Tag Archives: lanark

The Disappearing Older Buildings — The Kitten Mill — Speech– Lanark Heritage Preservation Society

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The Disappearing Older Buildings — The Kitten Mill — Speech– Lanark Heritage Preservation Society

Michael Rikley-Lancaster, executive director/curator, the Mississippi Mills Textile Museum-Lanark Heritage Preservation Society

THE LANARK HERITAGE PRESERVATION SOCIETY

A community-based preservation initiative

Thank you for inviting me last night- speaking about heritage is my passion…. this was my speech

In 1936 in an Ottawa Citizen column called Ramblin Reflections wrote that the historic old landmarks that reminded succeeding generations of what once was in our communities are disappearing and  will soon be numbered among the forgotten things. 

The razing of the century-old home of the once picturesque Laird o’ McNab in Renfrew county a few days ago shocked a goodly number of people into a realization that these treasure places of historic lore are crumbling back to mingle with the earth, whence they came. 

That old stone structure on the north shore of White Lake should have or could have been retained and maintained by civic, county or government agencies had not most people been content to sit idly twiddling their thumbs while others with a keener appreciation of the worth of these things wrote, spoke and kept the topic alive. 

The fast disintegrating fur trading post at L’Orignal, the famous old windmill on the St. Lawrence, the ivy-covered “auld kirk” atop the hill at Pakenham, the “Red House” at Perth, these and a goodly number more in this district are places venerated by the toil and sacrifice of those who laid well the foundation stones of the communities and it does seem a little like desecration to permit their walls where once was heard the vibrant voices of the idealistic community effort pass Into a state of complete neglect, dry rot and oblivion.

 Pretty soon there will not be one of those places of piquant historical charm to remind generations who come after what they owe to those that came before them. 

That was written in April of 1936.

Susan Berlin, Watsons Corners Lanark Heritage Preservation Society

MARK YOUR CALENDAR: JUNE 29TH, 2022 – THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE LANARK HERITAGE PRESERVATION SOCIETY

To quote a million people or so in 2022 they feel the same way as in 1936. It’s a shame how little value is placed on local ageing buildings and how they only become prominent when the bulldozer is at the door.

This past year and a half I have witnessed  four demolitions by  neglect and I am sure that next year could see another one.. What is demolition by neglect? That’s when the owner becomes negligent in upholding his duty to maintain the property. I know how expensive it is to maintain an older home, but demolition by neglect may also be used by some property owners or developers  who either don’t care about the building’s condition or wish to raze a protected historic structure but can’t get permission to do so. 

One of the biggest stumbling blocks is always the same – the private ownership of the property. Now, you can usually get permission to tear down any historic landmark simply by sitting on it and watching it fall to pieces. It happens in every town and city, and is an all too common occurrence that historic preservationists seem to be helpless to fight now.

The Kitten Mill  property was first developed by Clyde Woolen mills in the 1850’s. It housed the Bank of Ottawa from 1899 to 1947. It was Dave Markle of Glenayr Knit who bought it then and turned it into the renowned Glenayr Kitten mill which produced woollen knits and in the 70s and 80s. It was a huge tourist attraction for the village of Lanark.

My life began in Cowansville, Quebec, an Eastern Townships mill town similar to most places in rural Lanark County. The last time I personally saw or spoke with any of my old friends was years ago, but we still remember Bruck Mills and Albany Felt.  Bruck Mills was the first silk mill in Canada, and it employed a lot of folks in my town. Bruck Mills also founded an Arts Centre that was very much appreciated by the local community and it was important. But just like everywhere else, the mills closed. When you lose a building, you not only lose a physical building but you lose the memories. An old building is like a show. You smell the soul of a building. And the building should also tell  you how to redo it.

In 2017 I had the chance to meet the heart and soul of the Kitten Mill at their reunion. I’ve never gone to a reunion before; not even high school, because honestly I’m always afraid that there’s going to be some incident similar to the film Carrie that I won’t be able to deal with.

I was honoured to be part of that former Glenayr Knitting mill employees reunion. Some at the reunion on August 7th at the Lanark & District Museum still had their original tools of the trade (scissors etc) from their former jobs whether it was knitting, dyeing fabric or sewing.

Was the reunion a sense of nostalgia, or just reminders of what had transpired years ago? No matter how wonderful and interesting the lives of the former employees from Tatlock, Watson’s Corners, McDonald’s Corners and even Carleton Place have been, there was just something endearing about this work reunion of the staff that most went home with a pay cheque of just 45 cents an hour.

