for quality, they did very well and the company grew rapidly.They refused to put fillers in their spice, and they soon became the largest seller of unadulterated spice (something that was hard to find in those days).Besides the mill in Revere, they had a factory in Chelsea, and offices in Boston.When Bell Seasoning’s went on the market, they purchased that company, which had also been family-owned, but they retained the name of Bell’s on all its packages.Somehow the same nicety was not extended to the Slade’s brand when it was finally acquired by a large food corporation, and the Slade’s Spice name no longer exists.

THE SLADE MILL

The mill was one of several tide mills dotting the New England coast – an innovation that some say originated in the area. Tide mills worked by using a set of flood gates. When the tide surged in, the flood gates swung open to allow the ocean water to fill the marsh and mill pond. When the tide turned and began to exit the marsh, the gates closed, trapping the water. From this impounded water the mill drew off a steady stream to turn its machinery – similar to the way a mill on a river used the flow to drive its works.

Tide mill - Wikipedia

In 1918 Slade would make the investment that keeps its legacy alive today. It bought out the Bell’s Seasoning Company. In 1867, William Bell had begun selling his blend of poultry seasoning through his market in Boston. Bell had started as a grocer in Lowell, Mass. before moving south to Boston where he could buy spices directly off the ships arriving in port.

Over the next 40 years Bell continually expanded the popularity of his Bell’s Seasoning – a blend of rosemary, ginger, oregano, sage and marjoram – until his sudden death at age 76. Sensing opportunity, Slade purchased the brand, but wisely did nothing to change the name or formula. Instead, he  incorporated Bell’s into his own lineup, which had expanded to baking powders, cumin, pepper and a wide range of spices. The company promoted them in its own cookbook.

The Slade name finally disappeared from the grocery shelves in the 1970s when the Slade family sold the company. Only the Bell’s brand name remains today – touted by a wide range of cooks as still the best poultry seasoning for a Thanksgiving turkey.

The Slade Mill, though, still lives on. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, its owners converted it to apartments in 2004.

Hat tip to: The Spice Mill on the Marsh by Thomas P. Smith

The Boston Globe
Boston, Massachusetts
07 Nov 1919, Fri  •  Page 16

Comments from Larry Clark

Drove from North Bay to Ottawa with a wedding cake for my sister in law. My wife baked the cake (3 layers) and had it iced professionally here. The baker was a little dubious when told of our mission but completed the cake. Everything went well until the time to cut the cake. They ended up using a hammer on the knife to break the cake open. The cake (and icing, when you managed to soften it) was delicious. Larry Clark

Related reading

Vintage Culinary Blogging –Fun to Cook Book

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Remembering an Accident 1966 Larry Clark

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Remembering an Accident 1966 Larry Clark

I noticed a comment regarding my 63 Chev wagon that was parked in front of the ESSO station; that and the tragic news of David Hagerman’s death caused me to reflect on a most fortunate conclusion to a head-on collision we had on the Friday 1st Dec, 1966. ( Dowdall’s Esso and Hank’s Tire- Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown and Larry Clark)

The accident took place on Hwy 17 between Cobden and Haley Station Rd.  There were six of us in the car (Chev wagon) I was driving, Beth sitting beside me in the front seat and my 7-8 month pregnant sister, Eleanore beside her (loved those bench seats). The three children in the back. 

My youngest son Keith was lying on the back seat and the other two were way in the back, luggage area (probably fighting?) surrounded by a variety of Christmas presents. 

It was dark of night (very black). I had just turned my head slightly to speak to Eleanore, when my attention was drawn to an on-coming car breasting the hill, but one with four headlights-I reacted quickly as two of them were in my lane. Here my memory is rather vague-I must have cranked the wheel severely to the right-and then oblivion. I must have been out for only a couple of minutes and my next memories were of being in a stranger’s car being driven to Renfrew hospital-not sure who else was with me-perhaps the other adults (children?). 

Dec 2 1966

Arriving at the hospital, in a state of confusion, I very relieved to find out that everyone had survived albeit with a variety of broken bones , cuts and contusions. The doctor wanted to examine me but I  insisted he look after the others first. Later determined the Beth had a broken collarbone and a very large gash along her jawline requiring many stitches  (the gearshift lever); Eleanore some bleeding and was being monitored closely (the two of them had numerous small facial cuts from flying glass); Brent a small gash on his face; Aimee and Keith, no apparent injuries. 

