Tag Archives: lanark county

The Hidden Dumbwaiter in Springside Hall –Finlayson Series

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The Hidden Dumbwaiter in Springside Hall –Finlayson Series
old galley kitchen- dumbwaiter was exactly where the light and handprint plaque were- it went up to the second floor to the old servants quarters inside a bedroom cupboard that is lined in steel.. Often wondered why a sheet cupboard was lined in steel.

My home Springside Hall (aka the Hi Diddle Day house) was built in different eras. The Morphy’s were no nonsense Scottish folks and a sturdy stone house in 1867 was better than having luxury.

So way before the Property Brothers existed the Crams decided to add an addition in the late 1800s early 1900s. A dining room and a galley kitchen was built as well as a servants quarters on the second level.

21 Best Dumb waiter images | Dumb waiter, Waiter, Attic lift


When we bought the house in 1981 there was still push button lighting, and we knew there had been a dumbwaiter in the galley kitchen. We noticed that a long time ago it went up to the former servants quarters and there was a wooden call button in the master bedroom at a height and location which would be within easy reach from their bed, but we could not find it even when we gut the galley kitchen walls during the fire in 1995.

If you are following my series on Richard Finlayson who once visited Springside Hall as a child on Lake Avenue East he has answered some of my questions. So I asked him if he remembered the dumbwaiter.

Upper second floor bedroom-old galley kitchen- dumbwaiter went up to the second floor to the old servants quarters inside a bedroom cupboard that is lined in steel.. Often wondered why a sheet cupboard was lined in steel.

Richard Finlayson

I do remember the dumb waiter. We were specifically reminded not to touch it as kids! I remember it having chains and pulleys. I am guessing the location of the dumb waiter would be as you stated. My mother has hazy recall of it being in kitchen as do I.

Dumbwaiters were most often used to move dishes and food when the kitchen and dining room were on different levels of the house. It is hard to keep up with the history of an older house when years of renovations have occurred. So I thank Richard Finlayson for these historical tidbits.

read--Old school dumbwaiter

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

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A Houseful of Whimsy- Springside Hall 1982

Do You have a Hidden Room in Your Home?

What Did Adam Dowdall Find in My Carleton Place Yard?

The Sundial of Springside Hall

Then and Now Springside Hall 1920s-1930s Photos

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers — Part 2 — To Hell and Back

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

While You Were Sleeping —-The Storyland Bunny Moves to the Hi Diddle Day House

The Case of the Disappearing Back Staircase — Springside Hall — Finlayson Series

The Community Wells — Water Water Everywhere?

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The Community Wells — Water Water Everywhere?

Before the waterworks system was introduced, it shows that the civic wells were a great source of trouble to the Councils of our areas. With the growth of the towns there were increasing demands from various parts of our towns for additional wells.

People began to tire of walking too far to draw their water and began to ask for wells closer to their homes. At first the civic wells were all “open” wells of the old oaken bucket type. When pumps came in people began to demand that the wells be covered over and pumps put in. There were good reasons why people wanted pumps instead of the buckets and chains.

The first was a sanitary reason. Mischievous people had a playful habit of dropping dead dogs and cats into the wells, and that wasn’t pleasant. The second reason was that a pump was much easier to operate than a bucket, and the people were beginning to get lazy. The third reason (and an important one) was that the open wells were dangerous. Now and again children fell into them. People were afraid to send their children alone to the wells. But, no child could fall into a pump, so pumps were preferred.

The Town Councils were also bothered by demands for wells to be cleaned out — and chains broke and the buckets were stolen. To cover an open well and put in a pump cost about fifty dollars. To dig a new well cost from $175 to $130 according to depth.

The towns were poor in the 1860s and 1870s and it was hard to find the money for the new wells or the covering of the existing ones. But then the towns had business places which required a considerable amount of water in connection with their businesses and they began to request that they be allowed to tap the wells and run pipes from the bottoms of the wells into their cellars.

