Tag Archives: lanark village

A Trip to Lanark — June, 1940

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A Trip to Lanark — June, 1940

Somehow I got the idea that Lanark was the county town of Lanark county. Since this would be just about the only county town in Ontario that I had never visited (always of course excepting Hali-burton, where even the train goes only three times a week!) I decided it would be just the thing to round out my day if I could make it to Lanark. Here indeed would be terra incognita. So turning my car toward terra incognita, I went out of Carleton Place and turned off at the church.

I struck a road that sometimes was paved, and sometimes was not, till I came to a spot called Ferguson’s Falls. By now the countryside had changed. Gone were the lush acres of Carleton Place. In their place was that undecided sort of country that exists between Brockvllle and Kingston, and west of Perth. It can’t quite make up its mind whether to be agricultural country or not. So you find pockets of good land, interspersed by stretches of picturesque rock lands. These same woods, good for maple syrup in the spring, pasture in the summer, and fuel in the winter, are not to be sneezed at, if you have some arable land as well, but you are out of luck as a farmer if all your land is this way.

Rock Piles CLICK

However, I was not out to sob over the steering wheel about the plight of the farmer who owned a rock pile, but to get on to Lanark town, and ultimately it came into view. I took a couple of squirms, went around a hill or two, and landed plump in front of the Lanark Era. Just about the easiest place to get acquainted, the quickest place to get Information, and the best place to feel at home for any newspaperman is a country newspaper office. Deadlines aren’t the disagreeable things there they are in such fast-moving sheets as The Citizen, and so they generally have time to talk to you.

I sat there and sniffed that lovely smell of a composing room, and plumped myself down to see if I could find out something about Lanark. First and foremost, Lanark produced the great George Mair, whose epic, Tecumseh, is regarded as one of the truly great literary things done by a Canadian. With that I might couple the fact that Managing Editor Robertson of Beaverbrook’s London Daily Express, is an old Lanark boy. So is George Mcllraith, Liberal M.P. for Ottawa West.

In with these important tidings, I would breathlessly add that the chain stores have not yet invaded this delightful place. Lanark today has only a few over 700 people, but it once had more. Its chief support in days gone by was the woollen mill, but this burned down at the end of the last war, or thereabouts. There was no other large industry to replace it, and today the largest payroll in the town is that of the school. Incidentally, I see the Lanark Era of the issue when I was in town said the teachers had resigned, and it was decided to advertise for new ones.

I went south on the road which they said was the bumpiest in Lanark and they misinformed me, for there is a bumpier one in Georgia and in due course I came to the outskirts of Perth. I was told by George Mcllraith that I had missed a most important item outside Perth, and that was the first bank established in Upper Canada. I was back two weeks later, but entering by another road, missed it again.

I might say that I had been through *Perth a good many times by rail, but had no idea it was such a beautiful place. Perth has a pretty park in its midst, and is so laid out, not only to give it real beauty, but to create the impression that the town is really bigger than it is. I have been in the original Perth in Scotland, and both of course, are on the Tay. While doubtless the Caledonian counterpart is more entrancingly located, the Canadian Perth, and Lanark’s county town, does not suffer too much by comparison.

Whoever laid the pavement between Perth and Smiths Falls did a good job, and my own concern was the proximity of a speed cop. Smiths Falls is pretty enough, and seems to change but little. I associate with Smiths Falls all kinds of emotions. I remember, for instance, sitting at a table in the dining room of the main hotel there, and learning that Doc Cook had “discovered” the North Pole. It was also during another momentous meal there that a fellow at the table said that the Mauretanla had just broken the world’s speed record for a steamship.

At a later date, I stopped off at S.F. to see a girl, between trains, and later again, used to drop into the Canadian Pacific station to have a chat with “Tex” Ricard, who went to Queen’s in my day, and later became a railway despatcher. But above all. I remember going down to The Falls one time at the behest of The Citizen to write about vaccination and some of its evils. I went around to all the locations first, and climaxed the day by interviewing a couple of indignant medical officials.

