Tag Archives: lanark

Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark

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Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark

 

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Photo Lost Ottawa Photo Lost Ottawa–Image source: Library & Archives Canada

 

Abbie Gourgon on Lost Ottawa–This is rather a long shot, but I was hoping someone on here might recognize the house in this photograph from circa. 1910. The photographer was James Christopher Donaldson, whose studio was on Sparks Street

 

Jaan Kolk– (Linda’s historical lifesaver 🙂 A search for “Donaldson Studio” at LAC turns up only one hit:

“Unidentified house on mount stamped with ‘Donaldson Studio, 202 1/2 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario.’ “

So, the question Jaan asked which I found quite amusing was: It is identified as part of the collection of Rev. James Wilson of Lanark. One wonders if the “Devil’s Lake” pennant on the building wasn’t a bit of ironic humour for the good Presbyterian minister.

Author’s Note: Knowing the once piousness of Lanark County I doubt it, but sometimes one would like to think humour might be afoot.

 

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1960 collector’s plate for St. Andrew’s United Church, Lanark–Kijiji-

 

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Perth Courier, July 10, 1896

St. Andrew’s Church, Lanark, Historical Sketch by Rev.D. M. Buchanan, B.A.

1821-1986

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Photo- Archives Canada thanks to Jaan Kolk

 

The village of Lanark is situated on the River Clyde and is near the center of the county of Lanark.  The name “Lanark” and “Clyde” betray the origins of the early settlers who came chiefly from Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire, Scotland, many of them were Paisley weavers.  The first to settle in this vicinity was a ship load of immigrants from Scotland, who arrived near the present site of this village in the latter part of the summer of 1820 and who spent the first winter in the land of their adoption encamped on the hill near where the Episcopal Church now stands.  Though assisted by the government to make a start in this new land—then a wild forest—they nevertheless had to endure indescribable hardships and troubles.

In October, 1831 the contracts for building a manse were issued.  Messrs. Drysdale and Hay contracted for the mason work for 57 pounds.  The stone house now known as the old manse, was completed the following summer and continued to be used as the manse upwards of 62 years when it was sold to Rev. Mr. Wilson on his retirement.

On May 6, 1862, Rev. James Wilson, M.A., began his ministry and was regularly inducted to the pastorate on June 11, 1862.  The induction service was held in the Town Hall, the new church not being yet completed.  Mr. Wilson was for three years a missionary under the Colonial Committee in Nova Scotia and having returned to Scotland was minister of Maxwelton Church, Dumfries for a short time.  He came then to Canada and officiated for a short time on St. Joseph Street, Montreal.  The elders of the congregation at the time of Mr. Wilson’s induction were Messrs. Robert Mason, Alexander Stewart, Robert James and Peter McLaren (teacher) and the membership of the church numbered 106.  The congregation had been for some time wading in deep water and the finances were in a very unsatisfactory state the congregation being then deeply involved in debt.  The collection per Sabbath amounted to only sixty cents.  However, under the new minister the work revived and the people received fresh inspiration and entered upon the work with renewed energy and zeal.  The new church being completed a few months after Mr. Wilson’s induction, was opened on Sabbath, August 10, 1862.  The Rev. Mr. Wilson preached the first sermon at the opening of the church from Ezra vi:14 “and they builded and finished it according to the commandment of the God of Israel”.

On December 20 of the same year, Messrs. James McIlquham and John Brown were ordained as elders.  It can therefore be seen that Mr. McIlquham is the oldest elder in the congregation and is the only member of the session as it was constituted in the first year of Rev. Wilson’s pastorate that is now with us.  He is now in the 34th year of active service in the session.  Other ordinations to the eldership during Mr. Wilson’s time are as follows:  on September 20, 1868, Charles McIlraith and Robert Fleming were ordained and John Nicol was admitted to the session having acted as elder before coming within the bounds of the congregation.  On June 24, 1876, Robert James, Jr., George Blair and Andrew Blair were ordained.  Of these, Charles McIlraith and George Blair are still members of the session but all the others have gone to meet their eternal reward with the exception of John Brown who removed several years ago to the U.S. and Andrew Baird who is now serving as elder in Middleville.