One interesting thing was the wells was said to have fine water but the wells were never tested. They may have been, but there is no reference to the fact– nor complaints about the water. In those days, people were used to getting some dirt in their mouths from time to time. They drank out of delivery barrels from the hardware store which were seldom cleaned, and out of their own barrels which were frequently uncovered and subject to dust and contamination. But somehow or other they survived.

The days of the civic wells are gone, never to return, now that we have filtered water. But in the typhoid epidemic of the nineteen hundreds, the people were glad to use the new bored wells.

By the middle of the 1870’s, it was expected that a fashionable home in Carleton Place would have running water and an indoor bathroom.  This was generally accomplished by placing a large water tank in the attic which was usually lead lined — one reason the average life span was shorter back then.

One water pipe usually ran down to a boiler in the kitchen, where it could be heated.  Victorian bathrooms were virtually always located on the second floor and near the back of the house.  This served an esthetic purpose — Victorians definitely believed that bathrooms should be neither seen nor heard — and also placed the bathroom so that water pressure from the attic could conveniently supply the bathtub by pushing hot water up from the kitchen boiler.  The flush toilets of the era also worked off gravity, utilizing flush compartments that were placed as high as eight feet above the toilet, and activated by a long pull chain.

How did they fill the attic water tank in the first place?  Well, with a little luck, from rain water.  Gutters were used to funnel rainwater into the tank (which were built to hold as much as 600 gallons), and if the weather failed, the well-to-do could always depend upon wells and servants with buckets or hand pumps. Then there were the cisterns that are in our homes that I wrote about.

Carleton Place Waterworks
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Mar 1911, Wed  •  Page 2

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Jun 1912, Fri  •  Page 16

Did you know that when they laid the first water pipes in Carleton Place workers were brought in from Romania, Italy and the Baltic states? They all boarded at Leech’s School right next to Barker’s parking lot.

So it has been documented in a few places that there was a community well for years in Carleton Place on Queen Street. Jennifer Fenwick Irwin and I asked Duncan Rogers but he had no idea. So this week I went searching. I  initially thought it was at the bottom of Albert Street between Princess and Queen Street but then I drove up to the top by Coleman Street and I seriously think they were here as they were close to the C.P.R train station as mentioned in the newspapers.

There is also the fact that Mr McRae had his huge plof of Gladiolas in this space and if you look at the photo below this one the location is in the same spot and he the garden was so huge that he had water in a few locations probably from these old wells.

Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Benson McRae

2019

Photos from the McRae family.Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Benson McRae
Almonte Waterworks
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he Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Aug 1919, Sat  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1906, Sat  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 1906, Tue  •  Page 9
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 May 1907, Sat  •  Page 19

A Record of Drowning — River Falls and Cisterns

Tales of the Cistern —- Jan McCarten Sansom

Cisterns I Have Known

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Do You have a Hidden Room in Your Home?

“The Tim Horton’s River” Under my House.. Is That the Way To Fraggle Rock?

William Pattie — Built More Homes Than Any Other Man

Memories of Taylor’s Hardware — Mohra Taylor –

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1932, Thu  •  Page 5

The Taylor building on the Bridge and Mill Street corner was built in 1888 and bought from Archibald McArthur. It’s one of the few downtown Carleton Place buildings that has not been touched by fire, and one of the largest made from Beckwith limestone and local bricks. After William’s death, the store continued on as Taylor Bros Ltd.,hardware, fuel merchants, and auto dealers under C. Frank R. Taylor (1875-1940) until 1930 ca. Frank was William’s son.This is the largest commercial building in Carleton Place and was known as “Taylor’s Department Store and Garage”.Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

Linda, thanks for connecting! Hope you’re doing well. I am the great-granddaughter of JD Taylor of hardware store fame. My father, John Donald Laurie Taylor regaled my sybs and me with wonderful tales of the town, the people and the antics he got up to as a boy in Carleton Place.

Your postings about the store have filled in some blanks and the pictures are terrific to have. At the end of March my daughter and I are making a short pilgrimage from Burlington, ON, to CP where I can show her the store and the places my dad lived and “played”. With access to gun powder, nails, mason jars, a willing friend and a boat, the fish in the Mississippi and the boat didn’t stand a chance. When was this kind of fishing outlawed?