John Foliot, Lanark–Lanark Heritage Preservation Society

In 1953 the mill was the backbone of Lanark, and some still called it the Clyde Woollen Mill. David Markle made lots of improvements in the old grist mill, with new machinery initially making men’s woollen socks, blankets, and motor rugs. In 1945 the Markle brothers bought the large two storey stone building on the main street by the Clyde River and used it as a store. The Kitten Factory  at one time had a payroll of over $200,000 that turned over three times in local businesses before it left the village in the year 2000.

In 2017 Feryn Donaldson was still Miss Kitten of Glenayr Knitting that day with her original 60s sash. She was voted in by her fellow employees and got an outfit to wear for special events as long as it was back by 5.

When asked if she became the “belle of the ball” of Lanark Village after she won her crown she laughed and said she was already married with two children at that point.

These women still remembered the muffins brought by some to work, perms that were given in the washrooms, and the fact that a few actually met their future spouses at that plant.  As one woman said:

” I moved to Lanark in 1947 and most of the people that worked in the mill became my friends. I lived here, my family lived here, and when the time comes I will die here.”

For most of the 20th century, Lanark and its Glenayr Kitten Mill was a hub for textile production in Ontario. Since its closure in 1997, the mill has sat abandoned. The Kitten Mill had an impressively no-nonsense integrity: no frills; no fuss; just good, sturdy value at a fair price. Just like the people and just like the sturdy no frills no fuss building that once proudly stood there in one piece.

So what do we do? There is no doubt it is difficult when it is on private lands. But, the most popular way to get rid of an older building now is Demolition by  Neglect: which I call a Loophole in Preservation. It’s what happens when a building  is neglected so badly that it falls down on its own, or becomes a public menace that has to be removed. 

Currently in Ontario, the only buildings requiring notice of a demolition application are on properties listed or designated under the Ontario Heritage Act. For heritage property, if a property is listed the owner must give the municipality 60 days notice of an application to demolish, in order to give the municipality time to consider and process a designation. 

If a property is designated, either individually or as part of a Heritage Conservation District, an application to demolish is decided by the municipal council. If the demolition application is refused, the owner has the right of appeal to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT). Of course, many or most historic structures are neither listed nor designated.

Other than the above exceptions, demolition permits are pretty much granted on the spot.  It’s not like people wake up one morning and say, “I think I’ll tear down my building tomorrow.” Such projects are planned well in advance. And it would be nice if the notice requirements included posting a notice at the property to alert the broader community.

If a town or city suspects that a building is subjected to demolition by neglect, then in addition to not allowing a demo permit, they also should ensure that a permit for new infill construction on that property will not be allowed. They would only be issued a permit for the repair and restoration of the building and perhaps that repair permit would be free of charge. 

Why not provide property tax incentives for improvements made to historic properties? Or allow small grants to homeowners wishing to do the right thing? A bylaw to adopt the Heritage Grant policy was passed by Carleton Place council on May 31. This the first time the municipality has had such a policy. It means if someone is spending $10,000 on improving their heritage property, they could be eligible for a $5,000 grant from the town to help offset the cost. What are we saying when we put a huge tower over a building of historic significance?

For those trying to conserve heritage property, it’s a game of whack-a-mole — no sooner have we jumped up and down to say stop, this one is important, then another crisis appears.We have to stop enabling bad behaviour  before the buildings of our past disappear in front of us.

Across the province most heritage advocates are volunteers, charged with finding and advocating for the province’s heritage. We are up against a well-financed building and development industry who may not agree and who have the ear of government. But I keep talking and fighting– you keep talking and fighting–  because this is our history. It is the only one that we have.

Just remember old places have soul. Just like the folks that worked at the Kitten Factory here in Lanark Village. Wherever a beautiful soul has been in people, in buildings— there is a trail of beautiful memories.

When I was 17- The Kitten- Glenayr Knitting Mills Reunion

How Much is that Kitten Sweater in the Window?

Stories from the Old Kitten Mill

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

Stewart House Clippings and Memories

The House on the 511 — Thanks to Lanark Village Community Group

Putting Together Pieces About Historical Homes– John Moore’s House –Napoleon Street

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

Documenting Houses –Before and After 41 Julian

More History on the Murphy Morphy McEwen House — Karen Prytula

The Clyde River Overflows 1919

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The Clyde River Overflows 1919

Lanark, Ontario, Canada-28 May 1919

As a result of the heavy incessant rain storms the Clyde River has become taxed to and beyond its limits. Its quiet waters have become turbulent and have flown out of bounds and not since the spring of 1904 has the river assumed -such unusual magnitude.