The introduction of the organ to aid in the service of praise was a matter that agitated the congregation during the first decade of Mr. Wilson’s pastorate to some extent.  Some were in favor of its introduction whilst others had conscientious scruples against what has often under such circumstances been termed as a mark of reproach “the kist o’ whistles”.  But to the credit of the congregation—the organ was introduced in the latter part of 1872 with almost the unanimous consent of the congregation and has ever since been used as a means to aid the singing.

At the close of the year 1892 after a long pastorate of over 30 years, the Rev. Mr. Wilson feeling the infirmities of age, retired from the active duties of the ministry, the congregation granting him the use of the manse for life, which arrangement  was afterwards changed to selling to Mr. Wilson the manse property for $450.  Under Mr. Wilson’s pastorate the congregation made considerable progress.  Having found it in unfavorable financial circumstances he left it in good financial standing.  The weekly collection had risen from sixty cents to about four dollars and the membership had increased to 128.  The attendance at the Sabbath School was about 60.

In so long a pastorate, the congregation passed through many experiences and the pastor had his days of discouragement as well as sunshine.  Probably the most trying period of Mr. Wilson’s pastorate were to have on more than one occasion has work interrupted by the introduction into the community of self elected and self named evangelists who would be better described as fire brands destroying the peace and retarding the progress of the Church of Christ.  In the midst of such scenes and against the opprobrium of those who were carried off their feet with the wave of popular excitement, Mr. Wilson remained true to his sacred trust and maintained the doctrine of the Word of God at all hazards.  To Mr. Wilson’s steadfastness to the doctrine of Presbyterianism, yea to the truths of the Gospel and to those staunch and stalwart Christians who stood by him in the face of all such waves of excitement must in a large measure be attributed the solid foundation of Presbyterianism in Lanark today.  Mr. Wilson is still with us and it is the prayer of his many friends that he may be long spared to enjoy his well earned rest and to spend the evening of his life among us.

After Mr. Wilson’s resignation, the pastorate was vacant for over six months during which time candidates were being heard.  At a meeting of the congregation on the 4th of June, 1893, Rev. D.M. Buchanan, B.A., was called and at that meeting it was also agreed to sell the old manse property and proceed to build a new one.  Mr. Buchanan having agreed to accept the call, was inducted by the Presbytery of Lanark and Renfrew in the church on July 20.  The elders at the time of his induction were Messrs. McIlquham, Blair, Charles McIlraith and Robert James who died a few months afterwards.  Nearly three years have elapsed under the present pastorate during which time the congregation has made rapid progress but the history and details of these years must be left to be written by another pen.  Permit us, however, to give a few of the leading particulars and the present numerical strength of the congregations.  The new manse which cost about $1,825 was completed and the minister’s family began to occupy it in December, 1893.  During the following summer, commodious sheds for the horses costing in all about $325 were built.  Additions were made to the session as follows:  on January 7, 1894 Peter Duncan was ordained as elder and on September 23 of the same year Messrs. John Smith, John Manahan and Stewart McIlraith were ordained.

 

 

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Perth Courier, December 5, 1879

Graham-James—Married, on the 19th (?) Nov., at the residence of the bride’s father, by Rev. James Wilson, Lanark, Mr. William H. Graham, Cumberland, Ontario, to Miss Ellen James, daughter of Mr. Robert James, Esq., Lanark.

Campbell-Shanks—Married, on the 17th Nov., at the residence of the bridegroom’s father, Dalhousie, by Rev. James Wilson, Lanark, Mr. John A. Campbell to Miss Catherine Shanks, daughter of Mr. Samuel Shanks, Esq.

 

Perth Courier, Jan. 2, 1880

McCurdy-Crawford—Married, on the 17th Dec., at the Manse, Lanark, by Rev. James Wilson, Mr. John McCurdy to Miss Agnes Crawford, youngest daughter of Mr. Robert Crawford, Esq., Drummond.

McDougall-Johnson—Married, on the (date illegible) December, at the Clyde (?) Hotel, Lanark, by Rev. James Wilson, Mr. Charles McDougall to Miss Sarah Ann Johnson, daughter of Mr. Arthur Johnson, Esq., of the same place.
Perth Courier, Feb. 13, 1880

Stead-Lee—Married, at the Clyde Hotel, Lanark, on the 29th Jan., by Rev. James Wilson, Mr. William Stead to Miss Catharine Jane Lee, daughter of the late Mr. Peter Lee, Esq., and granddaughter of Mr. John Donald, Esq., all of Dalhousie.