In the middle of all this, the other driver was brought in but quickly ambulanced to Ottawa with a severe eye injury (I knew him from CP but forget his name, which is why I was looking for the newspaper article). Not a way to meet someone from our home town.

I called my parents with the bad news and arranged for a family member to come and drive myself and the children to my parents as Beth and Eleanore, were being held overnight (in fact Eleanore was being driven to Carleton Place Hospital by ambulance) in hospital. I would regret this decision later when, a pain in my left/ankle of which I had been dimly aware of, manifested itself in an increased, barely bearable throbbing, with which I had to put up with for the remainder of the night. 

Throughout the night I had to keep immersing my foot in near boiling water to distract from the throbbing. I did make it through the night and arranged to be driven back to Renfrew to gather the remainder of our belongings, visit the accident site, take pictures of the car and most importantly to arrange for the release of Beth from the hospital. I also persuaded a nurse to provide me with pain pills. 

A few days later, a friend (Dave) who was on course in Ottawa, joined Beth and I on a visit to Eleanore in Hospital. It must have been a sight coming down the hall, three abreast as I was limping, Dave was on crutches (broken ankle due to a fall off a ladder) and Beth with a large bandage on her face and left arm in a sling. It was cause for another bit of excitement.

Nine months late, having lost my limp, I was in a very fastidious (didn’t much like him for that reason) doctor’s office for my annual medical (ATC licence) and on questioning/examining me, pulled out a great protractor-type thing and upon applying this gismo to my arm, asked when I had broken my arm/elbow. 

I explained about the accident which of course arched his eyebrows and led to a much more thorough examination which alarmed me a little but nothing more was determined other than my arm was 20 degrees from being straight. This, over time resolved itself to near perfection (like the rest of me:)

A year and more later, I attended the trial of the other driver; he was defended by a very good lawyer (one of the Anka’s-Paul’s uncle, I believe) and by the time the trial was over it was hard to believe that the accident had actually happened. 

I was of little or no help as I didn’t remember much. The charges were dismissed. However the other witnesses (the ones being passed) tried their best to paint a complete picture. I took them to lunch and it was only then that my memory came flooding back (or at least their version). 

I had forgotten that I had cursed the onlookers who had gathered- for not acting quickly enough in getting the kids out of the back seat. I passed the kids, one at a time through the opening that should have been the windshield except that I couldn’t find Keith. He had been sleeping on the back seat and when the other two were projected forward, breaking the rear seatback and covering him when he was forced to the floor. This would have slowed their forward movement so that it had (probably) minimized the effect on those of us in the front seat and reduced or nullified any potential injuries they may have suffered as a result of the crash. 

The main witness testimony (a truck being passed) was that when they perceived what was about to happen they pulled to their right leaving their lane virtually clear but the overtaking vehicle. He, instead turned to his left thus colliding with our vehicle (he may have attempted to turn back) thus turning a head-on into a partial head-on??

Related reading

Ritchie Feed and Seed Part 3– The Egg Grading Station-Cecil Hicks — Larry Clark

Tales from Ritchie Feed and Seed — Larry Clark part 2

Tales From Ritchie’s Feed and Seed — Larry Clark — Story 1

Memories of Ritchie Feed and Seed Carleton Place

Home Boys and Family–Mallindine Family — Larry Clark

1963 Riverside Park — Stills from a 8 MM Movie Camera — Larry Clark

Dowdall’s Esso and Hank’s Tire- Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown and Larry Clark

More Photos of the Hazwill Pony Farm… Larry Clark — Wylies– 1962-1963

Photos of Carleton Place — Larry Clark— Findlay Memories

Memories of Larry Clark’s Photos- Bonds Horricks and Tombstones

Riverside Park Comments Larry Clark ‘The Dip’