On Saturday and Sunday the river in Lanark ex tended its boundaries on the south to the centre of the Clyde Hotel yard, and on the north to beyond Mr. Robert Whites livery bam. The boom at the saw mill gave way to the strain of the rising waters and on Friday afternoon an old familiar scene was repeated. Some two thousand logs floated down the stream until they were checked their runaway voyage by a temporary boom at the dam. This was speedily reinforced by a new boom.

All the outlying district has been more or less affected by those torrential rains and the farmers experienced great difficulty cm Friday morning in getting their milk to the factory. We have heard of some cases where the roads were rendered impassable. Such high water at this time of the year is a rare thing for this part of the country.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

Historical NOTES

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

1896 flood on the eastern seaboard… this is Maine

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’ Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Apr 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

The CLYDE Rises High…. Floods 1896

The Floods of 1926

Ironworks– Mississippi Iron Works 1928 Flood and Sale

Ferry Cross the Mersey?– Irishtown Almonte

Perth Flood 1930s Tay River

  1. Memories of the Lanark Flood-Wendell Crosbie
  2. The Lanark Village Flood 1998
  3. The Floods of 1926
  4. Floating Bridges, Toll Gates and Typhoons– Clippings of Billings Bridge
  5. Flood of 1870 — Water Street is a Satirical Joke

Did Wampole Ever Move to Lanark Village?

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Did Wampole Ever Move to Lanark Village?

 Author’s note

I researched for hours and could not find out if Wampole ever set up shop on Hillier Street.

Henry K. Wampole & Co. Occupy Clyde Woolen Mill Factory Office. Lanark Ontario

The Henry K. Wampole Co. Limited, manufacturing pharmacists with headquarters in Perth, Out. have completed negotiations where, they will open up a branch in Lanark Village. On Monday, Sept 22nd, representatives of that firm were in town and leased from Mr. Caldwell the factory office situated at 113 Hillier Street. ( now a priavte residence)

This office was found to be satisfactory for the companys immediate requirements, and operations have already commenced towards having the building renovated for the new industry. Some time ago the Henry K. Wampole Company announced the fact that they could employ many more in their factory if the housing and boarding problems then confronting everybody in Perth, could be overcome. Parties coming to Perth from outside points could readily find employment with this thriving industry.

They found it practically impossible to obtain board or secure a dwelling house. Consequently the manufacturing pharmacists found it necessary to expand their industry to other towns. Smith Falls was their first consideration but in this town they found that conditions as regards housing and boarding were on a par with that ot Perth. In the meantime Mr. Alex. McIntyre had written Mr. J. A. Stewart, M.P.P, Mr. Stewart controls the Henry K Wampole establishment and Mr. McIntyre explained to him the unlimited opportunities afforded to industries in Lanark Village.

In his letter he eulogized the excellent sites for such an industry and also the ample accommodations which Lanark can provide to outside families and employees. The result was that Mr. J. A. Stewarts attention was directed to Lanark as the field in which his industry could spread with great success and he had his representatives visit Lanark. Mr. Alex. McIntyre is to be con gratulated on his commendable act in being highly instrumental in bringing such a well known industry to Lanark.

The Henry K. Wampole Co. are a thriving and energetic concern and their pharmaceutical products are known throughout the Dominion. It is a growing industry and one which brings prosperity and progressiveness to any town. To have such an industry come to Lanark is, we hope, the advance guard of a tidal wave ol prosperity. At first this industry will be of small proportions in Lanark but we have visions of it being resembled to the acorn which, in a few years, becomes a mighty oak.

The branch to be opened in Lanark Village will specialize on the preparation and *packeting Formolid Throat Ease, a tablet which is strongly antiseptic and used for the prevention and spread of sore throat and bronchial trouble. The employees will be mostly girls, and we believe the industry will start with a staff of twenty-five which will increase as the industry progresses. This is the first new industry to come to Lanark since the burning of the Caldwell Woolen Mills and we hope this will be the nucleus about which many more industries will be established in Lanark Village.

