Tag Archives: Journal

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

 

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In the Springtime of 1876, April 21, I came to town (Perth) having rented the McPherson carding mill as associate with my Uncle George. He was supposed to have the capital, but after a few days he got homesick and I decided to continue, feeling that to turn back would mean defeat and that I would never get anywhere.

The executors of the property trusted me to go ahead. I bought the yarn stock for 159 dollars and 60 cents on time. During the next two weeks business was good and I paid for this in full. As terms were cash I was enabled to finance. There was a shingle mill in connection. I bought the shingle stock and cut it into shingles, but I had much trouble in getting rid of the shingles.

I continued carding rolls for home spinning: charging four cents when oiled at home, and six cents per pound for spinning, deducting one pound in ten for loss; much of the wool was hand picked or semi washed.

Customers were strong on getting their own wool back in the yarn as each person thought that his wool was better than the others, but they did not always get it. I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar as customers wanted to know when their work would be ready, and if not careful in promising trouble followed– sometimes with a severe chastisement.

In the autumn of 1876, together with a party, I went to *the Centennial at Philadelphia, Pa. We lodged in Germantown and had a rate one dollar a day. We were away 6 days in all, and altogether it cost me 28 dollars and a half. I was called the boy of the party, but I do not think it cost the others much more if anything. Of course we did not have Pullman accommodation.

When the custom season was over I was asked by the executors of the estate what I would give for the property where I was. I named 3000 dollars. Shortly after I was advised that the property had been sold to a *fellow elder at the figure that I had offered. I felt that I had been used, and naturally I was disappointed, however I resolved not to be outdone. I rented the small frame building at the south side of the stone flour mill and put in a water wheel. I installed carding and spinning machinery of a primitive character, and got into operation about the first of June 1877.

I got my share of the custom, and after two seasons, my opposition ceased to operate. The same executors came to me and asked me to buy the machinery. I told them I had no money, to which they replied that they would trust me. At the same moment one A. D. Disher– representing the McLaren Lumber Company at The Pache, province of Quebec– was on his way to buy the machinery. He was told that I had bought it so he came to me and asked if I would sell, and at what price. I named 1000 dollars for the cards, hand jack spinner, and the picker. He put his hand in his trouser pocket and produced one hundred 10 dollar bills. This happened without any banter whatsoever, and the deal was verbal.

I immediately went to the law office of F.A. Hall and paid off the claim. I had left a Judson roll card that had been operated by my Uncle Richard on the Haggart premises many years before, which together with some other equipment I had for 100 dollars. Without opposition the struggle was not so strenuous for a year or two, but the evolution had started from the homemade to the factory made.

Next- The Ryan Family and the Evolution of Socks

 

 

historicalnotes

*In celebration of America’s one-hundredth anniversary of independence, the Centennial Exhibition took place on more than 285 acres of land in Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park May 10-November 10, 1876. Close to ten million visitors (9,910,966) went to the fair via railroad, steamboat, carriage, and on foot. Thirty-seven nations participated in the event, officially named the International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures, and Products of the Soil and Mine. The grounds contained five major buildings: the Main Exhibition Building, Memorial Hall (Art Gallery), Machinery Hall, Agricultural Hall, and Horticultural Hall. In addition to these buildings, approximately 250 smaller structures were constructed by states, countries, companies, and other Centennial bureaus that focused on particular displays or services.

 

*Of possible interest, a notice in the Courier in August 1872 announced that John Drysdale of Glen Tay had come to work in the carding mill of McPherson Wool in Perth. The Drysdales had a connection to the Adams family, and a man by the name of Drysdale was injured in the woolen mill fire of 1870

 

 

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

 

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In the earlier days I remember the DeHertels- Fred and *Ned; the latter married in Perth. They were a snappy gay pair and drove fine horses and agents for the Gilmours. This was before the Gillies and McLaren took over the limit. I also remember the late Senator Peter McLaren in his early days. He was a great bush and river man, and in my opinion a severe driver of men. He was practical in lumbering from his boyhood days having worked for the Boyd Cardwell Company before joining with John Gillies. McLaren was to some extent vindictive and inclined to dominate the Mississippi, as evidenced in the historical Streams Bill Fight.  Read– Your Mississippi River, Ontario Fact of the Day

We did most of the portaging from the head to the foot of the rapids, viz, of chains and general supplies for the lumber mills. For this we got twenty five cents per load, and we usually came in for a dish of strong tea, a plate of pork and beans, and bread baked in the ashes. There is none better today when I look back to how we relished it then.

