Tag Archives: lake park

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

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Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

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If I get one good summer day in a summer, and I am out driving around on that summer day, I am content. I therefore declare the summer of 1947 to be a success. Such a day occurred on Civic Holiday. When I whipped in my Fireball motor over the highway  Monday night, I was singing along with Carrie Jacobs Bond: “When You Come to the End of a Perfect Day.” Do you want to know my recipe for a perfect day? Well, this one had everything in it from sunshine to smorgasbord.

Austin F Cross August 6, 1947- page 17

When I had started to high tail it through from Smiths Falls to Carleton Place I remembered Sven Larsen and his invitation to try a smorgasbord at the Queen’s Royal, Carleton Place.

Now those of you who know this Scandinavian ritual will realize that it sounds as improbable that you would get a smorgasbord in Carleton Place as you “would get bouillabaisse Marseillaise at Ka-zabazua”. But I wheeled into the Queen’s Royal, and ordered up a smorgasbord.

In case there are people unfamiliar with this kind of meal, I should explain that it is sort of hors d oeuvres on a Gargantuan scale, and that it is a full meal in itself. We had salami, and smoked salmon, fresh tomatoes, and pickled herring. Many people do not know that the “smoked fish” they eat is eel! It is caught in the Richelieu river, brought to Ottawa for smoking, and relayed to Carleton Place.

You may have heard of tropical ants that over-run an elephant who is lying down, and who five minutes later leave only a skeleton. Well, the ants are sluggards compared to our family, for we left nothing. The smorgasbord a la Larsen was a great success. This with ice cream garnished with fresh (yam yum) peaches, and I was willing to call it a day.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Aug 1899, Tue  •  Page 2

It was only then that I had time to look at the hotel. It was originally operated by Peter Salter, who used to operate the Bodega in Ottawa, and whose son Hubert, was a great favorite with the Ottawa (Lisgar) Collegiate boys, as well as being an all-round athlete. In any event, the hotel stood idle for a long time, till the Larsens got hold of it. It faces Mississippi Lake, a sportsman’s paradise if you like ducks, fish, or boating.

In front of the hotel is wild rice, specially sown to attract ducks. Wild rice with ducks or geese about Thanksgiving is a great delicacy. I do not know if you can buy wild rice here, but a couple of places in Montreal sell it. Anyway, the ducks get for nothing what we pay more than a dollar a pound for. The hotel, with the croquet, its badminton, and its loafing chairs give you a great chance to do little or nothing in a delightful way.

 Did you Know?

Furthermore, there were restrictive covenants on properties preventing them from being sold to Jews. As well, many clubs, resorts and beaches were barred to Jews. Signs warning “No Jews” or “Christians Only!” could be found on Halifax golf courses, outside hotels in the Laurentians and throughout the cottage areas of Ontario, the lake country of Manitoba and the vacation lands of BC.

Although I have no “personal knowledge” of such signs, I have been told from a few people that locally they remember seeing them at Lake Park Lodge

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jan 1955, Sat  •  Page 35

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Ottawa Valley Canoe Association– (Carleton Place Canoe Club) and Lake Park Gala August 16 1893

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

Family Photos– Mississippi Lake– Darlene Page

Tales from Lake Park– A Disabled Motor and Manslaughter

Tales from Lake Park– A Disabled Motor and Manslaughter

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Tales from Lake Park– A Disabled Motor and Manslaughter

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum—The Queens Royal Hotel – precursor to Lake Park Lodge

 - MANSLAUGHTER' IS THE CHARGE Upon Which George... - ' Special to The Evening Journal Carl too... - brother-In-law, brother-In-law, brother-In-law,...                                                           October 10 1906

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 Let’s end our week at Riverside Park with a lovely walk by the Mississippi River. This photo was taken in 1905 by Howard Edwards and shows a young couple strolling west along the river’s edge, towards the present day boat launch. Note the steamer in the water, also heading West – perhaps to Lake Park or Innisville.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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Ottawa Valley Canoe Association– (Carleton Place Canoe Club) and Lake Park Gala August 16 1893

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

Family Photos– Mississippi Lake– Darlene Page

Queen’s Royal Hotel 1899 Guest List- Names Names Names

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Queen’s Royal Hotel 1899 Guest List- Names Names Names

 

This is a picture of the Queens Royal Hotel, built by Peter Prosser Salter in 1899 and was part of the Lake Park Resort just outside of Carleton Place. The old 1887 Lodge was once the Queen’s Royal Hotel, an illustrious and notorious gathering place.