McDonald-Purdon—Married, at the Clyde Hotel at Lanark on the 7th Feb. by Rev. James Wilson, Mr. Alexander McDonald to Miss Jennie Purdon, daughter of Mr. William Purdon, Esq., Dalhousie.

Perth Courier, July 9, 1880
McFarlane-Dobbie—Married, at the Clyde Hotel, Lanark, on the 23rd June, by Rev. James Wilson, Mr. James McFarlane of Drummond to Miss Charlotte E. Dobbie, eldest daughter of Mr. Thomas Dobbie of Lanark.

 

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Terry Anderson from  Lost Ottawa As soon as I zoomed in on that house I thought “cottage.” I think the pendant on the front porch says Devils Lake. There is a Devil Lake about half-way between Smith’s Falls and Kingston – south west of SF, almost due north of Kingston. The front porch has a hammock, rocking chairs, and everyone looks pretty relaxed. Might this be some family’s summer place at the lake?

Author’s Note–  Terry Anderson –AGREED–I am wondering if the Devil’s Lake marked on the pennant is not a cottage at Devil’s Lake 10 minutes out of Westport? In looking at the residential buildings in that area it seems there are a lot of older homes that make up the area.

Jaan Kolk- The lake near Westport seems to have been consistently called “Devil Lake” while the pennant appears to say “Devil’s Lake” (with a very prominent apostrophe.) Given that the photo was in the family collection of Presbyterian minister Rev. James Wilson, it seems quite plausible that the devilish pennant was placed on the summer home as a wry joke – so it may be a red herring as a clue to the location.

 

So What do you think?

Red Herring? Joke? Or Name of Lake?

The Old StoreThis beautiful, fully winterized 3 bedroom cottage / home on Devil Lake is full of history. It is the original corner store & post office in the quaint settlement of Bedford Mills

 

 

Jaan Kolk- This is a bit of a long shot, but the house looks somewhat like the old manse at Lanark – perhaps at a different time. Does anyone have other pictures of the old Presbyterian Manse at Lanark (built 1832)?

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

 

The Jaan Kolk Files

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

The Cholera Epidemic of 1911

The Ashton Hotel– Questions Questions Flemmings and McFarlanes

Benoit & Richardson Photo– a Mystery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?

The Children of Ross Dhu –Evacuation to Canada

 

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

 

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Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–
Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

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The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

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The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

Increased horseshoeing charges, to fifty cents per shoe, were quoted in a joint announcement of fourteen blacksmith shops.  They were those of Duncan Cameron, Richard Dowdall, Robert Kenny, McGregor Bros. (Forbes and Neil), and James Warren & Son, all of Carleton Place ; Edward Bradley, William Jackson, Edward Lemaistre and William McCaughan, all of Almonte ; and George Turner of Appleton, George Kemp at Black’s Corners, S. Robertson at Ashton, Robert Evoy at Innisville and Michael Hogan at Clayton. 1898 Almonte Gazette

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

1912 BLACKSMITHS‘ PRICE LIST from the LCGS Online Resource Library–click here..

An original of this printed broadsheet is in the
Perth Museum, Perth, Ont.

 

NOTICE

We the undersigned Blacksmiths of the district have
arranged a new schedule for horseshoeing to take
affect (sic) on and after the 15th day of Nov. 1912.
New Shoes No. 0, 1, 2 at 25c per shoe
New Shoes No. 3 & 4s at 30c per shoe
New Shoes No. 5 & up at 35c per shoe
Resetting Shoes No. 0, 1, 2 at 15c per shoe
Resetting Shoes No. 3 & up 20c per shoe
and 75c per set of 4
Bar Shoe 50c per shoe
Resetting Bar Shoes 25c each