In the early days much square timber was brought out, and what beautiful stuff it was. Likewise the logs: we see nothing like them in Ontario today. It was said that there was enough timber up the Mississippi to last one hundred years. But with the coming of the settlers and the loose handling of the brush, fire wrought destruction, and little was left in 20 years but the gleanings.

After the logs were sorted out the men left for their retrospective homes. Bob Dial, a cousin on the farm with Uncle John, on the adjoining lot to ours– and I took our wagons with hay racks: we piled the trunks pyramid fashion and the men sat around the trunks. In this way we could accommodate quite a number. For this we got 75 cents each, and considered it a snap.

Bob and I did the hauling to Perth and Carleton Place for the woollen mils in my time. We received two dollars a trip and paid our own expenses, which were light. We were supposed to even up on our trips. When time could be spared from the farm we also drew shanty supplies, perhaps to Lanark or the Fall River.

The farm involved some close financing. We got men for 12-14 dollars per month and board for the year. Prices for produce were low: for instance lambs were sold for a dollar and a half, and everything else on a comparative basis.

One of the escapades of my life took place in the early 1870s. A party closely related by marriage to A. B. Code was not as industrious as A.B. thought he ought to be, and he induced the boys to give him a scare. We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge. When there the wool sack gave out, and some rough work followed. However, we all scampered. Uncle A. B. assured us he would take the responsibility.

A few days later, Thomas Cosgrave, the Perth Town Chief appeared on the scene with warrants for eleven of us in all. We appeared in Perth the following day charged with assault and battery, with intent to kill; the latter intent was very remote.

We engaged F.A. Hall to defend. Charles Rice tried the case; three of the party proved an alibi, and the rest of us were fined eight dollars and sixty cents each– but Uncle A.B. did not come to the rescue and take the responsibility. When done we all rode home in the same wagon and had a jolly good time. I did not call on relatives in Perth during that visit.

Next Springtime of 1876

 

 

historicalnotes

*When movies were not shown Perth Collegiate held commencement exercises The boy scouts, church organization and other institutions also used the facilities. Over the years the theatre was managed by a number of individuals including George Keral who was the first and Col. Ned de Hertel, Bill Hamilton, Jack Allan, Arthur White and Ken Carter who was the manager of the theatre closed in 1958

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F.A. Hall info

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading.jpg

 

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

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More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

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My actual book of “Pioneer Sketches of the District of Balhurst “( Lanark and Renfrew Counties) Volume 1” signed by Andrew Haydon 1925

 

When I began documenting the letters between Andrew Haydon and Thomas Alfred Code I assumed the approximately 40 page history journal relating to the Code family had been put into the book Haydon wrote about the district of Bathurst.

The journal I have in my pocession included correspondence with Andrew Haydon, member of the Canadian Senate (1924-1932) who asked Thomas Alfred Code for biographical information. Code in his attempt to aid Haydon put together correspondence, typed biographical information, and news clippings as well as a few letters handwritten from his mother in this journal.

The American seller that sold me the book also assumed that when Hayden later published “Pioneer Sketches of the District of Balhurst “( Lanark and Renfrew Counties) Volume 1”   had included a small portion of Code’s information in his book. He didn’t. The letters between Hayden and Code were done in 1929 and the book was published in 1925, so I figured that the letters were to be of use to him in Volume 2 if Hayden ever wrote it. Instead, he wrote Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party 1930, and then died in 1932.

