Tag Archives: lanark

Sometimes You Need to Just Walk Your Potatoe

Standard
Sometimes You Need to Just Walk Your Potatoe

 

20914617_10155166853586886_6332935650573867787_n.jpg

This photo is probably one of my favourite photos of all time. This little girl is standing directly in front of what is now (was in 1991) Don Drysdale’s store in the village of Lanark, Ontario 

 

I  don’t think I was much older than this week gal when I used to be sent to Bonneau’s grocery store on the corner of Albert and Main Street in Cowansville, Quebec every week. Things were different in those days and communities were safe and most grocery stores looked the same in every village or town. Stores had a human element, and there was nothing you couldn’t buy in the family-run stores. There was always fresh bread, gossip, and the grocery store was arguably one of the most important businesses in town. Each store had a wooden counter that people shared conversation around. The grocer always had a pencil behind his ear, a smile, and quick precision as he wrapped a piece of fresh meat, in brown paper tied with string

The penny candy in the grocery store was always a favourite of mine even though a neighbour informed me that her Grandfather had warned her that such candy could spread polio. In those days everything “caused polio”, but candy was supposed to be the number one culprit. No doubt some mindful parent had began the rumour to keep her children away from the sweets.

My favourite penny candy was a pair of big red wax lips. Every summer day I would sit on the edge of the Cowansville public pool kicking my legs in the water with the wax lips that were slowly melting in the hot sun. If they were not available I would buy the little wax bottles and bite off the top and drink the liquid that was probably heavy on Red #40 food colouring. The bottles were made of edible wax, but all everyone did was chew on them forever and then spit them out after the juice was consumed.

 

Cowansville Swimming Pool -photo thanks to Claudia Allen

Our favourite hang out away from my grandmother’s eyes was Dion’s lumber yard next door to my home on Albert Street. I would go to Mayheu’s corner store and with 10 pennies come out with a paper bag full of potato chips, marshmallow filled mini ice cream cones, wax lips, and Popeye candy cigarettes.

“Smoking” on our candy cigarettes, my friends and I would sit on the top of the piles of lumber and have earth shattering conversations about why I cut my bangs so short like Bette Davis.  I explained that you can’t control everything in  life, but your hair was put on your head to remind you of that.

My mother was in a wheel chair so I was sent every few days to buy things needed for meals. Eggs were not sold in a dozen and one by one they were placed in a small brown paper bags–but I could handle getting those suckers home. Potatoes on the other hand were another matter. They were put into larger bags and usually I brought my sisters baby carriage along as they were too heavy to carry. One day I thought I was too cool for school to bring that carriage and thought I could handle the situation all by myself.

I made it down half a block until my arms began to ache and I began to worry how I was going to get that heavy bag home until I had an idea. Every few steps I threw a potatoe out in the neighbour’s yards and thought my Mother would never notice. Once I got home I only had half a bag left and of course she thought the grocer had made a mistake. Upon calling the grocer he insisted I had left with 10 pounds and could not understand how I got home with 5 pounds, so I had to fess up. After I confessed she laughed and said that everyone on Albert Street was probably having potatoes for lunch. For years the vision of hot mashed potatoes being served to all my neighbours has haunted  me each time I have bought 10 pounds of potatoes. In all honesty I wish I had done things differently but as they say, hindsight is common and as bland as boiled potatoes.



historicalnotes

This wee gal is standing directly in front of what is now (was in 1991) Don Drysdale’s store on the village of Lanark, Ontario across from where Dave Hornell believes the “new” post office is. She’s probably 250′ south of the olde towne hall and the store with the awning (upper right of photo) is on the current site of LCBO store (It was E.C. Pace’s until 1945, then my father’s store until the fire of ’59).

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US)

Screenshot 2017-08-15 at 18.jpg

I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

 

relatedreading

 

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

Ashes to Ashes and Spins of the Washing Machine

The Days of Smocking and Spanish Bar Cake

Been Caught Stealing– Bank of Montreal

Angry Mobs, Wolves and Bloodsuckers –Selby Lake

Memories of UFO’s Earthquake Lights and Gale Pond

Misty Glen Mountain Snow Bunny Hop

Music in the 60s- Memories of Herman’s Hermits

Back to The Future — Twisting Your Dignity Away

Groovy Hints on How to Catch and Keep a Boy – 60’s style

The Dreams of a Sugar Plum Fairy

I Was A Free Range Child

Scrapbook Photos of Cowansville

6 Seconds of Cowansville High School – Our Miss Phelps

The Benefits of Having a Large Human Chassis for Traction

Linda and Christmas Cards– and the Lack off–This is Your Christmas Letter:)

 

Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

Standard
Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

20768242_10155155804966886_6920171657124258865_n.jpg

 

 

#11 Deachman’s Bridge, Lanark

How to Get There: Go to Lanark Village on Highway 511. In the middle of the village on themain street (George), turn east on Owen and then onto Rosetta Road. The bridge is over the Clyde River, just out of the village.