Larry Clark Photos Documented 1963 Parade

Get me to the My Future Wife On Time — Larry Clark

I Was Axed — Memories of Larry Clark — Bell Street

1954 CPHS Graduation Pictures — Larry Clark

Cruisin Through the Dance Halls- From Carleton Place and Beyond!! Larry Clark

The Summer of 1956- Larry Clark

The Carleton Place Night Patrol: Aka Skin Dogging — Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Upper Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Memories of a Photo — The Forgotten Canadian Forestry Corps, Booze and a Mud Quagmire

Update to the Charles Lindbergh Story — Larry Clark

 Tales You Did Not Know About—Charles Lindbergh Landed in Carleton Place

Memories of Neighbourhood Kids — Larry Clark

Larry Clark Memories : Billings Bridge, Willow Trees and the Orange Lodge

Skating on Fraser’s Pond and Hobo Haven — Larry Clark

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Your Veribest Agent

A Personal Story — Caught in the Ice– Rocky Point- Larry Clark

Women of the Red Cross — Mary Slade –Larry Clark

Old Notebooks Larry Clark and I Once Had a Math Teacher like This!

Memories of Mulvey’s Candy Store and Joie Bond — Larry Clark

My Family – Larry Clark — Hilda Strike — Olympic Medallist

Finding Treasure — Larry Clark

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Finding Treasure — Larry Clark

Finding Treasure– Larry Clark

It was a dark and stormy day and we were enjoying a visit from the grandkids-up to a point, as they started to get a little rambunctious. I had been examining a rat trap that I had purchased, thinking that I might catch whatever critter was getting into the back entrance. I remembered that I had unwittingly put a wallboard over a space in the block wall of the basement bathroom that I had been renovating. Sometime later I remembered that that was where I had hidden a bunch of coins I had been saving. At the time thought, “ well at least they are safe there”, so did nothing about it-until I had this great idea to keep the kids entertained. 

I gathered the kids, showed them the rat trap (a rather huge affair) and told them that it was a “treasure finder”. They were somewhat dubious but followed me upstairs to the bedrooms which we decided would be a good place to start. 

We traipsed all around the house from bedroom to bedroom, room to room with me placing the trap against the wall, moving it from side to side: saying every once in a while, “did you hear that; did you feel something” but all the answers were “no”; still they were entranced. As we made our way slowly to the basement, I mentioned that I thought perhaps the detector was beginning to get warm, -“feel it”. Some said “yes”, the others said “no”. 

As we approached the bathroom door, I said, “This is getting very warm, I hope I can hold on?”  We crowded (all 5 of us) in and I proceeded to check the walls. At one point in this inspection I yelled that the detector was beginning to vibrate, “ i don’t know if I can hold on much longer” and at that point there was a very loud snap and I loudly and excitedly exclaimed, the treasure must be here-somebody get a hammer!” So off one of them went to the workroom, coming back with a hammer and by now the clamour of excitement was such that I thought “why am I doing this-they are just as noisy as before , if not more so”. 

I sent one granddaughter off to find a marker so that we could mark the spot with an X. Having been now prepared, I boosted my 6 year old grandson onto the top of the toilet tank, pointed to the mark and said, “Hit the centre of the X as hard as you can”. Which he did with a mighty whack but barely made a dent. He very reluctantly gave me the hammer and I soon penetrated the wall-all the eyes became like saucers when they realized that I was exposing a very large hole.

 It took some effort to encourage my grandson to put his hand into this very black hole and finally he did. Yelling out suddenly when his hand found  (what turned out to be) a roll of coins (pennies), then another and another.  

Everyone was overly excited, so to calm them down I gave each of them a coin of their choice ( I had some large cents that impressed them). 

Over time they figured out that it was a hoax but they will never forget that occasion. Me, I recovered fairly easily too. (after removing the remainder of the coins, I got that self same hammer and nailed a very nice ornamental wall hanging over the hole. Back to normal-until the next time!

Ritchie Feed and Seed Part 3– The Egg Grading Station-Cecil Hicks — Larry Clark

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Ritchie Feed and Seed Part 3– The Egg Grading Station-Cecil Hicks — Larry Clark
Thanks go to Andrew Ritchie for these photos.

The Egg Grading Station-Cecil Hicks

Although I liked my job as a pin setter working for Bill Irwin , I looked for another job, a little less wearing (particularly for the sake of my Jeans)  and found it thanks to Cecil Hicks who operated (as far as I know) the only egg grading facility in town. 