In this book by Andrew Haydon he discusses the settlement and development of the ‘old’ Bathurst District. The District of Bathurst included most of Lanark, Renfrew and Carleton Counties in present-day Ontario. From the world events that set the scene for settlement of the ‘upper’ province, to specific information about individuals who came to call Bathurst District their home.

 

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My actual book of “Pioneer Sketches of the District of Balhurst “( Lanark and Renfrew Counties) Volume 1” signed by Andrew Haydon 1925

The author has included many first hand accounts of those who experienced the hardships and opportunities of settlement in a new land. Includes many references to the early families and individuals in the region. So, this makes the Code letters and ephemera I have in the journal all the more important to local history.

“The history of Bathurst still waits to be written. A well known English writer has explored in fiction the story of the Five Towns. The history of Bathurst turns to the geography of its Five Rivers– the ancient forest home of Algonquin tribes, whose wigwams once dotted those picturesque tributaries of the Ottawa, still carrying the French or Indian names of Rideau, Mississippi, Madawaska, Bonnechere and Petawawa.

And along the Five rivers the adventurous pioneers constructed scores of mills, little and large, around which were clustered scores of hamlets, many of whose locations are marked today by the crumbling ruins of an old stone chimney, or otherwise rest but in the dim memories of a rapidly disappearing generation.”– Andrew Haydon

It goes to show you that you should never judge a book or even words by their cover as History is not a burden on the memory but more of an illumination of the soul.

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The Code Journal of local history and Code Genealogy

 

historicalnotes

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon-–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

28685393_10155621750666886_5104255059631922571_n.jpg

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Oct 1924, Tue  •  Page 9

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

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Thomas Code

 

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Absolom McCaffrey was 46 when he opened his new bakery on Bell Street in 1867. Previous to this he had been a cooper – a maker of barrels – in business with Napoleon Lavallee between 1833 and 1847. Together they did a thriving business constructing butter tubs and barrels for flour and pork. Absolom was still listed as a cooper in the 1861 census. Why the change of career we wonder?–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

Thomas Code was another uncle of the writer and also a forty-niner. In company with Absalom McCaffrey of Carleton Place and others, he joined in the gold rush to California. Returning home a few years later he purchased the Innisville store business of Michael Murphy, who left and settled in Carleton Place. He  continued until conditions got very much impaired in the village, and having a large family decided to try his fortune in the West; this was in the middle 1870s. He took up land near a place called Elgin, south of Brandon, Manitoba. He and the family suffered great hardships on the early stages. He told me when I visited him in 1883 that only for the people of Ontario, the country would have never been settled. They were living in a sod house, and the outbuildings were built with sods– one of them an excavation on the side of the knoll. I again paid him a visit in 1902 and found conditions about as we find them at home- good houses and barns. Other facilities had changed the whole situation. Some of the family are farming there yet.

William Code

William Code, father of the writer, was born in Montreal in the year 1820 as stated. He served an apprenticeship with John Graham of Carleton Place– a wagon and carriage builder of the early days. In the middle to late nineteenth century 164 Bridge Street belonged to the Greig Block. One thing that is clear is that John Graham operated a wagon shop here. At the expiration of his term he drifted to Prescott, Ontario and obtained employment there.

This was in the historical year of 1837 when Von Shultz and his band (Rebellions of 1837–38) invaded the Windmill District. His employer, who was equipped with musket and regimental clothing, insisted that my father should don the outfit, which he did. His employer disappeared and was never heard of again. While the situation was not that dangerous he could hear the bullets in the air. Von Schultz and his gang were captured and history tells what happened there. An old friend, Robert Mackay, who passed away some years ago, told me that he was at the scene of the hanging at Fort Henry, Kingston, and said he saw bodies removed in a cart, the legs hanging over the end.

After my father’s experience as a journeyman, last in Kingston, he came back to Innisville and started a wagon shop. He had a turning lathe later in the old carding mill for rounding the hubs. I remember helping my father to crosscut the oak logs, to be split into spokes ready to be put away to dry. He made the coffins also for the district. They were an uninviting receptacle covered with black cloth, the best of them are not inviting.

