Tag Archives: lanark village

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

Standard
Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop  – Part 3

Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlop Family Reunion–The Gastro Pub– Carleton Place October 30 2021

Photo of the day–Found this amazing picture while digging through a box of stuff left by the previous owners… Fairly certain this is Bess Caldwell, circa 1900-1905, ripping around the lawn of Goth Manor on her goat cart. from Northern Gothic in Lanark https://www.instagram.com/northerngothic/ – read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans” –read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”
Miss Caldwell – Public Archives photo

Built in 1865 by the Caldwell family— (read more here More Tidbits About Lanark Village) and now known as “the Hielans,” this great house is a treasure of the Ottawa Valley, situated in the heart of the village of Lanark on the Clyde river”–read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders

Pictures and Memories of the Lanark Rink?

Standard
Pictures and Memories of the Lanark Rink?

Hi Linda would you have any photo’s of the old Lanark Skating Rink that was built in 1900 lasting until around 1960?
I’ve attached what I think is the rink as well as the current Arena.
Thanks 
James Laverance

The Young Funeral Home Part 2- The Buchanan Scrapbook

Standard
The Young Funeral Home Part 2- The Buchanan Scrapbook
read the one below first and then back up to the second column and then finally number 3

number 3

Also read-The Young Family Funeral Home Lanark County

Colleen MontgomeryDonald Foster was my uncle. May he rest in peace. It was also Uncle Donnie’s horses that were hitched to the hearse during pioneer days
Amanda Grace Emon
February 19  · 

I actually got to see a horse drawn hearse be used last year and it was amazing!
Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International
September 17, 2020  · 

I presume that J. Young might have been the father of George Young who operated Young’s Funeral Home when I was a boy in Lanark. This old photo looks like the modern day store front still at this site.

In days gone by George Young sold good quality furniture in this store on George St. When my Dad returned from overseas in WWII he went to George and bought everything he could afford to set up house for my Mom. I think he said that George, who was a very kind man, even threw in a free Marconi radio as a thank you.

Linda GemmillGeorge Young has a furniture store as well as a funeral home. This is the furniture location on George St just north of the bridge on left

Judy ArnottGeorge was an amazing man

Barry BatesWhat’s the funeral home back up in past the United Church used for now? (storage)

Michele ScanlanBarry Bates yes there have been countless people that were taken care of at Young’s including many of my family. It is a shame it is no longer used.

Judy ArnottEveryone from the old Lanark TWS was waked st Youngs. They were family, George, Wilson Creighton and Alex Headrick

Michele ScanlanGeorge Young was a very giving man. I saved his planing mill (I think that’s what it was ) from burning and he told me to go and get what ever I needed for the winter from Don Drysdales store. A new pair of boots kept my feet warm that winter

Wanda LabelleEric bought all his furniture there in 67. George let him pay off a little at a time. He still has all the bills from that time

Emily DesjardinsGeorge let me make payments on a kitchen table set l purchased for my Mom and Dads twenty fifth wedding anniversary and delivered it for me.l was so happy and they were really surprised

Rose MarieMy mother-in-law, Barbara Closs, worked as a live-in house keeper for George and Bessie Young in Lanark in the 40’s (her first job as a teenager). Barbara bought their original bedroom set while she lived with them. We still have this beautiful 4 piece set which is made of black walnut.

True story… Young’s Funeral business in downtown Lanark–Terence Miller said:There was a saying in the valley when a funeral director was spotted downtown, ” look alive lads here comes the undertaker”


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Oct 1963, Fri  •  Page 22


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Dec 1939, Wed  •  Page 6
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Mar 1971, Wed  •  Page 5

Also read-The Young Family Funeral Home Lanark County

William Patterson — Patterson’s Funeral Home

A Tale From the Patterson Funeral Home — Carleton Place

How Heavenly Funeral Potatoes Got Their Name

The Last Man to Let you Down? Political Leanings at Local Funeral Homes?

Embalming 1891 – A Local Report

Cemetery or Funeral Cake

The Woman Who Got the Dead End Sign Removed in Carleton Place

Ed Fleming — The First Funeral Parlour in Carleton Place

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Blast From the Past–Remembering Alan Barker– July 4 1979

Cracknell, Adams, and Phonsie Murphy –Lanark Village

Standard
Cracknell, Adams, and Phonsie Murphy –Lanark Village

If anyone has any stories, memories, history on this house please post. It’s beside the old Lanark Era house in Lanark Village. — Erika Danielle

Comments from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

Jessica K Levesque the man that would walk behind me with all the cats following him lived in the back of that building. It is a shame no one is doing anything with it. I have not heard of any history on it. The Lanark museum might. This was right around the corner from me.

Clara AshtonPauline Levesque I have a feeling it was likely condemned because it wasn’t structurally sound, or unsafe to live in due to all the black mold. I’ve heard through the grapevine that’s why he had to move out, but I could be wrong.

Daniel Keating —Jessica K Levesque It’s currently up for grabs via tax sale so can be purchased for a steal more than likely.

Clara AshtonCeleste Reisinger this building isn’t lived in. There’s no way. Filled with black mold. I live in the building next door, and I’ve never seen people inside it. Other than the fact the windows on the second level were opened recently. But if someone lived in here, I’d be seriously concerned for their Heath and well being.