I returned on the last train, charged a heavy dinner up to The Citizen, and then was pleased to hear from Vincent Pask, night city editor, that it was the best story I had written for him up to date. That I had turned in a lot of bad ones I am the first to admit. The trip from Smiths Falls home through a sort of lane of a highway was dull, and I was shocked to see what a small place Franktown is. I was prepared for something better. I bypassed Carleton Place on the way back, and arrived safely at the Island Boulevard traffic circle without incident. Austin F. Cross June 1940

*The first Bank in Perth– read –It Happened in Canada! The Peculiar Captain Leslie Of Perth

 The City Bank was the first bank to establish an agency in Perth, the Hon. Roderick Matheson being agent. He transacted business in his own office, where Matheson & Balderson now are, but finding that his own business required all his attention he gave up the agency, as no other agent was appointed, the office was closed. Then the Commercial Bank opened an agency, with Captain Leslie as Manager. His office was kept in the small stone building, which still stands on the property near the old dwelling house. John A. McLaren now lives in this building. He farmed a little, as well as managed the Bank, and had in his employ an old man by the name of McFarlane, but transacted all his business himself.
           In order to do this, he had a bell put on the building, which was rung if he was wanted while out attending to his farm duties during bank hours, but he had no scruples about keeping people waiting. He was very exact and particular about paying out money, as even in these days, a stranger could not draw money for a cheque unless identified, or accompanied by a friend known to the Manager. He married a lady from Kingston, who was very peculiar. She never went out except to church, and very rarely there, and always dressed in the same ‘good’ clothes from the time she came to Perth until they left. Captain Leslie did not do a very large business, in fact, not enough to pay his salary which was six hundred dollars per year. He only had an ordinary iron box for a safe, which was built in the floor of his private office, the top opening upward from the floor like a trapdoor, so that his business could not have been very extensive.
           In 1856, he handed over the books to Mr. James Bell, who later became the Registrar of South Lanark, and the Bank was removed to his dwelling on Drummomd Street, where Mr. McArthur‘s house now stands. As the Bank quarters were not ready for him, a small brick addition was built for an office, which was pulled down when Mr. McArthur built his present residence.
This was from the LCGS Click here..

A Trip Along the Ramsay Sixth Line –W.J. Burns

Stace Bottema’s Ghostly Trip to Balaclava

A Trip Down the 8th Line in 1970

Trip Advisor 1834- Richmond to Perth is the “Road to Ruin”

Weekend Driving- Smiths Falls Franktown and Carleton Place 1925

Tips From the Almonte Gazette “Travel Section” 1874

TWO GIRLS FINISH LONG MOTOR TRIP-Eileen Snowden— Almonte

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

The Caldwell Family Lanark Era 1910

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The Caldwell Family Lanark Era 1910

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
30 Nov 1910, Wed  •  Page 4

The Clachan – William Smith– The Buchanan Scrapbook

Memories of Brightside- The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Alexander Clyde Caldwell Family Part 1

Hielans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

Dalhousie Lake in Photos –Caldwell Family Summer Vacations

Alexander Clyde Caldwell Photos— Thanks to Chris Allen

Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5

Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part1

Did you Know About the Caldwell FirstNation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — DougCaldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have inCommon?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“TheHielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders

You Need to be Heroic to Live in Lanark — A Letter from 1907

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You Need to be Heroic to Live in Lanark — A Letter from 1907

The Lanark Era

Lanark, Ontario, Canada30 Jan 1907, Wed  •  Page 1

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Dissecting a Letter to the Editor — Isabel Aitken Ranney and Auld Kirk

Clippings and a Letter from Sadie Coleman –Robert Keith Duffett Coleman

Forgotten Letters – William Findlay- Almonte Memories –The Buchanan Scrapbook

Letter to the Editor– Chief Dougherty Does not Have the Best Firetruck!

1907 POSTCARD – VILLAGE OF LANARK. This postcard is from my personal collection of Perth and area scenes. It depicts the Village of Lanark looking northward on George Street. Caldwell’s Store and residence on the left with Caldwell’s Mill back left. To the right on the corner partially hidden is the Clyde Hotel. The postcard was sent to Miss Amy Caldwell of Caldwell Mills from Alice Quinn. The card reads. “Lanark, April 11, 07. My dear friend: I should have written before now but failed. How are you getting along and Alex also? From your former teacher Alice Quinn”. On the front it reads, “Clyde Forks can’t come up with this – eh

Mystery of the Lanark Cave — Lanark Village

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Mystery of the Lanark Cave — Lanark Village
Arlene Stafford-Wilson
February 19 at 9:07 AM  · 
50 years ago…………..part 2 of 2
Article written by James Lally, who worked for the “Lanark Era” and “The Ottawa Journal” from 1945-1960

I love how our community helps each other with history and it was with great interest when Arlene Stafford Wilson posted the artcle above this week. Read her local history blog here..