He also built a hotel, and procured a farm near the village. He died in the year 1868. Father was enterprising, ambitious, and met with more than average success, as success went at the time. But later, owing to limitations and the general trend, a Napoleon could only go so far, which leads me to advise ambitious young men to start out in life where the going is good, and where there is room at the top of the ladder.

The hotel was later leased to James Young, who afterwards ran the Queens Hotel in Perth. The old woollen mill on the south side of the river that had been operated by A & G Code was vacated. Strange to say during all the years it had been operating it had escaped destruction, but one night in the year 1878 it was discovered to be on fire. Without fire protection the building was obliterated together with the late A. Code home and the hotel. This with the burning of the flour and saw mills in 1882 left Innisville almost desolate compared with its former glory, as almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished.

Next –The family of William Code

 

historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville —  ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

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There are about 6 huge pages about Innisville written by Thomas Alfred Code so I will do this in parts. This is the last instalment about the village–4d– Tomorrow the family stories begin.

Fish

There are a great many fish stories going, and lest my veracity might be questioned I will not say much. But, I have seen the net in our local waters so heavily loaded with catfish or bull pouts that one man alone could not lift it out of the water, and likewise with suckers in the Spring run. The spear was much in evidence. In the shallows, or under a fence at the head of the rapids, the wader– with a man to hold the bag– would lift them out and put them in the bag.

It was quite an art to pick one out gently so as not to cause a stampede. The people came from all over– say ten miles out– loaded up with a few bags and took them home. After dressing they were put in brine, then dried, and when cured provided the finnan haddie for the Winter; as I remember them they tasted quite as good. Eels were frequently speared, or caught with the hook, but mostly in the mill sluice box– with the mill sluice gate open slightly during the night– you were sure to secure a good catch; but they were not highly prized for food purposes. Pickerel had not been introduced to the Mississippi Lake at that time. Later Bennett’s Lake was stocked and this fish found its way down the Fall River by way of Fallbrook. They seem to have secured the ascendancy over the pike and black bass which were plentiful at one time, but latterly the waters have been very much depleted. I remember being chided frequently by my mother for bringing home so many fish.

Fruit

We had little such as we have it today; but wild strawberries in the new land were different to what we obtain nowadays. Beds were to be found with berries as plentiful as you find them in some gardens today, and I think they were superior in quality.  Like wise with raspberries and thimble berries. Wild grapes and cherries were to be had in abundance, and in many cases were turned into refreshment.

Cranberry and blueberry supplies were ample, and obtained within two miles of the village (Innisville) on the shores of Mud Lake.

Some very good apple orchards were to be found in the district; and where apples would not keep over the winter they were peeled, sliced, cored and strung, then hung over the kitchen stove to dry. We called them “Fly Roosts”.

Agriculture

Of agriculture in the vicinity I need not say much, but the product of the virgin soil– thought the acreage was limited– was much greater per acre than today. The potatoes from the new soil were very prolific and of good quality. Crops were not subject to the pests we have.

Maple sugar was another product that assisted in furnishing the necessities for living, so with all those native luxuries the people were not badly off notwithstanding the primitive tools with which they had to work.

It is said that neighbours furnished one another with fire– taken from house to house. An old method was to strike fire with steel on flint or the back of a jackknife against a piece of dry spunk wood. It is told that some split matches to make it go farther. My experience dates from the tallow candle, and I have witnessed the coming of all modern conveniences as they came on stage since the early days of my time. Had the pioneers been told that those things would come they would have been skeptical. We may think we are near the limit, but are we?

And so..

The Ennis family and the Codes were factors in the prosperity of the village of Innisville. On the north side of the river were the Cramptons, Rathwells, Ruttles and Stuarts were leading settlers, mostly Irish. On the south side most of the settlers were Scotch: the McEwens, McLeans, Robertsons and Rathwells. (the latter Irish)

But few remain– I can only name four living that belong to the early generation, viz., Thomas Carswell, Daniel McEwen, Hugh Robertson and Benjamin Crampton; all men that have lived good clean lives– men of unimpeachable character.