WM. HAW, Perth A. BUCHANAN, Playfair
P. FURLONG, Perth M. McINTYRE, Elphin
J.H. McMILLAN, Perth J. WILSON, McDonald’s
Corners
M.P. WHITE, Perth S. McILRAITH, Lanark
J. ALLAN, Scotch Line N. AFFLECK, Lanark
WM. DeWITT, Eliott J. GALLINGER, Lanark
JAMES CONLON, Glen Tay A. CRAIG, Middleville
WM. NOONAN, Balderson R. SOMERVILLE,
Middleville
A. SHEPPARD, T. MOLYNEAUX, Hopetown
Ferguson’s Falls
BRUCE EDWARDS, J. LABELLE, Watson’s
Drummond Centre Corners
A. LEIGHTON, Harper W.J. WRATHALL, Poland
J.L. CAMERON, Fallbrook E.J. McFARLANE, Lavant

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

 THEN&NOW

JAMES BLACKSMITH SHOP

Edward James, whose father Benjamin came from County Wexford, Ireland, was born on the 2nd line of Drummond in 1837. Leaving the farm he opened this blacksmith shop, built by Lett James, at the corner of Drummond and North St. He then built a brick house (5 Drummond St. W.) Edward was the father of George S. James and Lawrence H. James. This is where they got their start in the iron business. It is believed that the blacksmith shop was moved to stand behind the George James residence that is shown in this picture as it is now. This home was built in 1924-25 from rock quarried from the James property on Rideau Lake

 

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Photo from Lanark & District Museum 

 

Walter Cameron, the famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook was also well known for his whimsical wooden carvings, especially later in life. We are so pleased to be able to showcase these pieces in our Walter Cameron show case. They still bring a smile. Pop by the museum this weekend and see them for yourself! See today’s other article about Walter Cameron.

 

 

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Hopetown Blacksmith shop from the 1984 book Lanark Legacy by Howard Morton Brown- Have you read it?

 

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At the time of the registration of William Jr.’s birth, William Sr. was listed on the birth registration as a carpenter. Later, William worked at the police station, and Jane cooked meals for the prisoners. They lived at 52 Market St., Smiths Falls. William had children, Madeline, James and Horatio, from his first marriage (Marian Rathey 1842-1872). Jane and William’s son Stan worked on the CPR. William (called Ginny) was a butcher, with no family. Mary was known as Minnie.

James, Horatio and William were among the people who migrated into Smiths Falls in the 1870s and 1880s. James was a carpenter. Horatio was a grocer. William was a blacksmith. CLICK HERE for more The Weekes Family

Descended from Joseph Weekes and Jane Fullerton, immigrants to Ontario in 1839 from County Antrim, Ireland (plus a few related families)

 

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Blakeney School Picture 1898 – 1900

10th Line School – Ramsay Township.This picture was submitted by Alex Holtby –

Margaret Jean Stewart is second from the left “X” and was born in 1888. She was the adopted daughter of Robert Ferguson Stewart and Isabella Smith. Robert was a blacksmith in Blakeney and Almonte.

 

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J. T. Hughes blacksmithing shop at Innisville. Photo submitted to the Perth Courier, 1984 by Mr. Crampton-Photo from Perth Remembered

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

 THEN&NOW

Balderson in 1905 boasted few trees along the dirt road which was the main road to Perth. In the top photo from the left: the original Balderson cheese factory erected in 1881, the Noonan Blacksmith Shop, Cowie home, Anglican Church and rectory. From the right: the Noonan home, Jone’s Store, Haley property (1962), J.M. McGregor property, J.C. McGregor barn and home. Balderson at one time was known as Clarksville.
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The Carleton Place Canoe Club. Pictured here are the first two clubhouses – the first was originally the blacksmith shop for the Caldwell Sawmill, located at what is now Riverside Park

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William Edward McGillivray
4.24.1877 – 1972Spouse: Etta McDonald
1877 – 1952

Grave: Hillcrest Cemetery, Smiths Falls

Parents:
William: Jane Amelia Weekes and William McGillivray
Etta: Maria F. McDonald

William was a blacksmith when he first moved to Smiths Falls from the farm. Later, he was a butcher, and was known by the name “Ginny”