All I know is it’s been empty a while! Although… the windows on the second level were recently opened, which I’ve never seen before. It’s filled with mold and in the winter it’s filled with snow as there’s large parts of the roof missing. It’s a shame, because our building, beside it, is so beautiful and the owners have put in so much work to restore it. This building is an eyesore and takes away from it. I have no idea who owns it, but I’ve been nosey and peeked at their electrical meter which is where our yard is. The power is still on and being used.

From Lanark Village Community Group

Michele ScanlanI spent a lot of time at the small apartment at the back of this house as a child. My godmother Jean Arnoldi and her daughter Jo lived there along with Granny Arnoldi. Wally and Liz Lance with their 3 children lived in the front part and Adam’s store was in the bottom.That was in the 50sand 60s.

Sandi SchonauerMichele Scanlan I remember shopping in the store as a young girl

Beverlee Ann Clow I remember Leslie Adam married Jack Burns. How does the Cracknel name come in here?

I certainly remember the Jean Arnoldi and Jo living there and also the Lances but I don’t recall the Adams.

It was a grocery store

Judy ArnottBeverlee Ann Clow Adam’s ran the grocery after Noonans.

Judy ArnottBeverlee Ann Clow Cracknells bought after Adam’s

Keitha PriceAdams had a grocery store in the bottom as well as the Cracknells!

Kim RichmondAdams had a grocery store on the bottom level. I remember going there as a child. Also there was a pool hall on the bottom level that Wally Lance ran this was after the store was gone. Cracknells had the grocery store after Adams if I remember correctly.

Sterling SomervilleAs a kid Living in Lanark,in 60,s I remember it was Grocery store, shop with my momout side stairs,still alot of tree’s and brush’s around many yrs now .What will they, do to it,when was it build then ? Shame that old Lanark ,not much around now, as Dairy Bar,is close down .Miss the old Store now,as was yrs ago,people also .

Joanne CrawfordI remember buying candy in there as a kid in the early ‘70’s when it was Cracknell’s store.

Muriel CraigI remember Hornell;s owed it , it was groceries then , I remember buying canned potatoes there ,when I had a room at Wilmer Barr;s and worked at Glenyar Knit , they also had a clothing store , about where the Landing is now , back in maybe 1953 -1954

Cathy Barr BrunetteI remember it as Adam’s then Cracknel’s in the store. Mrs Arnoldi, Jean and Jo lived over top of the store and the Lance’s lived on the very top floor

Paul MilottePrior to the Adams family it was operated by Phonsie Murphy.

Judy ArnottWhen I was a child(I lived at the Era) Mrs Arnoldi,Jean Arnoldi,her daughter Jo and the Lance family lived on the upper floors. The street front was Noonans grocery.Phonsi Murphy was the butcher there. Then Cliff Adam’s took over the grocery and later Cracknells. The grocery had everything you needed. Between there and the Licker Plant(Pretty Goods) there was no need to leave the village for your goods

Building in question on the left-Lanark Era building on the right

From in Search of Lanark–Judy ArnottDiane Duncan Lanark Era was beside it. My dad printed the paper for over 20years. We lived upstairs at the back( where long veranda is) the owners, Earl and Muriel Mason lived in the main part

It was a pool hall

Shelley McLeodMy only memory of this place was a pool hall. In the seventies.

Judy Arnott Wally Lance had snooker tables.

Gregory C. SproulePlayed pool there. Wally Lances

Anne LabelleCharlie lance joseph lance and parents lived up top


Michele Scanlan
Anne Labelle and their sister Gayal

Patrick LoftusMy Uncle Phonsey owned the store before the Cracknells and It was called Murphy’s Meat Market ( his last name was Murphy ) I also remember Jimmy Anderson worked for him and did the deliveries He would knock on your door and say ” groceries ! ” when entering Phonsey sold to the Cracknells not sure of the date probably early 60’s

Beverlee Ann Clow

When I worked there in the 50’s, Wilf and Dorothy Noonan owned it and ran a grocery store for quite a few years. Two of my brothers also worked there part time and also my sister. Phonsie Murphy owned it after Noonan and that’s where my knowledge ends because I moved away from Lanark.

John FoliotCarly Liz Brazeau I recently heard it is going up for Auction – apparently the opening bid is $28,000, but it will need plenty more than that to restore it.I don’t recall seeing many mansard roofs around the county (anyone?) which makes this kind of unique.If I had the money….

Judy ArnottPatrick Loftus Cliff Adam had it before Cracknells

Ken Potter

John Foliot Yes, that is the taxes owing. It is assessed at $78,000. The tax sale can be found on the township websight.

anielle DowdallRotting away is my guess. I think a fire destroyed the back apt and now it’s just falling apart.

Erika Danielle

Yes the inside is quite damaged from what I saw looking in. But it’s a beautiful gem if you look past the damage. I wish I could restore it to its original glory 💕

Carly Liz Brazeau for sale. Needs lots of repair. I was passing through and fell in love with it and wanted to know history on it and memories. If I had the money I’d buy and restore it ❤ it’s a dream alright

Kerri Rondeau WayThe gentleman who last lived there had to move out as it was a hazard, the roof needs replaced, and can not remember all he said needed done.