 

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Aug 1899, Fri,  Page 8

 

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

 

The Cottages of Mississippi Lake — Carleton Place Ontario

Miracle at Mississippi Lake-John Brown Jr.

Tales of the Mississippi Lake- Believe it or Not!

Tales of the Mississippi Lake- Believe it or Not!

CPHS Students Declare War on Mississippi Lake – 1973

Lake Park has been empty for a few years now

The Devil, a Regatta, the Enterprise and a Gale

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The Devil, a Regatta, the Enterprise and a Gale
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In preparation for  the American Canoe Association Regatta in June of 1902 the course from Nagles Shore to the Lake Park steamboat dock was measured on the ice in March.

Mounting interest in June was noted in the local newspaper by W. W. Cliff, who said :

“There are some thousands of persons who regard the coming Canoe Meet as considerably more important than the new fast trans Atlantic service, or even perhaps the end of the war in Africa.  Doubtless they are mistaken, but the world would lose a good deal if a temporary bias due to the ardor of youth did not exist.” (Howard Morton Brown)

 

The forces behind the American Canoe Association Regatta reported after the fact that the meet in Carleton Place in June of 1902 should have been cancelled. The races were postponed two days running due to the terrific winds which blew two days and nights and part of the third day. Winds higher than those on the St. Lawrence of the year before played havoc with the schedule of the national regatta held at Lake Park. In the earlier part of one day the press recorded the waves as being higher than any sea. It was one of the worst meets in the ACA history and older residents of Carleton Place said they couldn’t remember a wind of such force that went on for two days.

The visiting canoeists, numbering over two hundred, were said to be the largest group of paddlers ever gathered at one meet in Canada.  They had their tents pitched on the Lake Park grounds and remained there until the completion of the regatta.  Though the wind was very high, on the second day the principle events were completed before nightfall.

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo 1902 Lake Park

 

The trip to Lake Park was described in the newspapers as not inviting, and local management was not to be congratulated on the arrangements made for all the visitors. A couple of indifferent steam engine boats, some described almost in the condition of a shipwreck, took passengers by the steam route. Those that took the boat ride got a good wetting and many of the ladies were quite alarmed from the trip once they docked.

 

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Public Archives— Carleton Place Canoe Club photo no date

The Ottawa Journal said that every possible old rig in the county took “victims” on a long land ride on a road that was certainly innocent of any good roads movement in Ontario. Several gasoline yachts that had made their way up to Lake Park were compelled to go back or be swamped. Lake Park was deemed useless for canoe racing in a gale.

The management of the meet was most unsatisfactory with executive meetings every 5 minutes, yet nothing was done. The various canoe clubs said the local committee was lacking in knowledge of what would be required, and accommodation in every aspect was lacking. Had Thursday been a holiday over 5,000 more people would have been attended and half of them would have to sit up all night.

 

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The Carleton – Photo– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum


On the evening of  Friday the 27th the local canoeists entertained the visitors at the Leland Hotel, where a fine spread was laid by host Mr. Salter.  However no one dined before a group of the participants crowded onto the Mississippi Hotel veranda and “with bared heads” sang God Save the Queen. After the tables were cleared Mayor Patterson took the chair and then a ball was tendered for the visitors at the Lake Park Queen’s Royal Hotel, combined with a huge bonfire and a fireworks display.

 While the bonfire burned and the fireworks shot across the sky on the last night of the American Canoe Association Regatta there was another ball of fire in view. The Carleton steamer which had its top deck removed by this time docked in front of the Queen’s Hotel was burned to the water’s edge. They say the devil attended the Regatta that year and no one forgot the events for years.

Love many, trust few and always paddle your own canoe.