When was this flood? Any stories about the bridge?

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading.jpg

Why the Appleton Bridge Collapsed…

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

Memories of the Pickerel Run Innisville

The Floating Bridges of Lanark County

Down by the Old Pike Hole–The Island Bridges of Carleton Place- Before and After

Was the McNeely Bridge Funded on “Drinkin’ Fines”?

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

Rideau Ferry Road– Black Snakes Bridges and SS#6

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Tales from Oliver’s Ferry

The Tragic Tale of the Rideau Ferry Swing Bridge

 

Canadian Girls in Training

Standard
Canadian Girls in Training

 

20664979_10155148613211886_1128016444134794698_n.jpg

Photo- Lanark & District Museum

The Explorers who met on Thursday evenings in the United Church in Cowansville, Quebec worked on getting stars and eventually the “E’ pin which promoted you to C.G.I.T. The C.J. I. T. gals wore cool middy blouses and navy  blue skirts and their meetings opened with devotion and singing followed by a small “business” meeting. Then meetings would proceed with a social portion, often consisting of games or crafts and treats. I wonder if I could say that mission statement today.

 

 

CGIT was established in 1915 by the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) and the major protestant denominations in Canada as a means of promoting Christian living in girls aged 12-17. The CGIT movement was started by four young Canadian women: Winnifred Thomas, Olive Ziegler, Una Saunders, and Constance Body.

As World War One continued overseas Thomas, Ziegler, Saunders, and Body looked at the lack of leadership roles available to young women at home and the need to provide service opportunities for girls.  The four women formed the Canadian Advisory Committee on Co-Operation in Girls’ Work, financed by the YWCA, to study the interests and needs of female youth.

The Committee and CGIT movement was female dominated in its leadership and argued that girls should have opportunities equal to boys to serve their country in wartime and that training opportunities were needed for female self-betterment.

 

Sandy Dobie– I remember having to iron those cotton blouses. If you were a young teen in a small town you likely belonged.

Sue Johnston– I was a CGIT gal….loved the uniform

The years 1916-1917 saw the Committee attempting to determine what style of education would be most useful for Canadian girls.  The overwhelming majority of existing scholarship on religious youth education was focused on boys and the Committee hoped to design a program that reflected the needs and wants of female youth.  The first CGIT program was published in 1917 in a booklet called “Canadian Girls in Training — Suggestions for the Mid-Week Meetings of Sunday School Classes, Clubs, etc., for Teen-age Girls”.  The booklet’s popularity greatly contributed to the establishment of the CGIT movement nationwide.

The YWCA financed the CGIT movement for the first five years while it worked to become established on local, provincial, and national levels. By 1920 CGIT groups were being run across Canada and emphasized providing young women with the same opportunities that were available to young men, training girls for humanitarian service, and providing a safe space for personal and religious growth.

CGIT also served as leadership training for many young girls and the movement flourished with local groups being organized. In 1933 there were 40,000 members in 1100 communities across Canada. Retreat weekends, summer camps, leaders’ councils, and conferences sprouted up across the country providing additional leadership and skill building opportunities.

The early years of CGIT saw discussions of working with the Girl Guides of Canada however it was decided that the values of the two groups did not align.  CGIT disliked the emphasis Girl Guides placed on the accumulation of badges and competition.  Rather CGIT maintained that activities relating to physical, intellectual, religious, and service development should be undertaken for their own enjoyment and value. A Girl’s Standard issued by the CGIT provided guidelines for girls to measure themselves by and after 1920 the CGIT Purpose summed up the goals set by the organization:

As a Canadian Girl in Training
Under the leadership of Jesus
It is my purpose to
Cherish Health
Seek Truth
Know God
Serve Others
And thus, with His help,
Become the girl God would have me be.

 

In the 1930s the CGIT broke ground with its inclusion of sex education and its use of The Mastery of Sex by Leslie D. Weatherhead to provide appropriate sex education.  This education was often framed around the need to provide guidance for future wives and mothers.  However this emphasis on family life was frequently paired with sessions on vocations, talks from professional women, and the promotion of post-secondary education.