Judy ArnottDiane Duncan Lanark Era was beside it. My dad printed the paper for over 20years. We lived upstairs at the back( where long veranda is) the owners, Earl and Muriel Mason lived in the main part

Jeanie MaennlingAt one point, Judith Hughes, a woman who had bought, renovated and sold a few houses in Carleton Place, decided it would be a good artist’s loft and show room. Don’t know why she didn’t continue after about two years. Sad story. I think now it is almost beyond restoration. Just like the Kitten Mill. Wish some millionaire would do a good deed for this lovely town


Jennifer Joanne
I think it was a craft store for a very short time in the late 70’s. I remember going there with my mom I think. I was pretty young

Jo RintoulThere was no running water of any kind in it when we lived there 50 years ago ..and no land with it to put any in…

Judy Arnott most of the village had outhouses and drew drinking water from local pumps. A lot of houses did have a cistern so you could pump water into the house- yes it was. We got our water from there for years. That was my job once I was big enough to carry the pail. There was another one at the house we’ve been discussing but I think it went dry.

Your house is often referred to as Mrs Ballantynes, nut before she lived there she had the cutest house right on the cornerIt was pink and had a huge weeping willow tree. That was in the early 60s before they widened the intersection. There also used to be a big house on the other corner (Wilson Cteightons) in that large lot.

John FoliotJudy Arnott we’ve heard of Mrs. Ballantynes previously (did she also sell crystals and rocks?) I’ve also heard that it was once known as the Lamonte Inn (after the original owners, Mr. and Mrs. Lamonte – Mr. Lamonte passing away shortly after it was built, and Mrs. Lamonte opening the house as an Inn, presumably to make ends meet).I can hardly wait for the Lanark Museum to reopen: we’re also (fingers crossed) in search of a “historical” photo of our place.

Michele ScanlanJohn Foliot It was called the Lamont’s Inn at one time. I grew up in the White House behind yours on what is referred to as Brady’s hill. We also drew water from your well.–

Beverlee Ann Clow
6h  · 

A photo of Mr. Cracknel taken at a party around 1974. Joyce Barr in the foreground

It is being sold for taxes

John Foliot It’s an interesting lot as it is an L shape with the base of the L going behind the old Era office building

John Foliot

.

John FoliotFollowing up on Ken Potter‘s comment:https://www.lanarkhighlands.ca/…/home-and…/tax-sales

Etc. Etc

Alberta McNicol

I lived around the corner and it has been empty since I was a child. Couple people have tried to live in it but otherwise empty. Deep pockets or a passion to reno would get it back to former glory. Love the style of the building.

Jo Phipps ThomasLast time I was in this building was about 20 yrs ago, a woman owned it, there’s an entrance to the second floor by a laneway that is up a hill from 511, when I walked in, I was in love, the floor was flagstones at the time, there was a large room with a step up to the kitchen, open concept, the woman wanted to open a bakery in this area of the building. The rooms at the front were a livingroom and the other room could be a bedroom. Upstairs was in poor condition but had 4 large rooms, can’t remember where the bathrooms were, then downstairs on the street level at that time was 2 stores, only one was used, but could be one store, the wall was temporary. She lost the building to a foreclosure and it was auctioned off. But I always think of that flagstone flooring.

Charles DobieErika Danielle Complete lack of parking there and heavy traffic so curb parkers would make it even worse. The building just up the road to the west across from the chip wagon used to be a bakery. It was very popular and the only reason it closed was because a drunk (I think) driver drove into it and embedded his car inside.

Diane JudgeMy Mom’s parents were Ida and Charles Darou, owned them dairy in Lanark, my grandmother Ida would order meat & food from there, and they delivered to the Darou home , next to the machine shop, which they owned as well.– read John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Snippy Dicey1995 I removed a large amount of trash from this building for a Mrs. Rutledge. I can confirm their are 2-3 rentals but they were ROUGH. I can also confirm the previous owner was so CHEAP that she tried to have me hammer out bent nails and use old carpeting as window treatments. Took forever to get my $ out of her. Sticks out to me because I was a teen paying $250 a month on auto insurance and I needed the $…paid me $5 a hour cash instead of the $8 a hour I was promised…MISERABLE.

LANARK VILLAGE – 1851 DIRECTORY

Village of Lanark Business Directory 1886– 1887

From in Search of Lanark

The House on the 511 — Thanks to Lanark Village Community Group

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Community Comments– Lanark Village Postcard

Have you Seen one of These Lately? The Update from the Lanark Village Community Group

Lanark Village School Photos — 1901 Graduates names names names

  1. More Tidbits About Lanark Village
    1. It Raineth Every Day in Lanark County–Social Notes–July 30, 1897
    2. Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark
    3. Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?
    4. Till Death Do Us Part in Lanark County?
    5. Lanark Village 1868
    6. Lanark Village Old Boys Reunion 1913 Names Names Names
    7. Lanark Village Social Notes– Hot Weather and Names Names Names 

100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

Lanark Village News 1887–The $5 Wager and Other Things

Life in Lanark Village 1820 — Bad Roads Distilleries and Discontent!

So What Did We Find Out About this Photo from Lanark Village?