Then local historian Doris Quinn posted this on the Lanark Village Community Group Read Doris’s notations on: The Canada Character Civilization Award — Doris Quinn and Have you Ever Seen the Praying Station? The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Doris Quinn
8h  · 
In this weeks Lanark Era…. What we were mentioning a few days ago! FIFTY years ago 1972

Lanark Village Community Group Comments on the subject:

Paul Milotte

When I was young and in Cubs a Dr. Craig came to one of our meetings and told us a story of the early days in Lanark when a dog went into the cave at the 50 acres (behind Mrs M.’s house). The dog was lost for a few days but reappeared somewhere near George Young’s funeral home. I remember trying to go into the cave with Ted Holmes when where adventurous young lads. We could see inside the cave but no way we could squeeze in. Don’t know if the small opening is still there.

Ted Holmes

Actually you could go inside and as I remember the small opening was to the right of the main entrance

The dog story is true but never varied to my knowledge.

Dr. Craig also told us about tapping the wrong tree for maple syrup but also was very keen in the Baden Powell’s scouting. Jungle book and camping was certainly a large part of the imaginary and real fun we lived.

I was so keen on the totem pole Dr Craig had erected at his home across from Marg and Oval Adam’s.

Molly Mahon

Cool! There are drawings on the rocks at the playfairville rapids too – other side of the river near the old stone fireplace.

So was this cave a figment of stories from the past? Not at all, and it probably still exists. But I advise all of you not to go on private property, and for that I have abbrievated the last name (property) as that is the very last thing I want.

CLIPPED FROM
The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
22 Feb 1972, Tue  •  Page 3
CLIPPED FROM
The Sun Times
Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada
22 Feb 1972, Tue  •  Page 13
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The Expositor
Brantford, Ontario, Canada
22 Feb 1972, Tue  •  Page 21

Notations about the cave from one of my fave writers Randy Boswell in 2020

 Randy has a wide-ranging career with the Ottawa Citizen and Postmedia News, where he covered city hall, had a business column, wrote a variety of feature stories, served as city editor and developed a national history beat, he became a full-time professor at Carleton University in 2012.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Aug 2020, Tue  •  Page A7
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Aug 2020, Tue  •  Page A7
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Aug 2020, Mon  •  Page A5

Edward Van Cortlandt had a deep interest in the natural world and contributed greatly to the fields of geology, archeology and biology. He created a museum that was open to the public to display the geological and biological specimens he had collected from around the Ottawa area, as well as the indigenous artifacts, some of which came from the 5,000 year old indigenous burial ground he discovered along the Ottawa River.  Eventually his collection was broken up and used to seed the collections of other institution such as the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C., the Redpath Museum, The McCord Museum, the Geological Survey of Canada, the Canadian Museum of Nature and the Canadian Museum of History. Van Cortlandt was the first curator in Ottawa and his work went on to help create other world famous Museums. READ more here CLICK

CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Feb 1866, Tue  •  Page 2
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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Jun 1850, Sat  •  Page


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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jan 1861, Fri  •  Page 1

Related reading:

Where Was Meyers Cave?

Meyer’s Cave — John Walden Meyers

THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY

Historical Caves — Pelissier’s Caves

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

So Where Were the Caves in Carleton Place?

Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

Muddy Beaver Cave

Our newest cave adventure took us (Rob, Mick, Jeff and myself) to the far Eastern end of Ontario. Our mission was to find this long known but not over explored cave. Rob brought this cave location to the attention of us caver’s and some prodding of the cave community showed that it has been explored sporadically in the past. The cave has been somewhat modified due to advancements of the infrastructure in the area in the late 1800s or early 1900s. Muddy Beaver Cave was renamed to cover the somewhat revealing original name. The cave consists of a large half flooded chamber with numerous side nooks and mini chambers. A variety of formations and a rumored aggravated beaver make for an interesting exploration. Enjoy the pics.
1910 cave found.. click on photo to read..
Since Kayley and I both had the privilege of having Holiday Monday free from the constraints of employment, we decided to get out of the house and do a little adventuring.
Our first stop was at the Bonnechere Caves in Eganville, Ontario. CLICK HERE TO READ__http://www.thecountlesswandering.com/tag/calabogie/

Franks Culvert Cave near Perth click here

THIS IS A STOCK PHOTO OF WHAT I Thought it might look inside.