 

Next– The Code Family-Family Stories

 

 

 

historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

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Photo Clarendon Miller Archives- Plevna

There are about 6 huge pages about Innisville written by Thomas Alfred Code so I will do this in parts. This is 4c— 

Innisville also had their village doctor- his name was York. His principal remedies were: bleeding and pills– or “pulls” as he called them. This together with pulling teeth was his chief practice. The forceps used were more like blacksmith’s tongs than the instrument used today, and the victim was lucky if more than one tooth did not come at a time. John Code claims he went through the ordeal and lived to tell. He was laid on the broad of his back on the floor with a third party to hold him down. This procedure could only apply to the male sex.

In North Sherbrooke Eby(?) Wilson was the dentist for the neighborhood, at least for all emergencies requiring extraction, having acquired the art in uprooting boulders, not molars, by means of the plough.  His instruments consisted of a peculiar shaped lance for tearing the gums and what was known as a key for the extraction operation.  When his knee was planted firmly on your chest it was considered an anesthetic for agony when it is at its height, is mute.  But why linger on this painful scene?

By the way, I may mention his wayward son–Henry–who was attending the village school in my time. He was not a bad character, but somewhat eccentric, and a rolling stone in his early years. He drifted away to the Great Lakes and was employed on the boats in some capacity, finally going to Detroit where he joined up– for a time– with the theatricals, which could not of been of a high order. He returned some years later with less gear than when he left, and tided over part of the winter with friends.

Having a dancing partner with him, his visit was entertaining to the people of the village. He then got a place as a school-teacher on the shores of Buckshot Lake near *Plevna in the county of Frontenac. As lumbering disappeared his pupils gradually decreased in numbers, until finally he was left high and dry in a small cabin on a rough piece of ground. He had a cow and some poultry and the snatches of work which he obtained in the district he eked out an existence.

Forty years after he was last seen at Innisville John Code  happened to be hunting in the district and heard the name of old Henry York mentioned in camp. This excited John’s curiosity and he resolved to investigate, which he did the following year when he made a visit to York’s humble ranch and discovered the missing Henry. Representing himself as a drover he inquired if Mr. York had any cattle to sell, but was received somewhat coldly.

The conversation turned into another channel– the flourishing condition of that district along the banks of the Mississippi and the village of Innisville in bygone years when the lumbering industry with all its attendant activity was at the zenith in its own production. Familiar references made by the visitor to the old timer of Innisville excited York’s curiosity.

Evidently the question in his mind was: “Who may you be? You seem to be familiar with Innisville.” John replied. “If from Innisville, who do you think I am, an Ennis, a Hughes, or a Code?” The reply came after a moment’s hesitation,“If one of those named you must be Johnny Code!” — the appellation by which he was known in the schoolboy days. This was followed by an exchange of mutual reminiscences and a pleasant meeting.

Later York was induced to visit Perth, and I (T.A. Code) engaged him as a night watchman for two periods, but he always wanted to go home for Christmas–he and his dog– but there was no one to greet him in his lonely cabin. When leaving the last time he had enough to pay off a mortgage of some one hundred and fifty dollars, and as he said, enough,  together with what he could earn in the district– to keep him for the balance of his days. He obtained his supplies in Plevna from a Mr. Osler with whom his credit was good.

York was an artist in handwriting; a reader, a man of strong individuality; fearless and honest in his dealings, but a recluse. When leaving at Christmas the last time, he threw back his arms and exclaimed:

“I long for the bracing air of Buckshot Lake, and the charms of solitude.”

This time he went without his dog. In 1927 he was found dead in his cabin, apparently he had dropped dead while engaged in daily chores.

Thomas Alfred Code 1929

Tomorrow– The Innisville School and Social Amusement.

historicalnotes

*

Plevna Section School #4

– About/History

This, a log school, (located in the area of the current junction of Mountain and Grindstone Rds) was opened in 1863, possibly the first in the area, and originally numbered as No.2. Children from Buckshot/Plevna, in Clarendon, attended here with students from Miller Township. When it closed all students went to SS No.2 in Buckshot/Plevna.