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Remembering a Shoemaker in Lanark Village–Thomas Wilson

Lanark Village 1913 — Clippings Old Boys Week

So What Did We Find Out About this Photo from Lanark Village?

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

UFO Sightings in Lanark County 1982 — Lanark Village

John Strang Lanark Village

Lanark Village Social Notes– Hot Weather and Names Names Names 1900

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

Lanark Village 1952

Remembering The Lanark Fair — The Buchanan Scrapbook

Standard
Remembering The Lanark Fair — The Buchanan Scrapbook

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

If you were lucky to have a quarter when you went to the fair you immediately turned them into pennies. In those days a penny could do lot, and you cherished each one. Some would walk miles to attend the fair and Hazel Mitchell ( Mrs. Albert Mitchell) walked 7 miles to the Lanark Fair. From Ladore to the MacDonald’s Corners Fairs she made the trek as she had begun to exhibit at an early age. Hazel had prize ribbons for handwriting and various baked goods, especially bread.

She felt the walk was well worth it but sometimes she stayed with some of her relatives overnight. They would watch the horse races and look at all the exhibits, especially the fowl. Ice cream was a rare thing in those days so it was usually her treat for the day.

Most people only attended their local fair– which was the one that was closest to them. It was the social event of the year where the local people went to meet their friends as in those days you seeed to know everyone you met. When Albter Sommerville was involved the society hired a cook by the name of Martin Larocque, and there was always a good dinner served at midday. Archie Yuill looked after the dining hall for a few years also.

At the Lanark Fair there used to be a string of horse buggies pass up and down the road from Carleton Place. Mrs. McCurdy lived down on the Guthrie place near the McIlquham Bridge on the 11th line. She never exhibited at the Fair but was busy preparing meals served by the U.C. W. ( WA at that time) and they treated the boys after the ballgame. There was also a big horse show and had many fruit stands will all kinds of autumn fruits for sale.

Lanark Fair was first connected with the early Bathurst Horicultural Society at the start in the 1800s. The grounds they felt were on a good site, on a rising knoll with good buildings, a big hall, and an eighth of a mile long race track. It took 8 rounds to make a mile and the horses were always going in circles. As some said there was no high class stuff and the ice cream and popcorn in very long bags were the desired treats.

In its hay day the Lanark fair even beat out the Perth Fair when the fairs were bring held at the same time. But the Lanark fair eventually lost out as the merchants thought it just wasn’t lucrative enough as far as their businesses were concerned and chnage was eveident everywhere. The last Lanark Fair was held in the village in 1948. The buildings were demolished and the lumber sold– but people still talked about the great little fair in Lanark.

Walter Cameron said he felt like a millionaire with a five cent piece in your pocket. He loved the bicycle races and a ride on the merry-go-round meant more to him than anything else. It used to be hard to find a place to tei your horse up at the fair there was such a crowd. But it began to fizzle out after the first world war and more after the second. People travelled farther and things close to home didn’t mean so much anymore.

So what happened to the fair? The fairgrounds became a park with most of the treesgone and according to some– for better or worse sports took over in Lanark.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Sep 1949, Sat  •  Page 1
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Sep 1949, Mon  •  Page 22
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 1948, Sat  •  Page 13
Upper George Street, Lanark, shop of John P. Leslie, wagon maker. The shop did buggy repairs, general, built new wheels, etc. and was also an agency for the machinery shown in front. Mr. and Mrs. Leslie lived above the shop at the time. Next is the home of James Darou and next the Labelle home.
Ray Paquette21 hours
It was nice to see the picture of the ball diamond where I attended many games acting as the batboy for many teams coached by my Dad in the 1950’s…

The Village That Wouldn’t Die — Verna (McEwen) MacRae Unseen Photos and Poem – Buchanan Scrapbooks

Standard
The Village That Wouldn’t Die — Verna (McEwen) MacRae Unseen Photos and Poem – Buchanan Scrapbooks
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here.
Complete fire map-NRC Publications Archives
NRC Publications Archives
NRC Publications Archives

NRC Publications Archives

NRC Publications Archives

Related reading

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

Herriott Street History — Rachel McRae Joann Voyce

Rhonda McRae Landriault — McRae Genealogy

The Henry Family — Rachel McRae

The 12 Hardships of Mr. McRae

Down at the Farm –9th line Beckwith. McRae Family Photos

Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Benson McRae

More on Those “Glads” of Carleton Place

The Mystery of the W.G. Hill Store Continues….

What Did it Cost to Stay in the Hospital?