 

 

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Public Archives— Carleton Place Canoe Club photo no date

 

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Jun 1902, Sat,  Page 15

 

Carleton Place Canoe Club officers for the big year of 1902 were patrons Mayor Robert Patterson, William McDiarmid and Dr. George McDonald, commodore Colin McIntosh, vice-commodore R. A. Sibbett, captain W. J. Welsh, secretary treasurer J. N. Gibson, executive Frank Donald, Dr. K. C. Campbell, George Cornell, J. F. Moffatt and Fred McRostie, and auditors M. G. Howe and C. A. Roberts.  Chairmen of committees were, Racing, Fred McRostie ; Sailing, Dr. K. C. Campbell ; Entertainment, Frank Donald ; Property J. F. Moffatt.– Howard Morton Brown

The summer resort record of Lake Park, central site of  the early Canadian Canoe Club Association and Northern Division regattas goes back over 100 years. In its days Allan’s Point, and for many years later, was a favourite location for the aquatic outings and sport days of Carleton Place social organizations. It’s first small two- storey summer hotel was built in 1887. The Lake Park Company of Carleton Place Ltd. completed most of the existing lot and street subdivision of the community in 1893. To serve it with transportation the company built the Carleton ­ which was the lake ’s largest steamboat, an 80- foot double decked paddle wheeler.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

  relatedreading

The Young Olympic Hopefuls-1970’s Carleton Place Canoe Club

Know Your Carleton Place Olympians!

The Ministry of Propaganda in Carleton Place — Carleton Place Canoe Club

Looking for Information on Pooh Bell & The Powder Puffs

Three Cheers for Dave Findlay –The Movie

Who Was Mickey Morphy? Noteworthy Paddles to Portage

 

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 5

Don’t Be Scared Ladies –Steamers on the Mississippi

 

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The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor

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The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor

Sept 6 1968— Almonte Gazette

A relic of the Mississippi river’s interesting past was reclaimed from the waters recently by Kathy and Keith Dack. The two were diving in the river opposite the former Hawthorne Woollen Mills, now Leigh Instruments, when this discovered a ship’s anchor, well over three feet in length and of tremendous weight.
Does anyone know anything about this?

 

(with files from the Almonte GazetteAlmonte Gazette)

I found the article right under my nose.. of course, when I was not looking for it..:)

A relic of the Mississippi River was reclaimed from the Mississippi River by Kathy and the late Keith Dack in September of 1968. The two were diving opposite the Hawthorne Knitting Mills, then Leigh Instruments, when they found the ship’s anchor. This area is around the same area that Carleton Place’s once *floating bridge was located.

Using diving apparatus they were diving in about 7 feet of murky water when they found the ship’s anchor embedded on the bottom of the river. Attaching a rope to the anchor and using power they dragged the object to shore and found out they had found an “ancient” anchor over three feet in length and two feet in width. Some of the original chain was well worn and the Dack’s wondered how what was left of the chain supported the anchor that was of great weight.

According to the article the anchor was left against a tree on the property of Kathy’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Dack. The late Keith Dack was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ken Dack. It was said that the age of the anchor could go  back as long as 80 years or so when it was used in the “good old days” when steamers operated on  the Mississippi River pulling log booms and operating picnic excursions. The last steamer on the lakes  was apparently still tied up at the dock at the foot of Frank street in 1968.

A look into the Canadian’s files reveals that if the anchor belonged to an excursion steamer it could have been the Enterprise, which must have been a sizeable boat. This description of the anchor should give some indication of the size of boats which once plied the Mississippi from Carleton Place to the docks near Innisville. Steamers were quite common on the lakes,  constant excursions being run to the old four- storey Queen’s Royal Hotel with its long tiers of surrounding verandahs before it was destroyed by fire.

 

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Photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum—This is a picture of the Queens Royal Hotel, built by Peter Prosser Salter in 1899 and was part of the Lake Park Resort just outside of Carleton Place.These Carleton Place citizens of the 1890’s are lined up on the Lake Park dock waiting to board the steamship “Carleton”. It ran regular trips between Lake Park Lodge on Mississippi Lake and the town docks located near the Hawthorne Mill at the end of Charles Street. 

