Tag Archives: John Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

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Innisville Mills in background ( old bridge)

In 1876 John Code had been out West for a while ( since 1872) and he decided to come back to Innisville for a visit. John Ennis was running the flour and saw mills at that time and decided he didn’t want all the hard work at that time and was trying to interest someone into renting the mills.

Ennis had an employee at that time called Sam Spender and asked John Code if he would consider renting the property with him. Both Spender and Code went into business with each other and rented the Innisville mills for $850 a year for five years. They told Spender they would try it out and would give it up at the end of the year if they did not do well. Even though they did not do too badly John Code got gold fever once again and left to try out the west once again and the partnership ended.

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John Code –ancestry.ca

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Penny Readings of Lanark County

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The Penny Readings of Lanark County

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1872-Innisville

John Ennis, Maggie and Beckie, Margaret, Mary Elizabeth, Jane Hopkins and myself went to Lanark Village for the 5 cent readings. There were 400-500 locals present and the entertainment was very good. John  Code-  with files from A Perth Boy in the Wild West-David Code

Appleton, Ontario-April 17 1874–Almonte Gazette

We have succeeded against considerable opposition in establishing a series of *penny readings. When they were first proposed the minority of the old folks sat in council at their own firesides and passed the following resolution :

“Whereas once upon a tune there was a Temperance Society organized in this place, and whereas said Temperance Society ended in a courting school and was thereby productive of harm to our young people, and whereas we have come to the conclusion that the readings contemplated will end likewise; Therefore be it resolved, that we discountenance them— Carried.”

Penny Readings were given periodically in Lanark County. There were travelling showmen, ventriloquists, slight of hand experts, magicians, acrobats all came, performed at a price, and passed on, contributing to the entertainment of the moment.

The best thing about the Penny Readings was its mutuality, it was a method of communal communal self-help. The person who was to take part as a performer attended for the greater part of the evening as a member of the audience. The effect upon the people as a whole was the strengthening of the bonds of neighbour lines.

There was a decidedly educational effect in the efforts that each prospective performer made in order to perfect his understanding of what he was to read and his powers powers as an elocutionist to “put it over” so that his audience might be both instructed and impressed. It requires no such preparation to watch the movies or turn the knob of a radio.

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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Ontario’s Version of the Marks Bros-Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

The Day the Hypnotist Came to Carleton Place

John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

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As I have previously written, after the death of my father William Code in 1868 my brother John Code took charge until 1872. In that year he left for the West and Mother retired in the red brick house near the river on the south-east side of Innisville. From then until 1876 I was in charge with the exception of a few months during the winter of 1874.

I admired how John left after writing to Billy Quinn, who had also departed from Lanark a few years previous to join those seeking their fortune in gold. Billy had mentioned that gold had been found near the town of Helena, Montana by four gold miners who had struck it rich at the appropriately named “Last Chance Gulch.” John had decided that I was old enough to take over, and he at the age of 22 left the train station at Perth with his good friend Bill Ennis. The trip from Perth to Brockville was $1.50 at that time, and the whole trip cost him about $150.00 to Montana.

He didn’t write a lot, and Mother worried, and I guess I did too.  Last Chance Gulch would prove to be the second biggest placer gold deposit in Montana, producing some $19 million worth of gold in just four years. Overnight, thousands of miners began to flood into the region, and the four original discoverers added to their fortunes by establishing the town of Helena to provide them with food, lodging, and supplies. But unlike many of the early Montana mining towns, Helena did not disappear once the gold gave out, which it inevitably did.

John reached Helena in 1872 working odd jobs along the way and Mother finally heard from him in July  in a letter that was written and posted in May. Mother asked me to mail him a copy of the Perth Courier so he could keep up on the comings and goings of the area. Bill Ennis eventually left the area in October of 1874 to seek another adventure  in the state of Washington leaving my brother in Montana.  An interesting fact is that in 1888 Helena, Montana had more millionaires per capita than any other city in the world and sad to say that my brother John Code never became one of them.