Author’s Note– I don’t think I remember sex education in my small rural town:)

 

15941503_1370020829709734_6410483792843882116_n.jpg

This another photo from Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil.. this is a Girls’ Conference, Iroquois Ontario, November, 1928. Looks like the CGIT (Canadian Girls In Training) to me? Anyone remember that? I know I was in them briefly.–Charles Dobie Photo

CGIT did not aim to radically change female roles in Canadian society.  Rather it aimed to promote female influence in already accepted female spheres.  It placed considerable emphasis on the role of women in Christian education, the home, and the community. CGIT provided spaces for women to engage in self-discovery, intellectual pursuits, and community leadership roles.

Membership declined nationwide following World War II but continued to thrive in numerous small communities. The community anniversary I participated in was one of those regions where CGIT continued to thrive through the 1950s and 1960s. After 1947 the movement was under the direction of the Department of Christian Education, Canadian Council of Churches. In 1976 the organization became an independent ecumenical body and is now supported by Canadian Baptist Ministries, Presbyterian Church in Canada and the United Church of Canada.  

The decline in membership can unsurprisingly be linked to the decline in mainstream church membership. Parents and youth are looking outside of the church for extracurricular activities, and leadership opportunities for young women can be found in a diverse range of organizations today.–by Krista McCracken

 

 

 

historicalnotes

img.jpg

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Mar 1970, Wed,  Page 39

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Feb 1959, Thu,  Page 20

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Mar 1947, Fri,  Page 27

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Among the Strangers There Was…

The Eaton’s Sewing Girls

September Morn and the Dancing Girls?

Anyone Know anything about The Whoop La Girls Camp

You Better Work it Girl! Cover Girls of Carleton Place 1965

 

 

unnamed (1)

Nelson R Baker- Fashionable Tailor of Lanark

Standard
Nelson R Baker- Fashionable Tailor of Lanark

 

20638373_10155146011921886_3623799784089938124_n

Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

James George McLean was a tailor with his shop on the main St. of Lanark Village, next door to his mother-in-law’s, Marion Umpherson Prentice, millinery shop. In the mid 1990’s his name could still be seen in the cement sidewalk in front of that building.

The Lanark Era announced on Mar 23, 1910 that “Mr. Nelson R. Baker” has bought the stock and goodwill of Mr. J.G. McLean’s Tailoring establishment” and reported again on April 6, 1910 “owing to hundreds of requests from the people of Lanark and surrounding country, McLean the tailor has decided to stay with his customers instead of going back South”.

In 1910 Nelson R. Baker had opened up his own shop on George Street and he advertised that he provided his own elegant fit and superior finish and no other local merchant or importing tailor can hope to be  noted unless he meets these indispensable conditions. The House of Nelson R. Baker was situated on George Street and were admirably adapted for storage, display and sale purposes. Mr. Baker had a constant stock of English French and Scotch tweeds, suitings and trouserings in all the latest styles and novelties.

All garments turned out by the House of Baker are characterized by artistic cut and most careful workmanship, while the garments turned out by this house are characterized by artistic cut and most careful workmanship while the facilities for prompt fulfillment are unsurpassed. Parties living in or visiting in Lanark will find Mr. Baker always ready to offer excellent workmanship, finish, fabric and fashion not easily duplicated elsewhere. Mr. Baker had been in business since February 1908.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

historicalnotes

 

20638259_10155146011926886_1124632004585845673_n.jpg

Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

20708159_10155146011911886_3245663157822292863_n.jpg

Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

20664542_10155146011916886_8085842852784408505_n.jpg

Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

relatedreading

McLean the Tailor from Lanark and Other News

Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell

Lost Buildings–Sinclair Brothers Tailor Shop

How Much is that Kitten Sweater in the Window?

Standard
How Much is that Kitten Sweater in the Window?

 

il_570xN.812225285_slrg.jpg

 

il_570xN.812224905_j1ql.jpg

Vintage 1950s red pullover sweater, a classic! Ribbed waistband, cuffs and neckline. Made of 100% virgin wool.

 

il_fullxfull.333092293.jpg

 

1950s cardigan – kitten sweater – Glenayr Kitten Brand cardigan – gold and brown houndstooth – preppy – vintage cardigan

 

 

il_570xN.1135163495_boh1.jpg

il_570xN.1088573456_9389.jpg

Glenayr Kitten Vintage Womens Cardigan, Womens Blue Sweater, Sz 16 Wool Polyester Top, Made in Canada Sweater Cardigan

 

il_570xN.774458357_cf35.jpg

il_570xN.712743858_nir2.jpg

 

il_570xN.1183238884_9fys.jpg

il_570xN.1183238858_t6hb.jpg

 

258fc9c59c8b11d26307dfdf89425b65.jpg

This is a gorgeous 100% wool Sweater made by Glenayr KITTEN. Features an argyle pattern of beige, mustard and brown.