This establishment occupied the basement (eggs) and one other floor, above Ritchie’s (chicks), known as the “brooder”.

A very commonplace door, adjacent to the Ritchie loading platform led into a cavernous room with two sets of stairs, one leading down to the egg grading station and the other, up to the brooder. At the bottom of the stairs, one turned right for buying or selling eggs, or straight ahead to exit the building. Perhaps to enjoy the sound of the rushing water or just to enjoy the view and let your senses react to the noise of the disturbed waters. Or you are just plain lost!

It was a long corridor to reach the door to the egg sorting room-the office on the left and once inside you were faced with an almost square room (20’ approx.) with a large heavy doored enclosure in the right corner. 

This was a refrigerated room for storing eggs after they had been graded and actually the main room was a little cool. On the left side was the huge grading machine which took up most of the wall (except for a door to access the office and the working area of the machine).

A not unusual start to  Saturday morning would have Cecil begin candling the eggs and placing them on the machine according to the following criteria  (Perhaps not the same as now) from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency:-

ReceivingEggs are received and held in a refrigerated holding area which is separate from the area where the eggs are graded.

Candling

Eggs pass over a bright candling light by means of a conveyor that transports and, at the same time, rolls the eggs. The light makes the internal contents of the egg visible allowing a determination of internal defects to be made (i.e. blood spots, meat spots, rot, poor quality yolk, air cell size, etc.) By rolling the eggs as they pass over the candling light, the entire outer surface of the egg can be seen by the grader.

The light makes cracks in the shell visible (some cracks are very difficult to see until candled) and also allows dirt, stains, or excessively rough shelled eggs to be seen. By this process, the candler can determine whether each egg meets the grade requirements for Canada Grade A. Defective eggs, leaking eggs and rejects are removed by the candler. This was done one egg at a time by Cecil (although he could hold at least a half dozen eggs in each hand, switching them around one handed as he placed them up to the light. (there was a bucket conveniently placed under the light position for rejects and mishaps)!

The Canadian Food Agency Guidelines

The eggs that meet Canada A grade requirements proceed to the scales to be weighed.

Weighing

Eggs are weighed and sorted according to size category for Canada A grade eggs (jumbo size, extra large size, large size, medium size, small size and peewee size). Each of the sizes has a weight requirement that must be met.

Packing

Eggs are packed in containers according to their grade and size (if

Canada A grade).

Storage

Eggs are stored at an appropriate temperature in the graded cooler until they are loaded into a vehicle for transport to the retail location.

The following is an example of a grading machine although this is much smaller (an example of a larger machine at the start of the video but still smaller than the one we used). 

Back to the action:

I would have tuned the radio (probably CFRA or CKOY, no CJOH then) to listen to the Cisco Kid (Pancho), the Lone Ranger, or Roy and Dale.

As the eggs came tumbling out (gently), I placed them in the appropriate trays, stacking and storing them as the day progressed. 

In addition to the grades mentioned (I suppose not in accordance with current directives) there were Cracks, B and C eggs separated from the others.

Cracks-as advertised

B-slightly darker yolks.

C-definitely darker and might have blood spots (safe for use in cooking)

Next is the operation of the grader!

This next photo is somewhat the shape but Cecil’s grader was larger and more substantially built.

From time to time adventurous ladies (usually older/regular customers) came in to buy eggs. Usually in search of one or the other of the last 3 grades mentioned, the exception being those that wanted white eggs. 


The most popular chicken breeds that only lay white eggs include the White Leghorn, Andalusian, Polish chicken, AnconaEgyptian Fayoumis, Hamburg and California White, with the Leghorn by far the most popular.
Most eggs, in days gone by were brown, as they were produced by local farmers who had to rely on a chicken that not only produced eggs but could be sold as meat chickens when the laying days were over-there is very little meat on a Leghorn. A farmer would bring in eggs in a variety of containers with no distinction as to colour. We made no effort to separate the colours unless we were asked by the aforementioned customer, “do you have any white eggs”. No difference in price for this service.I worked in a confined, cool environment, doing a somewhat boring, repetitious job but enjoyed the characters/customers that came in to buy eggs, and of course, chat. I knew most of the farmers in the area but have since lost most of those memories.From time to time Cecil would load eggs in the truck and make deliveries to local grocery stores and/or restaurants.Finally, would come the end of an eggstraordinary day

This is my personal gasp at the past!