Andrew Baird, Lanark — Killed by a Smoke Stack

Standard
Andrew Baird, Lanark — Killed by a Smoke Stack
Name:
Andrew W Baird
Gender:
Male

Age:
59
Birth Date:
abt 1860

Birth Place:
Lanark, Ontario

Death Date:
8 Aug 1919
Death Place:
Lanark, Ontario, Canada

Cause of Death:
Concussion of Brain
BIRTH
29 Aug 1860
DEATH
7 Aug 1919 (aged 58)
BURIAL
Lanark Village Cemetery
Lanark, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada  Show Map
MEMORIAL ID
210767478 · View Source
Name:Andrew William Baird
Birth Date:29 Aug 1860
Death Date:7 Aug 1919
Cemetery:Lanark Village Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Lanark, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:N
Father:Andrew Baird
Mother:Margaret Baird
Spouse:Janet Baird
Children:Margaret Stead BairdNettie Scott Baird
ancestry.ca originally shared this on 03 Jun 2020
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Sep 1912, Mon  •  Page 14-Andrew Baird-Lanark Fair

Andrew Baird-Lanark Fair-The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Sep 1910, Wed  •  Page 10

Perth Remembered—Residence and Mills of Boyd Caldwell, Lanark Ontario. Manufacturer of woollen goods and dealer in lumber and square timber. That would be the smokestack that killed Andrew Baird

EARL DONALDSON on  said: Edit

The death notice of Andrew Boyd , states he was killed at one of Caldwell’s mills in Perth . Perth remembered , shows a picture of the Caldwell Mill in Lanark , stating that the location was likely the location where Andrew Baird met his fate . I don’t believe Boyd Caldwell had any operations in Perth . I knew Margaret and Nettie Baird , Andrew’s two daughters .

Thomas Boyd Caldwell came from a business family. In Carleton Place his father had operated a sawmill while in Lanark Village the family operated a sawmill, a woollen mill and a general store.

After his father’s death in 1888, Thomas Boyd Caldwell continued to operate Boyd Caldwell & Co. in Lanark Village. In 1899 he expanded the business to include the woollen mill in Appleton and later he purchased a woollen mill in Perth.

Splinters of bark and wood flew with each thunk of the timber axe. Clearing thick forests near Lanark in the 1840s, muscles rippled and grunts emanated with vigorous swings of the axe. Trees crashed to the ground and then were delimbed, prepared to be sent to the mills. One teenager delighted in lumbering and later in commerce. Peter McLaren found his calling. Read more

Three years later, retiring lumber magnate “McLaren sold his interests in the area. Boyd Caldwell’s death followed in 1888, marking the end of one of the most influential disagreements in Canadian legal history,” according to Cision.

Read more here..

Related reading

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Alexander Clyde Caldwell Family Part 1

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

Your Mississippi River, Ontario Fact of the Day

Remembering The Bingleys and the Barrs

Standard
Remembering The Bingleys and the Barrs
Barr family baseball 1962-From Lanark & District Museum

There were also three sisters of the 14 children: Dorothy, Ruth and Lulu-

Remember when the Bingleys played the Barrs? One of the most memorable games played in the Lanark area was when the Bingley brothers met the Barr brothers in an exhibition game in 1962.Nine brothers on each team, with a few Barrs to spare.

As part of the village’s centenial celebrations,someone thought about bringing the two families head to head on the baseball diamond. So alonf with the beard-growing contest, the hotly contested tuf-of-wars, greased pig catching street dance, the ball game was the afternoon highlight. It was the biggest crowd ever to witness a ball game in Lanark.

The Bingley familiy had produced an outstanding number of ball players, many who were playing on teams at that time. They had also won a game at McDonalds Corners some time earlier playing as a family team.

The Barrs had 11 boys, with Leonard and Pete who were known as outstanding ball players, but the others had played periodically. That day however, Pete was stationed in Germany in the Canadian Armed Forces. The Bingley bats struck early and often, while the Barrs struggled against a tough pitcher. Dan Barr, then 25 and the catcher remembers that they couldn’t get many timely hits. When the final out was made, the score was a lopsided 15-1 for the Bingleys.

But, everyone had enjoyed the competition and the good sportsmanship. Vernon Bingley, a home run hitter that day, recalls that there were not a better bunch of guys than the Barrs. Dan Barr rememebers that he contributed to the Barr’s one run, but his team as a whole didnt have a great game. He recalled with a grin that maybe there was too much celebrating before the game that might have been the cause. But, no one really cared about teh score, it was just the day that Bingleys beat the Barrs.

with files from Tom Shoebridge

from the Lanark & District Museum..

Related reading

I Think it’s Time for some Donkey Baseball!!

It’s The McNeely’s Baseball Team!

The photograph from the early 1950’s captured The Barr Clan in the family’s Tatlock homestead which was destroyed by fire Jan 1. Family members in the front row were, (left to right), Glen, Dan, Donnie, Jean, Mack and Leonard. The back row consisted of Dewey, Lulu (Craig), Harris, Dorothy (Wallace), Graydon, Ruth (Houston), Ronald and Jack. Peter and Craig were missing from the shot which Gail Barr submitted.
— with Maxine Topping.
awa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Mar 1955, Wed  •  Page 9

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Standard
Documenting  The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Photo of the day–Found this amazing picture while digging through a box of stuff left by the previous owners… Fairly certain this is Bess Caldwell, circa 1900-1905, ripping around the lawn of Goth Manor on her goat cart. from Northern Gothic in Lanark https://www.instagram.com/northerngothic/

Miss Caldwell

Built in 1865 by the Caldwell family— (read more here More Tidbits About Lanark Village) and now known as “the Hielans,” this great house is a treasure of the Ottawa Valley, situated in the heart of the village of Lanark on the Clyde river”.
Before- Lanrk & District Museum
“Highland Laddie”, also known as “Hielan’ Laddie”, is the name of a Scottish popular folk tune “If Thou’lt Play Me Fair Play”, but as with many old melodies various sets of words can be sung to it, of which Robert Burns’s poem “Highland Laddie” is probably the best known. “If Thou’lt Play Me Fair Play” has been reworked several times since Burns set down his words,


Snippets of HISTORY OF LANARK VILLAGE
COVERS AN 85 YEAR PERIOD

The Trials, Difficulties, Slow but Steady Progress and
Finally Success of the Hardy Pioneers Written
Especially for the “Courier” — Inter-
esting Sketches.