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Mary Maria Butler (1st wife) Family were merchants from Harper and Perth and John Code- ancestry.ca

John did return to Innisville in 1877 and married Mary Butler and had 4 children, but sadly Mary died in 1892 at their home in Perth. Five years later he took another wife by the name of Isabel McKinley from Scotch Line who blessed him with another 4 children. My brother joined me in co- founding the Golf Club in Perth and dabbled in the insurance business as well as being the Treasurer of the County of Lanark for many years.

Author’s Note- John Code died at the age of 82 in 1932

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John Code –ancestry.ca

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John Code and Mary Marie Butler and Isabella Mary McKinley–

Perth, Drummond Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada–ancestry.ca

historicalnotes

  1. Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpgIn the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembereds-l1600.jpg

    How did I get this?

    I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

    How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

    Allan Leslie Code

    1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

    Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

  2. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

    relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

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John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

 

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When I was doing some research about John Code from Perth I fell upon this article about he sent money to help fund Wild Bill’s monument after his death. Like a lot of folks in Lanark County he went out West to prospect. He had the chance to meet Wild Bill in Cheyenne and who knew that his cousin T. M Code was laid to rest a few feet from Wild Bill. John Code returned to Deadwood even though he said he should have been at Homestake. The Homestake Mine was a deep underground gold mine located in Lead, South Dakota. Until it closed in 2002 it was the largest and deepest gold mine in North America. The mine produced more than forty million troy ounces of gold during its lifetime.

I wonder if his ancestors still have a piece of stone that he used in jewellery as a keepsake from Little Big Horn.

There is a book about his life….

A Perth Boy in the Wild West: The Journal of John Code 1872-1877

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times,
  2. 27 Nov 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 4

     historicalnotes

    Thomas Code was another uncle of Thomas Alfred Code who wrote the journals I am transcribing and also a forty-niner. In company with Absalom McCaffrey of Carleton Place and others, he joined in the gold rush to California. Returning home a few years later he purchased the Innisville store business of Michael Murphy, who left and settled in Carleton Place. He  continued until conditions got very much impaired in the village, and having a large family decided to try his fortune in the West; this was in the middle 1870s. He took up land near a place called Elgin, south of Brandon, Manitoba. He and the family suffered great hardships on the early stages. He told me when I visited him in 1883 that only for the people of Ontario, the country would have never been settled. They were living in a sod house, and the outbuildings were built with sods– one of them an excavation on the side of the knoll. I again paid him a visit in 1902 and found conditions about as we find them at home- good houses and barns. Other facilities had changed the whole situation. Some of the family are farming there yet.

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Moses Embree Milner (May 8, 1829 – October 29, 1876) also known as “California Joe” was an American miner and frontier scout. Click here for more info

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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  1. Billy the Kidd’s Mistress — Roxy Theatre Time

  2. The Truth About Broncho Charlie and the Pony Express

  3. From Carleton Place to Fish Creek –North West Rebellion

    Lanark County Residents involved in the California Gold Rush

    Lanark County Moves West — Sarah Plain and Tall it was Not

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

 

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Author’s Note—Since *Nathaniel McLenaghan was a customs collector in Perth beginning in 1897 and Edward the 7th was on the throne from 1901-1910 so this letter was written in the 1897-1910 time frame.

Apology

Nathaniel McLenaghan, Esquire. Collector of Customs and of Inland Revenue for His Majesty, Edward the 7th, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the British Dominion beyond the Seas, Kings and Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India, and to all these presents may come, we sent greeting.

Dear Mr. McLenaghan,

We, the undersigned, who live, move and have our being (doing as little real work as possible) in and around the County Buildings in the Town of Perth feel that we have done you a grave injustice by circulating foul slanders calculated to injure you, not only in your official capacity, but also your private associations, if such were possible.

We doubly regret our actions as well know your reputation in the community will not stand much trifling with and we hasten to make redress. We plead in mitigation of our offence the fact that we have become so accustomed to stating what is not the fact, that it is most difficult for us to tell the truth excepting when a lie will not suit  our purpose, and we trust that this apology will, with the hereinafter mentioned compensation, be accepted by you as a full and ample settlement of the whole matter and a peace offering from us.