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THOMAS A. SMITH
The death occurred on Monday morning of Thomas Alfred Smith, formerblacksmith at Clayton Village for over 30 years. Death was due to a heart seizure. He was 76 years of age. Born in Ramsay Twp., he learned theBlacksmith Trade and operated a shop in Clayton until five years ago when he retired. He was a veteran, of both World Wars and an active worker in St. George’s Anglican Church. In 1906 he married the former, Phamia Cochrane of Almonte who survives along with two sons, Robert of Almonte, William of Kingston, Margaret (Mrs. Archie Laramee) of Ottawa; Isobel (Mrs. Arnold Craig) of Almonte; Mabel (Mrs. Wm. Kellough of Toronto; Ruby (Mrs. Archie Murdock) of Trenton; Bernice (Mrs. Newton Campbell) of Kingston. A son Norman was killed in action at Hong Kong in World War II. Following a short service at the Comba Funeral Home, Almonte, on Wednesday morning, the body was conveyed to St. George’s Church, Clayton where a service was conducted by the rector, Rev. M. F. Oldham. Interment was in the United Cemetery, Clayton
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Years ago where the new St. James Church addition is at the corner of William. It sits, more or less, on the footprint of this big frame building from long ago. It housed James Warren’s blacksmith shop, and later, C.R. Whicher (???), House Signs and Carriage Painter. Image taken from a postcard circa. 1915.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Apr 1945, Thu,  Page 20

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The trough was presented to the Town of Carleton Place by the horse Association in 1925. It was later found on the Andison property on High Street. Bill Andison kindly donated the horse trough to our museum in 1995.
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Middleville Store, Middleville, Ontario.

Tom Deachman,
remembered by old timers. as the village blacksmith at Middleville

 

 

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More Local Blacksmiths

 

Perth Courier, Feb., 1870 names names names

Devlin—Birth, at Drummond on the 5th (?) Concession on the 4th inst., the wife of Thomas Devlin, blacksmith, of a daughter.

Bathurst Courier, Aug. 29, 1834 Duncan McIntosh places an ad notifying the public he has commenced business as a blacksmith in Perth.

Perth Courier, August 20, 1897 W.J. Kirkham has sold his dwelling in the East Ward to Michael Murphy, Drummond, who is coming to reside in town. Mr. Kirkham wishes to pay or rent a house convenient to his blacksmith shop in the West Ward.

By 1812, Burritts Rapids had become a bustling hamlet. At the peak of its prosperity, it had telegraphic and daily mail, 2 general stores, a bakery, a millinery shop, 2 shoe shops, a tin and stove store, a grist mill, a woolen mill, a tannery, 3 blacksmith shops, 3 wagon shops, a cabinet shop, 2 churches, 2 schools, 2 hotels, a bank and an Orange Lodge.

 

 

historicalnotes

Iron nails were so valuable that people burned down buildings just to get the nails back. Archaeologists have uncovered nails and nail-making tools from the early years. So nails were not unduly rare or expensive; nor were they something to waste.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 May 1955, Sat,  Page 33

 

 


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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Tour Lanark County 1980 Labour Day Weekend

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Tour Lanark County 1980 Labour Day Weekend

In the days of yore you could hop on a ByWays tour bus and tour Lanark County for a mere 10 bucks. Things have changed but you can still do the same thing in your car. Take the kids and explore Lanark County this weekend.

 

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The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

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The Ghosts of the Mill of Kintail

Mill of Kintail Conservation Area– click here

Remembering Pakenham 1976- Do You Remember These Places?

You Never Talk About Appleton

Have You Ever Paid Tribute to our Pioneers? Middleville Pioneer Cemetery

What Justin Bieber is Missing by Not Coming to Carleton Place

 

 

The Kitten Factory and the Bank Bakery Cafe may be closed, but there is a wealth of history and fun in Lanark and don’t forget to visit the Lanark & District Museum.

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

 

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Before and After in Balderson

 

 

Shaw’s of Perth

Heritage House and Their “Wards”

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

and there’s more

relatedreading

Is this One of the Seven Wonders of Lanark County?

What Justin Bieber is Missing by Not Coming to Carleton Place

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

So What was in That Old Alligator Hole Anyways in Carleton Place?

Lanark Mormons and Mormon Tree?

One of the 7 Wonders in Carleton Place

Where Was Meyers Cave?

 

Mark Your Calendars for September 16 and 17

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

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Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

 

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1979

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photo-– Scott Reid– 175th Anniversary of St. Paul’s

 

Reverend Michael Harris travelled afar setting up local parishes as early as 1819 in Lanark County, and St. Paul’s Anglican Church was one of them. Set in the midst of the original cemetery overlooking the Perth Highway, the church partially built in 1852 celebrated its 175th anniversary this year.