Larry Clark

Related reading

Tales from Ritchie Feed and Seed — Larry Clark part 2

Tales From Ritchie’s Feed and Seed — Larry Clark — Story 1

Memories of Ritchie Feed and Seed Carleton Place

Tales from Ritchie Feed and Seed — Larry Clark part 2

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Tales from Ritchie Feed and Seed — Larry Clark part 2

Photo- Andrew Ritchie

Back at the mill, one entered by climbing the stairs to the loading dock (or jumping from your truck) and entering the store. The office was a glassed in square opposite the entrance but along the right side were bins filled with some intriguing  items-mostly dog biscuits, which came in a variety of shapes and colours-I preferred the pink! 

The first “boss” I remember was a ? Churchill whose wife was the grade 7 teacher in Central School and in the mid 50’s It was Ian Brodie (more later).

Remember, I’m a kid wandering around here with little or no supervision. 

There was an entry from the office area to the mill proper through a storage area to the mill proper. The first person I would see would be Alec?Bowes (running these names through my mind I just forgot his first name) who was usually covered head to toe in flour dust. He would be attaching bags to the chute that he operated, filling them and weighing the bags on the large scale which was off to one side. Also a Burns (townline & 7?) worked in this area also. Adjacent to this location, by the loading dock (big doors) was the hopper which was accessed from outside. This area was also very noisy with a variety of belts driving the machinery. This was all very interesting to see and hear and a little intimidating but one had to run the gauntlet (so to speak) if you wanted to get to the huge elevator and a chance to explore the upper floors.

I ate many lunches perched on the old millstone, enjoying the sunshine and noise of the falling water. I don’t know what dad was originally hired to do but by the time my memory kicks in, he, for the most part, drove the delivery truck -to all parts of Lanark County.

They were a great group of men to be in contact with-always taunting/joking with one another and playing tricks. On one occasion, they were discussing someone’s jacket which was hanging on the hooks provided in the hall. The owner of the jacket being described went to check it out, put his hand in the pockets, only to discover that there was dead mouse in his hand-it had been dead for some time-hence the discussion as to what to do about the situation.

Another time there was a contest to see who could carry the most bags of feed (100lb). In the end it was my dad that was the winner (of course). One bag under each arm and he had the others place a bag on each shoulder and then proceeded to walk the length of the room (20’)There were other contests but I wouldn’t want you to think that they didn’t work but they did, in an unhealthy and in some ways a dangerous environment (especially where cookies and dog biscuits are involved).

Memories of Ritchie Feed and Seed Carleton Place

Related reading:

Home Boys and Family–Mallindine Family — Larry Clark

1963 Riverside Park — Stills from a 8 MM Movie Camera — Larry Clark

Dowdall’s Esso and Hank’s Tire- Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown and Larry Clark

More Photos of the Hazwill Pony Farm… Larry Clark — Wylies– 1962-1963

Photos of Carleton Place — Larry Clark— Findlay Memories

Memories of Larry Clark’s Photos- Bonds Horricks and Tombstones

Riverside Park Comments Larry Clark ‘The Dip’

Larry Clark Photos Documented 1963 Parade

Get me to the My Future Wife On Time — Larry Clark

I Was Axed — Memories of Larry Clark — Bell Street

1954 CPHS Graduation Pictures — Larry Clark

Cruisin Through the Dance Halls- From Carleton Place and Beyond!! Larry Clark

The Summer of 1956- Larry Clark

The Carleton Place Night Patrol: Aka Skin Dogging — Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Upper Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Memories of a Photo — The Forgotten Canadian Forestry Corps, Booze and a Mud Quagmire

Update to the Charles Lindbergh Story — Larry Clark

 Tales You Did Not Know About—Charles Lindbergh Landed in Carleton Place

Memories of Neighbourhood Kids — Larry Clark

Larry Clark Memories : Billings Bridge, Willow Trees and the Orange Lodge

Skating on Fraser’s Pond and Hobo Haven — Larry Clark

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Your Veribest Agent

A Personal Story — Caught in the Ice– Rocky Point- Larry Clark

Women of the Red Cross — Mary Slade –Larry Clark

Old Notebooks Larry Clark and I Once Had a Math Teacher like This!