CLIPPED FROMThe Lanark EraLanark, Ontario, Canada24 Sep 1919, Wed

*

At this time, some of the better known Wampole products were the tasteless extracts of Cod Liver, Grape Salt, Formolid Throat Ease, and more. Our products may have changed, but their quality did not. This rich history allows Wampole to make a claim that only they can do… Being the 1st Canadian Established Vitamins and Supplements Company!–Wampole Facebook

#Wampole#History#Canada

Perth Courier, November 23, 1917

Perth’s Honor Roll

Casualties:

1.)        Pte. Ronald Gamble, killed in action.  Much sympathy is felt in town for Mr. and Mrs. James Gamble in the death of their son Ronald Gamble who was on Monday officially reported killed in action between the 3rd and 4th November.  Evidently it was his first time to go in to the trenches as in one of his last letters he said his unit was on the march and that he would write again when he reached the front lines.  In one of his last letters he said “we have been traveling around the country and have seen some lovely scenery.  There is so much dust here as it has done nothing but rain this week and we are over the boot tops in mud where ever we go.  We will likely be meeting our friends across the way in a few days.”  Ronald enlisted with the 240th Battalion on the 10th September, 1916 and left Canada for overseas with this unit on the 25th April, 1917.  He went to France this past September and thus was there but a brief period before he was added to that long list of Canadians who have their last resting place in France.  He was but 18 years of age and a very fine young man.  Before enlisting at Perth he was employed in the printing and box making department of the Henry K. Wampole Co.   (transcriber’s note, a letter from this company was not transcribed.)

Top stories of the June 7, 1912 edition of The Perth Courier 

Perth gets big new thriving industry
“Perth will have another new industry. For some time, negotiations have been in progress between Henry K. Wampole & Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio to take care of the Canadian business for the Jergens company. The Jergens company is the second largest manufacturer in the United States of high class toilet soaps.. the two companies are coming together to handle the soap, perfume and toilet business in Canada. A new company, with headquarters as Perth, is being incorporated to be known as the Andrew Jergens Co. Limited.”

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters — Part 28–I Didn’t Swindle Money from the Wampole & Co W.H. Brick

Scrapbook Clippings of Wampole

More Home Adventures from Amy Thom

Perth Flood 1930s Tay River

The Clyde Woollen Mill Fire — Hour By Hour 1917

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The Clyde Woollen Mill Fire — Hour By Hour 1917

CLIPPED FROMThe Lanark EraLanark, Ontario, Canada27 Jun 1917, Wed  •  Page 1

The was completely destroyed by fire late Thursday night. Of the large main building in which all the manufacturing was carried on nothing remains except a lint portion of the inactive stone wall and a great heap of smoking debris.

Part of Mr. Crierson, the Superintendants home, also fell prey to the flames, but the office and shipping room, store houses and a few other outhouses wore saved by the excellent and effective work of the firemen. The damage amounts to one hundred thousand dollars, covered by insurance to the extent of 50 thousand dollars. The fire originated at about 9.4.1 p.m. in the boiler room, and was first noticed hy Mr. Cardinal, nightwatchman, on his return from one of his hourly rounds.

A time clock is used and registered upon every hour as the watchman makes a complete inspection of the entire plant. He had just returned to the waiting quarters in the boiler room and had gone to the adjoining department for a handful of waste when the fire was spotted.

Though at times it seemed that the flames would get beyond the rear of the main building where there were a number of storehouses in which are kept large stocks of wool and other raw material it did not. The cloth from the shipping room was all removed to places of safety. Danger to the wool was immediate and serious, and, and the firemen did all they could do to hold down the danger at the east and north ends, the chances of cutting off the -wool losses seemed’ remote.

Extra precautionary measures were taken in this direction and all put in readiness with men and teams to remove the wool in short order. The arrival of the Perth Fire Brigade relieved the situation. They had been summoned and made the journey from Perth to help. When they came they saw a small smouldering fire in a wood pile which stands in the boiler room. Deciding that they could extingnish the blaze quite easily with a sprinkling of water, they went to procure pails and found upon their return that the flames had developed out of control, reaching high up the wells and all around the boiler room.

The alarm was given and quick help at hand, but so sudden and furious had the burning grow that it was impossible to do anything of an efficient nature. The mill firefighters were situated inside the building, but the raging flames prevented this being brought into service.

In a few minutes devastation hail spread east and went to the spinning and carding departments and westward into the finishing room. The last room of all to come to ruin was the weaving. Bursting from their confinement it hit the interior of the building, the flames passed out and over to the dye room and curled in the direction of Mr. Grierson’s house.