The mission of Lanark dates from 1819 when the Rev. Michael Harris began ministering to the people in the community. St. Paul’s was built in 1842 on land donated by Mr. James H. Manahan. A new parsonage was built by 1899 and renovated in 1906 at which time the church was enlarged.  It missed being damaged by the Lanark Village fire  in 1959 but was considerably damaged by fire in 1945 and while repairs were being made, services were held in the Congregational Church. The parsonage was sold around 1990. 

It hasn’t changed much except for the small hall to the right that was built in 1964, but the belfry, porch, tower, sanctuary and vestry were added on in 1906. It thankfully escaped the Lanark fire of 1959 but it suffered fire damage to the roof and interior in 1945.

Their first organ was an old pump organ and then the United Church gave thenm mone that was powered by a hand pump. In 1953 someone willed the church their home and the contents and after the house was sold it bought Sr. Paul’s a new pulpit.

The cemetery in the churchyard was closed in 1917 and a new burial ground was obtained. St. Paul’s Church celebrated its centenary on June 28, 1942. The dead were buried strictly in the churchyards in those days, but back in 1917 local health officials requested that the original old cemetery built on the hill next to the church be closed and moved two miles out of town.  People worried about risks to public health and they came not only from the dank odours of the churchyards, but from the very water the people drank. In many cases, the springs for the drinking supply tracked right through the graveyards of the original churchyards.

 

 

historicalnotes

Did you know suicides, if they were buried in consecrated ground at all, were usually deposited in the north end, although their corpses were not allowed to pass through the cemetery gates to enter. They had to be passed over the top of the stone wall or fence. In the case of St. James in Carleton Place they were buried outside the fence.

They once tried to ban the use of coffins altogether for health reasons, insisting that ‘all people should be buried in sacks’ for sanitary purposes. The Victorians recognized the dangers of lead coffins, and made it mandatory that pine be used as an alternative as it ‘decays rapidly,’ thus allowing the corpse to return to the earth more naturally.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Aug 1928, Wed,  Page 3

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Mar 1959, Wed,  Page 25

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Jan 1945, Tue,  Page 16

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

St. Andrew’s Pakenham celebrates 175th anniversary October 9– 2015– Click here–Millstone

 

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Old Churches of Lanark County

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

 

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Sometimes You Need to Just Walk Your Potatoe

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Sometimes You Need to Just Walk Your Potatoe

 

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This photo is probably one of my favourite photos of all time. This little girl is standing directly in front of what is now (was in 1991) Don Drysdale’s store in the village of Lanark, Ontario 

 

I  don’t think I was much older than this wee gal when I used to be sent to Bonneau’s grocery store on the corner of Albert and Main Street in Cowansville, Quebec every week. Things were different in those days and communities were safe and most grocery stores looked the same in every village or town. Stores had a human element, and there was nothing you couldn’t buy in the family-run stores. There was always fresh bread, gossip, and the grocery store was arguably one of the most important businesses in town. Each store had a wooden counter that people shared conversation around. The grocer always had a pencil behind his ear, a smile, and quick precision as he wrapped a piece of fresh meat, in brown paper tied with string.

 

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The penny candy in the grocery store was always a favourite of mine even though a neighbour informed me that her Grandfather had warned her that such candy could spread polio. In those days everything “caused polio”, but candy was supposed to be the number one culprit. No doubt some mindful parent had began the rumour to keep her children away from the sweets.

My favourite penny candy was a pair of big red wax lips. Every summer day I would sit on the edge of the Cowansville public pool kicking my legs in the water with the wax lips that were slowly melting in the hot sun. If they were not available I would buy the little wax bottles and bite off the top and drink the liquid that was probably heavy on Red Dye #40 food colouring. The bottles were made of edible wax, but all everyone did was chew on them forever and then spit them out after the juice was consumed.

 

Cowansville Swimming Pool -photo thanks to Claudia Forester Purchase

Our favourite hang out away from my grandmother’s eyes was Dion’s lumber yard next door to my home on Albert Street. I would go to Mayheu’s corner store and with 10 pennies come out with a paper bag full of potato chips, marshmallow filled mini ice cream cones, wax lips, and Popeye candy cigarettes.