My dad was born in 1925 and his sybs, twins, Barbara and David were born in 1930. My grandfather passed in 1972, my grandmother, Hazel, in 1999, my father 7 years ago, my uncle a couple of years after that, and my aunt is still going!! Thank you so much for keeping Carleton Place alive for me. I am truly looking forward to seeing it for the first time. Wishing you good health and happiness,

Mohra Taylor

Taylor’s Hardware was also in Almonte  -

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1934, Sat  •  Page 8
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Feb 1901, Sat  •  Page 8

We will list some of the business places of that day further along the street, but not all in order. Taber’s Ladies Wear, Merchants Bank and later bought by W. H. Stafford. (It had once been owned and operated by John McKinnon), McLean’s Bakery, Woosley’s Barber Shop, M. R. Young Men’s Wear, Clement Bicycle Shop, Dr. McGregor, dentist, and Taylor Bros. Hardware (they opened a Garage on Bridge St. in 1928 with Cliff Robertson as manager.)

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 May 1936, Sat  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Dec 1947, Mon  •  Page 7

A well known accountant in Ottawa began his career at Taylor’s Hardware. Thomas Dowe worked for 12 years at that very hardware store before going to the government income tax dept and many prestigious accounting firms including the chartered A. A. Crawley in Ottawa.

You Didn’t Go to Taylor’s Hardware Store for Milk

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

Sir Malcolm Campbell Bluebird for Sale at Taylor’s Garage?

There were Spies Among us in Carleton Place

The Day the Comba Building Sold-Taylor Block

N. S. Lee & Son Hardware Comments and History

Family Heirlooms and Antiques of Mississippi Mills — Golden Jubilee 1937

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Family Heirlooms and Antiques of Mississippi Mills — Golden Jubilee 1937

Heirlooms and antiques, the property of old families in the Ottawa district, were brought together in one of the most interesting exhibits of the Ottawa Exhibition Golden Jubilee program. This exhibit, which will be located In the women’s handicrafts building in 1937. The exhibition was in the form of a parlor in a well-to-do home of 1887. To give a contrast there was another exhibit, that of a modern living room, with all the comforts and conveniences

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1887 living room

The Ottawa Citizen i
Location:
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Issue Date:
Wednesday, August 18, 1937

As the exhibition was celebrating its 50th birthday, the idea of having an exhibit to show what the “properly equipped” parlor of the year 1887 when the exhibition was first held in Ottawa, and another exhibit to show the great strides made in style and furnishings for a home, was developed by the exhibition management with the co-operation of Mrs. J. K. Kelly, of Almonte.

World Of Mirth Carnival Vintages 1960 Pictorial Program With Route ...
World Of Mirth Authentic Carnival Poster (c.1955) 50 Rail Cars ...

To Mrs. Kelly went the credit for finding the magnificent heirlooms and antiques which were used to furnish the “parlor of 50 years ago.” Among the first settlers in what is known as Blakeney or Snedden’s Station, were members of the Snedden family who came from Rosebank, Scotland. They named the place where they settled Rosebank and it is still known by that name in that vicinity.

Burns -

Among the treasures the Snedden family brought from Scotland were brass candlesticks, brass curtain tics, pictures of Robert Burns, ‘the poet’, and of Rev. Robert Burns, who was the Presbyterian minister in the kirk where the Snedden family worshipped, a chair worked in needlepoint, a small Brussels rug and a table cover.

New Deals on One-of-a-Kind Brussels Medallion Persian Hand-Knotted ...

All these treasures were loaned by the Snedden family to help furnish the parlor. Another Scottish family coming from Braehead, near Glasgow, was the Young family. Their contribution to the parlor was a mantel clock, well over 100 years old and still keeping good time; a farmer’s seed wreath made by a granddaughter 85 years ago and a needlepoint cushion, beautifully worked. The farmer’s wreath was a work of art and few of them are in existence today.

