Tag Archives: jail

Overnight Lock-up Guests Should Be Fed For 25c Apiece — Little Geneaology

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Overnight Lock-up Guests Should Be Fed For 25c Apiece — Little Geneaology

The question of what kind of meal should be furnished to transient guests in Almonte lock-up was discussed at the council meeting on Tuesday night. At the present time the caretaker, Ed. Little, gives these men a breakfast that costs the town 35 cents. It was felt they should get plainer grub at not more than 25 cents and after a good deal of talk Thomas Reid, the new chairman of the police committee, was asked to interview Mrs. Little on the subject and report back to council at a special meeting, Friday night. 

This matter was brought up by Councillor Montgomery who was on the police committee last year. He pointed out that many of the men who were out of employment and sought a night’s lodging in the local jail went around saying they did not get the kind of breakfast they were entitled to when they honoured a town such as Almonte with a night’s patronage. 

This caused talk that was unfair to Mr. and Mrs. Little. Mr. Montgomery thought some set bill of fare should be arranged so as to relieve the caretaker and his wife of any responsibility and criticism. Someone suggested that Mr. Reid was the very man to draw up a menu for the unwelcome overnight/ guests the town is forced to entertain.

 It was hinted that if he made it plain enough the word might spread and there would be fewer calls on Almonte’s hospitality. Mr. Reid refused to accept responsibility. for arranging what the transients were going to eat. He thought though that a meal suitable for them could be served for .25 cents and still leave enough to reimburse Mr. and Mrs Little for their trouble. Mayor Comba felt there should be nothing fancy about the food served to these gentlemen of the road. While he did not believe in turning them out in the winter months with nothing to eat. He couldn’t see why the town should go to needless expense in the matter. His Worship instanced the case of Smiths Falls where it was decided that such transients spending a night in the lock up should get tea without milk and sugar, bread and butter. “Yes and in the end they didn’t get anything,” said Former Councillor LeMalstre who was sitting In the audience. “I guess that’s right, ” replied Mayor Comba amidst laughter. Jan 1933

In 1935, the Star published a recipe for coffee “cream” that combined egg yolk, sugar and water. The Canadian Woman’s Cook Book of 1939 contains six recipes for fake foods, including almonds made of croutons, a bisque with tomatoes but no shellfish, cherry pie with cranberries and raisins, and a mock sausage filled with mashed beans and bread crumbs.

One of Kraft Food’s most requested recipes is Mock Apple Pie, which substitutes 36 crushed Ritz crackers for apples, baked in a pie crust along with two cups of sugar, butter, lemon, cream of tartar and cinnamon. It was introduced in 1935, one year after the Ritz cracker, according to Jean Anderson’s American Century Cookbook.

Ingredients

Dough for double-crust pie

18 saltines, halved

1-1/2 cups sugar

1-1/4 cups water

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 teaspoon cream of tartar

1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions

Preheat oven to 400°. On a lightly floured surface, roll 1 half of dough to a 1/8-in.-thick circle; transfer to a 9-in. pie plate. Trim to 1/2 in. beyond rim of plate.

Layer crackers in shell; set aside. In a small saucepan, combine remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Carefully pour over crackers (filling will be very thin). Cool for 10 minutes.

Roll remaining dough to a 1/8-in.-thick circle; cut into 1-in.-wide strips. Arrange over filling in a lattice pattern. Trim and seal strips to edge of bottom crust; flute edge. Bake until crust is golden brown, 25-30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. click for more here..

Convictions: Moonshine in Darling, Party in Appleton and Firetrucks 1948

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Convictions: Moonshine in Darling, Party in Appleton and Firetrucks 1948

December 1948 Almonte Gazette

Lloyd James who lives in Darling near Calabogie was convicted of keeping liquor for sale illegally in the District Magistrate’s court, here, this Thursday morning, and was sentenced to serve 60 days in the county jail.