The summer resort record of Lake Park, central site of  the early Canadian Canoe Club Association and Northern Division regattas goes back over 100 years. In its days Allan’s Point, and for many years later, was a favourite location for the aquatic outings and sport days of Carleton Place social organizations. It’s first small two- storey summer hotel was built in 1887. The Lake Park Company of Carleton Place Ltd. completed most of the existing lot and street subdivision of the community in 1893. To serve it with transportation the company built the Carleton ­ which was the lake ’s largest steamboat, an 80- foot double decked paddle wheeler.

So, therefore it may be concluded the anchor could have belonged to any of these boats, which once plied the lakes. Files also indicate there was also the 40 ft steamer the Lillian that once docked at the Lake Park Wharf.

Memories of what once was.

 

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Lake Park Lodge dock that greeted many visitors at one time- Photo of Dock and Lake Park by Linda Seccaspina

 

 

 

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So was it from the tugboat that used to frequent the Nichols lumberyard where Centennial Park now is– or the steamers that went up and down the Mississippi River?

 

1,500 people attended the C.P.R. employees’ picnic at Lake Park on Wednesday of last week, and enjoyed the thirty-eight events that made up the program . The baby competition resulted as follow s: 1, Leo Hockenhull, 11 months o ld ; 2, H . McDiarmid, 4 months; 3, George Dummert, 10 months’; 4, Roy McRostie, 4 months. Sept 1 1899

*Dack History-

Losing an Institution- Dacks Jewellers

The Story Behind the Clock – Dack’s Jewellers

 

*Floating Bridge–Thelma Hurdis said as a child when they were swimming they found shaped block/rocks that went across the river and Lloyd Hughes has documented the bridge in his papers on Bridge Street. Read-The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo 1902

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal31 Aug 1899, ThuPage 8

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal10 Aug 1899, ThuPage 2

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal04 Aug 1897, WedPage 7

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal30 Jun 1893, FriPage 7

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

The Anchor on Lake Ave East???? Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 5

The Steamboat Picnics on Pretty Island

Don’t Be Scared Ladies –Steamers on the Mississippi

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Lynne Johnson

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This is how The Tales of Carleton Place  on Facebook goes.  I write, people comment on my posts, and I document them on the story. Then some send me stories which I love. Today, we have a guest author today– Carleton Place’s very own Lynne Johnson– Thank you Lynne!

 

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Lynne Johnson

People lived and worked in the town of Carleton Place. We walked and biked. Our dads drove to work. Harry Appleton, a beloved teacher at CPHS always walked, no matter the weather. Almost everyone worked at Findlay’s Foundry, so it seemed to me.

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Photo kindly shared by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
We moved to Carleton Place because my father got a job at Leigh Instruments. He came home for lunch at noon and returned to work at 12:45. My mother had a few jobs, some work at Digital before it moved, and at the Review, the “other” local newspaper, a job she loved. When the Review discontinued, Robbie Probert opened up a candle shop. A
lot of the local ladies got jobs there rolling the beeswax candles. All the stores and business in town hired local people.

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Photo kindly shared by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
We all had various part-time jobs at students. Moving on from babysitting led to the Balderson Cheese outlet on Hwy. 7, Young’s Variety Store, Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority, Embassy Restaurant and Rolark Cheque Co. during summer breaks from university.

Little stores were throughout the neighbourhood. When we lived on Prince Street, there was a variety/candy store at the corner of Queen and Munro. The store was the front of the house, slightly larger than a porch, and a woman and her little girl lived in the house. A local teen would work part-time in the store. You could get a bag of candy for 25 cents.

There was a great deal of thought put intoselecting the perfect bag!
Linda Ready, a lover of science, obtained an Opportunities for Youth grants for two summers (maybe more) to do a pollution study on the Mississippi River. We actually had one of the Swerdfergger cottages as our “base camp”. We rode our bikes south on Napoleon to the original connection to Lake Park Road.I don’t remember any issues crossing the highway. Times were sleepy then.

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Photo kindly shared by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Friends worked at Canadian Tire, William’s drugstore, dress shops. It was always a good job if you could work for the Town. There certainly were jobs to be had, but there were not as many hospitality opportunities like today, and NO box store employment.It seemed strange that anyone would “commute” to the city for work. In fact, employees at Digital were offered employment, but some declined due to having to take a bus to get there. The Queensway extension was not built. The way to Ottawa was through Stittsville, just a village in those days. There is no doubt that the Queensway extension and Bayshore Shopping Centre made a distinct mark in downtown shopping in Carleton Place.