 

historicalnotes

6507e3503a17f7f4aa1692222d8a59b4.jpg

                                       Elaine Louise Dick

January 29, 1935 – May 02, 2013

Obituary for Elaine Louise Dick-Glenayr Knitting Mill Alumni

Elaine Louise Dick (Maiden name Dean) Born in Toledo, Ontario on January 29th, 1935 – Passed away in Lanark, Ontario on May 2nd, 2013 Elaine, who cherished her family, passed away at home with her husband, daughter, and grandson, at the age of 78 years old, following a difficult battle with cancer and will be sadly missed. Elaine had 12 brothers and sisters, and was the second oldest daughter of the late Albert Dean and Nellie (Catchpole) of Plum Hollow, Ontario.

When Elaine was in her early 30s, she left Ontario and travelled to Didsbury, Alberta to marry Calvin Jack Dick. For 40 years, she worked a variety of jobs alongside her husband on a small mixed beef farm. Elaine had fond memories of being a caregiver in the Didsbury Region and described it as a job that gave her much joy.

Prior to her move west, she spoke often of her time spent as a “mender” at the Glenayr Knitting Mill in Lanark, Ontario where she worked after her mother’s death when she returned home, from Toronto, to help her father care for her younger siblings. In 2007, Elaine and Calvin moved back to Lanark, Ontario where she spent the last few years of her life surrounded by her siblings, numerous nieces, and nephews. She will be greatly missed by her immediate family. Elaine loved to dance, enjoyed music and concerts, playing cards, was a gifted knitter and canner, and took every opportunity to travel to various places. She enjoyed spending time with her family, friends and was a dedicated grandmother. Elaine is survived by her husband Calvin, daughter Talva, and grandson Ethan. She is pre-deceased by her parents and siblings; Gerald, Joy, George, and Sharon. She is survived by her siblings Charles, Gary, Ross, David, Albert, Richard, Randy, and Debra.

comments

 

Marge Mitchell
Marge Mitchell My Mom loved that “Kitten store”…she lived just north of Hopetown on Bow Lake Road with my Dad in their cottage on the Clyde. Everyone that came to visit shopped in the Kitten store and the shoe store up midway on the hill…she loved the shoe store on Bridge Street (Ken’s Shoe Store) in Carleton Place. .so many super memories…no wonder I love this area.
Karen Blackburn Chenier
Karen Blackburn Chenier My dad ,Ken Blackburn, had the shoe store in Carleton Place,”Ken’s Discount”. He sold Naturalizers at discount prices way before the trend of discount stores.LOL I worked there as a teenager as did my youngest brother and literally BUSLOADS of shoppers would come on Saturdays . They would buy shoes at Dad’s store,hop on the bus and head to Lanark to the Kitten Mill.There was a discount shoe store in Lanark later on but it was the “competition” not run by Dad.Fun times indeed.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

Monday!!!

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling

 

 

relatedreading

Stories from the Old Kitten Mill

Down by the Old Kitten Mill

Linda’s Mail Bag– Do You Have any Info on my Blanket?

You’re from the Village of Lanark You Say?

Stories from the Old Kitten Mill

Standard

20543928_10155126681856886_4338856544732768730_o.jpg

 

From Up the Line–Steve Evans

Hazel Mitchell was born in Dalhousie across from the Dalhousie Township Hall and moved to Lanark December 5, 1926. She worked at the Kitten Mills for over 30 years and was the longest that lived on the Main Street of Lanark.

For most of the 20th century, Lanark and its Glenayr Kitten Mill was a hub for textile production in Ontario. Since its closure in 1997, the mill has sat abandoned and it was the mill that made the village of Lanark a pretty bustling place. And then the mill closed down and now there’s nothing there. Lanark sadly  still hasn’t recovered from the mill closure.

 

Do you or someone close know former staff from the “Kitten” Glenayr Knit Mill? Have you ever shopped there and wanted to reminisce about those good old days? The Lanark Museum is hosting a reunion! August 7th 2017 1-4pm! Former staff photo at 2pm!