Constable Legate of the Provincial Police laid the charge. James was defended by C. A. Mulvihill, K.C. of Arnprior. While there , was no evidence that money had changed hands the officer was able to prove that there was a great volume of traffic passing in to James’ home and that drinking was going on there.

The Magistrate decided that the rush of business was too great to be on a friendship basis and registered a conviction accordingly, A charge of supplying liquor to minors against a man who resided in Appleton was dismissed. This chap was accused of keeping the house where the long week-end party was held at which two Almonte girls and two Arnprior men working here temporarily, were “belles and beaux” of the ball.

The accused was able to show to the satisfaction of the court that he was not in charge of the house at the time of the lengthy festivities. C. J. Newton, Almonte lawyer, appeared for the accused. This was another provincial case.

M. A. McNairn, Almonte chief of police, had a couple of youths in court for traffic offences. One 16-year-old lad was fined $2 and $3 costs for hanging onto the back of the fire truck while it was returning from a fire. Another paid a like amount for riding two on a bicycle through heavy traffic returning from the fire. Another traffic case was adjourned.

Name:Lloyd James
Residence Date:1957
Residence Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Street Address:R. R. 1, Flower Station
Electoral District:Lanark
Occupation:Farmer

Rick Roberts12 minutes

Lloyd James was my grandmother’s cousin who owned the farm next door to hers on highway 511 in Darling Township. Though there was never a firm rule, I wasn’t encouraged to spend time at Lloyd’s place but did anyway. Until reading this excerpt I didn’t know about Lloyd’s ‘sideline’ nor his time as a guest in the county jail. This was never discusssed in front of me though I’m sure my grandmother must have known about it.. she was a tea-totaller and had very strong negative opinions about alcohol.

As a kid, hanging out at Lloyd’s was a lot of fun. A brook ran through his yard where we fished for speckled trout. He tried to teach me to play the fiddle, but my aptitude for that instrument was wanting as was my enthusiasm. One summer he needed to remove some huge rocks that were exposed up into his lane. We had great fun digging down and planting dynamite then seeking cover during the explosions. My parents would have grounded me for life if they had known.

That said, reading Lloyd James name, regardless of context, makes me smile

Run Pig Run–Shake it Off! Convictions of 1870

Throwing a Snowball is Going to Cost you $1- Your Convictions of 1898

To Steal a Barge on Ebb’s Bay— Your Convictions of 1897

Step Right Up- Here are Your Family Convictions-September, 1894

Breach of the Town Bylaws and Other Convictions.. Sept. 11 1888

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–July 17, 1885

Assault Abusive Language and Bridget McNee

The Notorious Bridget McGee of Perth

Down at the Old Perth Gaol

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–Dec. 13, 1898-Who Do You Know?

Auctionering Without a License and Pigs on the Loose

Going to the Chapel –Drummond Whalen and Johnson of Carleton Place

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Jailhouse Rock in Lanark County Part 2

The Drunken Desperados of Carleton Place

The Young Offenders of Lanark County

More Clement Clippings — Almonte

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More Clement Clippings — Almonte
Unexpected Almonte
August 2, 2019  · 