“Smoking” on our candy cigarettes, my friends and I would sit on the top of the piles of lumber and have earth shattering conversations about why I cut my bangs so short like Bette Davis.  I explained that you can’t control everything in  life, but your hair was put on your head to remind you of that.

My mother was in a wheel chair so I was sent every few days to buy things needed for meals. Eggs were not sold in a dozen and one by one they were placed in a small brown paper bags–but I could handle getting those suckers home. Potatoes on the other hand were another matter. They were put into larger bags and usually I brought my sisters baby carriage along as they were too heavy to carry. One day I thought I was too cool for school to bring that carriage and thought I could handle the situation all by myself.

I made it down half a block until my arms began to ache and I began to worry how I was going to get that heavy bag home until I had an idea. Every few steps I threw a potatoe out in the neighbour’s yards and thought my Mother would never notice. Once I got home I only had half a bag left and of course she thought the grocer had made a mistake. Upon calling the grocer he insisted I had left with 10 pounds and could not understand how I got home with 5 pounds, so I had to fess up. After I confessed she laughed and said that everyone on Albert Street was probably having potatoes for lunch. For years the vision of hot mashed potatoes being served to all my neighbours has haunted  me each time I have bought 10 pounds of potatoes. In all honesty I wish I had done things differently but as they say, hindsight is common and as bland as boiled potatoes.



historicalnotes

 

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Photo coloured by Richer Talbot

 

This wee gal is standing directly in front of what is now (was in 1991) Don Drysdale’s store on the village of Lanark, Ontario across from where Dave Hornell believes the “new” post office is. She’s probably 250′ south of the olde towne hall and the store with the awning (upper right of photo) is on the current site of LCBO store (It was E.C. Pace’s until 1945, then my father’s store until the fire of ’59).

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US)

Screenshot 2017-08-15 at 18.jpg

I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

 

relatedreading

 

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

Ashes to Ashes and Spins of the Washing Machine

The Days of Smocking and Spanish Bar Cake

Been Caught Stealing– Bank of Montreal

Angry Mobs, Wolves and Bloodsuckers –Selby Lake

Memories of UFO’s Earthquake Lights and Gale Pond

Misty Glen Mountain Snow Bunny Hop

Music in the 60s- Memories of Herman’s Hermits

Back to The Future — Twisting Your Dignity Away

Groovy Hints on How to Catch and Keep a Boy – 60’s style

The Dreams of a Sugar Plum Fairy

I Was A Free Range Child

Scrapbook Photos of Cowansville

6 Seconds of Cowansville High School – Our Miss Phelps

The Benefits of Having a Large Human Chassis for Traction

Linda and Christmas Cards– and the Lack off–This is Your Christmas Letter:)

 

Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

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Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

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#11 Deachman’s Bridge, Lanark

How to Get There: Go to Lanark Village on Highway 511. In the middle of the village on themain street (George), turn east on Owen and then onto Rosetta Road. The bridge is over the Clyde River, just out of the village.

When was this flood? Any stories about the bridge?

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

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Why the Appleton Bridge Collapsed…

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

Memories of the Pickerel Run Innisville

The Floating Bridges of Lanark County

Down by the Old Pike Hole–The Island Bridges of Carleton Place- Before and After

Was the McNeely Bridge Funded on “Drinkin’ Fines”?

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

Rideau Ferry Road– Black Snakes Bridges and SS#6

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Tales from Oliver’s Ferry

The Tragic Tale of the Rideau Ferry Swing Bridge

 

Canadian Girls in Training

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Canadian Girls in Training

 

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Photo- Lanark & District Museum

The Explorers who met on Thursday evenings in the United Church in Cowansville, Quebec worked on getting stars and eventually the “E’ pin which promoted you to C.G.I.T. The C.J. I. T. gals wore cool middy blouses and navy  blue skirts and their meetings opened with devotion and singing followed by a small “business” meeting. Then meetings would proceed with a social portion, often consisting of games or crafts and treats. I wonder if I could say that mission statement today.

 

 

CGIT was established in 1915 by the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) and the major protestant denominations in Canada as a means of promoting Christian living in girls aged 12-17. The CGIT movement was started by four young Canadian women: Winnifred Thomas, Olive Ziegler, Una Saunders, and Constance Body.