The situation was one of keeping control with Perth by means of relays of teams at points along every few feet. The Fire Captain (placed his engine at the Clyde Bridge on George Street), laid hose along Hillier St., caught up around the rear of the building anil joined with Captain White’s Lanark men in forming a complete barrage which cut off the danger from the wool stock anil outbuilding.

Stubbornly the flames shot and roared towards the superintendent’s home, lint equally stubborn and the ascendancy ebbed and flowed for nearly two hours before the flames showed signs of subsidence. In the mill itself large quantities of wool were stored amongst quantities of goods throughout the mill in various stages of fire.

In the scouring house downstairs a miscellaneous assortment of goods were ready for the machines and these were recovered. Thousands of dollars were in stock everywhere and had a strong wind prevailed even this might have been a vain effort, and when the fire spots came along they were quickly extinguished.

Precautions taken in this way saved the fire from spreading and the Fire Brigade was doing splendid work The fire engine stationed at the bridge, no more than one hundred feet distant from the burning building, worked along at full capacity and sent four strong, steady streams of water, distributed to the heat advantage, along the north sides of the building. This was a great task that demanded courage and perseverance.

About an hour after the first alarm the roofs began to weaken and fall, cracking and splitting with the terrific heat, broke off in sections and came down. The centre section of the mill was raised to the ground, disclosing fantastic shapes in twisted and gnarled machinery. A few years ago a brick storey had been added to tho mill, which is all gone, as well as about one-third of the eastern and western sections of the substantial old stone walls which enclosed the plant.

The destruction is so complete that all the order and form of this industry, which was Lanark pride and main support, has passed into the elements, and nothing remains but the slag of the ruin. The fire was all around and as far away as Smiths Falls the glare in the sky was noted. Crowds of people gathered from all quarters. Scores of automobiles came from the towns and villages and countryside. The fire alarm rang in Perth as soon as word was received there, end in a short time the engine and hose were ready end on the way.

Many of Perth’s folk came along in cars and other rigs.The building was originally a store owned by tlie Main, at that time a prominent business family in Lanark. A few years later the property was acquired by the late Boyd Caldwell and converted by him into a Woolen Mill. From time to time improvements end additions have been made.

When the wheels first turned that gave Lanark a standing as an industrial village there was general rejoicing. Caldwell’s Tweeds have honored Lanark for as long as it has existed. At the same time, it seems unthinkable that the place which has been the voice of inspiration for fifty years of successful effort and uninterrupted business policy, should be abandoned lightly. In the meantime plans have been in motion for recovering as fast as possible.

Appleton will take care of the finishing until machinery can be installed in the Perth plant. The Aberdeen Mill in Lanark will be doubled up in capacity by overtime.

Also read–100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
25 Jun 1917, Mon  •  Page 8

CALDWELL, WILLIAM CLYDE

Click here

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1910, Wed  •  Page 8

Clyde Woolen Mills
  • Lot 2 George St.
  • Clyde Woolen Mills (Caldwell and Watchorn, proprietors; subsequently Boyd Caldwell and Co.) established a woolen mill in 1867.
  • The building was destroyed by fire in 1917. (the Glenayr Kitten Outlet Store was later situated in the Boyd Caldwell store).

Aberdeen Mills
  • Lot 2 George St.
  • William Clyde Caldwell, proprietor, built and began operating a woolen mill by 1890.
  • There was a fire at the mill in June 1901.
  • It was still operating under the Caldwells until 1930.

From-WOOLEN MILLS OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
19 Nov 1919, Wed  •  Page 1

100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

The CLYDE Rises High…. Floods 1896

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The CLYDE Rises High…. Floods 1896
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

Aberdeen Mills
  • Lot 2 George St.
  • William Clyde Caldwell, proprietor, built and began operating a woolen mill by 1890.
  • There was a fire at the mill in June 1901.
  • It was still operating under the Caldwells until 1930.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

In 1874 James married Marion Umpherson, who was born at Umphersons Mills, Poland, Lanark County, in 1850. She was the daughter of James Umpherson and Agnes Waddell. Marion was working as a weaver at the time of her marriage. (Early spelling was “Umpherston“).