“Clement House” on Brougham Street, in 2019 (after an awesome renovation). This building or a version of it on this site is thought to be the very first “registry building” in use pre-1879, the year the Registry Office next door was built.
Note: The 2nd pic below is of the iron shutters in the front room of this building. It is believed (but yet to be confirmed) that the first jail in Almonte was in this building – perhaps a “drunk tank” not necessarily an official jail.
Photos- Christine Moses
L-R Front Row-Marie, Gr. Grandma Clement,Gr. Grandpa Clement,Beatrice,Edna–Back Row-Pat, Frank (Cheese-my Grandpa),Della,Trixie,Vi and Orville.–Photo from Susan Elliott Topping
Hello Linda,
I love reading your posts about Almonte and it’s rich history. I grew up there and it will always be home. My Great Grandfather E.P. Clement was a great part of Almonte. I can still see him in his three piece suit and cane (which we think was just for effect) strolling downtown to pick up the paper. I know he also backed some businesses to help them get started.
The manger scene at St. Mary’s church every Christmas was built by him many, many years ago. Mr. Finner, who lived nearby and a couple other helped him take it to the church when it was finished. It was built in the Finner’s garage. The bells you hear ringing from the same church were donated by my Great Grandfather. My Mom says every time she hears them, she thinks of Great Grandpa.
He also did a lot of work on the old St. Mary’s School. His home was actually the first jail in Almonte, where he and my Great Grandmother raised raised their large family! There are two of their children left now. Theresa (Trixie) Robillard, and Vi Larose, who is turning 102 years young in November!! Whenever I had to do a project on Almonte in school I would head to Grandpa’s and my Great Uncle, Fred LaRose’s houses, because I think between them, they knew just about all there was to know about Almonte!–Susan Elliott Topping
The Vinton Record
McArthur, Ohio
25 Jul 1867, Thu  •  Page 3
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 May 1913, Sat  •  Page 14
The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
18 Oct 1940, Fri  •  Page 1
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jan 1944, Thu  •  Page 12

Susan Elliott Topping– The Clement home-Spring Street. Almonte.–Her brother lives there now!

Did you know?

One Hundred Years ago the residential section of Almonte was Queen, Main and Princess Streets. New England was mostly forest. Elgin Street had but four residences and Church Street three. From the corner of Mill and Bridge Streets South to Country Street there were but five buildings. Just around the corner at Country Street was Robert Anderson’s store and dwelling. I am inclined to think that over this store was the first lodge hall of the Almonte Masons.

The Island (Coleman’s) was mostly under timber. But across the stone bridge was Tennant Brothers’ store (one of the earliest ) and on the Power House lawn was the first Village jail. Joseph Jamieson was the first lawyer in Almonte, having come here from Arnprior in 1867. He first lived on Wesley Street in a row of plaster houses which were torn down about twenty-five years ago. He had intended to be a printer and founded the “Renfrew Journal.” Later he studied law in Perth with W.O. Buell and practiced for a short time in Arnprior. He was the last Reeve of the Village of Almonte, and also an early Warden of the County of Lanark.

Additional reading

They Called Him Cheeser

Remembering E.P. Clement from Almonte—By Susan Elliott Topping

Henry Clement Cured of Rheumatism

The Perth Gaol 1876 Almonte Gazette– Names Names Names..:)

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The Perth Gaol 1876 Almonte Gazette– Names Names Names..:)
Photo by Linda Seccaspina 2015 during a Perth Classic Theatre event

Return of Convictions for the Period Ending June 14, 1898

Trespass:

Jno. Reid and Jno Denham, Henry Rescroft, Wilmer Fleming, William Wright, Robert Hornebrook, Andrew Armour, Fred Griffith, George Stewart, Loren Griffith, each fined $1

Drunkenness

Jake Angus and Frank Bennett, each fined $5

Drunk and Disorderly

Jacob Leslie, Dinah Harper and John O’Hare, each fined $2

Selling After Hours:

Michael Dixon and F. Lambert, each fined $20

Sale of Liquor During Prohibited Hours:

Jacob Morris and George A. Jackman, each fined $20

Disorderly:

William Nicholson, fined $5

  1. St. James, and Jas. Phillips, each fined $1

Breech of Game Act

Thomas Needham, fined $5

Insane

David Morreau, committed to gaol

Battery

Robert Cowie, complainant was Frank Boothroyd, fined $2

Assault

Robert Cowie, complainant was Archibald Calhoun, fined $1

Mrs. D. Logan, complainant was Duncan Ferguson, fined $1

Alexander Short, fined $5

  1. Molin, fined $5.25

Richard Duffy, fined $1 plus costs

Congregating on Street Corners:

George Dixon, Reginald Simpson, James Ennis, George Black, Jas. O’Neil, Thomas Willoughby, W. Willoughby, Charles Thornhill, J. Murphy, H. Easton, each fined $5.25