FIRST SCHOOL-HOUSE AND KIRK — THIS IS LANARK.


Written By Mr. C. M. Forbes.

Published in The Perth Courier, Dec. 15, 1905 through Feb. 9, 1906.
Transcribed for the LCGS website by Charles Dobie. read the rest here click-http://lcgsresourcelibrary.com/articles/A-LANARK.HTM
THE CALDWELL’S COME.
           In 1837 the lumbering industry throughout Canada passed into an era of unexampled prosperity. This attractive business condition marked the entrance into active life of the village the Caldwell family, who coming out from Lochwinnoch, Scotland, in the early twenties, had gone on with others to the Township of Lanark. But the strong armed young sons John, Alexander and Boyd had learned woodcraft and possessed the business acumen and foresight to penetrate its possibilities. They were more ambitious than could be gratified on the Lanark homestead. Alexander and Boyd formed a partnership in 1837 and for thirteen years together engaged in the export timber business. They acquired lands and when they dissolved partnership these were divided, Alexander retaining the Clyde lands, Boyd the Mississippi, and pursuing separately the fortunes of the timber trade. They moved into Lanark Village and until their death remained the central figures of that great lumbering industry which they carried on.
           Sandy, as Alexander was affectionately called, possessed in a marked degree the power of winning men. His promises and his threats were alike accepted irrevocably. If a man proved himself on a jam of logs and Sandy said he should have more per month than he engaged for then the man got the increase, or if big Mick Ryan, swinging, swaggering Mick, tearing down Hall’s Hill shouting in response to a query, “drunk again ?” “Yis, be gad, it’s not every day I kill a pig” — if Mick went home and ill-treated his wife and Sandy knew of it then there would be threats and executions. Poor Mick he feared nobody but Sandy ; one day when in response to a summons for help the latter went to remonstrate with the Irishman for his cruelty he found him sitting in the house busy with a saucer of tea. He never looked up but at the first word from Sandy, Mick threw the tea in his face, but for his impudence and other misdeeds found himself sprawling upon the floor. Sandy nearly broke his hand with the blow.

CaldwellsMill-644x401

W. C. Caldwells Aberndeen Mills, Lanark Ontario. Grist and carding mill. Photo: Ewan R. Caldwell Collection, Negative No. PA-135197. Public Archives of Canada. –Perth RememberedSandy Caldwell King of the River Boys
           But there were happier times than this settling of family disputes. Every person acquainted with the life and disposition of a “shantyman” knows that in his merry moments, when through with the season’s operations in bush or on “drive” he is wont to engage in diversion of an innocent nature. And also in the long winter evenings when the work of the day is done and the “lads” have all returned from the woods and are seated around the camboose. It has been an arduous day perhaps out in the “works”; from before dawn till twilight’s close the men have been faithfully attending to all the parts of making logs or timber, chopping, scoring, hewing, skidding, hauling, with a brief midday meal of bread and pork at the base of some tall monarch of the woods, then thankfully coming to camp at night the lads file in, take their turn at the wash basin and then red cheeked and hungry they get down to a good substantial meal of meat and bread and tea. The appetite of a shantyman is great and swift. He eats a lot and it doesn’t take him long. So when the meal is over there are axes to grind, peavies to tighten up, axe handles to make and everything to get ready for the morrow’s operations. After this is all carefully attended to the jubilant spirits of the “shantymen” find expression in songs and sports. And it was in these sports that the leader Sandy excelled. He was always ready for a trial of swayback, twist the broom, hop the barrel or any one of the many games of the woods. This was the winning side of his nature but he also possessed a keen appreciation of the practical side of affairs and was ready to note every detail of the business in which he engaged. Thus, on the “drive” season when a jam of logs or timber obstructed the stream no readier arm or knowing mind ventured out upon the mass of locked timbers. Quick to find the place where the pinch of a peevie would do most good, where the unloading of a log would relieve the pressure in the proper spot, he appeared to possess a genius for bringing order out of chaos by this speedy restoring the tranquil passing of the drive. Moreover in the estimating of a timber limit few men of his time knew better than Alexander Caldwell how much square timber or logs a given area would produce.
           The partnership of 1837 then, between these two brothers Alexander and Boyd Caldwell, was one destined to have only good results for they were both eminently qualified. Thus we see them for thirteen years actively engaged side by side until the importance of their interests led to an understanding that each could pursue his fortunes alone. This perhaps was a good thing for the young village because it now became the home of two aggressive lumbering concerns instead of one and these added to a number of other companies who did business on the Clyde or Mississippi gave Lanark that picturesque bearing and character which belongs to every prosperous lumber town. In those days Lanark Village was spread over as much area as at the present time.