From the descendants of James Stewart, Scottish blacksmith, the exhibition received the loan of wonderful samplers, old family pictures, walnut what-not, curtains knit years ago by a granddaughter, Jessie Stewart, and several other articles including an old family Bible. The curtains were made of cotton warp twisted and a yarn, homespun and home-dyed by another granddaughter.

The Bible originally belonged to the Tyner family of Toronto and was a wedding gift from Mrs. Robert Knowles, mother of the well known novelist. Mrs. Bower Henry, wife of the immediate past president of the Central Canada Exhibition Association contributed a fireplace almost 100 years old, which was built into the original home on the Silver Springs farm, the Henry home on the Richmond road.

A lovely student’s lamp, an outstanding example of old craftsmanship, was loaned by Mrs. Rose of Pakenham. This lamp was brought here from Baltimore more than 50 years ago.

Miss Annie Arthur, donated a feather wreath which she made when a young girl. The colors were well blended and the flowers-still had a natural appearance. This is an art which is almost lost today. Miss Arthur also loaned an organ, which was one of the first In the Almonte district and was over 85 years of age. The tone was still mellow and true.

One of the smaller ‘ pieces, a little pitcher, well over 125 years old, and a work basket, were loaned by Miss Arthur. Another pitcher and curtain poles were loaned by Mrs. Toshark. Miss K. McDougall was contributing a footstool in needlepoint, very old and beautifully worked. All the items loaned for that Golden Jubilee in 1937 were examples of a pioneer industry or art which had practically disappeared at that point.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Aug 1937, Fri  •  Page 2
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LIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Aug 1937, Fri  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1933, Sat  •  Page 2

More Memories of Wave’s Inn- Julie Sadler

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More Memories of Wave’s Inn- Julie Sadler

Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Wave’s Inn belonged to my “other grandmother “, Wava Armstrong- McDaniel -Baker . In 1942, Wava purchased about 12 acres of land on Franktown Road. Waves Inn was a cottage moved into town and there is not a foundation underneath it. I live in her daughter’s second house that is next door, 347. There are 7.5 acres of her land left untouched. The deer come out of the woods at night and eat all of my flowers!

My mom and Wava’s only child, Joan Hamilton, were best friends for 85 years until Joan passed away almost 2 years ago. We were family, just not biologically!

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Arnie McDaniel and his dog Rexie pose for a photo in front of Wave’s Inn sometime in the 1940’s. Arnie’s wife Wava ran Wave’s Inn, which was located at 345 Franktown Road and was THE place to host a party or reception
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Apr 1955, Tue  •  Page 15

Wava also had 5 or 6 cabins in her backyard. Room for one, maybe two, to sleep. There might be one left on my neighbour’s property. She rented them out to the guys who were working in the area, ie: highway, hydro, railway, etc. She made their breakfast and dinner as well as sending them off with a boxed lunch. As a kid I thought they were so much fun!

I remember at that time Wava was on the 12 acres by herself, but the cabins were all just behind the inn. Her bedroom was downstairs at the back and Joan had a tiny one upstairs. Joan and her husband Keith built their first house at 349 Franktown road in the late 70’s. Then the mall was built, so they built another house in between Wava’s at 345 and the first at 349, hence 347 which is where I now live.

It was all fields at the time of Wave’s Inn. No neighbours to complain about noise, but she ran a very tight ship ! She was small but mighty. Everyone adored her and treated her like their mom! When I was married in 85, my wedding pictures were taken by Jeff Mills in Wava’s beautiful garden.

Mum, Doris and her baby girl Julie Sadler who is the author of this story–Photo Julie Sadler
Julie's Mother Doris's Memories

My mother Doris said there were only 3 cabins at Wava’s. The last one is still there close to the road and the owners sided it to match their house. Only room for one cot in each. I was at my mom’s this afternoon (she is 87) and she remembers two summers in a row when she was in high school and 3 university students from Toronto rented those cabins. They had a great time at the Inn.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Sep 1954, Tue  •  Page 28

Wava needed to earn money. She was widowed when her daughter was about 18 and she made the best pies anywhere and sold them. She also hosted dinner meetings for the men’s clubs in town. Obviously we weren’t into that in the 40’s and 50’s ! I asked my mom to keep thinking about the inn for the next day or two. She may come up with more. Bill Bigras was the best jive dancer in town. All of the girls wanted to dance with him!