  1. Huddleston, John Davis and Ed. Marquette, each fined $1.50

Vagrancy:

Jacob Thompson, William Henry, Esther Majory, L. Shaw, Susan Bennett, Jno. K. Elliott, each received six months in gaol

Throwing Balls of Snow

Jas. McAllister, fined $1

Practicing Medicine Without a License

Dr. W. McKay, ten days in gaol

Causing a Disturbance on a Public Road

John Salter, fined $9.75

James Nolan, J. Conlin, and George Nolan, each fined $5.25

Refusing to Pay Wages

William Hogg, complainant was Alexander C. Fraser, fine was $40 plus costs

Related Reading

Run Pig Run–Shake it Off! Convictions of 1870

Throwing a Snowball is Going to Cost you $1- Your Convictions of 1898

To Steal a Barge on Ebb’s Bay— Your Convictions of 1897

Step Right Up- Here are Your Family Convictions-September, 1894

Breach of the Town Bylaws and Other Convictions.. Sept. 11 1888

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–July 17, 1885

Assault Abusive Language and Bridget McNee

The Notorious Bridget McGee of Perth

Down at the Old Perth Gaol

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–Dec. 13, 1898-Who Do You Know?

Auctionering Without a License and Pigs on the Loose

Going to the Chapel –Drummond Whalen and Johnson of Carleton Place

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Jailhouse Rock in Lanark County Part 2

The Drunken Desperados of Carleton Place

The Young Offenders of Lanark County

Jail Break 1929 Lanark County

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Jail Break 1929 Lanark County
ail break in Perth,Ont.. In the Manitoba Free Press – June.24th.1929 …I wonder if they were ever found. I’m guessing not. thanks Tammy Marion

Well Tammy, yes they were caught a month later in July, same year 1929.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Jul 1929, Mon  •  Page 4

Men Who Broke Jail At Perth Sentenced for an Indefinite Term in a Ontario Reformatory. –The sentence imposed by Magistrate McNeely on Frank O’Donnell and John Kennedy, two of the prisoners who escaped from Perth Jail on Saturday June 24, 1929. The two men were apprehended at Halifax and were brought back to Perth by Chief of Police Gilhuly. Fred Mitchell and James Smith received the same sentence for escaping at the same time. All four men were taken to Guelph today.

Gypsy’s Tramps and Thieves–Are We Turning Thieves and Jailbirds into Role Models?

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Jailhouse Rock in Lanark County Part 2

Throw the Whole Family in Jail!

Newsies — Jailed at Nine Years Old

Run Pig Run–Shake it Off! Convictions of 1870

Throwing a Snowball is Going to Cost you $1- Your Convictions of 1898

To Steal a Barge on Ebb’s Bay— Your Convictions of 1897

Step Right Up- Here are Your Family Convictions-September, 1894

Breach of the Town Bylaws and Other Convictions.. Sept. 11 1888

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–July 17, 1885

Assault Abusive Language and Bridget McNee

The Notorious Bridget McGee of Perth

Down at the Old Perth Gaol

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–Dec. 13, 1898-Who Do You Know?

Auctionering Without a License and Pigs on the Loose

Going to the Chapel –Drummond Whalen and Johnson of Carleton Place

The Drunken Desperados of Carleton Place

The Young Offenders of Lanark County

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–Dec. 13, 1898-Who Do You Know?

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Perth Courier, January 13, 1899

Return of Convictions for the Period Ending Dec. 13, 1898

Petty Trespass

George McGrath, fined $2.00

Napoleon Breard, fined $1.00

Damage to Property:

Alexander White, fined $4

Vagrancy

William Curran, sent to gaol

Thomas Johnston, 15 days in gaol

George Smith, 20 days in gaol

James O’Keefe, $2.00 fine

Elizabeth Mitchell, William Smith, Samuel Snider, Thomas James Prior, Robert McCoy, Archibald McNeill, John Garwood, John Fisher and Henry Plinston, each six months in gaol