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Apr 1919, Wed  •  Page 5

related reading

Mrs. James Prentice Hatmaker Milliner of Lanark

Clydesville General Store

Smiles of Content and Social Notes in Clydesville

Helen Isabella Murdoch Campbell— Remembering Commerce Ship Settlers

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Helen Isabella Murdoch Campbell— Remembering Commerce Ship Settlers

CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
09 Nov 1916, Thu  •  Page 5

In the first year of immigration, 1820, many of the settlers arrived at Lanark very late in
the season. The Commerce had docked at Quebec City on June 20th allowing her 402
passengers to reach the settlement by midsummer. But the other vessels did not arrive at
Quebec until late summer; the Brock on August 20th and the Prompt on August 31st, meaning
their 546 settlers did not arrive at Lanark until early autumn.. read more here–CLICK HERE

LANARK’S FIRST POSTMASTER.
           Eighty-three years ago Lanark’s first post office was established with Mr. J.A. Murdock as postmaster. At that time and indeed until 1851 it was controlled by the English post office. Mails were not so frequent as now and were carried on horseback from Perth. John Hall acquired the position in 1834 and appears on the scene of incoming and outgoing mail bags until 1854 when A.G. Hall succeeded to the office. This gentleman resigning in 1858 left an opening for William Moorehouse, who was appointed on Oct. 1st of that year. He held office for less than three years, resigning on April 1st, 1861. A.G. Hall was reappointed on Oct. 1st, 1861, and remained the incumbent till his death which took place January, 1866. William Robertson next took the position on April 1st, 1866, was removed from office in December, 1872, and Alexander Munro appointed. In 1874, however, William Robertson was reappointed and remained till the 11th March, 1879, when he resigned and A.P. Bower thereafter ruled behind the scenes, until 1882, when Mr. MacLean was asked to step in. The Lanark post office was made a money order office on the establishment of money order offices in Canada in 1855 and a savings bank business was established in 1868.
That peaceful residential part of Lanark now known as Beatty Corner was once the neighbourhood where two taverns flourished, viz, Buffam‘s, mentioned before, and Mrs. Lamont‘s. The Lamont inn supplied a sort of home for the shantymen when off work and many tales are told of the roistering times passed within its hospitable walls. — CLICK Here
Name:Helen Isabella Campbell
Gender:Female
Age:85
Birth Date:abt 1831
Birth Place:Lonark Co
Death Date:21 Oct 1916
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Cause of Death:Senility

On Saturday, October 21, Helen Isabella Murdoch, widow of John Gray Campbell who died one year and three months ago. Aged 85 years 11 months. He father the late John A. Murdoch, brother in Aberdeen and her mother Jean Hall, from Clackmannan were among settlers on the “Commerce” in 1820. They married in Lanark Village shortly after and had family of ten. She married June 16, 1852 by Thomas Fraser, Presbyterian, Lanark. To Elmwood.

Name:Helen Isabella Campbell
Gender:Female
Birth Date:10 Nov 1830
Birth Place:Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Death Date:21 Oct 1916
Death Place:Perth, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Cemetery:Elmwood Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Perth, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:Y
Spouse:John Gray Campbell
Children:Peter Gray CampbellJohn Murdoch CampbellEva WalkerAlma Hall RuddAlexander Bower CampbellLorne Argyll CampbellMary Isabella BurnsAnnie Gray MacGillivray

The Green Settlers of Lanark County

Mothell Parish familes that are in the 1816-1822 1816 – 1824 Beckwith Settlers Names

One of the First Settlers of Drumond from the Massacre at Culloden

The Old Settlers Weren’t so Old After All

Dear Lanark Era –Lanark Society Settlers Letter

James Weir Campbell — Lizzie McKeracher — Lanark

John Lyons John Campbell & Morphy Appleton Bridge Settlements

More Kitten Mill Memories -As the Needle Surges

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More Kitten Mill Memories -As the Needle Surges
Julia James
January 26, 2021  · 
Where the 3 roads meet in Lanark looked like a busy spot in the horse and buggy days. On the left, when I first went to Lanark was, I think, Campbells Rest., not sure what was there when this photo was taken, beside it is what was or became the Kitten Mill, on that same side you can see the second storey of Young’s Furniture Store and the bridge over the Clyde River. The first place on the right side was where the Lanark Era was printed and that building is still there, up at the top of the hill you can see the Clock Tower on the Town Hall
Lanark & District Museum photo

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Dec 1992, Tue  •  Page 15
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jun 1996, Sat  •  Page 52
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Thu, Mar 11, 1982 · Page 33
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Jun 1991, Thu  •  Page 52


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Mar 1956, Fri  •  Page 46

Frances Somerville
April 25, 2014  · 

Went shopping and was given a reusable bag from
the old kitten mill in Lanark
memories of years gone by

CLIPPED FROM
The Expositor
Brantford, Ontario, Canada
16 Jun 1959, Tue  •  Page 1

The Glenayr Kitten Mill (A Reminiscence)

 ~ M.C. MORAN

Memories of the Kitten Mills.. Please note that the video was done by John Foliot from the Lanark Heritage Preservation Society.