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Mar 1958, Sat  •  Page 43

BILL BIGRAS

War medals gleam away from media glare Bill Bigras click here

Canada’s Maple Leaf is the symbol of national unity.

In 1965, on Feb. 15, the red-and-white emblem was raised for the first time on Parliament Hill. The late Bill (William) Bigras, a Carleton Place resident and Korean War veteran, did the honours. Bill was a 50-plus year member of Legion Branch 192. In his youth, he was a serious paddler and as an adult, he was an avid hockey coach. He passed away in 2004. Read more here..

BIGRAS, William “Bill” In hospital, Carleton Place, Ontario on Wednesday, March 24th, 2004. Bill Bigras, at the age of 73 years. Loved husband of Doreen “Dodie” Bennett. Loved father of Kurt (Pat), Jocelyn, William and Angela (Pierre Seguin). Loved grandfather of Serge, Bianca, David, Jeremy, Joshua, Jessica and Sage. Loved great-grandfather of Rei-Ann. Dear brother of Mary Frazer, Margaret Hamilton and Georgette Turner. Survived by nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his brothers Normie, Lionel, Ronald and Oswald and sister Yvette.

Wava Marguerite Armstrong Baker
BIRTH
29 Nov 1913Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH
4 Aug 1997 (aged 83)
BURIAL
United Cemeteries
Beckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada  Show Map
PLOT
St. Fillans

Wava Marguerite Baker, daughter of Ernest Armstrong and Margaret Armstrong. Widow of Arnold McDaniel and Gerald Baker. Mother of Joan and Keith Hamilton, Carleton Place; sister of Lola (John) Moore, Carleton Place and Arthur (Ruth) Armstrong, Burke’s Falls. Predeceased Edith McBride, Howard and Milton “Tim” Armstrong.

By her wishes, created remains were placed with each husband– I cried when I read that..

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Julie Sadler— Originally it was a family home with 2 bedrooms upstairs at the back. The front was a dance hall ( with food, no alcohol) for the young people of Carleton Place in the 40’s and 50’s. Beautiful hardwood floors. Ask anyone in town who is over 80 and they will have some stories to tell you! Older photo-Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum- New one- Linda Seccaspina

Down At the Twist and Shout–Wave’s Inn

Interesting Tidbits — Frances Moore

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School — Wava McDaniel Baker

Documenting Franktown Road Before it Changes

Do You Know This Man? Wave’s Inn –Lorie Paul

Do You Know This Man? Wave’s Inn –Lorie Paul

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Do You Know This Man? Wave’s Inn –Lorie Paul
345 Franktown Road- Wave’s Inn– photo Lorie Paul

Hi Linda. My name is Lorie Paul. I moved to Carleton Place last October, but have had a family cottage on the lake for over 60 years. My Dad (Kenneth Paul) grew up on Napoleon St. I have this picture of my Dad working at what was a lunch counter at 345 Franktown Road (Wave’s Inn). He would have been around 14 or 15 at the time, so early to mid 1930s.

I have always wondered who the other gentleman in the picture was. Wondering if I should post the picture to see if anyone knows who it is, and perhaps a family member would like to see it as well. I’m not sure if I’m allowed to post in any of the Carleton Place FB pages. My dad is standing on the left in the picture. Thanks so much, and have a great day.