Martin Sullivan, three months in gaol

Furious Driving on the Street:

Albert Leaway and William King, fined $2.00

Disorderly Conduct:

William Nicholson, fined $3

Eph. Little, Wesley Hick, Miner Sadler, fined $2.00 each

Ernest Holmes and John Steacy, fined $1.00 each

Assault:

Bernard Trainor, charged by Ellen Trainor, $2.00 plus costs

Arthur Gatfield and John Houston, charged by James Prisley, fined $1.00 each

Charles Maloney, charged by John McArton, Jr. for Mary McArton, fined 44

Robert Armstrong and William O’Meara, charged by A. Bertrand, fined $5 and $1 respectively

J.J. Ennis, charged by R.A. Campbell, fined $1

Insane:

Sarah Trainor, sent to gaol

Neglect to Turn Out on Highway

Thomas Chapman, fined $3

Allowing In Bar

Peter P. Salter, fined $20

Carrying a Pistol

J.D. Colvin, fined $5

Carrying a Revolver

W.J. Price, fined $10

Drunk and Disorderly:

  1. Gleason, fined $3

Martin Conlin, fined $5

Keeping Bar Open

  1. Grace, $20

Selling Liquor After Hours

George O’Brien, fined $20

Breach of Cattle Bylaws

Andrew Armour fined $2

William Bennett, fined $1

Abusive Language

Hudson Payne, fined $1, charged by Jno Larkins

Mrs. A. Nolan, fined $1, charged by George Herrington

Drunk:

  1. Brown, $2

Martin Conlin, $5

Infraction of License Law

E.(?) Lambert, $20

Deteriorating Milk

Michael Curtis, $30

James Roger, $40

Cow at Large

John Daughan, Edward James, Edward Bygrove, each fined $1

Frank Hourigan and William Zelden, each $5

Stealing:

John G. Henly, charged by J. Flett, committed for trial

Albert Quinn, charged by Michael Lappin, committed for trial

Buying Goods On Market before Hours

Thomas Clark, Mr. Bissonette, A. McLean, each fined $2

Cattle at Large:

A Stephens, $1

William Zeldon and J. Bothwell, $5 each

Horses at Large:

Hy. Crate, $5

Fighting:

James Moore and James Morrison, each $1

Horse Running at Large

James Noonan, $1

 

Related reading

Assault Abusive Language and Bridget McNee

Auctionering Without a License and Pigs on the Loose

Going to the Chapel –Drummond Whalen and Johnson of Carleton Place

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Jailhouse Rock in Lanark County Part 2

The Drunken Desperados of Carleton Place

The Young Offenders of Lanark County

Want to see more? Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

Assault Abusive Language and Bridget McNee

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download (62).jpg                                                            courthouse and jail in Perth

Perth Courier, June 11, 1875

Subscription—The citizens of Carleton Place and employees of the B. & O. and C.C. Railways have subscribed over $200 for the widow of the late Mr. Sommerville who was killed on the 26th ult. in the Round House of the B. & O. R. at Carleton Place.

Return of Convictions from 11 Sept. 1875 to 10 December 1875

James Turnbull, Disorderly Conduct, went to gaol.

James Doyle, Jr., No Visible Means of Support, sent to gaol

Malcolm Taylor, No Visible Means of Support, sent to gaol

Arthur Ennis, Throwing Down Fences, sent to gaol

John McManagle, Assault and Battery, $10 fine, paid Treasurer of Elmsley

Francis Kerr, Assault, $20 fine, paid Treasurer of Bathurst

William Allan, Assault, $20 fine, not paid, distress learned

Charlotte Campbell and Bridget Allan, Abusive Language, $1 fine each, paid to Treasurer of Bathurst.

George Miller, Encumbering Highway, $15 fine, paid to Treasurer of Bathurst.

Matthew Gould, Abusive Language, $1 fine paid to Treasurer of Drummond.

John Hughes, Assault and Battery, $3 fine, paid to Treasurer of Smith’s Falls.