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

 

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There are about 6 huge pages about Innisville written by Thomas Alfred Code so I will do this in parts. This is 4b— the  1860s and 1870s.

 

Reverting to the 1860s and 1870s was the prosperity in the village of Innisville. We had two woolen mills (I will refer to that later) and a tannery in addition to the Innis Mills already referred to. The latter was operated by James Jackson. It was a primitive institution, but it served the wants of the people at the time. The people sent the hides, which they might get back six months later. We had our local shoemakers: boots and shoes were made up in the homes by itinerant shoemakers: likewise tailoring. This form of service was called:”Whipping the Cat”.

The carding mill was on the south side of the river and was operated by A& G Code making carded rolls for spinning. In many cases a woman went from house to house at 2 S. 6 d a day, sometimes spending weeks at one home. The hand loom-weaver who wove the yarn into drugget– which consisted of a No. 10 cotton warp, wool filling– was to be found in every section of the locality. Coarse flannels were made into fancy striped patterns, and proud were the wives when the piece came home. All the friends came to see it and pass their opinion, or express their appreciation. This was worn next to the skin, which would be somewhat ticklish for the people of today, but we never saw knitted underwear or rubber footwear in those days.

We had our cooper– William Churchill— who with an assistant turned out pork barrels. I may here mention that the hog product in the shape of pork was packed in barrels and branded by the district inspector as mess, or prime mess etc. for shipment to the lumber shanties. The old dash churn was another product, and there are many who can remember churning was quite a task, especially for the small boys who wanted to join their chums at play, or go fishing. Another product of the cooper was a firkin for butter, a small barrel which would contain as I remember, one hundred pounds, and was marketed in the autumn in Carleton Place, or in Perth at Meighen’s, Shaw’s, Henderson’s, Hicks’ and other stores.

The locality was what might be called self contained– that is, the people produced most of their requirements with the exceptions of groceries. Those were obtained during the year at the places named, and paid for in the autumn with produce: butter, wheat, oats and pork, etc. Potash was another product of the early days.

Wash-tubs and wooden buckets completed the cooper’s list of manufactured articles. But, with the trend of time, and the coming of more modern utensils, the village cooper became extinct. The same applies to Perth: when the writer came to Perth to attend school in 1874, Perth had five cooperages and 81 shoemakers on the bench.

In the village was to be found a foundry where plows and plow points were turned out. In addition there was a thriving blacksmith shop, established by the Hughes family and continued by Robert Jr. Blacksmithing is still something carried on in the same building (1929) which must date back about 90 years. Horse-shoeing, and the ironing of vehicles for a brother who works next door, was the principal work carried on. Two men were employed.

Two shoemakers, two stores, the village tailor and two hotels made up the list. Meals were to be had at 25 cents, and lodging for the night free to the wayfarer who partook of the good fare of the stopping-house.

Tomorrow- The Innisville’s doctor, Henry York, and the country school

 

historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

 

29178811_10155634403671886_5558608625091477504_n.jpg

There are about 6 huge pages about Innisville written by Thomas Alfred Code so I will do this in parts. This is 4a— the beginning.

As to the early history of Innisville, little is on record. The place was known as Freer Falls at the outset. Later the water power property was deeded to James Ennis Senior, and rather pretentious mills for that time were erected, which later on included a flour or grist mill as they were called in those days. An Oatmeal mill was added later. The oats were kiln dried, and the sole method used in the next process, was stone grinding. The product was the Scotch Oatmeal; there is none better made today.

A sawmill was amongst the first necessities: and up and down single saw was operated– a slow process compared with the circular saw which was added later. A shingle mill made up the list. About 12,000 feet of lumber, and 20,000 shingles were turned out daily and hauled to the Perth Railway Station.