IMPETUS OF THE FIFTIES.
           The growth of the village so far as steady population and the erection of houses are concerned was slow until the fifties. Then an impetus seemed to be given progress and we find the Caldwell store and residence among the substantial structures that came into form at that time. This building is one of the best pieces of masonry in the place and indeed we know of no walls built here since that excel these in point of workmanship.
           It was also in this decade that the Congregational church of Lanark came into existence.
           A simple incident brought this about. Certain preachers at Middleville had been holding strong attractive meetings and a few of the elders and members of the Presbyterian church had gone to hear them which brought upon the offending churchmen the displeasure of the meenister. This precipitated a church quarrel which ended in 60 families seceding from the Presbyterian Church owing to what they called arbitrary treatment and setting up a branch of the Congregational Church. This was about 1848 although the congregation was not formally organized till 1852. Two years later an offshoot found good soil in Lanark Village when a congregation was organized here and in 1856 a church built and opened. This was the building partially destroyed by fire in 1900 and torn down to make room for the splendid new church in 1903 with Rev. D.C. McIntosh, pastor.
The rolling nature of the country upon which Lanark is built has given prominence in name to some of the more conspicuous peaks and stretches inside the corporation. Thus we speak of the French Hill, Legary’s Hill, the 50 acres, in the same manner as Glasgow people speak of similar peculiarities in the topography of their city. The bend of the High Street was the Bell o’ the Brae, where according to ancient tradition Wallace won his strategic victory over Bishop Beck of Durham and the English garrison of the Castle. Balamany Brae was another historical incline and Glasgow Green at the foot of the Saltmarket was a fashionable promenade down to the end of the eighteenth century. At that date John Mayne could write :
Whae’er has daunered oot at een
And seen the sights that I hae seen
For strappin lassies tight and clean
          May proudly tell
That, seach the country, Glasgow Green
          Will bear the bell.
           I have often thought of dear old Glasgow Green when on a Sunday afternoon perchance I roamed over Lanark’s 50 acres. It is true that the 50 acres will ill compare in point of size or historic association with the famous green, nearby the Court House where in July, 1865, the last public execution took place. It was that of Dr. Pritchard, the Sauchiehall Street poisoner whose mortal agony was watched by some thirty thousand persons. But our 50 acres is a considerable stretch of green and here in the summer time Lanark lads and lassies are wont to stray even as they do in the Old Country and moreover where Ned Belton and a certain cobbler along with a number of cronies held full many a sweet and savory “bouillon.” Our own poet John Moran has immortalized this feature of the 50 acres in his clever verses on the “Stolen Gobbler.”
           One who is at all acquainted with the history of Lanark cannot mention “French Hill” without recalling memories of a pleasant old Frenchman who once lived there. Whence he came I know not nor do I care to enquire, for the people who knew him always speak so reverently and affectionately of “Old Tut Millotte” that I fain would believe he spent all his days in Lanark. Everybody knew him and none had an ill word to say. Fortune had not been kind to Tut even when we consider a lack of making the best of opportunities. But though the fickle dame frowned and despotically refused to accord the beaming old fellow any roseate chance yet he never showed discouragement.

           He had a position with the Caldwell firm when that company were in the heyday of their lumbering. Cooper by trade, it was his duty to make barrels in which to pack pork. This he did in the summer time and cut up and packed the pork in the fall. His workshop situated on George Street at the base of the hill between the Era office and Nelson Affleck‘s blacksmith shop contained all the equipment necessary for the business. In one end stood a pair of scales of the old pattern, large board squares supported by chains from a balance beam of iron. A huge cutting block and a ponderous cleaver such as some Gargantua might use, a sharp knife, a huge fork, a pot of lamp black and a brush with which he marked B.C. & Son on the carcass completed the outfit. He also wore while in this inspecting house a special suit which bore thickly spread evidences of his calling for the grease accumulations of years deepened until it was reckoned by inches. Pork for Millotte‘s inspection was usually sold at the Caldwell office or store before submitting for inspection and almost invariably Millotte received it with the remark “No meestake, fine pig for Boyd’s Willie.” This perhaps was not intended as a word in praise of the pork so much as it served to please the seller, and brought the reward of a glass of malt at Dobbie‘s tavern, and when night came he was pleased to boast, “No meestake, twenty one horn of malt and all right yet,” accompanying this statement with a slap of the right hand upon his open mouth which produced a sharp sound indicating all was right below. Dear old Millotte ! Your bronzed features and fringe of snow-white hair, your imperturbable disposition has set many a one thinking.
The death of Alexander Caldwell in the sixties and Boyd in 1868 passed the control of the family interests on to a younger generation. The late W.C. Caldwell, M.P.P., took up the business which had been established and vigorously prosecuted, with success by his father; T.B. Caldwell and William Caldwell succeeded to the holdings which had made the name of Boyd Caldwell and Son prominent among Canada’s foremost commercial firms. The old school dropped into history and Lanark’s business circles were now formed of younger men who by their energy, push and enterprise have shed fresh lustre upon the family name. Early in life W.C. Caldwell became identified with the political life of the province and for upwards of thirty years stood as the leader of the Liberal party in the North Riding of Lanark. He engaged in numerous political campaigns and invariably won the admiration and respect of those with whom he came in contact even when they found their views diametrically opposed to his. His manly bearing and straightforward manner were of the kind one might expect in a son of a worthy sire. Lanark mourned when her honored son was laid low, for his achievements in public life had brought enoniums not only upon himself but also the village of his birth. One of the more important election contests in which he invited public opinion was that of 1879 when he defeated Dr. Mostyn by the majority of 282 votes. When the news was announced after the returns were counted up, wild enthusiasm prevailed. A procession was formed and marched out to meet the conquering hero who had spent that day in Almonte and was returning home in the evening. Ardent supporters manufactured a banner out of colored cloth and upon it the number 282 flamed. With this emblem of victory waving proudly in the breeze, the long line of men entered the village and shouts of acclaim greeted the man who won the day. A banquet held in Baird‘s brick block the same evening has never been surpassed in point of excellence. Political fervor also ran high and speeches made which are remembered down to the present day.
           Mr. William Caldwell moved to Toronto a few years ago and his removal left Mr. T.B. Caldwell the sole representative and proprietor of the Boyd Caldwell interests which included the Clyde Woollen Mills, timber limits, iron mines, and the large Lanark store. T.B. Caldwell is now North Lanark’s representative in the Federal Parliament. Since the death of his father the expansion has ever been reflective of that careful business administration combined with aggressive enterprise which have always characterized the name.