Down At the Twist and Shout–Wave’s Inn

Interesting Tidbits — Frances Moore

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School — Wava McDaniel Baker

Documenting Franktown Road Before it Changes

The Mystery of the Springside Hall Carriage House Door — Donovan Hastie

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The Mystery of the Springside Hall Carriage  House Door — Donovan Hastie
Photo Donovan Hastie

Another mystery solved about Springside Hall, Lake Ave East in Carleton Place

Hi Linda, I just found out from my dad this weekend that the door in this pic is from the Raeburn carriage house. He used to store his Jaguar there and ended up getting the door with the original hardware. It’s now (since the early 80’s) the main entrance to our cottage. — Donovan Hastie

Photos of the Carriage House

Son of Albert Cram in front of carriage house 1920s- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
carriage house 1920s on side- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Cecil on the Campbell Side of the house. My house in the background.–Photo-Susan McCann ( Carriage House is white building in back)

Susan McCann’s Father burning leaves. Remember those days? You can see Springside Hall with the original fence. When we bought it- it had a white picket fence. Originally, there was concrete pillars with pipes as a fence. The carriage house is in the back and we tore it down in 1988 as it was falling down. You can see the white summer  kitchen on the back of the house. That was not there in 1981 when we bought the home. There was just a hole in the ground where it had been, and we built the stone addition and garage where it was. Photo-Susan McCann –( Carriage House is white building in back)

A Houseful of Whimsy- Springside Hall 1982

The Story of a Local Family -Finlayson- Richard Finlayson

The Sundial of Springside Hall

Then and Now Springside Hall 1920s-1930s Photos

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers — Part 2 — To Hell and Back

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

While You Were Sleeping —-The Storyland Bunny Moves to the Hi Diddle Day House

The Carleton Lunch Bar- Carleton Place Tourism of the Past — Keith Giffin

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Linda here is picture of my dad and his uncle Wes, in front of the Carleton Lunch Bar. There is a sign colonial coach line in the window behind them. The fish were caught at Mississippi lake. The photo was part of the town’s history and what was available, for tourists coming to the area. I have the brochure with all the information. The colonial bus line stopped on a regular schedule. the brick in part on the front of the building was the entrance to the restaurant. When my parents ran the restaurant we lived up stairs. The buses used stop across the street, it was a full service schedule. Keith Giffin

Other photos from Keith Giffin from the brochure

These were probably put out by the Chamber of Commerce photos- Keith Giffin

66 Bridge Street Circa 1860

The building has one off centred entrance but at one time there may have been two entrances to this building as the brick where the second possible entrance was is a different colour compared to the rest of the brick on the façade.

Mr. Steen (from the Winchester area) owned this brick building and Mr. P.G.N Frizell who lived on Lake Ave. East operated a small grocery store.  Later Percy Hardy operated his photography studio and in the 1930s Fred and Lib Stanzel occupied it as a lunchroom and had living quarters upstairs. It also use to house a clothing store that I can’t seem to find a mention of.

Clifford Peden bought the building and made it into upstairs and downstairs apartments where he and his wife Donalda and son James lived in the upstairs apartment. Mrs. Rena Paul and then Mrs. Gladys Lashley lived downstairs. Keith Giffin said: “My uncle Clicker Peden lived there after he retired and converted the lower part to apartment. My cousin Jim Peden lived there for awhile and the Giffins  ran the lunch bar for number of years called The Carleton Lunch Bar”.

The local bus stop in Carleton Place on Bridge Street–Ray Paquette— As Keith may remember, it was also the terminal for the Colonial Coach Line and it was from the lunch bar, where we bought our tickets, we would wait for the bus which would come from Ottawa, turning off Moore Street at Lake, coming up Beckwith to Albert where it would wait at the corner of Bridge for the passengers. I remember Doug Labron went to the Ottawa Technical High School and commuted to Ottawa by the bus which left early in the morning.

Norma Jackson-– One memory I have is going to the restaurant with my Mom and having pigs in a blanket Donna Mcfarlane-– Howard and Allie Neil ran the restaurant there for awhile when I was in high school then Mrs Mcgregor had it.Valerie Edwards– I will always remember my Dad taking me there, I think we sat at the counter, for a hot chocolate after the Remembrance Day ceremonies, each November 11. So much so, that each Nov. 11 I take a thermos of hot chocolate with me & find some place to sit after the crowd has gone.

This building became a residence and for many years the citizens will remember it as the Colonial Bus Stop and restaurant.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Oct 1950, Mon  •  Page 4

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

A Few Memories of Blaine Cornell

The Carleton Place Riverside Park Booth Etc. Etc.