The Lanark County Spinster Convention

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The Lanark County Spinster Convention

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Sep 1904, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
17 Aug 1904, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
17 Aug 1904, Wed  •  Page 1

and the merriment continued in Middleville and McDonalds Corners

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 Sep 1904, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
11 Aug 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Dec 1915, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 Apr 1911, Wed  •  Page 4
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
23 May 1917, Wed  •  Page 4

Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

The Insane Spinster Ghost of Appleton Ontario

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

I Found My Thrill on Hall’s Hill

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I Found My Thrill on Hall’s Hill

The Lanark Era –24 Nov 1915

The exhilarating pastime of bicycling down Hall’s Hill is one that appeals to the youngster looking for thrills. The momentum that a bicycle gains excites the rider, but the bump end, the whack that greets the poor pedestrian toiling upwards end onwards are not the things one expects in Lanark.

There ia a law which says you can’t run down yonr neighbour indiscriminately, and if this law is to be disregarded the Chief will play his part. Complaints are frequent and the public is long-suffering, but a peaceful citizen can’t be expected to restrain his temper if bicyle riders are allowed to behave like Huns.

Hall’s Hill is not a roller boller boaster by any means. If any person thinks it is, let him keep on thinking so and he will land at the end of his wild career with a charge against him that will take a lot of explaining. Our advice is to forsake the cement sidewalk and pedal to more congenial stretches where the going is good and pedestrians venture not.

So where was Hall’s Hill?

Robert Milotte

Halls Hill is the hill on Main Street right at the dog groomers the old Dairy Bar.  It was named after a gentleman named James Hall he was one of the first wave of settlers in the village from Scotland and had a big hand in erecting the first school in the area.

Susan M. Storie

 The dairy bar house was built by John McLean postmaster in the late 1800’s. My grandmother was adopted by Mr. McLean and then when she married, she and my Grandfather, Wallace Storie lived in the house, where they raised their nine children. They eventually sold it.

Susan M. StorieRobert Milotte so it is Hall’s Hill…. thank you so much for sharing this information. 🙂 How is this not more known… I wonder…

Susan M. Storie I’m not sure Perhaps this information got lost as part of the history of the village because it was named for one of the original settlers in the 1820’s

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 Jul 1905, Wed  •  Page 4

Isobel Foster– Fiddler’s Hill –Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Stories From Fiddler’s Hill

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

Did You know they Wanted to Cut the Bay Hill Down? And Other Stories

The Egg House on the Hill — The Duncans

No Memories of Boot Hill — Comments

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

The Taylor Brothers from Carleton Place — Lanark Village Fire 1911

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The Taylor Brothers from Carleton Place — Lanark Village Fire 1911
Lanark & District Museum
September 30, 2020  · —
Our beautiful “Village Queen”, the retired fire truck that looked after our village for so many years, will be on display in honour of all first responder– read-Remember the Village Queen in Lanark?



Taylor Brothers were very popular hardware stores with its home base located in Carleton Place and they other stores in Almonte, Lanark and Perth

CLIPPED FROMThe Lanark EraLanark, Ontario, Canada17 May 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1911, Wed  •  Page 4

LANARK VISITED BY FIRE. 1911

Taylor Bros. Warehouse and Contents Destroyed Mrs. McGuires Block

Lanark narrowly escaped destruction last Saturday morning when fire broke out in the workshop Messrs. Taylor Bros. Limited, spread with rapidity to the storehouse in front and wiped out of existence the big frame building, together with a large stock of hardware and pipes valued at over 4,000.

At time the roof of a score of buildings close by ignited, aud it looked as though it would end in a general conflagration and the village would be wiped out. But the brigade stuck unflinchingly to their task, and after hours of stubborn fighting it could be seen that the fire was under control.

Next to the building the greatest damage was sustained in the building owned by Mr. Thomas McGuire, and used by Mr. A. J. McDonald as a storehouse. Here were stored quantities of feed, of which was removed in lime to safety. But the building itself presented the greatest danger. Only separated from the burning building by an alleyway not more than ten feet wide, time and time again it burst into flame only to be beaten out by three streams of water that swept the flaming walls.