In the early 1850s James Ennis Junior had taken charge of the business. He died early in life and his son John became heir to the business. The boy being underage the grandfather Jackson took charge and conducted business successfully and economically for years. I remember a penny a slab was charged for the slabs from the sawmill. A story is told of a customer wanting a better rate going to the miller and advising him to reduce the toll from one twelfth to one tenth if he wished to get more business.

Grandfather Jackson passed away in the late 1860s. The business then came into the hands of John Ennis, then of age, and conducted with enterprise, but with indifferent success until 1882 when the whole premise burned down. At that time there was  an evident dry rot creeping in that finally settled the fate of all the small mills throughout the country. The wants of the people were gradually being supplied from without.

There was another son of James Innis by first marriage– David Innis. Being dissatisfied with home treatment he left– as stated at the time–for Australia. David married Elizabeth Churchill shortly before leaving. In due time after his departure a son was born. David returned twenty years after to find his son a young man. Both died shortly after meeting for the first time. Author’s Note–Read Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

 

John Innis left for Sarnia and started a grocery business there and passed away a few years ago. (this was written in 1929) Thus ended the name and personnel in the village that took their name.

With the burning of the mills little was left to mark the existence of this once thrifty community. Let me add that it was not uncommon to see twenty teams load up with supplies for Sand Point and the north country. Many of the teamsters remained for the balance of the winter at a  wage of about one dollar a day, and finding. In those days the railway had not extended beyond Arnprior or Sand Point. In fact I am told that when the old B&O came to Perth the wise men did not approve of extending the road beyond Perth, hoping to make Perth the forwarding point for all time.

In the settlement days the villages built up where water power was to be obtained in order to provide lumber and grind the grain. Today (1929) conditions have changed. The disappearance of adjacent lumbering had much to do with leaving these small places high and dry. Transportation was another factor in the evolution.

Tomorrow– the peak years of the village.. Part 4 b

17911042_1939481689621278_1408603826_n (1).jpg

Photo Nancy Hudson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

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Original letter typed up in 1929 and sent to Andrew Haydon from the journal I purchased.

Perth, Ontario,1929.

The subject of this narrative (Thomas Alfred Code) was born June 9th, 1854 on the banks of the Mississippi in the township of Drummond, Lanark County. He had a varied experience in the early days, principally on the farm being in full charge for our years previous to embarking in business. He received a limited education in the local village school, and spent a winter term at the Grammar school in Perth.

In the year 1876, in his 21st year, Mr. Code rented a small carding mill in Perth. A year later he removed to a  small building on Mill Street owned by the Hon. John Haggart.

Owing to the ever changing conditions in the local custom trade, it was deemed necessary to make some shift to keep step with the times. The people were gradually changing from the homespun to the factory-made article.

As the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway was in contemplation, a railway contractor, the late Mr. Hugh Ryan suggested that there was an opening for the knitted goods: Mitts, socks etc. This was adopted without any previous knowledge of the art. About the year 1880 the plant was removed to the present location, and the knitting has continued up to the present time.

In the year 1897 the Gemill Mill was taken over by the Perth Woollen Company, the principals being the Hon. John Haggart, Geo.D. Ross from Montreal, and Mr. Code. After a few years of indifferent success making tweeds, flannels, etc. a plant was installed for manufacturing pressed felts, and continued to make a limited range until the year 1920. At this time the holdings of the Hon. John Haggart and Mr. George D. Ross were taken over by Mr. Code. The Perth Felt Co. Limited and the Tay Knitting Mill were then re-incorporated and operated as one, under the name of the Code Felt & Knitting Co. Ltd.

 

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An addition was then added for the manufacture of fine piece felts, which greatly enlarged the field for the company’s product. The mills are managed jointly by Wellington Douglas and Allan L. Code. The former has had a life-long practical experience in every department of the mill. The latter served in the Royal Flying Corps in France. He has since taken a course at the Lowell Textile School, and has applied his time to the development of the mills.

Mr. Code, the founder is spending his fifty- third year in harness without interruption,– a feat equalled by few.

Thomas Alfred Code

This poem was on the other side of the page opposite the narrative from Thomas Alfred Code

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historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?