St. Mary’s and Riverside Park 1969

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St. Mary’s and Riverside Park 1969
Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum (date 40s-50s)

1969 thanks to Grace Drummond

relatedreading

When Were Some of the Trees Planted in Riverside Park?

The Carleton Place Riverside Park Booth Etc. Etc.

Let’s Build Cabins at Riverside Park!

When the Circus came to Carleton Place

Tug of War 1970’s Riverside and Centennial Park Carleton Place

Just Beat It! Carnival Riot in Carleton Place at Riverside Park

Before and After at Centennial Park

So What Did You Do in Riverside Park?

It was the Boathouse that Went On and On….

The Carleton Place Riverside Park Booth Etc. Etc.

The Duncans and Finlaysons — Don Duncan

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The Duncans and Finlaysons — Don Duncan

Although there is no direct family relationship with the Duncan and Finlaysons they were the best of neighbours going back many generations. The Finlayson farm was Located on the 11th line of Ramsay  also known as the Appleton Road at East Lot 8, Con. 10 where the house and barns are located. They also owned 50 acres on West 1/2 Lot 8, Conc 11 on the other side of the 11th line. We owned the other 50 acres beside it.

The house in the 1948 photo below is of log and covered over with clapboard. It still is there but harder to recognize as a huge addition was added in the late 1970’s and a large horse arena was added at a later date. The large bank barn is still  there but an addition was added to it in the 1960’s.

Progression of owners since the Finlaysons have been Lloyd and Dorothy Reid. Then Howard Darwin from Ottawa bought it for his daughter who wanted to farm, that is when all the additional building took place. It has since been sold to a couple who operate it as a horse boarding and training farm. I don’t recall their name at the moment. I think it might be people by the name of Campbell. Although I haven’t completed the research yet I believe that Charles Finlayson and Mary Smith took over the farm when they married as it was a Smith farm before that.

James and Agnes assumed the farm from his father and they raised  a family of six including Rick’s father, Jim and Edgar who I remember well. I went with my father to visit Jim when he lived in a trailer south of Carleton Place on Hwy 15 near Parkman and Taylors if you remember where it was. Also remember visits over to the Finlayson gravel pit on Con 2 Ramsay to pick up a load of cement gravel. Dad would have a long visit with Edgar often over lunch which would be a can of pork and beans that Edgar would heat on top of the wood stove, open the can and spoon it onto your plates. I remember being impressed with this no fuss way of having lunch. Of course Edgar and Jim were both confirmed bachelors.

Bob, my dad, Edgar and Jim were the best of friends. Jim was older but dad and Edgar were close to the same age and went to school together. Edgar was my father’s best man at his wedding in 1941. Many farm operations were shared between the two farms.


I just recalled that I do have a family relationship with the Findlaysons. Alexander Sidney Duncan, a 1st cousin, married Minnie Finlayson as a second wife after the death of his first. Her parents were William Finlayson and Amelia Cunningham. They had one son, Albert Finlayson Duncan –Ab Duncan of Carleton Place who died in 2000. Ab was my second cousin once removed. Linda may well remember him. ( she does 🙂

I have a fair bit of the Finlaysons documented and appreciate this unexpected update. I will send the family file to you Rose, maybe you can find what’s missing or wrong info for me.


Don Duncan (Mostly retired except when able to operate big red or green combines)

I saw your article on WordPress about the Finlaysons and Don Duncan. Dave and Lorraine Campbell now own the farm. I live right across the road. I bought 50 acres from Don Duncan (to add to my 50) when he sold his farm about 27 years ago.These are a couple of pics that I found of Dave’s place across the road– Terry Cairns

Not sure you want to add this to your story or not but the Finlaysons might be interested. Howard Darwin built what is now the stable, seperate from the big barn, as an airplane hanger. He was taking flight lessons and was going to have his landing field right in front of my place. Apparently he was not able to pass his flying licence because based on local gossip (which has never been independently verified :-)) he almost took a couple of bricks off my chimney.

🙂

The Story of a Local Family -Finlayson- Richard Finlayson