The first seen by Mr. T. Lett Simpson, Manager of the Lanark branch of Taylor Bros., Limited. He got up out pf bed to put down the window, and was awakened by the flash and crackling like an approaching thunderstorm. He attended the fire at once, and, without so much aa taking the time to change into conventional attire. He sped to the fire alarm in a nightshirt and bare feet.

The tolling of the bell was heard in a hundred homes, and instantly there appeared men and women pouring from all quarters. The Clyde Woolen Mills, situated not more than one hundred yards away, had a splendid stream of water going in a twinkling, the town brigade followed shortly with a second stream.

A volunteer pail brigade meanwhile stationed themselves on the housetop, east of the tire and by incessant watching succeeded in stopping some of the fire that would catch now and again by floating embers. Shingles and pieces of wood carried a far as Jas. Bair’s farmhouse, nearly a quarter of a mile away.

Photo- Laurie Yuill

The fire was too far advanced to save much of the contents after the men arrived, only a few rolls of wire and sundry small sides were withdrawn unharmed. The great task was to keep the blaze confined, which in itself called forth the very best efforts of the brigade.

Captain T. Lett Simpson directed his men with good judgment and succeeded in stopping the fire zone enlarging. Barrels of oil, cylinder oil, tank of coal oil, a full line of house paints fed the flames which leaped a hundred feet in the air and reared with a mighty noise. Two thousand live hundred rounds of ammunition, owned by the local Rifle Association and stored away, rattled like a cannonade, like a score of guns.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
25 Sep 1912, Wed  •  Page 1

The hose played here and there where the most effect could be had. Holes were cut in the roof next door und a stream sent in that held the fire back. The fire engine wordked under pressure and halted not for a single second through all the exacting demand. In perfect running urder, the shining Clyde proved itself one of the very best engines through hours of heavy work.

The scene presented an exhibition of effective fire fighting. Considering the danger to the town, very little excitement waa displayed. The gallant firefighters moved from point to point grimly beating the flames inch by inch, stand by stand, until finally they got control of the situation well in hand. It might be surmised that a fire occurring at such an early hour not many citizens would call to the source. All sorts and conditions of men appeared in ail sorts and conditions of attire, mostly of the deshabille order. It did not matter if a professional gentleman who I have seen usually groomed with the greatest care should jump from the fray garbed like a tramp. No one noticed anything like that.

Nor should a lady come alung with dishevelled locks and swathed in a blanket. They were there to fight fire, and it did not matter if collar and cuffs wore lacking. It wa just that the alarm had rung, the village alarm ringing, then the sawmill joined in the awakening.

The village engine was rushed to the river at the bridge and from that point forced the water up hill. The men were completely exhausted when safety was declared and the charred, smoking heap of ashes gave strong testimony to the great work they had done. Some had escaped by the skin of her teeth, and to the gallant men to whom we owe our safety we are deegily grateful.

Injuries were light–: in several eases men fell off roofs, but luckily all managed to avoid serious hurt. A few sore shins compeled men to limp slightly, but these minor injuries are borne cheerfully. The town is safe and that is everything. Farmers from all the surrounding country streamed into th evillage alarmed by the steam whistles going.

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
25 Sep 1912, Wed  •  Page 4

So What Happened To The Taylors?

William Taylor operated his business along with all of his sons until he turned the operation over to sons John and Frank. The other brothers moved on to different places throughout the country. For example Alexander moved to Winnipeg along with his new wife Marion Brown who was the aunt of WWI flying ace Captain Roy Brown.

During the late 1800’s the Taylor Family along with other families such as the Browns, Gillises & Findlays were the creme’ de le creme’ of high society in the town. There was a rich level of culture, privilege, recreation and art that was very much alive and well in Carleton Place at that time. These families not only socialized but inter-married with one another.

John and Frank ran successful hardware businesses in both Almonte and Carleton Place until the depression occured in 1929. By then they had gotten HERE into the automobile industry and had extended credit to many of their customers and members of both communities. As the depression dragged on these dedts were never paid and by the late 1930’s the brothers could hang on no longer. The Taylor Block in Carleton Place was eventually sold in 1945. from CLICK HEREand read-Sir Malcolm Campbell Bluebird for Sale at Taylor’s Garage?