Address80 George St, Lanark, ON K0G 1K0

Phone(613) 259-2575

 

historicalnotes

E. MITCHELL

Obituary

MITCHELL, E. Hazel Peacefully at Lanark Lodge, Perth on Tuesday August 3rd, 2004 Hazel (Scott) Mitchell in her 98th year. Hazel was born January 3rd, 1907, she was predeceased by her husbands Albert Mitchell and by previous marriage, Edward Labelle; she was the cherished mother of Fern (Boyd) Roberts, Eric (Dianne) Labelle and Everett Labelle; step-mother of Frank (Doris) Mitchell, Arnold (Shirley) Mitchell, Elizabeth (late Des) Vaughan, Agnes Emon, Merina (Jim) Elliott, Florence (Tom) Healy; she will be sadly missed by many grandchildren and great grandchildren. Hazel was predeceased by sisters Mabel Swerbrick and Frances Munro and brothers Harold and Orville Scott. Friends may pay their respects at the Young Funeral Home, Lanark Thursday August 5th from 2 to 4 and 6 to 9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in St. Andrew’s United Church, Lanark Friday at 11:00 a.m. Interment, Greenwood Cemetery, Middleville. In remembrance, contributions are suggested to the Alzheimers Society of Lanark County, the Lanark Lodge Memorial Fund or the First Baptist Church, Lanark.

 

Published in The Ottawa Citizen on Aug. 5, 2004

The Glenayr Kitten Mill (A Reminiscence)

From Ottawa Valley Irish

(The year before I was married, which was thirteen years ago, I lived in Scotland.)

One day, about fourteen years ago now, while perusing the wares at a knitwear outlet in Edinburgh, I felt a curious and unexpected wave of nostalgia. This place in Edinburgh, Scotland was so strikingly similar to a place my mother used to take us to in Ontario, Canada (now, what was the name of that place that Mum used to take us to? … it was in Lanark, and there was something Scottish about it … and something to do with a kitten … ), so uncannily reminiscent of the Glenayr Kitten Mill of my childhood. The piles of jumpers (but we called them ‘sweaters,’ of course) all laid out on wooden tables; the firm but friendly salesladies; the general air of solid but unpretentious quality … all of a sudden, I was back in Lanark (Lanark Co., Ontario, Canada, that is).

I have to admit, I bought a cardigan that day, just on the strength of that memory.

The Glenayr Kitten Mill outlet in Lanark (Lanark Co., Ontario, that is) was the kind of place that we (my sisters and I, that is, though certainly not our mother) loved to hate. So fusty and old-fashioned, and please, mum, don’t make us wear those sweaters! that’s not what the popular girls are wearing, and the mothers of the popular girls only shop at the Bay. But our pleas fell on deaf ears: our mother has always known a bargain when and where she finds it, and bargains are what she found at the Glenayr Kitten Mill.

As I now recall it, the Kitten Mill had an impressively no-nonsense integrity: no frills; no fuss; just good, sturdy value at a fair price. But it wasn’t until years later, while looking at jumpers at a knitwear outlet in Edinburgh, that I began to appreciate the Kitten Mill for what it had been: a little piece of the Scotland-to-Canada knitwear tradition that had already, alas, all but died out when our mother took us to the Glenayr for new sweaters.

(And it wasn’t until I lived in Scotland for a year that I began to truly appreciate the fundamentally Scottish character of so much of “English” Canada, or of “English” Ontario, at any rate. I recall going to the Waterstone’s on Princes St. in Edinburgh to look for an Alice Munro book [which I found, btw] because there was this story that I just hadto reread: I had heard something earlier that day that had so uncannily reminded me of this Munro story, and something had finally just clicked about Scotland and Canada…)

 

 

 

relatedreading

Down by the Old Kitten Mill

Linda’s Mail Bag– Do You Have any Info on my Blanket?

You’re from the Village of Lanark You Say?

 

 

unnamed (1)

Searching for Information: J.A. Stevenson and Robert and Jane Ross of Lanark

Standard
Searching for Information: J.A. Stevenson and Robert and Jane Ross of Lanark
ancestory1.jpg
Ed Murphy sent this and hoping someone can help…
I am looking for ancestors or any information really about the family of J.A. Stevenson of Lanark who resided in District 83 of Lanark North as per the 1891 census report. My grand uncle (George Kewley and later his sister Florence) were British Home Children who was placed with the Stevenson family specifically looking for the location of the farm and anything about the family to help provide contextual background on these Kewley childrens early life in Canada. Florence was eventually adopted by the Stevenson family…. as you can see from my previous posts 4 children ended up in the same area (thankfully). and luckily some of the “happier” stories associated with the Home Children program.
I am looking for ancestors or any information really about the family of Robert and Jane Ross of Lanark who resided in District 83 of Lanark North as per the 1901 census report. My grandfather (Joh Kewley) was a British Home Child who was placed with the ROSS family. He lived with the family from 1889 until he married in 1905. specifically looking for the location of the farm and anything about the family to help provide contextual background on Joh Kewley’s early life in Canada.
If anyone can help let me know at sav_77@yahoo.com and I will email Ed.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 relatedreading

 

unnamed (1)