When I was 17- The Kitten- Glenayr Knitting Mills Reunion

How Much is that Kitten Sweater in the Window?

Stories from the Old Kitten Mill

Down by the Old Kitten Mill

Linda’s Mail Bag– Do You Have any Info on my Blanket?

You’re from the Village of Lanark You Say?

More on the Secret Life of Ginseng in Lanark County-Everett Milotte

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More on the Secret Life of Ginseng in Lanark County-Everett Milotte
Hello Linda, I am sending you the cover page of Fuller’s Directory for 1866 & 1867 along with the page for Watson’s Corners, apparently a hive activity in those days. All it was the country store, the Church, community hall during my time there.–Everett Milotte

Hello Linda, really enjoyed your article on Ginseng in Lanark Village. I spent many a day with my father looking for wild ginseng in the backwoods of Lanark County from about the time I was six years old and continued on a more sporadic basis myself. If I remember the last time I looked for it would be around 1988.

My father always had a cultivated patch at there home north of Watson’s Corners and I imagine it is still growing there. Attached for your info is a few pictures I have. The first two were taken in my fathers patch the single root is one I found around 1988 and the last is one of my mother (Lorna Milotte) with a sample of some had found in the 1980’s.

Sure, by all means, I think the last year I picked ginseng, it was about $700/pound dried and I had about $1700.00 for the season. Was a valuable source of income for my parents in the early years (1950’s – mid 1960’s) of their marriage when they were subsistence farmers at Joe’s Lake.

Thanks to Everett Milotte for text and photos..

Emily Desjardins

My Dad Gerald Desjardine also picked wild Ginseng. Brother of A.J and Leonard. Many times he bought our Christmas presents with money.

Kevin Bingley

I can recall A. J. Desjardin & his wife coming into Brian Bingley’s cabin in behind the Dome and asking if he could pick Ginseng. A. J. said “he still knew the special places on the property to harvest this crop.” That was years ago and I recall him telling Brian that he and Elwin had some private lots to select from. All sounded like extremely coveted grounds to me.

Ron Closs

Butternut trees and black ferns were usually good indicators of places it would grow

It is now on the endangered species list I do believe. I use to pick it lots with my Dad who has picked lots and planted it throughout Lanark Highlands

Ken Potter

It grows on north slopes in hardwood forests so there are many locations that it could be grown in Lanark Highlands.

Mary-Jo Sibbitt-Horner

I remember Leonard Desjardins harvesting Ginseng in North Lanark back in the mid to late 70s up past Joe’s Lake – always secret locations.

More on the Ginseng Garden Co.in Lanark– Clippings 1905-1914

The Lanark Ginseng Company?

The Watts Bros Seed Company Lanark Village

Remembering the Carleton Place CPR Gardens

Pages from —The Ottawa Horicultural Society Prize List 1940–Simpson Book Collection

Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Benson McRae

Pollock and Dora McDougall’s Rose Garden — 47 years later ….

Rennie’s Seeds Thomas Hawkins

Larry Clark — Your Veribest Agent

Remembering Milk Weed Pods and World War II

Living Dangerously With Lilies of the Valley

Orchids in Gemmils Swamp June 1901

Next Time You Drive Down Highway 15–Gemmils

“The Mounties Will Arrest You if You Step on a Trillium”

More on the Ginseng Garden Co.in Lanark– Clippings 1905-1914

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More on the Ginseng Garden Co.in Lanark– Clippings 1905-1914

CLIPPED FROMThe Lanark EraLanark, Ontario, Canada24 May 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

In the early 1900s Walter J Robinson conceived the idea of growing ginseng under cultivation. After an exhaustive examination into the project he became convinced the Lanark soil and climate would be ideal to the growing of Ginseng as wild Ginseng had been already found throughout the vast hardwood forests of Lanark County—– Read-The Lanark Ginseng Company?