Memories of Mulvey’s Candy Store and Joie Bond — Larry Clark

My Family – Larry Clark — Hilda Strike — Olympic Medallist

Tales From Ritchie’s Feed and Seed — Larry Clark — Story 1

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Tales From Ritchie’s Feed and Seed — Larry Clark — Story 1

Richie’s was a presence in Carleton Place long before the grand re-opening in 53 (55?). Don’t know what the legal name was at that time but we always referred to the company as “Ritchie’s”. My father, Norman Clark, worked there for many years (approx. 37-57). I roamed all over the building-remember the loading hopper, the huge freight elevator, the dust, the flour/grain chutes and the men who worked there-Burns, Bowes, Curry, Briscoe, Churchill and others whose names escape me. The other drivers I remember  are Allan Currie (Franktown), Ken Briscoe (near Franktown-later had his own trucking business). I accompanied Dad on  the delivery routes through the Lanark countryside as far as Ompah, Plevna, Snowroad, and surrounding areas. Years later, I worked in the wooden extension (missing in the photo, demolished) for Cecil Hicks. He operated an egg grading business in the basement and a chicken brooder in the upper story of the stone building; next to and entered thru the extension.The place names I recall are Arden, Poland, Plevna, Snow Road on the one end and to White Lake, Calabogie, Blakeley– Pakenham on the other.  There was also Clyde Forks, Drummond Centre, Fergusons Falls, and Innisville down the middle. Did I mention Middleville. All these name are from memory so there are many missing. 

No radio in the truck, so we went on our merry way singing all the old classics. Favourites were “Ramona” (not mine), “She’ll be coming round the mountain”, Hank Williams, etc. There are others I didn’t really care for so don’t remember them offhand. These trips were always an adventure for me on the Saturday morning runs. Particularly the road into Snow Road and Plevna, which was a one lane gravel road with pullouts for passing every mile or so. If you met another vehicle, one of you had to back to the pullout-not sure what determined who had priority (except for horse drawn vehicles) but a 3 ton truck carried a lot of clout. (tried to say persuavousness but apparently that is not a word). That being said, the most interesting part of this road was the various contours. The best way to describe it would be to say you were either going uphill or downhill, curving left or right with these two actions at the same time (the former and one of the latter).

Snow Road General store

Snow Road stands out as a milestone for a couple of reasons. We were unloading at the General Store and until that time (I was 10, give or take) I would drag the 100 lb. bags from the middle of the truck bed to the back. At some point I discovered that I could wrap my arms and knees around a bag and actually lift the bag and waddle to the back- A very proud moment! At some point, on my lifting a bag, a mouse scurried from under it-headed directly at dad. He reacted instantly, swatting the mouse and instantly killing it-dad was extremely strong (more later). Later, I entered the store only to spy a counter display of the best cookies I think I had ever seen. Several varieties of delectables. As I was flush at the time, I bought a pound of assorted cookies and started to have a feast; eventually, finding my way to bottom of the bag-not a good idea as I found to my later regret. There road out was the same as I previously described but the truck was near empty and in motion, had acquired a rather disconcerting rhythm to which my stomach began to take offence- no amount of singing could. Quell the maelstrom. Fortunately as the boil came to a peak, we pulled into a lay-by-I’ll leave the rest to your imagination. It was a long time until I ate another cookie-must have been at least a couple of days. 

There were others but I remember Allan Currie (Franktown), Ken Briscoe (near Franktown-later had his own trucking business).