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Debbie Crain-Dulmage– Great memories from your guest author Lynne Johnson. I remember the little girl at the corner store. Her first name was Bonnie. She played with my sister and I when we first moved here in 1964.

 

RELATED READING

Before and After in Carleton Place — Mac Williams and The Good Food Co

CPHS Students Declare War on Mississippi Lake – 1973

The Day the Cheque Company Bounced in Carleton Place

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Remembering Industry in Carleton Place- Digital and Leigh Instruments

The Cottages of Mississippi Lake — Carleton Place Ontario

I Found My Thrills on the Main Street in Carleton Place

 

 

The Cottages of Mississippi Lake — Carleton Place Ontario

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The “Riverside Cabins” were established by James and Ethel Drummond in c.1947. These cabins and main booth were on the edge of Mississippi River at the end of Lake Avenue. Riverside Cabins was a great camping spot for local and out-of-towners! Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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This is “Tranquila Lodge”,One of two cottages built by Henry Schwerdtfeger at Lake Park. The Schwerdtfegers spent the summers next door in their octagonal cottage, and this building was rented out. It still stands today, painted a bright blue colour! -Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum- Photo

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Photo- Linda Seccaspina

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Lake Park has been a summer resort centre of one kind or another for about a hundred years. As Allan’s Point, later sometimes called the Regatta Grounds and Carleton Park, and finally as Lake Park, it served for most that time as a community park for many of the town’s bigger lakeside events of the summer season.- Photo-Linda Seccaspina

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The name Lake Park came partly from its purchase as a publicly owned picnic and regatta part for the town being under consideration when it was bought in 1892 by a local syndicate at the start of a period of about fifteen years as a very lively commercial summer resort. Photo-Linda Seccaspina

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Within about fifteen years the high life at Lake Park was fairly well finished and soon after it settled down as an ordinary summer cottage community. One of the reasons for the change was claimed to be township local option, which did not arrive in the town itself until 1916. In 1907 as an indication of the change at Lake Park, the steamer ‘Lillian B’ belonging to the Park’s Queen Royal Hotel, was replaced with a bus line as the regular passenger service and later was beached in the Hotel Bay. A view of this abandoned forty foot steam craft about the year 1910 with her ribs lying open to the elements may serve as a picture of the end of one era on the lake, still carrying its earliest Indian name of the Lake of the Big River, and the start of another era a little more like our own. Photo- Linda Secaspina

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The point at the lower end of Lake Park has had the name of Lookout Point for many years, and alternatively has been called Hammond’s Point and McRostie’s Point after cottage owners of the past fifty years. The bay and mainland shore behind it have been called Duff’s Bay and Duff’s Shore for the other William Duff and his family (Little Bill Duff) who lived there from the 1840’s.

Howard Morton Brown– summer cottages Photo- Linda Seccaspina

1912 Social Column

1912

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Brighton Dale Cottage- The Schwerdtfeger cottage at Lake Park 1905- Henry and Bertha on the top verandah. Children Hazel and Gladys on the grass. The cottage was demolished in 2005. This poster is available for $5.00 and available at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

Mississippi Lake in 9 Minutes

Larry Clarka day

Love the cottage photos as I recall most of them. The booth at the riverside cabins would have been at the left in the photo. Used to hang out there a lot. On one of these occasions I first encountered Americans. They were bragging about the fish they had caught and I saw that they were all sunfish, rock bass and perch -was not impressed and wondered why they would want to keep them. We never did unless, somehow, we had latched on to a huge one. While on this theme, I remembered another encounter with a man from Georgia (which we were later to discover). I was in the CP Dairy to buy ice cream when a man entered after me. He attempted to order a cone but the clerk couldn’t understand him because of his very thick accent. She asked me but I didn’t know-he tried again and still no understanding. At this point he got very red in the face. angrily went behind the counter and pointed to the ice cream that he wanted. This story would have be much better if I could remember what it was he wanted!