As World War One continued overseas Thomas, Ziegler, Saunders, and Body looked at the lack of leadership roles available to young women at home and the need to provide service opportunities for girls.  The four women formed the Canadian Advisory Committee on Co-Operation in Girls’ Work, financed by the YWCA, to study the interests and needs of female youth.

The Committee and CGIT movement was female dominated in its leadership and argued that girls should have opportunities equal to boys to serve their country in wartime and that training opportunities were needed for female self-betterment.

 

Sandy Dobie– I remember having to iron those cotton blouses. If you were a young teen in a small town you likely belonged.

Sue Johnston– I was a CGIT gal….loved the uniform

The years 1916-1917 saw the Committee attempting to determine what style of education would be most useful for Canadian girls.  The overwhelming majority of existing scholarship on religious youth education was focused on boys and the Committee hoped to design a program that reflected the needs and wants of female youth.  The first CGIT program was published in 1917 in a booklet called “Canadian Girls in Training — Suggestions for the Mid-Week Meetings of Sunday School Classes, Clubs, etc., for Teen-age Girls”.  The booklet’s popularity greatly contributed to the establishment of the CGIT movement nationwide.

The YWCA financed the CGIT movement for the first five years while it worked to become established on local, provincial, and national levels. By 1920 CGIT groups were being run across Canada and emphasized providing young women with the same opportunities that were available to young men, training girls for humanitarian service, and providing a safe space for personal and religious growth.

CGIT also served as leadership training for many young girls and the movement flourished with local groups being organized. In 1933 there were 40,000 members in 1100 communities across Canada. Retreat weekends, summer camps, leaders’ councils, and conferences sprouted up across the country providing additional leadership and skill building opportunities.

The early years of CGIT saw discussions of working with the Girl Guides of Canada however it was decided that the values of the two groups did not align.  CGIT disliked the emphasis Girl Guides placed on the accumulation of badges and competition.  Rather CGIT maintained that activities relating to physical, intellectual, religious, and service development should be undertaken for their own enjoyment and value. A Girl’s Standard issued by the CGIT provided guidelines for girls to measure themselves by and after 1920 the CGIT Purpose summed up the goals set by the organization:

As a Canadian Girl in Training
Under the leadership of Jesus
It is my purpose to
Cherish Health
Seek Truth
Know God
Serve Others
And thus, with His help,
Become the girl God would have me be.

 

In the 1930s the CGIT broke ground with its inclusion of sex education and its use of The Mastery of Sex by Leslie D. Weatherhead to provide appropriate sex education.  This education was often framed around the need to provide guidance for future wives and mothers.  However this emphasis on family life was frequently paired with sessions on vocations, talks from professional women, and the promotion of post-secondary education.

Author’s Note– I don’t think I remember sex education in my small rural town:)

 

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This another photo from Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil.. this is a Girls’ Conference, Iroquois Ontario, November, 1928. Looks like the CGIT (Canadian Girls In Training) to me? Anyone remember that? I know I was in them briefly.–Charles Dobie Photo

CGIT did not aim to radically change female roles in Canadian society.  Rather it aimed to promote female influence in already accepted female spheres.  It placed considerable emphasis on the role of women in Christian education, the home, and the community. CGIT provided spaces for women to engage in self-discovery, intellectual pursuits, and community leadership roles.

Membership declined nationwide following World War II but continued to thrive in numerous small communities. The community anniversary I participated in was one of those regions where CGIT continued to thrive through the 1950s and 1960s. After 1947 the movement was under the direction of the Department of Christian Education, Canadian Council of Churches. In 1976 the organization became an independent ecumenical body and is now supported by Canadian Baptist Ministries, Presbyterian Church in Canada and the United Church of Canada.  

The decline in membership can unsurprisingly be linked to the decline in mainstream church membership. Parents and youth are looking outside of the church for extracurricular activities, and leadership opportunities for young women can be found in a diverse range of organizations today.–by Krista McCracken

 

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Mar 1970, Wed,  Page 39

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Feb 1959, Thu,  Page 20

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Mar 1947, Fri,  Page 27

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Among the Strangers There Was…

The Eaton’s Sewing Girls

September Morn and the Dancing Girls?

Anyone Know anything about The Whoop La Girls Camp

You Better Work it Girl! Cover Girls of Carleton Place 1965

 

 

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