Memories of Ritchie Feed and Seed Carleton Place

Related reading:

Home Boys and Family–Mallindine Family — Larry Clark

1963 Riverside Park — Stills from a 8 MM Movie Camera — Larry Clark

Dowdall’s Esso and Hank’s Tire- Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown and Larry Clark

More Photos of the Hazwill Pony Farm… Larry Clark — Wylies– 1962-1963

Photos of Carleton Place — Larry Clark— Findlay Memories

Memories of Larry Clark’s Photos- Bonds Horricks and Tombstones

Riverside Park Comments Larry Clark ‘The Dip’

Larry Clark Photos Documented 1963 Parade

Get me to the My Future Wife On Time — Larry Clark

I Was Axed — Memories of Larry Clark — Bell Street

1954 CPHS Graduation Pictures — Larry Clark

Cruisin Through the Dance Halls- From Carleton Place and Beyond!! Larry Clark

The Summer of 1956- Larry Clark

The Carleton Place Night Patrol: Aka Skin Dogging — Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Upper Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Memories of a Photo — The Forgotten Canadian Forestry Corps, Booze and a Mud Quagmire

Update to the Charles Lindbergh Story — Larry Clark

 Tales You Did Not Know About—Charles Lindbergh Landed in Carleton Place

Memories of Neighbourhood Kids — Larry Clark

Larry Clark Memories : Billings Bridge, Willow Trees and the Orange Lodge

Skating on Fraser’s Pond and Hobo Haven — Larry Clark

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Your Veribest Agent

A Personal Story — Caught in the Ice– Rocky Point- Larry Clark

Women of the Red Cross — Mary Slade –Larry Clark

Old Notebooks Larry Clark and I Once Had a Math Teacher like This!

Memories of Mulvey’s Candy Store and Joie Bond — Larry Clark

My Family – Larry Clark — Hilda Strike — Olympic Medallist

Memories Carleton Place- Town Hall

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Memories Carleton Place- Town Hall
Photo- Larry Clark 1963

Bill LemayLove this building dances and. Movie’s and library up stairs

Heather DarraghBeautiful picture, We have such a great little town, thanks for sharing this.

Dean BrownHasn’t changed a bit in almost 60 yrs Eh !!

Marlene SpringerMemory, my first kiss happened at the movie night but it was a hit and run! To this day not know what boy❓

Tracy DoddsFun memories of movie nights and Mississippi Mudds rehearsals ♥️

Sylvia GilesTracy Dodds oh the movie nights!!!! The Keyes boys!!! 😘

Laurel TyeMy happy place.

Colleen RobillardLaurel Tye I miss this place more than I thought possible…🙄😔



CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Aug 1896, Sat  •  Page 4
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Nov 1894, Fri  •  Page 5

The Carleton Place Town Hall is an important landmark both historically and architecturally. The land was originally owned by William Morphy, one of the first settlers in the area and for whom the town was originally named Morphy’s Falls. He built a house on the present Town Hall site in the early 1820s.

Designed by George W. King and built by Matthew Ryan, the building is a fine example of the Richardson Romanesque style of architecture, which was popular in North America in the latter quarter of the nineteenth century. Richardson Romanesque style is a North American style, introduced by architect Henry Hobson Richardson, with typical features of rough stone, round-headed windows, semi-circular arches around doors and windows, dormer windows and round towers. The Council Chamber on the interior was originally called the Red Chamber because of the fine pine woodwork with a red satin finish. Other features on the interior include one of the few remaining raked stages in Canada, fine examples of woodwork in pine and ash, decorative pressed metal ceilings and mosaic encaustic flooring.

Sources: Town of Carleton Place Bylaw 42-78; Town Hall Feasibility Study, 1986.

An imprinted line on the back of this CARLETON PLACE Ontario postcard shows that it was originally purchased there … in the variety shop of Miss Sarah Hickson on Bridge Street.From the 1910-15 period, the card presents another view of the street close to the Mississippi River; in the background is the beautiful 1890s town hall at the corner of Mill Street.A message is written on the back side, but the lack of an address/postage stamp indicates the card was sent by cousins inside a protective envelope.

available on etsy click-

Chris Drake Art click

Related reading

The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place


Carleton Place Town Hall Sued For Cupolas!

Why is the Town Hall Stage Slanted? Is it Collapsing?

Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897

A Concert at the Town Hall While Small Pox Raged on…. 1901

Sarah Marselles the Spirit of the Town Hall Square Park

Saved By The Bell in Carleton Place? What Does the Photo Say?