We may say that as far as our information goes, you did not steal any wood from the Inspector of Public Schools, Francis L. Mitchell, to wit, and we base this conclusion on two grounds, either of which we deem good and sufficient.

Firstly: Mr. Mitchell had no wood to steal, that is, we believe all the wood he has been known to have since he moved to the Rideau, has been gathered by him at night from the premises adjacent to his cottage and we understand that at such times you were in company with, and like him, make your own provision for the next day. As a consequence, in our opinion, you would not be at all likely to take such a long chance on being caught, as would necessarily result from an attempt to take any of Michell’s plunder.

Secondly: We think you would be much more likely to steal the money from Michell and buy the wood. As against this last conclusion however, is the fact that Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales. For these several reasons, we are able to completely exonerate you from having either directly, or indirectly, unless perchance you may have done so in your sleep, ever harboured a single thought which would tend to deprive your friend and neighbour of a single chip of his wood pile.

In order to fully recompense you for the injury done to your reputation and to show how fully we desire to save you from financial loss by reason of our wrong-doing, we will pay you the sum of One Cent in equal quarterly instalments of One Farthing.

Believe us,

Your most humble and obedient servants,

Wm. P. McEwen

John Code

W.H. Grant

John Lee

 

 

historicalnotes

*Nathaniel McLenaghan (November 11, 1841 – September 26, 1912) was an Ontario merchant and political figure. He represented Lanark South in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1890 to 1893 as a Conservative member.

He was born in Drummond Township, Canada West in 1841, the son of Irish immigrants, and educated in Perth. He taught school for several years before becoming involved in exporting cattle. McLenaghan served on the town council for Perth. He was named deputy customs collector at Perth in 1893 and customs collector in 1897.

He died at Perth in 1912

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times,
  2. 27 Nov 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 4

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

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Of the four brothers who came to this country it is only necessary in conclusion to allude to John, he being the grandfather of the generation in which the writer is included. When the brothers reached Canada Grandfather Codd secured work at his trade in Montreal, and continued to work there until after John and William were born. He then with his family left Montreal and sojourned in Kitley for a time, where George was born. About this time Grandfather Codd and three or four others formed a party and determined to seek land for themselves. At that early day in the history of this Canada of ours, this was not an easy matter.

Very fair progress was made until Perth was reached, only a few unpretentious houses representing the County Town of today. Three miles north of Perth, about where the John Doyle home is situated, all further progress by oxen and wagon had to be abandoned. This was the first wagon that had been brought through the country and it was naturally quite the curiosity.

The land first taken by Grandfather Codd did not prove satisfactory, it have been drawn in the district now called Scotch Corners. The next lot drawn was the farm owned by the Willows family, and here the rest of the family was born. (The writer is not altogether sure of the foregoing paragraph as he was told that the farm taken by grandfather was known as the Thomas Jackson lot which he had given up.)

The farm afterwards settled upon by Grandfather Codd at Innisville was purchased from a retired British soldier who obtained it from his government in recognition of services rendered late in the war.

It was told to the writer that when Grandfather Codd with his family reached the banks of the Mississippi after their laborious journey from Perth they were confronted with the problem of just how to ford the river. The woods on both sides were dense and trees grew close to the water’s edge. They appear to have made the crossing where the old woollen mill stood, for there was a small island in the centre of the river just below where the slide used  to be. (at the dam) This island was swept away by the rush of water at this point some years ago, which accounts for the hole or basin that be found there today. Black Bass and other small fish used to be caught in this hole in the good old days, and may possibly still be caught there.

Uncle George told the writer that as they forded the stream, the water being somewhat swift and reaching a little over their knees, they found it most difficult to make headway owing to the fish that filled the river from bank to bank. The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall. With Aunt Ann, who was a little girl, on his shoulders, Uncle George had a most anxious time getting across the Mississippi River, and when they reached the Island he was greatly relieved. After a brief rest they reached the other shore in safety.

There were three daughters and six sons in Grandfather’s family: the daughters being Ellen, Ann, and Bessie. The sons were: John, Richard, George, Abram Thomas and William. Abram and Bessie were twins. The writer may not have the names just given in the order of their birth, but that will not matter of the purpose of this short family history.