John Thompson, Profane and Abusive Language, $1 fine, paid to Treasurer of Smith’s Falls.

Harriett Mary Code, Malicious Injury, $3 fine, not yet paid.

John Thompson, Abusive Language, $2.50 fine paid to Treasurer of Smith’s Falls.

Isabella McLeod, Assault and Battery, $4.00 fine paid to Treasurer of Carleton Place.

  1. Livingston, Drunk and Quarrelsome, $2 fine not paid.

Alex Hunter, Assault, $5 fine, paid to Treasurer of Almonte.

 

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Bridget McNee—The irrepressible Mrs. McNee, after raising a row in the streets a short time ago, for which she was sent to the lockup until she sobered up, was shipped off by the Corporation to other parts on Saturday last.  Chief Constable Corry was employed as a shipping agent and accordingly escorted his fair charge as far as Brockville but farther than that Mrs. McNee positively refused to go.  Accordingly, he had no other alternative then to let her stay where she was.  As all her earthly possessions—furniture, clothing, baby, etc., were shipped off with her, her return here is not anticipated for two or three days at least.  Since writing the above, sure enough, Mrs. McNee has got back again bag and baggage, and baby, having been taken with an attack of homesickness which necessitated her early return.

Perth Courier, Dec. 13, 1878

Acquitted—We learn that Mrs. Elliott submitted to trial by Judges Frost and Fontec (?) for stealing clothes from a line in Mrs. Henry Baird’s yard, has been acquitted by the judges as the articles were still on the premises and she was not seen to take them so the law could not regard it as a proven case.

Perth Courier 1880

Carleton Place—New Chief Constable

We believe that our excellent street inspector Mr. Jas. Wilson has been appointed to the office of Chief Constable of the town.  A vacancy had been created by the removal of Mr. John McLaren to Perth some time ago. We hope that Mr. Wilson will without fear or favor faithfully and honorably perform the duties of his office.

Throw the Whole Family in Jail!

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Village of Lanark -Perth Remembered

 

1889 Almonte Gazette

On Thursday morning Miss “Mag” Robinson at whose house in Lanark the lamentable tragedy occurred on Exhibition Day, was brought to town by the Lanark authorities along with six of her children and all were lodged in gaol to put in six month’s confinement under the vagrancy act.  The unfortunate family made quite a show in gaol.

 

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Carleton Place Prison facts:

Erected in 1872, the now Victoria Public School served the community of Carleton Place as the Town Hall and lock up until 1879, and as Victoria School  for 90 years until 1969.

Cliff Bennett told the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum that his great uncle Harris Bennett was one of the first students to attend the school after it was a town hall. He remembered that the “town lock up” was still in the basement and the local police had to bring prisoners through the front door and hallway, past the school rooms to get to the jail. Some, he admitted, were quite drunk.

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The Sometimes “Keystone Cops Moments” of the Carleton Place Police

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On August 21, 1918, several persons stormed the local Carleton Place jail at an early hour. After smashing the lock on the cell door the small mob freed Russell Perrin. Perrin, a man with one leg,  had a rap sheet longer than your arm had been charged with stealing an auto in Ste Catherines, Ontario.

He and another accomplice had stolen gas from an Ottawa garage and drove off without paying for it. They were caught on Highway 7 and sent to Carleton Place to serve 30 days in jail. They were later let go to on a suspended sentence. Later on word got to the Carleton Place cops that Perrin had stolen a car from someone in town on his way out. Perrin was apprehended once again and locked in a cell with his wife– who came back with him this time.

The Ste. Catherine’s man told his wife not to worry as someone would get him out. Police say it would have been physically impossible for Perrin to have broken the lock by himself as it was located more than two feet from the opening in the door. How he got out was never solved, and this time he wasn’t caught. Mrs. Perrin, with the loss of her now escaped husband and her 13 month old baby in tow, had to be cared for by town officials as she was now destitute.

No other account was written about either of them.

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place