Bytown Paranormal
August 9, 2020  · 

Visiting Northern Gothic today and came across this beautiful old church on a hill in Lanark, Ontario.
118 MILL STREET, Lanark Highlands, Ontario K0G1K0
For Sale

Description for 118 MILL STREET
Waterfront Victorian Home on 5.4 Acres! Perched atop a hill overlooking the Clyde River & Lanark Village, youll find this masterpiece from the mid 19th century. Just 15 mins from Perth! 600ft of waterfront. Example of excellent 1800s craftsmanship, w/ 11 ceilings throughout, fireplaces in every rm on the main lvl, & a wrap-around porch. On the main lvl youll find a grand staircase, & huge family rm to your left adjoining the formal dining rm. On the right youll find an opulent parlour w/ wall-to-wall bookshelf harbouring a secret passageway! Upstairs youll notice grand arching doors w/ stained glass leading to a separate suite w/ full bthrm, bdrm, & extra set of stairs. On the other side there are 3 lg bdrms & 3 full bthrms; 2 were recently remodeled. A separate 2 storey outbuilding offers a workshop wired w/ its own 200 amp service, loft & 2 car garage. Backing onto golf course for optimal privacy. Come experience the rich history of this one-of-a-kind estate! 24hrs irrevocable. (id:1937)

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders

Lanark Village School Photos — 1901 Graduates names names names

Standard
Lanark Village School Photos — 1901 Graduates names names names
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Dec 1900, Mon  •  Page 2
Amanda MelnykLanark Village Community Group
 
Came across this picture in a box of my Dad’s “treasures”! Lanark Public School, Grades 2 & 3 1959. How many people do you recognize? My Dad (Art Paul) is in front row, bottom right.
Lanark Village, Ontario :
Public School, Grade One, 1946.

Teacher was Miss Shillington (not shown).
Back Row, L to R: Mary Graham, Margie Somerville, Patsy Campbell, Ruth Somerville, Ruthie Drysdale, Evie Gibson, Margaret Matthie, Sandra Bouchette.
Middle Row, L to R: Donna Christie, Victor Greer, Bev Liddle, John Storie, Lewis Blackburn, Marie Brady.
Front Row, L to R: Billy Ballentyne, Ron Jones, Bill Darou, Harold Reid.

Photo from Ruth Duncan
Jo Rintoul is wondering if anyone can name the students.
School is the large building across from the Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church in Lanark ..in my day it was used as public school but, I believe it also was used at that time as High School but not completely sure of my facts
Beverlee Ann ClowI would love to know the names of those students. All my siblings and I went to that school. Mona, Ron, Murray, Craig, Clarke and I. (Whyte)
Lanark Public School 1921
Eric is wondering how many people can you name from this 1959 Lanark Public school picture
Amanda Melnyk
November 7, 2020  · 

Found another gem my dad (Art Paul) had kept! Lanark Public School Grades 5 and 6 Circa 1962/63
How many people do you recognize?

  1. relatedreading
    More Tidbits About Lanark Village
    1. It Raineth Every Day in Lanark County–Social Notes–July 30, 1897
    2. Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark
    3. Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?
    4. Till Death Do Us Part in Lanark County?
    5. Lanark Village 1868
    6. Lanark Village Old Boys Reunion 1913 Names Names Names
    7. Lanark Village Social Notes– Hot Weather and Names Names Names 

100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

Lanark Village News 1887–The $5 Wager and Other Things

Life in Lanark Village 1820 — Bad Roads Distilleries and Discontent!

So What Did We Find Out About this Photo from Lanark Village?

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Remembering a Shoemaker in Lanark Village–Thomas Wilson

Lanark Village 1913 — Clippings Old Boys Week

So What Did We Find Out About this Photo from Lanark Village?

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

UFO Sightings in Lanark County 1982 — Lanark Village

John Strang Lanark Village

Lanark Village Social Notes– Hot Weather and Names Names Names 1900

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

Lanark Village 1952

Community Comments– Lanark Village Postcard