Tomorrow: Aunt Ann

 

historicalnotes

 

It went as far as incorporation by the Legislature of the Mississippi Navigation Company in 1809, with the authorized capital of $100,000, to build locks at Innisville and Ferguson’s Falls and carry on a shipping business. The chief freight was expected to be sawn lumber and iron ore, which was to be towed by barge to Carleton Place, and to go from here by rail to American markets. The steamer, the Enterprise, was built for this purpose, and then the lock-building scheme was abandoned.

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

29216054_10155639791476886_1338412320258260992_n.jpg

Photo Clarendon Miller Archives- Plevna

There are about 6 huge pages about Innisville written by Thomas Alfred Code so I will do this in parts. This is 4c— 

Innisville also had their village doctor- his name was York. His principal remedies were: bleeding and pills– or “pulls” as he called them. This together with pulling teeth was his chief practice. The forceps used were more like blacksmith’s tongs than the instrument used today, and the victim was lucky if more than one tooth did not come at a time. John Code claims he went through the ordeal and lived to tell. He was laid on the broad of his back on the floor with a third party to hold him down. This procedure could only apply to the male sex.

By the way, I may mention his wayward son–Henry–who was attending the village school in my time. He was not a bad character, but somewhat eccentric, and a rolling stone in his early years. He drifted away to the Great Lakes and was employed on the boats in some capacity, finally going to Detroit where he joined up– for a time– with the theatricals, which could not of been of a high order. He returned some years later with less gear than when he left, and tided over part of the winter with friends.

Having a dancing partner with him, his visit was entertaining to the people of the village. He then got a place as a school-teacher on the shores of Buckshot Lake near *Plevna in the county of Frontenac. As lumbering disappeared his pupils gradually decreased in numbers, until finally he was left high and dry in a small cabin on a rough piece of ground. He had a cow and some poultry and the snatches of work which he obtained in the district he eked out an existence.

Forty years after he was last seen at Innisville John Code  happened to be hunting in the district and heard the name of old Henry York mentioned in camp. This excited John’s curiosity and he resolved to investigate, which he did the following year when he made a visit to York’s humble ranch and discovered the missing Henry. Representing himself as a drover he inquired if Mr. York had any cattle to sell, but was received somewhat coldly.

The conversation turned into another channel– the flourishing condition of that district along the banks of the Mississippi and the village of Innisville in bygone years when the lumbering industry with all its attendant activity was at the zenith in its own production. Familiar references made by the visitor to the old timer of Innisville excited York’s curiosity.

Evidently the question in his mind was: “Who may you be? You seem to be familiar with Innisville.” John replied. “If from Innisville, who do you think I am, an Ennis, a Hughes, or a Code?” The reply came after a moment’s hesitation,“If one of those named you must be Johnny Code!” — the appellation by which he was known in the schoolboy days. This was followed by an exchange of mutual reminiscences and a pleasant meeting.

Later York was induced to visit Perth, and I (T.A. Code) engaged him as a night watchman for two periods, but he always wanted to go home for Christmas–he and his dog– but there was no one to greet him in his lonely cabin. When leaving the last time he had enough to pay off a mortgage of some one hundred and fifty dollars, and as he said, enough,  together with what he could earn in the district– to keep him for the balance of his days. He obtained his supplies in Plevna from a Mr. Osler with whom his credit was good.

York was an artist in handwriting; a reader, a man of strong individuality; fearless and honest in his dealings, but a recluse. When leaving at Christmas the last time, he threw back his arms and exclaimed:

“I long for the bracing air of Buckshot Lake, and the charms of solitude.”

This time he went without his dog. In 1927 he was found dead in his cabin, apparently he had dropped dead while engaged in daily chores.

Thomas Alfred Code 1929

Tomorrow– The Innisville School and Social Amusement.

historicalnotes

*

Plevna Section School #4

– About/History

This, a log school, (located in the area of the current junction of Mountain and Grindstone Rds) was opened in 1863, possibly the first in the area, and originally numbered as No.2. Children from Buckshot/Plevna, in Clarendon, attended here with students from Miller Township. When it closed all students went to SS No.2 in Buckshot/Plevna.

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?