Ginseng has a special place in the history of Ontario and Quebec. Roots were used in traditional Native medicines. In 1715, a Jesuit priest recognized the plant from descriptions out of China and initiated export to Hong Kong. At one time, ginseng trade rivalled the fur trade.Ginseng is native to the floor of the mixed hardwood forests of Eastern North America. It requires only 20% sunlight, and in fact will senesce (age) and die if light intensity exceeds this level for any length of time.  All the roots were harvested from the forests, and now truly wild ginseng is rare in Ontario and Quebec. In June 2008, the Endangered Species Act, 2007, came into effect in Ontario, making it illegal to plant, harvest, possess, buy, sell, lease or trade ginseng collected from the wild in Ontario without authorization through a permit or agreement under the Act.

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
30 Aug 1905, Wed  •  Page 1

Read-The Watts Bros Seed Company Lanark Village

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Lanark, Ontario, Canada
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Lanark, Ontario, Canada
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Lanark, Ontario, Canada
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
15 Sep 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

Seems like the Lanark Ginseng Co. also had other business going that was liquid and profitable..

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1909, Wed  •  Page 1


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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
20 Jan 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

By 1911–the foraging of the wild ginseng was hot and heavy as they say….

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
01 Nov 1911, Wed  •  Page 5

NINE years later……

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 Jul 1913, Wed  •  Page 7

The Death of the founder….. Walter J. Robinson

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
03 Dec 1913, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 May 1914, Wed  •  Page 1

In the end Lanark County Wild Ginseng became foraged out of existance similar to the early years in Beckwith when most of the deer were hunted down by the settlers there..or beavers in Blakeney. Ginseng is an endangered species now in Lanark County where it once grew plentiful and after 1914,could not find anything about the Lanark Ginseng Co.

Ontario Ginseng Sites Known in 1987 and Revisited 1996-1998

Lanark8960PrivatePartially harvested about 1990. Thinning and understorey removal may cause further decline.
Click here
 Panax trifolius (Dwarf Ginseng) 2, 8, 13 May 2009– click here

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Oct 1914, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Oct 1914, Wed  •  Page 1

The Lanark Ginseng Company?

The Watts Bros Seed Company Lanark Village

Remembering the Carleton Place CPR Gardens

Pages from —The Ottawa Horicultural Society Prize List 1940–Simpson Book Collection

Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Benson McRae

Pollock and Dora McDougall’s Rose Garden — 47 years later ….

Rennie’s Seeds Thomas Hawkins

Larry Clark — Your Veribest Agent

Remembering Milk Weed Pods and World War II

Living Dangerously With Lilies of the Valley

Orchids in Gemmils Swamp June 1901

Next Time You Drive Down Highway 15–Gemmils

“The Mounties Will Arrest You if You Step on a Trillium”

The Bohemians of Lanark County

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The Bohemians of Lanark County

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Jan 1912, Wed  •  Page 1

Bohemian (1900 reference) A person with artistic or literary interests who disregards conventional standards of behavior. They were the elite of Lanark County, the so called cream of the crop. You had to be somebody to be part of the Bohemian Club.

Evening clothes worn by men (and also appropriate for women) included tail coats with white vests and ties. In the early twentieth century dinner jacket tuxedos also began to make their introduction, and although not historically typical for attire for a formal ball, a modern tuxedo will not be out of place for a Ragtime event. In the 1860s women’s dresses featured hoops, in the 1890s leg-of-mutton sleeves were in fashion, and in the 1910s the style changed to loose fitted dresses of light materials. You wore the best of everything for a Lanark Bohemian Club event.

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
17 Jan 1912, Wed  •  Page 1

The English artistic community in the first half of the twentieth century. Includes Augustus John, Eric Gill, their families, friends and other artists, writers and musicians lived lives outside the tight moral boundaries of conventional society

The Mysterious Origins of Bohemian Grove

The secretive club is naturally the source of much speculation.

Brooke Valley School –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

The Hagarty Township Hippies 1981 – The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Anyone Remember The Farm???? The Hippie Years of Lanark County

Hippies Wars in Carleton Place

Woodstock in Carleton Place Letters — Those Dirty Hippies!

Woodstock in Carleton Place Letters — Go Back to Your Holes!

Woodstock in Carleton Place– Let the Tambourines Play and — And About That Junk Pile!

No Hippies in Carleton Place! — The Children of God

Do You Remember Yoshiba’s Retreat? Clayton