Read—The Story of the Taylors in Almonte & Carleton Place
by Lyle Dillabough CLICK-

Remember the Village Queen in Lanark?

Wilbert Foster Garage Fire —Lanark

Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

Lanark 1962 Centennial Photos

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

Taylors

The Safe Cracker Comes to Taylor’s in Carleton Place

Memories of Taylor’s Hardware — Mohra Taylor –

Sir Malcolm Campbell Bluebird for Sale at Taylor’s Garage?

You Didn’t Go to Taylor’s Hardware Store for Milk

There were Spies Among us in Carleton Place

The Day the Comba Building Sold-Taylor Block

Sir Malcolm Campbell Bluebird for Sale at Taylor’s Garage?

Dedication to Deachman’s Bridge 1946–Photos— thanks to Laurie Yuill

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Dedication to Deachman’s Bridge 1946–Photos— thanks to Laurie Yuill

Sunday, Feb 5th, 2022– from local historian and friend Laurie Yuill

Good afternoon Linda. I hope you’re doing well. I saw you did a piece on Deachman’s Bridge. Do you know the history on the bridge? What was there before this one was built?

I’m scanning some of my Grandmother’s photos and came across a couple of pictures of a bridge with no description on it. Then I came across later in the album of the dedication to the Deachman’s Bridge on November 29, 1946. I’m thinking that the pictures of this other bridge, may be one that was built prior to its replacement in 1946. There is a tree in both pictures, that to me looks like the same tree. Could you help me confirm this?

Dang straight it was… so here is the Dedication to Deachman’s Bridge 1946 thanks to Laurie Yuill

 Deachman’s Bridge, Lanark

How to Get There: ( Lanark County, Ontario)Go to Lanark Village on Highway 511. In the middle of the village on the main street (George), turn east on Owen and then onto Rosetta Road. The bridge is over the Clyde River, just out of the village.

Old and new Deachman’s Bridge–I’ll send you everything I have.
Unfortunately I don’t even have a date on when the pics were taken of the old bridge. But I have 2 of them from different angles.
Charles Deachman
W.L. Dixon, F.W. Matthews, M.L. Woods, November 29, 1946
These are the Reeves for Drummond, Bathurst, Lanark Townships and the Reeve of Lanark Village
Reeve Stewart, James McLaren, Lorne Somerville, M.L. Woods, Agnes Yuill & W.H. Stead

L-R L.C. Affleck, Lorne Stewart, Charles Deachman, John C. Mather, W.L. Dickson, Harold Mather, F. W. Matthews, Agnes Yuill, W. H. Stead, Lorne Somerville, Mrs. Jim McLaren, James W. McLaren, M.L. Woods, Mrs. Lorne Stewart and Mrs. M. L. Woods

Thanks Laurie Yuill you years of photos you have sent us all to enjoy!!

The Hart Children of Lanark — Laurie Yuill

  1. Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family 
  2. Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1

 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Middleville– Yuill- Photos Laurie Yuill

Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28

Photos of Men at Work – 1920s — Don’t Forget About Me!

DEACHMAN related reading

The Deachman Brothers Revivals of Lanark County

Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

Lanark Village 1870 Flour, Pork Packing and Duels

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Lanark Village 1870 Flour, Pork Packing and Duels

H Brown & Sons were also in Carleton Place. Read –Down by the Old Mill Stream — Carleton Place or The Brown Flour Mill Stories and The Brown Family

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 Mar 1900, Wed  •  Page 4

Merchants of Lanark and Renfrew Counties 1850 – Directory Names Names — Genealogy

LANARK VILLAGE – 1851 DIRECTORY

Village of Lanark Business Directory 1886– 1887

Hielans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

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Hielans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop  – Part 3

Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlop Family Reunion–The Gastro Pub– Carleton Place October 30 2021

Photo of the day–Found this amazing picture while digging through a box of stuff left by the previous owners… Fairly certain this is Bess Caldwell, circa 1900-1905, ripping around the lawn of Goth Manor on her goat cart. from Northern Gothic in Lanark https://www.instagram.com/northerngothic/ – read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans” –read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”
Miss Caldwell – Public Archives photo

Built in 1865 by the Caldwell family— (read more here More Tidbits About Lanark Village) and now known as “the Hielans,” this great house is a treasure of the Ottawa Valley, situated in the heart of the village of Lanark on the Clyde river”–read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders